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FORUM  CALENDAR  SPORTS

 Peter O’Malley returns to his roots Page 9

18 25 32

TO ADVERTISE CALL MARTINE FECTEAU 772.696.2004 MARK SCHUMANN 772.696.5233

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T H U R S D A Y



F E B R U A R Y

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V O L .

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All hail Lennon Property Tax Increase (2)

The Nutopians bring their John Lennon tribute to Sunset Theatre Page 29

The past and present

Old Vero and new Vero mingle at the Heritage Center Celebration Page 20

STAFF PHOTO

Qigong master John Walcott is spreading his passion for the ancient healing art. Story page 15

A new plan for downtown?

 Goal is to further revitalize central districtPage 3

Wellness for women

A conference of female professionals will delve into women’s health concerns Page 34

History is the difference. Knowledge is the difference. Global is the difference.

E D S CHLITT R EALTORS® We’re everywhere you want to be along the Treasure and Space Coasts.

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CONTINUES ON PAGE 4

V E R O

Last week, Vero Beach Councilman Jay Kramer recapped previous suggestions for implementing down-

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Latest idea to fund improvements gains favor

town improvements and discussed the latest proposed idea to establish a BID which would set a base amount of taxable value for properties within the targeted area and then set aside a portion of those taxes for improvements as property values increase. Kramer noted that the present effort had its genesis in a federal organization that recognized there were blighted areas within communities which needed redevelopment. A Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) establishes a taxing district within a targeted area and taxes above the base valuation. Area communities with established CRAs include Sebastian, Melbourne and Fort Pierce. “The state also got together and did a similar program – the Safe Neighborhood Act – which allowed

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and scores of Florida municipalities. Funding is accomplished through partnerships between the public and private sectors. The 2008 Downtown Action Plan -which was designed to remain viable through 2019 – set the highest priority to establish a long-term funding mechanism for Main Street Vero Beach and future implementation of proposed downtown improvements. Another priority of the Downtown Action Plan was to create a master plan that would set up an improvement or development district as well as identify existing open space and redevelopment opportunities.

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For years City of Vero Beach residents have worked to restore the city’s quaint historic Downtown District to a place where residents could come to conduct business, appreciate the arts or enjoy a meal. Though often stymied by budgetary constraints and differing opinions how to maximize the downtown’s inherent appeal, the district’s supporters remain committed to forging ahead to making the popular district an even more desirable destination. City officials, County Commissioner Peter O’Bryan and district area business owners are hoping to begin to establish a Business Improvement District (BID) for the downtown area which would ultimately underwrite funding for capital improvements to the area such as sidewalks; fixing

streets; better parking, lighting and signage and decorative elements. In August 2008, a Downtown Action Plan for the city prepared by consultant Land Design South sought to address such things as land use and urban form; organization and funding; business development; redevelopment, cultural and historic preservation; streetscapes and traffic, transportation and utility issues. The 2008 plan drew on previous downtown redevelopment or “vision” plan studies done in 1990, 1992, 2005, and 2006. Formed in 1993 as the Downtown Vero Beach Association, the organization was awarded Main Street status by the State of Florida in 1998. Main Street is a national program that provides models for community development and redevelopment and has a presence in more than 40 states

F E B R U A R Y

BY BARBARA YORESH VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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gCQTH dO8= Officials explore new downtown development district

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DOWNTOWN DISTRICT FROM PAGE 3

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neighbors to define boundaries and use that organization to fund things that would combat criminal activities,” Kramer said. “That turned into the Neighborhood Improvement Act which took it a step further – doing capital improvements for things such as sidewalks and fixing the streets.” In a further ripple-effect, those improvement plans resulted in what Kramer termed Enterprise Zones. Vero Beach has such an enterprise zone around the Municipal Airport. “That’s what we’re looking for because there was a fear in Vero Beach that a CRA would tell property owners what they can and cannot do because the CRA becomes its own governmental entity. We just want to implement the capital improvement portion,” Kramer said. Vero Beach City Manager Jim O’Connor agreed that this latest proposal might be the most viable solution.

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“This one looks like it may be it. Business didn’t want any property tax issues or for the district to be declared a blighted area,” O’Connor said. “And if a BID is established, it has an extending type of impact to (help) make the downtown a destination.”

Setting BID baselines Matthew J. Henry, DDS

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To establish a BID, the subject area properties’ present assessed taxable values are set as a base. In the case of the Vero Beach Downtown District, that value is currently assessed at

$69.6 million for properties zoned for general trade commercial; downtown district and professional office/ institutional. The present tax revenue generated by the downtown properties – and the baseline for future values and revenues - is $356,686.94 which is shared by the county and city. As property values rise, the difference in the baseline tax revenue and the higher tax revenue would be held aside by the BID to use for improveCONTINUES ON PAGE 6


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DOWNTOWN DISTRICT FROM PAGE 4

ments within the downtown area. For example, if properties’ assessed value rose 10 percent above its present baseline value, (to a total real estate value of $76.6 million with $392,355.63 in tax revenue) the revenue generated to the BID would be $35,668.69. With each incremental increase of property valuation, the BID receives increased revenues for projects.

“They’re looking at things like parking, sidewalk improvements, lighting, landscaping and signage,” Kramer said. “The CRA process had been tried three times and has met opposition because of (government) control issues. The Business Improvement District is taking the element we like out of the CRA and implementing it.” Because that element is merely a funding mechanism for agreed upon projects, Kramer noted that

General Surgery for routine and complex surgical problems

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LOCAL NEWS

Daniel Glotzer, M.D., FACS Board Certified General Surgeon Fellow of the American College of Surgeons

V E R O

Board certified by the American Board of Surgery and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, Dr. Daniel Glotzer provides modern, comprehensive care for your routine and complex surgical problems in collaboration with colleagues in other surgical and medical specialties at Indian River Medical Center. Daniel Glotzer, M.D.

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it is inoffensive to property owners and would likely spur further downtown interest and investment. “We want the downtown revitalized and get some money into doing that. It’s about defining an identity for the city and moving forward with it,” Kramer said. Building on an existing “destination” district. With much of the targeted area part of the present Downtown Dine & Design District, which hosts such popular events as First Friday Gallery Stroll; Downtown Friday; the Hibiscus Festival and regularly scheduled art gallery show openings and exhibits, Vero’s downtown has already become a destination with its trendy restaurants, galleries and boutiques. Marjorie Bohler presently serves as president of a 20-member artist cooperative which owns Artists Guild Gallery in the heart of the downtown area on 14th Avenue. =While she noted that she could not speak on behalf of her entire membership, she personally voiced

enthusiasm for a proposal to enhance the area. “I’m all for promoting the downtown in an even better way and I think the idea is great. There has been a fabulous transformation already and I’m all for it,” Bohler said. The first official step to establishing a BID is gaining the concept’s approval from City Council, Kramer explained. If approved, the BID would be defined in an official, legally correct resolution format by city legal staff. Once council approves the format, the resolution would go forward for its first reading. Following a second hearing and additional council approval, the resolution would become a part of the city’s ordinance structure. “Then they can apply for a BID. It would take a minimum of five meetings to get it done,” Kramer said. “We’ll (the city) still be getting the same tax revenue we’re getting today but then we can lock down that district to become a self improving district.”

UNOFFICIAL FINAL PRESIDENTIAL REPUBLICAN PRIMARY RESULTS INDIAN RIVER COUNTY

Michele Bachmann · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 32 Herman Cain · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 38 Newt Gingrich · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6,050 Jon Huntsman · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 80 Gary Johnson · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 11 Ron Paul · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1,213 Rick Perry · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 68 Mitt Romney · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 11,936 Rick Santorum · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2,657

(0.144%) (0.172%) (27.39%) (0.362%) (0.049%) (5.492%) (0.307%) (54.04%) (12.03%)

STATE OF FLORIDA

Romney · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 47% Gingrich · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 32% Santorum · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 13% Paul · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 8% Includes Absentee Ballots & Early Vote Ballots . Does Not Include Provisional Ballots.


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LOCAL NEWS

Indian River Shores still We’re looking for a few great community considering water-sewer deal heroes and heroines.

KRAMER

FROM PAGE 6

YOUR PARTNERS IN COMMUNITY SERVICE Scripps Treasure Coast Newspapers, WPTV News Channel 5, Gordon & Doner, and The Jefferson Awards For Public Service SEEK NOMINATIONS FOR THE

2012 Jefferson Awards Clip and mail the nomination form below or apply online at:

INDIAN RIVER SHORES — The Indian River Shores Town Council refused last week by a 4-1 vote to allow Indian River County to take over the town’s water and sewer service. Vice Mayor Jerry Weick offered made a motion to have the county take over the water and sewer service, but he was not able to get other commissioners to support his motion. Mayor Tom Cadden and Councilwoman Fran Atchison, and Councilmen Richard Haverland and Michael Ochsner voted to hold off until the city of Vero Beach had a chance to revise its current offer. The City of Vero Beach now provides water, sewer and reuse water service to the town through a franchise agreement that expires

in 2016. Town commissioners have been considering whether to stay with the city or switch to county services after that date. Mayor Cadden said one of the areas that still need to be resolved is the issue of who owns the lines currently within the Indian River Shores. City officials have given Indian River Shores the choice of staying with city rates or being charged county rates for water and sewer service. The city has not yet agreed to such a deal when it comes to reuse water and Indian River Shores officials said the higher city rates could cost residents millions of dollars over the next 30 years. The Vero Beach City Council could discuss a revised contract proposal to the town at its Feb. 7 meeting.

www.tcpalm.com/jeffersonawards JEFFERSON AWARDS NOMINATION FORM Seeking Outstanding Community Service Volunteers NAME OF INDIVIDUAL NOMINATED: _____________________________________________________ STREET ADDRESS: ________________________________________________________________ CITY: ______________________________________ STATE: _______ ZIP: ____________________ TELEPHONE: (W) _______________________________ (H) _______________________________ JOB TITLE AND/OR VOLUNTEER ROLE: (ELECTED OR APPOINTED OFFICIALS ARE NOT ELIGIBLE) ______________ _____________________________________________________________________________ YOUR NAME:____________________________________________________________________ STREET ADDRESS:_________________________________________________________________ CITY: ______________________________________ STATE: _______ ZIP: ____________________ TELEPHONE: (W) _______________________________ (H) _______________________________ E-MAIL ADDRESS: ________________________________________________________________ Attach a letter 500 words or less that details the nominee’s contributions to the community. Also include the name and telephone of another person who will support the nomination. Supporting documents, letters, resumes and/or published articles about the nominee may be included.

Mail entries to: Jefferson Awards 2012 C/O Scripps Treasure Coast Newspapers PO Box 9009, Stuart, FL 34994 Or apply online at: www.tcpalm.com/jeffersonawards

ENTRIES MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN 5PM, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

Those selected from among nominees from the Treasure Coast and Palm Beach area will be cited for exemplary community service. One will compete nationally. There are no age restrictions.

City, FPL move one step closer to deal VERO BEACH -- Florida Power & Light this week presented a draft agreement setting out in more detail its offer to purchase of the city’s electric system. Mirroring the initial offer outlined in a letter of intent signed in April of last year, the new 77-page document brings the city and the state’s largest utility a step closer to a deal. In addition to a cash price of approximately $100 million, FPL is proposing to assume a portion of the city’s pension liabilities, and is also offering to hire for two years the city’s electric system employees, and to make improvements in transmission lines that will allow for the eventual decommissioning and demolition of the city’s power plant. FPL is also proposing to lease the power plant site for four years for $1 million a year. The total value of FPL’s offer is approximately $130 million. City Manager Jim O’Conner described the draft agreement as a path

forward. “Up until now we’ve just been having discussions. Now we have important details down on paper.” Though O’Connor sees the draft agreement as helpful, he stressed that everything in it remains negotiable. In the document FPL defines 190 terms being used in the negotiations. According to O’Connor, it also details all the issues that must be worked out before a sale can be concluded. Among the more complex issues to be resolved are the city’s obligations to the Florida Municipal Power Agency and the Orlando Utility Commission. Councilman Jay Kramer described the draft agreement as being “full of blanks,” all of which he said he thinks should be answered before the city enters into a binding agreement. The city council meets Feb. 7 at 9:30 a.m., and will likely discuss FLP’s draft offer. Richard Igeo, the city’s transactional attorney, is scheduled attend next week’s council meeting.


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GoLine still seeking funding for new hub BY BARBARA YORESH VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Due to a lack of funding, the GoLine hub will not be moving in the near future. facility. Deigl said the site’s needed improvements would take about a year to complete once the project was started. Although state and federal grant money was sought for the project – as well as a hoped for $50,000 donation from the city – widespread budgetary constraints at the federal, state and local levels resulted in an unavailability of funding for the project, Diegl said. “We’re (still) applying for grant dollars. Until we receive funding, we temporarily are staying where we are,” Deigl said. She said the project is estimated at $600,000 to $1 million to complete and would include paving a large area of the grassed site, adding restroom facilities and building sheltered areas for riders. “The property would be like a Park & Ride and it would be nice to get the project up and off the ground,” Deigl said. “I’m sorry for the riders who currently have no shelter from inclement weather or actual restroom facilities. They can use the county’s administration building facilities across the street because it’s a public building, but many don’t want to because they’re afraid they’ll miss their bus.” In the meantime, she said officials are staying in touch with concerned

neighbors living near the present transfer site and keep them apprised of the situation.

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Organization – had hoped to secure funding to build a new bus center on city-owned land south of 16th Street west of the railroad. Phil Matson, staff director of the county’s MPO said this week that efforts to obtain grant monies were being “redoubled.” “There’s no time certain on this but we’re always hopeful. We’ve tried to apply to any discretionary grant available that we have a realistic change of securing,” Matson said. “We’re optimistically trying. The state in the past offered a lot of grants but the state is now under fiscal fire.” The MPO had applied for a federal “State of Good Repair” grant to help fund the bus hub project, but learned last fall that the grant was not approved. Matson said the MPO would reapply for the grant -- which is usually offered on an annual cycle -- if the federal government reauthorizes it again, though to date, no such announcement has been made. Matson noted that the county’s MPO also applies for state grants to fund earmarked project operations versus capital improvements. Last summer, City Council approved going forward with a land lease agreement and conceptual plans were drawn for the new bus transfer

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GoLine Transit Service - the county’s public bus transportation service which last year provided 895,000 fixed route trips - is still hoping to relocate to a proposed new hub center despite a lack of funding for the move. Operated by the Senior Resource Association, the bus service’s main transfer point for riders is presently located in a primarily residential area on 25th Street at the site of the county’s former administrative complex. Riders waiting for buses have no shelter during inclement weather and although there is a portable toilet on site, there are no restroom facilities. Neighbors in the vicinity have expressed concerns about pedestrians and traffic generated by the bus center, prompting City Council and GoLine officials to seek an alternate bus hub solution. Vero Beach City Manager Jim O’Connor said that while neighbors want the bus transfer site moved, they are aware of the reason that hasn’t yet occurred. “I’m hearing that they want it out of here but they understand it’s a funding issue,” O’Connor said. “But I think it’s going to have to wait for grant funds. There’s a site preparation issue as well as a security issue for the public works located nearby.” Neighbors of the Old Town district near the present bus transfer point don’t want it there but Councilwoman Tracy Carroll said this week she had not received any recent complaints about the situation. “The SRA has made a concerted effort so as not to impact the neighborhood and I’ve heard no complaints from anyone in the neighborhood since they cleaned it up and temporary bathrooms were put in,” Carroll said. SRA Chief Executive Officer and President Karen Deigl – working with Vero Beach city officials and through the county’s Metropolitan Planning


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GoLine advertising campaign comes under fire BY IAN LOVE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- A plan to wrap advertising around GoLine buses has been come under fire from auditors and county officials for mismanaging funds and trading advertising for onair plugs. The bus wrap program was started in 2007 with buses draped in advertising. The plan at the time was for the funding and the revenue to go to the Senior Resources Association. SRA CEO Karen Diegl also runs the GoLine system. The problem came to light when a tri-annual audit by the Florida Transportation Authority found in 2010 that money used to start the program along with expenses and revenue derived from it should have all been contained within the GoLine budget. In order to get the program off the ground the SRA took out a loan and

STAFF PHOTO

A GoLine advertising wrap that became the subject of a state audit. presumably hired a sales person with the plan that profits would benefit SRA programs. At the time of the audit it was found that SRA advertising revenue was $225,506.83 with expenses

of $330,119 amounting to a loss of $104,613. When this shortfall was revealed and in order to return the money to the transportation budget, the Board of County Commissioners agreed to cover the $104,613 deficit. In a letter dated Jan. 11, 2012, County Administrator Joe Baird noted, “Since the transportation budget had to take over revenues and expenses, the county used grant money to cover the loss which could have been used to enhance the transportation system. Advertising revenues are not covering expenses of the program. This bus wrap advertising program deficit has taken and continues to take valuable dollars away from the transportation system.” Diegl claims the wrap advertising campaign is “a successful program.” “Yes, it is a successful program. Could it be improved? Absolutely. We’d love to have more advertisers on our buses.” Baird also noted that even after being told by auditors that all money and expenses generated by the bus wrap program had to stay within the transportation budget, such advertising was being traded with local media outlets with the “free” advertising being used to promote the Senior Resource Association. In the same Jan. 11 letter, Baird noted: “Recently, it has come to my atten-

tion that Senior Resource Association has been bartering advertisements to promote the Senior Resource Association -- not the transportation system -- rather than taking in revenue (i.e. the Rhett Palmer radio show on, WTTB). This is a misuse of federal funds and a violation of FTA requirements. The practice needs to cease immediately. In addition, Senior Resource Association will be required to reimburse the transportation budget for all advertising and services received as a result of the bartering. If we had been aware of the bartering practice, the county would not have reimbursed the Senior Resource the full $104,613 deficit.” However, he has also asked for a number of documents, including a copy of the original business plan, a list of companies that bartered for wrap ads, services that were provided the Senior Resources Association for the bartered ads, what money was lost because of the barter deals, a copy of all bus wrap ads agreements, and a monthly report of all revenues and expenses for the bus wrap program since February 2011. Diegl noted that all current barter ads with Rhett Butler are now promoting the transportation system. She also noted that as of September 2011 the bus wrap campaign was at breakeven.


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Peter O’Malley was in town last week looking over the work being done at Historic Dodgertown, as he prefers to call it. BY MICHAEL BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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VERO BEACH – Peter O’Malley, who returned to his beloved Dodgertown last week to survey one of his newest ventures, says he will be counting on some old friends to bring back some of the lost luster to the former Spring Training complex. O’Malley joined his sister and former co-owner Terry O’Malley Seidler, and two of his former players, Chan Ho Park and Hideo Nomo, in taking over the lease of Vero Beach Sports Village from Minor League Baseball in December. The property is being loosely named “Historic Dodgertown” by O’Malley at this point, and the name is pending approval through all of the proper channels. “There is a long list of former Dodgers who would help out this place as a friend,” O’Malley said. “Orel Hershiser loves this place and so does Mike Scioscia. You also have two former National League umpires who live here year-round in Dutch Rennert and Bruce Froemming.”

O’Malley is also currently trying to buy back the Los Angeles Dodgers, but has said he will not move spring training or a minor league team back to Vero Beach if he secures ownership of the franchise. He insists, though, that baseball will continue to have a major presence at the former Dodgertown property thanks, in part, to former players like Park and Nomo. Park and Nomo are expected to attract a steady stream of teams from their respective countries, South Korea and Japan, to the Sports Village, which will, in turn, bring income to a property which has lost a combined $1.5 million over the past two years. The former allstars are two of the most popular Asian athletes in the world, and their influence within baseball circles in their respective countries is a significant and should prove a huge draw for the endeavor. Currently, the SK Wyverns of South Korea has brought 70 players into training camp to the Sports Village to prepare for their upcoming regular season. This is in addition to The


LOCAL NEWS

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — Osceola Magnet School will move to the former Thompson Elementary School in August, School Board members de-

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Indian River School Board to move Osceola Magnet’s to Thompson Elementary

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VERO BEACH -- Dr. Ronald Hartnett has been named Indian River Medical Center’s Hospitalist of the Year. Hartnett was chosen for his clinical excellence, professionalism and valuable contributions to IRMC. He was the first winner of the award. Dr. Hartnett joined IRMC in 2005. Hospitalists are doctors who devote their practice to the care of hospitalized patients. IRMC Hospitalists are specialists in Internal Medicine. They see hospitalized patients who have been referred by primary care doctors, emergency room doctors or other physicians at the hospital. They do not see patients outside of the hospital. This way, a patient has the benefit of being seen by a doctor whose practice is entirely focused on the care of hospitalized patients. Additionally, this can enable a patient’s primary care doctor to be more available for care in his or her office, rather than trying to go back and forth between seeing patients in the office and in the hospital.

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trepreneur at heart, though his goal with Dodgertown is to simply break even and preserve some of the grandeur to what was once the Mecca of Spring Training complexes. At one time he almost became an NFL owner. In 1996 he had already spent $1 million surveying land next to Dodger Stadium and gathered the support of other NFL owners to obtain a team. O’Malley was going to finance the project privately, but then-Los Angeles mayor Richard Riordan wanted the new franchise to play in the over70-year-old Los Angeles Coliseum. In November 2011, ESPNLA. com columnist Arash Markazi tied O’Malley’s failed NFL bid in 1996 directly to the sale of the Dodgers less than two years later. City Hall wanted both the Staples Center and a new Coliseum, to be developed and planned by people with deep University of Southern California ties. Here’s to hoping nothing stands in his way to return some of the glory to “Historic Dodgertown.”

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Umpire School, which is wrapping up its training of over 30 umpires. Later in February, several colleges and high schools will hold spring training at the complex. Further down the line, four youth dual-purpose baseball/softball fields will be completed in April, giving the O’Malley’s “Historic Dodgertown” another market—little league baseball and softball—to draw from in its ongoing effort to turn a profit. Peter O’Malley has (almost) travelled full-circle in the13 years since selling the Los Angeles Dodgers. He has financially aligned himself with South Korean conglomerate E-Land in an attempt to re-purchase the team his family once owned from embattled owner Frank McCourt. Whether or not McCourt gets the $1.5 billion he is asking for his team remains to be seen, as no baseball team has ever sold for more than the $845 million paid for the Chicago Cubs in 2009. The 74-year-old O’Malley is an en-

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cided last week. The board voted 4-1 to move the school, despite opposition by about 100 parents attending the meeting. Parents spent about two hours trying to persuade the board not to move the school. Board members said their decision was the only option. While the plan was originally to build a new Osceola Magnet on a site donated by Pointe West, board members said the district can’t afford to spend $20 million on a new school. The district would have to borrow to pay for the new school, which isn’t economically feasible in these times, board members said. School Board Vice Chairman Carol Johnson cast the dissenting vote. Moving Osceola to Thompson is expected to cost about $2.8 million and can be done quickly. Osceola is expected to reopen in the new location by August. Osceola Magnet, at 665 20th St., Vero Beach, is prone to flooding after heavy rains. District officials also have expressed concern about structural issues. Thompson Elementary was closed two years ago and repurposed to hold the district’s voluntary pre-kindergarten program, adult education classes and a few district offices. The VPK program now will move this summer to the new Vero Beach Elementary.

who cast the dissenting vote, said she wants a new proposal to release Pointe West from its obligation which was to run another two years. The Pointe West site under consideration was located west of the Indian River Mall, off State Road 60. “There is no way we are going to build (a school) in that short of time,” Johnson said. “We need to be honorable and, since we are not going to use it, not hold on to it.” Mechling agrees. “Please let me move on with my life,” Mechling said. “I have waited too long for something that we know is not going to happen.”

New award honors county’s late assistant fire chief Nolan INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- The Treasure Coast Fire Chiefs Association named the first recipient of the Chief Brian Nolan Award during its annual banquet last week in Fort Pierce. The award is named after former Indian River County Assistant Fire Chief Brian Nolan, who

died while off-duty in August 2010. Nolan, a third-generation firefighter, was 55 years old when he died from cardiac arrest. He spent 27 years with Indian River Shores before joining Indian River County Fire Rescue in 2006. For the first award, the board chose Indian River County firefighter Ray Jones based on his actions to save a fellow fighter who was being shocked during a fire call in October, Gonzales said. Fire crews went to a home on Tenth Lane in Vero Beach to put out a fire. Firefighter Jay Chesnutt grabbed a chain-link fence that had become charged from a short fuse in the home, Fire Rescue said. Jones, a 20-year veteran, saw Chesnutt was being shocked and knocked him away from the fence, firefighters said.

Crockett Insurance Group partners with Auto-Owners VERO BEACH -- Auto-Owners Insurance Company has announced that The Crockett

School Board to consider releasing Pointe West as school site INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — With the School Board voting to move Osceola Magnet to the former Thompson Elementary, it will likely now release property in Pointe West that had been considered as a home for the elementary school. Pointe West president Chuck Mechling reached an agreement with the district to give the site to the Indian River County School District to be used as a school. The agreement mandates that construction begin by 2014. But there is little likelihood that will happen. The board voted 4 to 1 to move Osceola to Thompson, in the south part of the county off Oslo Road, in the fall. Up until a few months ago, a new Osceola STAFF PHOTO Magnet was slated to be built on the Pointe Members of Vero Beach’s Rotary Clubs “planted” a peace pole this week in Humiston Park. In six languages West site. Board Vice Chairman Carol Johnson, the pole reads, “May peace prevail on earth.”


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of their lungs -- even marathoners. “Deep breathing stimulates the olfactory nerves, five areas of the brain and the spinal cord,” he said. He also reminds them about posture and to think less, feel more. Walcott was the first qigong instructor in Indian River County, beginning at the Jungle Club in 2000. Since then, he said he has trained at least 90 percent of the current instructors in the area. While he hopes to open his own clinic one day, he continues to teach at many of the area’s exclusive country clubs, Sebastian River Medical Center, various churches, and every morning on South Beach at sunrise for the past 11 years. “Qi is life force energy,” said Walcott. “That energy courses through your body via a cable system of ‘meridians.’” Those meridians have to remain unblocked to ensure optimal physical, mental and emotional health. Striving for improvement, not perfection is the key. That principal is reflected in the definition of “gong,” which means “to be working on a skill that takes time to develop,” said Walcott. “Pull down the heavens, pull up the STAFF PHOTOS green earth,” he instructed, as clients Student Gloria Biersheid, 89, performs a movement called “the hawk swirls in CONTINUED ON PAGE 18 sky” at a qigong class at Unity Center of Vero Beach.

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Every Thursday, a group of 20 or so local residents gather in a meeting room at the Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Association of Indian River County for a qigong class taught by John Walcott. Walcott, who has attained a master’s level in this ancient Chinese healing art, leads the participants through various movements while they are seated in chairs, many of them with canes on the floor beneath them. A prodigious presence, Walcott, 51, calls himself Cloudwalker. Standing about 6-foot-3, he is a big black man with a booming voice who easily transitions between explaining the purpose of each movement and lighthearted humor, with a Brooklyn accent barely discernible. “Place your hands on your thighs… and make sure it’s your thigh you’re holding,” he joked as the room erupted into gales of laughter. According to Walcott, qigong (pronounced chee-gung) works like acupuncture without the needles. The exercises focus on the alignment of breath, movement and awareness. “Take your breathing off automatic and put it on manual,” he said to the class, explaining that untrained adults only use about 40 percent

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LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Ancient healing art finds a home in Vero Beach


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QIGONG FROM PAGE 17

and their caregivers bend this way and that, squeezing the toxins from their organs, visualizing the colors associated with each one and lubricating the joints with lymphatic fluids. With a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Florida Atlantic University and about two years from a doctorate in medical qigong at an institute in Palm Desert, Calif., Walcott is able to interject his lessons with equal parts scientific evidence and Chinese philosophy. Walcott was introduced to qigong while in high school in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn, N.Y. As a sprinter on the track team, his ability to compete was impeded by asthma. Some of his teammates were involved in the martial arts, so he signed up for a kung fu program that incorporated qigong. “After three to six months of doing the deep breathing exercises, my asthma was gone,” he said. But it’s not just physical ailments that are cured. Walcott said qigong helps dissipate emotions that are stored in the organs, explaining that old grief resides in the lungs; old anger, in the liver; stress and trauma in the spleen (which is why you shouldn’t eat while reading or watching TV); old fear in the kidneys; and spiritual disturbance gets stored in the heart. As the class stretches, tapping and stroking themselves along their arms, legs, chests, backs and faces, -- activating the endocrine glands -- they make soft noises with their mouths, which help soothe the mind and relax the nervous system. Aside from sitting-qigong, Walcott teaches a myriad of the over 7,000 possible styles in the discipline, taught to him by some of the best masters over the past 35 years. “The most popular style of qigong is tai chi,” said Walcott, placing the discipline back 400 years in China. Acupuncture, he said, is about

John Walcott, a.k.a. Cloudwalker, teaches qigong at the Gifford Youth Activity Center’s after school program. 4,000 years old. But qigong has been around for some 8,000 years, taught exclusively to an elite group for self healing and passed down through the ages, and ultimately being leaked to the peasant classes.

In the 1950s, when China capitulated to communist rule, Chairman Mao Tse-Tung ordered all qigong practitioners to be purged by execution. The belief was that their philosophy would interfere with their

allegiance to the state. But when one of Mao’s favored cabinet members contracted leukemia, he granted amnesty to the remaining qigong doctors who had fled to the mountains, and they were able to heal him. “People in Hollywood have known about qigong since the ‘70s,” said Walcott, citing Regis Philbin and Goldie Hawn as practitioners. When Dr. Oz announced on his show, “If you want to live to be 100, do qigong,” Walcott said his phone rang off the hook with requests for private sessions and group classes. Now, there is a much wider acceptance of the healing benefits, with the U.S. Olympics team relying on qigong instructors to help athletes maintain peak performance. In addition, “most of the major hospitals, such as Sloane Kettering and Johns Hopkins retain qigong instructors on staff,” said Walcott. “Qigong is good for the immune system, mitigating the effects of chemotherapy, nausea and insomnia,” he explains. Walcott also works with patients of Dr. Hema Rao, an oncologist in Vero Beach, and speaks at events for the American Lung Association. Moreover, the calming effects have proven beneficial to inmates at the jail, where Walcott volunteered for a time helping men deal with withdrawal symptoms from chemical dependencies. But perhaps what Walcott is best known for is his sunrise classes on the beach, where children are welcome, too. “The ocean produces the most negative ions,” said Walcott, helping improve the bio-electricity that runs through our bodies. “Nowadays, nursing homes have ion machines; even the space shuttles have them. A lot of people are on medicine unnecessarily. These modalities are very good for you.” When Jane Thompson, 65, started coming to Walcott’s classes five anda-half months ago, her blood pressure was 200/165. Now, with daily qigong sessions, “I have lost 20 pounds and


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at Walcott’s urging, Thompson credits the deep breathing exercises and gentle movement for helping regain her health.

“People come to qigong when they have exhausted their options with conventional medicine,” said Walcott. “I would like to educate them before

they ever lose their health.” For information about qigong class schedules, visit www.TheCloudWalker.com or call (772)569-4090.

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my blood pressure is 118/84 without any drastic changes in my routine,” she said. Although she does try to eat healthy

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Students at South Beach, where John Walcott has taught qigong every weekday for 11 years, perform a movement “roll back and push,” intended to benefit the liver.


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qCGG:DK;6 nC?:G EDITORIAL

Showing respect for a long-standing relationship By a vote of 4-1 the Indian River Shores Town Council last week delayed accepting the county’s offer to supply water and sewer services to the town when the current franchise agreement with Vero Beach expires in 2016. Rather than approving a motion to have the county take over water and sewer services in four years, the Town Council instead gave Vero Beach additional time to develop a more attractive offer. At issue is the difference in the rate that Vero Beach and the county are proposing to charge the Shores for pressurized reuse water. The city has already offered to match the county’s rate for potable water and nonpressurized re-use water. Also in question are the ownership rights of at least a portion of the utility infrastructure in Indian River Shores. Several members of the Shores Town Council have indicated that they would like to see these questions answered definitively before making a final decision. Perhaps the Shores Town Council members, respecting long-standing relationships while also looking out for the best interest of their

residents, are not inclined to simply walk away from Vero Beach without giving the city every reasonable opportunity to present an offer comparable to the county’s. After all, by agreeing several decades ago to extend utility services north and south of its city limits, Vero Beach has certainly aided in the growth and development of the Shores and the south barrier island. And certainly the county has benefited from the expanded tax base that has resulted from the development of the barrier island. Long before the county had so much as a vision for a utility system, Vero Beach was serving the residents of the Shores and has continued to do so faithfully for decades. Perhaps the Shores Town Council is also reluctant to be used as a chess piece in the county’s attempt to put Vero Beach in a position where it will have little alternative but to accept an initial offer of just over $20 million for a water and sewer system valued by the city’s consultant at nearly five times that amount. County Utility Director Erick Olson said he hopes that if the county Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

“Doing well by doing good.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

Ian Love, Managing Editor 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com Mike Bielecki, Sports Editor 321-6105 mbwordsmith@gmail.com

succeeds in outbidding Vero Beach for the Shores business the coup would be a “catalyst” for a regional system. By “regional,” of course, Olson is referring to the vision for a county system that includes all of the Shores, Vero Beach and the south barrier island. As a part of its offer to the Shores, the county agreed to forgo charging Shores residents an impact fee, even though the county will have to spend millions connecting its system to the Shores. Who will pay those costs? All county customers would have to pick up the tab. By some estimates the county will shell out up to $4 million piping under the lagoon in order to serve the Shores. The county is betting, of course, that long before it must fulfill the promises it is making to the Shores it will be able to acquire Vero Beach’s system. With the city’s system the county will be able to serve all of the barrier island without running additional pipes under the lagoon. The county, staying ahead of the curve during the recent housing boom, finds itself with so much over capacity that it very much wants and needs to acquire the Carrie Scent Graphic Designer Marsha Damerow Graphic Designer Lisa Rymer Contributor Milt Thomas Contributor

Scott Alexander Contributor Michael Birnholz Contributor Barbara Yoresh Contributor Martine Fecteau Account Executive

To contact one of our contributing writers please call 772-978-2251 or send an email to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 (martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com) or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233 (Mark.Schumann@scripps.com) Christina Tascon, Writer/Photographer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

city’s customer base. Such a consolidation of water and sewer services may have benefits for everyone. For starters, a consolidation would enable the decommissioning of the city’s riverfront plant, a result practically everyone supports. A regional system could offer more stable rates for all county residents, including those living in the city limits. Remember, everyone in Vero Beach is also a resident of Indian River County. We are all in this together. The question is whether the county is willing to pursue regionalization in a way that is fair to the city. After all, the city currently owns and operates a utility system that returns no less than $800,000 a year to the general fund, and it does so at competitive rates. Vero Beach may eventually agree to sell its water and sewer system to the county. But it should not be forced to do so under duress, and it should not be squeezed into a corner by a county administration determined to “relieve” the city of a profitable business for far less than it is worth.

LETTERS WELCOME Vero Beach Newsweekly invites you to send Letters to the Editor on topics of interest pertaining to Indian River County. Letters should be 250-300 words and may be edited for length. We encourage an open dialogue, but reserve the right to refuse publication of letters that do not meet our editorial standards. E-mails may be sent to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com or by regular mail to Letter to the Editor, Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. 1, Vero Beach, FL 32960.


COMMUNITY FORUM

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BY MILT THOMAS VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Inside T H U R S D A Y

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Christmas in July Santa makes summertim e visit for Homeless Family Center !Page 16

Toe-tapping fun Oceanside Business Association hosts end concert ! weekPage 10

J. Scott Kelly

verobeachnewsweekly.com

combines his love of

photography with giving

Finding a cause for art !Gallerytodonateto !City defen ds Finance Direct or hiring

back to the

PHOTO BY

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J. SCOTT KELLY

non-profits! Page 18

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In land they trust Indian River Land the Indian River Trust sets about keeping Lagoon green !Page 7 12 TO ADVERTIS 20 MARTINE E CALL FECTEAU 24 MARK SCHUMAN 772.696.2004 N 772.696.52 33

The Vero Beach Newsweekly gives you the barrier island and more. To learn more, call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233.

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Advertise your business in Vero Beach Newsweekly to reach every home on the barrier island, plus communities such as Vero Isles, River Wind, Oak Harbor, Grand Harbor, Vero Beach Country Club, Indian River Club, Pointe West and Bent Pine.

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Milt Thomas is a Vero Beach resident and an experienced freelance writer/author with a 20-year background in the music industry. He currently writes biographies, blogs, lectures, travels extensively and is an active member of the National Press Club.

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It was also my last government job. Now, getting back to the conference I attended last week, I could relate to the two eager government representatives, Ms. Oates and Mr. Wilczewski, returning to Washington with great expectations to fix the problems they encountered. They reminded me of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, enthusiastically charging a very large and intractable windmill.

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for admission to the Youth Conservation Corps. Needless to say, he was not interested. The thought of leaving his family behind for two years was unbearable. I tried to convince my superiors to find someone else, but Steve had already been approved all the way up the chain of command. Steve and his family finally relented and I drove him to the airport with his family, all of them in tears, as TV cameras filmed him boarding the plane, first class ticket, to Oregon. He quietly returned home two weeks later. The War on Poverty and Johnson’s other major endeavor, the Vietnam War, ended at one point during the Nixon administration.

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Last week I attended a State of the Region conference at Florida Atlantic University. It was an opportunity for private sector business people to meet with representatives from the U.S. Department of Labor (Jane Oates) and Department of Commerce (Adam Wilczewski). Audience members took turns expressing their frustrations at working with intractable government agencies, while Oates and Wilczewski did their best to try and help. They took plenty of notes and I’m sure they had every intention of going back to Washington and solving the problems presented at the meeting. I wish them the best of luck, but have my doubts that anything will happen. Here’s the reason: The government bureaucracy has evolved over 236 years to arrive at its modern, unworkable state. My guess is that the system started to become unworkable about 226 years ago. That’s when someone came up with the idea of improving efficiency by hiring another employee. Since then, governments at all levels have applied the same formula with consistent and increasingly unworkable results. My very first job out of college was working as a counselor in a federally funded program. That was back when Lyndon Johnson was president. He declared a War on Poverty, not unlike the War on Drugs or the War on Terror in that they all cost a lot of our tax dollars with arguable results. So, I was a soldier in the War on Poverty. I worked in a major market with high school dropouts to

get them back into school or into a job training program. Then someone in Washington came up with the brilliant idea of reopening the old Civilian Conservation Corps MILT THOMAS camps established back during the Great Depression to provide jobs on government conservation land. This time though, the camps would be used to train hard core unemployed youth to become productive members of society. They called it the Youth Conservation Corps. The only problem was that these camps were located in rural communities with little or no crime and the hard core unemployed youth were either gang members or felons. To appease those local governments and guarantee that bringing disadvantaged youth to their communities would not result in criminal activities, our job was to find unemployed high school dropouts with no criminal record or gang affiliation. Good luck. Of course, there was the requisite 30-page application form that, if completed, would meet all the government criteria for admission to the camps. It was now a race among states to find the very first candidate and resulting national publicity. I had worked with one young man – let’s call him Steve – who was 16-years-old, living with his mother and a younger sister. His mother could not work so he dropped out of school to support the family. This family was very close and the young man had never been in trouble with the law. Unfortunately, he met all criteria

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Heritage Center celebrates Vero’s rich history

BY CHRISTINA TASCON

was on hand to not only celebrate the history, but also to talk about how the Center still conVERO BEACH – The Heritage Center has altributes to the city today. ways stood as the epicenter of old Vero’s hap“The histories of families are contained in penings. The Center has been the home for this place,” said Rickey, “We welcome all that square dances, city suppers and celebrations come to Vero and they, in turn, become a such as the Hibiscus Pageant throughout the part of the history of the community.  We are now holding events here that are making new memories for the next generation.” Hildie Tripson, president of the Historical Society, has been hard at work to bring new residents into the group.   She and her staff were on hand with a display of some of the Historical Society’s treasures.   “The Historical Society supports the Center to keep its existence as a vital part of historical downtown just like it was in the generations before,” said Tripson. “Maintaining the historical quality of downtown means keeping this landmark property intact.” The Heritage Center Celebration offered visitors a chance to see pictures and hear stories about the old days and the way the area has changed. George Hamner displayed and talked to visiPHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON Mayor Pilar Turner with Vero’s “unofficial lifetime tors about his collection of vintage fruit crate Nicki Maslin and Rebecca Rickey mayor” Alma Lee Loy labels, while displays of B.T. Cooksey’s postcard collection had a constant group searching for familiar places.   About twenty tables of memorabilia were displayed and everyone could speak to the collectors as they reminisced. Steve Hayes said that he moved here when he was five.  “When I was a kid, I played in the old WWII airplane next door and came here for all kinds of events.  We were in and out of the building all the time.  Boy Scout meetings, jamborees, Pioneer dinners; you name it and we were here.” Mary Graves was also sharing memories and talked about the Heritage Center’s past. “One of the nice things about coming here in the old days was we used to know everyone who came,” said Graves.   The Celebration was a night when old Vero could gather again while meeting new members of their friend’s families who are likely to become the next generation to share the Heritage Center. Carol Fennell, Rody & Tommye Johnson and Mary Graves

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years. Last week “old Florida” met new Vero as the Center held a Heritage Celebration to honor the building’s past and its place in the city’s present day. Heritage Center Director Rebecca Rickey


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Tim McGarry, George Hamner and Mary Mitchell

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Displays of Indian River postcards and Vero memorabilia had visitors looking for old familiar sites

Rich Votapka, Hildie Tripson and Rene Perez


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Top Chefs battle, qualify for Pointe West finale BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The Homeless Family Center’s Top Chef Qualifying Event was a foodie’s paradise Monday evening at the Elk’s Lodge. As ten chefs vied for four final spots on the dinner menu and three chefs looked for a final dessert win, almost 300 hungry guests tasted their way

Chefs participating at the qualifying event were the prelude to the final Top Chef Challenge to be held on Feb. 27 at The Club at Pointe West. The four entree finalists were Pipa Movida’s Chef Jay Herman; Osceola Bistro’s Chef Chris Bireley; The Tide’s Chef Leanne Kelleher and Hale Groves River Market’s Chef Chad Darwent.

late, Gina Battle, took home the dessert prize and won the honor of serving a confection at the final event. Her entry of Belgian Chocolate Spiced Soup, Vanilla Cream with a Caramel Drizzle wowed the crowd and garnered the votes to put her on top. Carnival Confections Chef Sean Pierce challenged with an assortment of fruit topped cheesecakes and a

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Chair Neda Heeter (left) with Top Chef Qualifying Homeless Family Center volunteers through the room of delicacies.

win, we will take solace in eating the leftovers,” said Pierce before the tastings, “but it is all for a good cause.” Winning items included The Tides’ slow roasted pulled pork with creamy cheddar grits, Pipa Movida’s smoked salmon in a savory black sesame seed cone; Hale Grove’s walnut oil poached beef tenderloin with serrano ham and roasted New York strip with truffle demi-glace, southern style grits and roasted asparagus by Bireley of Osceola Bistro. The participating chefs were all happy so many people came out for the benefit and were also able to sample their food, some of them for the first time. “The seafood paella was so good,” said Molly Pratt, “it’s nice to try the foods from new places. I have not been to La Bodeguita de Vero yet but I will now.” Homeless Family Center’s Director Lorne Coyle was impressed by the turnout. “I have not tried the food yet because it is ‘family hold-back time,’ so we can be sure everyone who paid get to eat,” he said, “but I will, if there is anything left. It is so fantastic to get this kind of a response.” You must have advance reservations for the main event, call 772-567-5537 ext. 326 to make arrangements.

Owner of Faith, Hope, and Choco- jeweled treasure theme. “If we don’t Humane Society Pets Of The Week

Hamlet

Topper

Neeko

Big Milo

Oreo

Callie

1 Year Old Pointer Mix Male

Unknown Cockatiel Unknown

7 1/2 Years Old Domestic Shorthair Male

12 Years Old Domestic Shorthair Male

7 Years Old Cocker Spaniel Mix Female

3 Years Old Domestic Shorthair Female

These and other animals are available for adoption at the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County located at 6230 77th Street. For directions and information call (772)388-3331


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Over 80 vendors! Kerry Firth, Kim Black, Helen Tracy, Susan Dayton and Kai Martinvolunteers

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Sat. Feb. 4th, 9 am...5 pm

Sun. Feb. 5th, 9 am...4 pm

“Ask the Experts”

Saturday

10:00 am... Herbs, Growing & Cooking.. >\JJXF eG\EEIJk D & D Growers 12:00 pm... Square Foot Gardening..... _\V A<GEYIVIK\:k Author & TV Host

and inventor of Square Foot Gardening

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Starts on the even hour each day of the event...Look for the Banner!

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Trees, Hanging Baskets, Plants and Flowers... A great selection of Orchids, Roses, Ferns and Herbs CA?E IA=K Q> G?K OJL>=AQHNJ DQJ@<B M>QQJ=EB FP=?HQP=JB F>P?QAH?<......

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3250 Riverside Park Drive, Off SR 60, beachside Vero Beach

ZGQGG HDIII ?PP ?FB_a ]@YSRW>IIIIIIIIIIIIII P<DV PGX^\k Odom’s Orchids 12:00 pm... Square Foot Gardening..... _\V A<GEYIVIK\:k Author & TV Host

and inventor of Square Foot Gardening

Mollie Pratt, Bernie Snarski, Liz Mayo and Andrea Mignano

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OX^Y<G] A<KV\Ek Senior Forester of Florida Forest Service

Sponsors Blue Ribbon Gardeners PG\FF bIDGJ<V j MY\ AG\\l\ RThS <J] RShU Q^\<J f_ j L\GI A\<^Y _<Z<lXJ\ Award Winning Gardeners PD;VX9 NDH\G _<GW\EF ?Y<GXEX\Fk cJ^h Green Thumb Gardeners BVV<K<J]< e<G]\J ?XG^V\ I[ e?cO? j MIK ?IVVXJF cJFDG<J^\ BZ\J^mk cJ^h fVIGX]< PI:\G @ `XZYE ?IKH<Jm j b<^W=F ?IKHV\E\ MG\\ N\GCX^\ b<FKXJ\ e<G]\J ?XG^V\ I[ e?cO? j PIXJF\EEX< e<G]\J ?XG^V\ I[ e?cO? Backyard Gardeners ?<GE\G BFFI^X<E\Fk cJ^hi gJZXJ\\GF <J] `<J] NDGC\mIGF fhLh ?<F<JI gV\^EGX^<V ?IJEG<^EIGFk cJ^h j MI]] d\^WK<Jk gFE<E\ PV<JJXJZ B]CXFIGF _\\WF PVDK;XJZk cJ^h j ><^\ NED;;F

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Food Court...ALL DAY!

Quail Valley’s Michael Shields with Toni Abraham and Mica Hyman with the duck confit and quail eggs on toast

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Children’s Crafts...11 am - 2 pm each day www.gardenclubofirc.org

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Community Calendar Every Friday: Farmer’s Market from 3-6 pm, downtown Vero, corner 14th Ave. & 21st St. 772-480-8353. Every Saturday: Oceanside Business Association’s Farmer’s Market, 8 am-noon. Ocean Dr. & Dahlia Ln. 772-532-2455. First Friday of the Month: Downtown Gallery Art Stroll, art galleries and businesses open house receptions. Free. 772-562-5525 or 772-299-1234. Second Saturday of the Month: Oceanside Business Association Free Concert Series – 5:30-8:30 pm, music, food & drink. Ocean Dr. 772-532-7983. Every Sunday Jan 22-Apr 1: Vero Beach Polo, Polo Grounds Field, 12th St. between 74th & 82nd Aves., 2 pm, $10+ per car. 772-778-2224. Every Sunday in February: Art in the Park, Vero Beach Art Club members exhibition, Humiston Park, free. 3000 Ocean Dr. 772-231-0303. Dec 15-Apr 30: Sculpting Nature, 30 large scale art pieces in McKee Botanical Gardens, 350 S US1, $5-$9, 772-794-0601. Feb 2: John Ebersberger presentation, Darby Fine Art, 1902 14th Ave, impressionist plein air techniques, 6:30 pm. 772-480-0491. Feb 2: Alternative Healing for Pets, Humane Society, 6230 77th St., noon-1 pm, 772-388-3331 x18. Feb 3: “Care To Laugh” with Suzanne Westenhoefer at Disney’s Vero Beach Resort, $75 includes 1 drink, show, VIP reception & appetizers. Advance tickets only. pccvero@aol. com, 772-321-9394. Feb 3:  Jazz in the Garden” with Bossas, Boleros and Blues, McKee Botanical Garden, 350 US1, general admission prices, 6 pm, optional dinner $17.50. 772-794-0601. Feb 3-4: Laughing Dog Gallery SomTHURSDAY, FEB. 2

STAFF PHOTO

If you’d like to see one of your photographs published in Vero Beach Newsweekly, please send them to us at verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com. Photos need to be at least 200 dpi and in jpeg format. ers Jewelry Trunk Show to benefit the Humane Society, cocktail reception Friday 5-8 pm, 2910 Cardinal Dr., Saturday 10 am-5:30 pm. 772-234-6711. Feb 3-5: Environmental Learning Center Family Camp Out, kayak to leeward island to camp, $305-$425, meet at 255 Live Oak Dr. 772-589-5050. Feb 4: D’Art for Art, Vero Beach Museum of Art, 3001 Riverside Park Dr., $500, dinner, cocktails and art dash, 6:30-10 pm. 772-231-0707, VeroBeachMuseum.org. Feb 4: RIDES & Smokin’ BBQ Competition, hosted by IT Chamber of Commerce, Indian River County Fairgrounds, 9 am-3 pm. 772-567-3491. Feb 4: Sporting Clays Charity Shoot for the Sun Up Center at Indian River Trap & Skeet Club, 5925 82nd Ave., $85-$425. 772-770-6626. Feb 4: El Schneider Memorial Din-

FRIDAY, FEB. 3

SATURDAY, FEB. 4

ner/Dance, Vero Beach Elks Club, 1350 26th St., 6-10. $50. 772-562-8450. Feb 4-5: Gardenfest!, festival with plant and related items, nature experts, activities & food, Riverside Park, 3000 Riverside Park Dr., Sat 9-5, Sun 9-4. 772-567-4602. Feb 6: AAUW Book Review Breakfast, “Why Gender Matters” by Leonard Sax, Richardson Center, 9:30 am. Feb 6: International Lecture Series with Musician/Composer Jeffrey Hollander, Vero Beach Museum of Art, 3001 Riverside Park Dr., 3&6 pm, $55-$65. 772-231-0707. Feb 8: Art Meets Fashion, fashion show, artwork & auction benefits March of Dimes, Breast Cancer Awareness and Homeless Family Center, 6:30 pm, Costa d’Este, 3244 Ocean Dr., 772-562-5525. Feb 8: “Full Moon Fever” fundrais-

SUNDAY, FEB. 5

MONDAY, FEB. 6

er for Exchange Club scholarships & CASTLE at private Grand Harbor home, 6:30-9 pm, $50. 772-696-5347. Feb 9-13: Wine & Dine, Hibiscus Children’s Center wine tasting & food pairings, Feb 9 – Northern Trust opening reception, 755 Beachland Blvd., $45, 5:30-8:30 pm; Feb 10-13 – reserved wine/dinner pairings around Vero Beach locations. 772-978-9313 x313, HibiscusWineandDine.org. Feb 9: Warm Nights Cool Music at Vero Beach Museum of Art, 3001 Riverside Park Dr., 5-7 pm, $10. 772231-0707. Feb 9: Navy League’s TC Council Dinner, Heritage Center, 2140 14th Ave., social hour, 5:45 pm, followed by dinner & speaker Vice Admiral Joseph Kernan, $28. 772-231-6101. Feb 10: “Love Your Lagoon” dinner, cocktails & music under the stars, 6 pm, $125, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, 5600 N. US1, Ft. Pierce. 772-466-9876. Feb 10: 5th Annual Haiti Partners Banquet, Community Church, 1901 23rd St., 6:30 pm, Haitian food, art and auction. Reserve by Feb 3, 772539-8521. Feb 10: “Beyond the Chamber,” 4 outstanding chamber musicians, 7 pm, $10-$15 ($3 students) at First Christian Church, 1927 27th Ave., benefits VBHS. 772-564-5537. Feb 11: Oraganic Spa Green Living workshop by Environmental Learning Center, 1-3 pm, $25, advance reservations required.  772-589-5050. Feb 11: Valentine Genealogy Seminar, “Who Do You Think You Are,” Richardson Center, IRSC Mueller Campus, 6155 College Ln., 9 am, $30. 772-234-8686. To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

TUESDAY, FEB. 7

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8

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Amy & Bob Brunjes, Toby Hill, Susan & Paul Becker and Susan Relicke

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)%&# '## *+" ,#( *!-$# Dr. Brooks welcomes dental hygienists: Norma Howerton and Susan Hawas State-of the-art equipment PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Rick McDermott and AnnMarie McCrystal with Becky Allen who is thanking them for their service on the board

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Marilyn and Buzz Wurzer with Rick and Laura McDermott

Elizabeth Sorensen, Matilde & J. Dale Sorensen and Anna Nichols

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VERO BEACH -- The Indian River Community Foundation celebrated a $4.5 million dollar grant donation benchmark with a tribute to their 51 founding members at the Riomar home of Matilde and J. Dale Sorensen. Eight years ago the Indian River Community Foundation was a fledgling non-profit but it took the supportive efforts of a core group of members to commit to the organization’s mission to support charitable causes throughout Indian River County. The IRCF supports a wide cast of non-profits throughout the community through their donors. In just the last four years over $7 million

has been granted to local agencies. This evening was about saying goodbye to a few board members as they welcomed Lois Appleby, Kevin Given and Andrea Thurn to the board.   As guests nibbled on margarita shrimp and mini-empanadas by the pool, Rick McDermott and AnnMarie McCrystal said their goodbyes as board members.   “I am stepping down at the end of my term but I believe I am leaving this board as strong as it has ever been,” said McDermott. Chair Becky Allen said the organization had delivered over $200,000 into the community this year.  “That figure proves that even in the current economy, philanthropy is alive and well in Indian River,” said Allen.

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IRCF pays tribute to founding members


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Hit the trail to see artists at work in Sebastian BY BARBARA YORESH VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

A group of Sebastian-based artists is presenting a unique opportunity for art lovers and collectors to see firsthand the creative process of experts working in multi-medias. The first Sebastian Art Studio Tour set for Saturday, Feb. 11 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. is a free event open to the public featuring eight independent artists who will open their studios in an effort to promote awareness of the high quality of art among the growing Sebastian art community. Event organizers note that creativity begins in the artist’s studio and art collectors are rarely given an opportunity to see art being created as well as a chance to discuss with the artist the inspirations, materials, process and methods which go into completing an art work. Those visiting the studios will also have an opportunity to purchase unique, one-of-a-kind artworks. The self-guided tour includes artists Rita Bernstein (silk paintings, wearable art); Robert Johnson (metal sculpture); Sharon Morgan (painting, mixed media); Geoffrey Myers (sculpture); Richard Ramierez (pottery); Mary Segal (painting, mixed media); Weldon Stout (oils, stained glass) and Quentin Walter (watercolors, mixed media). Maps for the tour listing artist studio locations plus additional informa-

tion about the artists may be found online at www.SebastainArtStudioTour.com and maps will be available on the day of the tour at Sunbelt Produce, 10625 U.S. Highway 1 at the corner of Schumann Drive in Sebastian. Event organizer and participating artist Sharon Morgan said the artists hope this premiere tour is the first of many. “We hope it will continue from year to year. We want to let the public know that there’s a lot of art in Sebastian,” Morgan said. “We’re looking forward to a good turn-out and it’s been nice to see the interest is there so we want to keep the ball rolling.” Morgan noted that Sebastian features interesting shops and galleries but not an officially designated art district. “It would be great to have artists banding together and find a place,” she said. Painter Mary Segal, whose studio is on the tour, is eager to share art with tour participants. “We are looking forward to the tour and it will be beneficial to the artists and the community. I think people will have a good time visiting eight accomplished artists,” Segal said. “This is a feel-good event. By visiting studios one can get a feel for what artists are going and there is a bigger choice in art when you go to someone’s studio.”

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Mary Segal works on one of her mixed media projects.

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Geoff Myers will open his studio to show off some of his sculptures.


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Nutopians bring Lennon tribute show to Sunrise Theatre

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Fort PIErCE -- The Nutopians, an eight-piece ensemble that will honor the genius and artistry of John Lennon, will perform Friday, Feb. 24 at the Sunrise Theatre. Formerly The John Lennon Song Project, the band is celebrating its prestigious Independent Music Award for Best tribute Album of 2010, an honor bestowed for its CD Imagined, just months after the band’s debut. The Nutopians are touring the U.S. throughout 2012. The Nutopians, founded and led by rex Fowler of Aztec two-Step and tom Dean of Devonsquare, are also celebrating the addition of its newest band member, 15-year-old “phenom” vocalist Maggie Coffin. In a show that reviewers have called “magical,’’ “captivating” and “inspiring,” The Nutopians concertgoers are treated to exquisite lead singing, three-part harmonies and insightful song narratives, plus a host of multi-talented musicians on acoustic, electric and bass guitars; cello; violin; piano; mandola; accordion; chromatic harmonica and light percussion. In concert The Nutopians perform

their acclaimed renditions of many of Lennon’s most beloved Beatles songs, often weaving melody, lyric and song together in a series of singles and mini-medleys. These tunes are given surprisingly fresh treatments that often inspire a whole new appreciation for Lennon’s original lyrics. Selected songs from his solo years are also featured. The band’s new name was suggested recently by Yoko ono to honor Lennon’s social and political activism, and the couple’s fictitious country of peace, ‘’Nutopia.’’ The group is also now actively supporting the “Artists Against Hunger & Poverty” program, which raises awareness and funds for WhyHunger, a leader in building the movement to end hunger and poverty by connecting people to nutritious, affordable food. A portion of proceeds from the ensemble’s performances and CD sales benefit WhyHunger’s grassroots effort to inspire self-reliance and community empowerment. The Band: rex Fowler -- rhythm guitar and vocals; tom Dean – sixand 12-string guitars, mandola and vocals; Alana MacDonald -- violin and vocals; Jordan Jancz -- cello and

percussion; teg Glendon -- bass guitar and vocals; robby Coffin -- electric and acoustic guitars and vocals;

Gary Schreiner -- piano, accordion and chromatic harp; Maggie Coffin -- vocals and percussion.

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The Nutopians were founded and are led by Rex Fowler of Aztec Two-Step and Tom Dean of Devonsquare.


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In a musical rollercoaster of adventure and make believe, Riverside Children’s Theatre gives new life to what has become a favorite literary character of kids worldwide. “The Musical Adventures of Flat Stanley, Jr.” is a fresh and lively production that tells the story of Stanley Lambchop, a 10-year-old boy who is flattened when a bulletin board falls on him. Barely two inches thick, Stanley is able to slip under doors, fit into envelopes and even fly like a kite. Featuring a cast of 25 local actors, ages eight to 16, the musical opens February 3 at the Ann Morton Theatre, and runs through February 26. The brainchild of author Jeff Brown, who penned the first book, “Flat Stanley,” in 1964, the series didn’t become really popular until the end of the century, when a Canadian school teacher launched a writing curriculum using Flat Stanley as a tool. Typically, third grade teachers assign students to make a paper cut out of Stanley and write about his adventures in a journal, says Kevin Quillinan, the director, who believes “the musical makes the two-dimensional hero even more accessible to children who are just beginning to read and write.” Choreographed by Adam Schnell, the production took top honors for dance a couple of weeks ago at a competition sponsored by Music Theatre International. With such numbers as “I Wish I Were” and “Surfing the Mail,” Stanley endears himself to children by first wanting to have a more exciting life than normal, then by trying to get back to normal and the loving embrace of his family. In between, he’s stamped and posted around the world, thwarting thieves in Paris and hanging ten in Hawaii. Those adventures are just like the Flat Stanley kids learn about in

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Flat Stanley the musical at Ann Morton Theatre

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“The Musical Adventures of Flat Stanley, Jr.” runs from Feb. 3 to Feb. 26. school. From classrooms across North America to those in exotic locales, Flat Stanley encourages children to share their enthusiasm and personal experiences with each other through writing. Flat Stanley is so popular, in fact, that he has his own Facebook page, an iphone application and he was even on the famed US Airways Flight #1549, which made an emergency landing on the Hudson River in 2009. With costumes and set designs by the staff at Riverside Theatre, the production is particularly well performed, in part because the cast has become seasoned from working together for some time now. The role of Stanley is played by

Sean Castro, 14, a student at Vero Beach High School who has received awards in the past for his acting ability. Megan Taylor Callahan, 16, plays Mrs. Lambchop, Stanley’s mother; Mackenzie Ross, 13, plays his father; and the postal worker, Mrs. Cartero, is played by Lilla Stawara, 14. With about 300 children and teens involved in Riverside Children’s Theatre, most of the productions have large casts to provide ample opportunity for acting. “It’s a professional experience they’re getting,” says Linda Downey, the educational director of the theater. “They get to work with professionals both on our staff and next door at Riverside Theatre who have made this their life work so they’re going to

learn a lot.” Among Riverside Children Theatre alumni is Rikki Klaus, who is now working as a television news reporter for WPTV Channel Five in West Palm Beach. “She started with us when she was little,” recalls Downey, “and then was a camp counselor.” Riverside Children’s Theatre hosts nine summer camp programs for children of all ages. Performances are Feb. 3 and 24 at 7:30 p.m. and Feb. 4, 5, 11, 18, 25 and 26 at 1:30 p.m. Tickets range from $5 to $8 for students and $10 to $16 for adults and may be purchased through the Riverside Theatre box office at (772) 231-6990 or at www. riversidetheatre.com.


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EMERSON CENTER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Dr. Dennis Stanford

INDIAN RIVER SYMPHONIC ASSOCIATION Community Church Community Concert Series 1901 23rd Street 772-778-1070 irsavero.org Feb 11: Wroclaw Philharmonic, pianist Garrick Ohlsson, 7:30 pm, $50

RIVERSIDE THEATER 3250 Riverside Park Drive 772-231-6990 riversidetheatre.com Children’s Theatre: Feb 3-25: The Musical Adventures of Flat Stanley, 1:30 & 7:30 pm, $10-$16 Stark Main Stage: Jan 12-Feb 5: The Full Monty, 2 pm, 7:30 & 8 pm, $57 - $73 Second Stage: Feb 2-12: The World Goes Round Revue, 2 pm & 8 pm, $40

SPACE COAST SYMPHONY Various Locations 321-536-8580 SpaceCoastSymphony.org

TREASURE COAST JAZZ SOCIETY 772-234-4600 tcjazzsociety.org Feb 27: Two Grand Piano Giants “More Improvs on The Great American Songbook” by Dick Hyman and Derek Smith, Vero Beach Museum of Art, Leonhardt Auditorium, 7:30 pm

VERO BEACH MUSEUM OF ART 3001 Riverside Park Drive 772-231-0707 Feb 10: See Atlantic Classical Orchestra Feb 20: Jules Feiffer, Humorist, Leonhardt Auditorium, 4 & 6 pm, $55-$65

VERO BEACH OPERA verobeachopera.org 772-569-6993 Box Office: 772-564-5537 verobeachopera.org Feb 4: Broadway, Operetta and Zarzuela by Miami Opera Academy, 7 pm, $30-$50, VBHS Performing Arts Center, 772-564-5537 Feb 5: Afternoon with Opera Star Paul Plishka, 1 pm, $20, Majestic 11 Theatre, 772-770-0773 VERO BEACH THEATRE GUILD 772-562-8300 2020 San Juan Avenue verobeachtheatreguild.com Feb 2-5: Cinderella the Musical, VB Charter High performers, 2 & 7 pm, $20, irchsonline.org

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1590 27th Avenue, Vero Beach (772)778-5249 www.TheEmersonCenter.org

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found in Clovis (New Mexico) with the culture of the Solutrean people who occupied France and Spain more than 20,000 years ago. As one of the world’s foremost authorities on the early inhabitants of North America, Stanford evaluated the engraved bone found in Vero Beach by area resident James Kennedy and corroborated the authenticity of its ancient age. His findings as well as those of his Smithsonian staffers were published in the June 2011 edition of the Journal of Archaeological Science. The Florida Humanities Series is presented by The Emerson Center at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship in Vero Beach. Speakers and performers for this series will appear through April and presentations will relate to varied aspects of Florida history and issues. Funding for the free Florida Humanities Series at the Emerson Center was provided through a grant from the Florida Humanities Council with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Emerson Center, which is handicapped-accessible and seats more than 800, is located at 1590 27th Avenue at the corner of 16th Street in Vero Beach. For more information, call (772) 778-5249.

520 Royal Palm Boulevard 772-562-9088 Feb 12: Wintley Phipps, Gospel Music Singer, Benefit for US Dream Academy, 7 pm, $25 minimum donation

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VERO BEACH -- The Emerson Center’s popular Florida Humanities Series continues on Thursday, Feb. 16 at 7 p.m. with a free, open-to-thepublic presentation by a special guest from the world’s largest museum. Sponsored in part by Marine Bank & Trust and in cooperation with the Old Vero Ice Age Sites Committee, world renowned archaeologist and curator Dr. Dennis J. Stanford of the Smithsonian Institution will discuss his research that challenges commonly accepted explanations how the Americas were originally populated. Dr. Stanford’s presentation replaces one originally scheduled by Dr. Alex Stepick who for personal reasons could not attend. The Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. is comprised of 19 museums and nine research centers as well as the National Zoological Park. Established in 1846 through an endowment from a British scientist, the educational and research institute and its affiliated museums employ more than 6,300. Stanford is curator of North and South American Paleolithic, Asian Paleolithic and Western United States archaeological collections at the Smithsonian Institution. His theory regarding the arrival of the hemisphere’s earliest residents postulates that the first residents of the Americas crossed the Atlantic by boat and arrived earlier than previously thought. During his presentation, Stanford will present archaeological and oceanographic evidence to support his theory and link ancient stone tool making artifacts and technology

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at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1590 27th Avenue 772-778-5249 TheEmersonCenter.org Feb 4: Mark Shields, Celebrated Speakers Series, 4 & 7 pm, $65 Feb 16: Alex Stepick, Ph.D., Immigration Impact on Florida & US, Florida Humanities Series, 7 pm, Free

BY BARBARA YORESH

SUNRISE THEATRE 116 South 2nd Street Fort Pierce 772-461-4775 sunrisetheatre.com $25-$50 Feb 2: Tribute to Blues Brothers, 7 pm, $45/$35 Feb 3: Damn Yankees, 8 pm, $55/$49 Feb 10: Foreigner, 8 pm, VIP $159/$59/$49 Feb 16: Get the LED Out, the Led Zeppelin Experience, 7 pm, $35/$29 Feb 17: Ron Dante’s Back to the 60’s Show, 8 pm, $75/$49/$39 Feb 19: The Hit Men, 7 pm, $39/$29 Feb 21: Paul Anka, 7 pm, $85/$75 Feb 23: Monty Python’s Tour “Spam-a-Lot,” 7 pm, $50/$60

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Dr. Dennis Stanford says first residents crossed the Atlantic to reach the Americas

Feb 5: Pines of Rome, Trinity Episcopal Church, 2365 Pine Avenue, 3 pm, $20 Feb 12: Tosca, Waxlax Center for the Performing Arts, St. Edward’s School, 3 pm, $20

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866-310-7521 acomusic.org Feb 2: Mendelssohn, SchumannBarber & Beethoven, 8 pm, Waxlax Center at St. Edward’s School Feb 10: “Behind the Mask,” Dinner & Music Gala, 6:30, Vero Beach Museum of Art, $250, 772-460-0850

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Smithsonian curator to Entertainment Calendar speak on first inhabitants


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These Mighty Mites have some game BY MIKE BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The Indian River County Recreation Department wrapped up the first half of its winter Mighty Mites schedule Saturday with a full slate of seven games in the A.G. Center at the Indian River County Fairgrounds. The 6-, 7-, and 8-year-olds also play games at Oslo Middle School and Sebastian Middle School throughout the season. The 14 teams in this age group are sponsored by

11 different businesses and coached by 13 different coaches: AT&T Real Yellow Pages; Bill Baysura with Dale Sorensen Realty; Dauch Electric; Indian River Federal Credit Union; Law Offices of Keith Bregoff; Photography by Michael Siegel; Scottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sporting Goods; Vero US 1 Nissan; Wells Fargo; Communications International; Linus Automotive group. The teams and coaches are: Cortney Ohs, Huskies; Tim Bruggerman, Irish; Eugene Douglas, Midshipmen; Ralph Lynch, Tar-

heels; Frank Dagleish, Orangemen; Mark Hanlon; Bob Hiller, Jayhawks; David Marshall, Hurricanes; Pete Karaconstantis, Yellow Jackets; Kevin Byrnes, Bulldogs; Henry Hughes, Knights; Chad Bryan, Badgers; Matt Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor, Bearcats; Eugene Douglas, Hoyas. This co-ed instructional league is designed to teach the basic rules and fundamentals of basketball, while introducing children to the team concepts and teach sportsmanship.

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the growing popularity of brightly colored clothing on the court -- from Serena Williams and her sister, Venus, to Anna Kournikova and even Pete Sampras – there is a greater receptiveness to the sport’s evolving style. In fact, Wimbledon, about as traditional as it gets in the tennis world, is allowing colors to be worn

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VERO BEACH -- When local resident Tammy Blackwill combined her love for sewing with a passion for tennis, she discovered a market eager for her colorful designs. In contrast to the traditional white worn on tennis courts from Wimbledon to John’s Island, Blackwill’s company, Tropical Tennis, makes bright, cheerful, tropical-motif women’s tennis wear, which she manufactures herself right here in Vero Beach. “You won’t find tennis clothes like this anywhere else,” said Blackwill, who moved to the area nine years ago with her family. A native Californian, Blackwill had always been athletic. She took up tennis at a friend’s urging and was immediately struck by the price of tennis apparel and the limited styles. A self-taught seamstress, she began making patterns and sourcing fabric. Now, the orders are pouring in from country clubs and tennis teams near and far, with pro shops along the Treasure Coast selling her line. Penelope’s on Ocean Drive carries some of her designs and her web site is getting bombarded with requests for customized matching uniforms. But Tropical Tennis was almost derailed before it even began. “Six years ago, I was diagnosed with stage 3-C breast cancer and was given a 40 percent chance of making it five years,” said the 52-year-old mother of two; April, 16, and Colby, 13. Blackwill credits the support of friends, neighbors and the parents of her children’s schoolmates, who “cooked and did whatever was necessary to help get me through the process,” she said. In the midst of the harrowing ordeal, which entailed a double mastectomy, chemo, radiation and even a hysterectomy, she put everything away, even her dream. Fortunately, she is now six years cancer free and her business is finally flourishing. The fabrics used in the Tropical Tennis line are moisture wicking and reminiscent of Blackwill’s extensive travels. One of her first jobs was a windsurfing and sailing instructor at Club Med, ideal for a single woman who wanted to see the world. She worked at clubs in Bora Bora, Mexico, Greece, Brazil and the West Indies, cultivating her people skills, which she said helped her to make

sales, and taking in the sights and sounds now reflected in the vibrant fabrics of Tropical Tennis. While Tropical Tennis does make some all-white apparel, bright floral and other island-themed patterns comprise the majority of her pieces. Many traditional tennis clubs still require allwhite tennis wear, which looks clean and doesn’t absorb the sun’s heat like darker colors. But with

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Vero designer scoring aces with her tennis apparel

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Tammy Blackwill of Tropical Tennis works on one of her many floral tennis outfits.


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on its courts for the first time at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. And, don’t be surprised if some of those outfits are Blackwill’s own designs, as people from around the globe vacation and play tennis in Vero Beach. “My business has spread solely by word of mouth,” said Blackwill, who has clients in France, Canada and England. Some of the women found

Tropical Tennis by accident on the web, while others became fans after seeing her designs worn by someone else. Currently, a national sports retailer is also interested in carrying her line. Blackwill researched athletic wear thoroughly before diving head first into the business, which is why her clothing literally almost never wears out. In certain circles, Blackwill’s reputation as a clothing designer pre-

ceded Tropical Tennis, as she had previously produced a children’s line, Maui Munchkins. When April was just a toddler, Blackwill taught herself to sew in order to dress her daughter in oneof-a-kind adorable outfits, which she sold at the Beached Whale. Now that Tropical Tennis has taken off, Blackwill doesn’t have time to focus on children’s clothes. As a one-woman enterprise, she makes all of the patterns, customizes sizes when necessary, cuts the fabrics, sews every last stitch with her signature flourishes, such as wavy

ribbon at the hem and the label that bears the company name. She also handles the mailings, sales presentations, and even the accounting. “I hope to have the problem where I can’t do it all,” she said. “I would love to have a little factory here in Vero Beach where we could manufacture the clothes and create new jobs in the community.” Locally, Tropical Tennis apparel is available at Penelope’s, Riverside Tennis Pro Shop, the Vero Beach Tennis Club, various private country clubs, and online at www.TropicalTennis.com.

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She uses a structured weight and nutrition management program that holds people accountable in combination with blood tests that provide information to create customized vitamins for each individual patient. “Very few people are able to get everything they need nutritionally,” she said of the supplements she recommends, explaining that stress, pollutants and busy lifestyles can dramatically diminish reserves of vitamins and minerals in the body. “The effects can be chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia and even coronary heart disease,” she said. Deborah Kaufman, MD, a gynecologist/obstetrician, is lecturing on the impact of stress on the thyroid and adrenal glands. “Cortisol is a hormone produced by the adrenal gland,” said Kaufman. “It is made to respond to acute stress, such as when attacked by a tiger. Man-made stress depletes cortisol reserves, causing adrenal fatigue.” To compensate, the body slows down the thyroid gland, making it look like it’s underactive. Although she makes nutritional recommendations to counter the effect of adrenal fatigue from

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wellbeing of a person. King’s “Stop Stressing” lecture “challenges the paradigm that stress is outside of you, something to avoid so as not to get sick,” she said. “Stress is not a noun, it’s a verb; it’s the way we respond to things in our life that are difficult but can’t be changed.” She explains that many programs teach stress relief and stress management using techniques such as exercise and avoidance. “But those things haven’t done anything to change how a person reacts or responds to stressful situations,” said King. Instead, she introduces a variety of activities – such as affirmations and emotional release techniques -- to help shift people’s beliefs and thoughts about stress, giving them a greater sense of control and, ultimately, inner peace. In another lecture, Melissa Dean, MD, an internal medicine physician who recently completed a second master’s degree in metabolic and nutritional medicine, discusses ways to balance hormones and metabolism in order to deal with type 2 diabetes and hypertension. “As obesity levels have increased, so has the occurrence of certain lifestyle-oriented diseases,” she said.

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From left to right: Marjorie Rodd, physical therapist; Deborah Kaufman, MD, obstetrics/gynecology; Angela King, acupuncture physician/doctor of oriental medicine; Melissa Dean, MD, internal medicine; Julie Cielo, yoga/massage therapy; Dawn Gordon, chiropractor.

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VERO BEACH -- As people begin to take responsibility for their own health, there is a greater demand than ever for information about the prevention and treatment of disease. But with doctors having only limited time to devote to each patient, and much of the information available on the internet highly suspect, where do people acquire the knowledge they need? The Women Leading Wellness conference is a one-day series of seminars and workshops designed to provide women with tools, resources and information about some of the most common health challenges. Led by a group of female physicians and health care professionals, the program emphasizes the inter-connectedness of the human body. “True health comes from integrating the mind, body and spirit,” said Angela King, a local acupuncture physician and doctor of oriental medicine who will be presenting at the forum. “You can’t just separate those things.” As one of the event founders, King recognized that conventional doctors rarely, if ever, discuss certain aspects of overall health, such as the role of spirituality. So she collaborated with a group of area healing practitioners who specialize in alternative modalities to address holistic care. Last year, the forum debuted at the Emerson Center to a sold out house of 175 attendees. This year, to accommodate a larger audience, the event is being held at the Richardson Center on Saturday, February 18, from 9 am to 3 pm. Tickets prices vary from $25 - $45, depending on early registration. A common theme through many of the presentations is the issue of stress and its domino-like effect on the physiological, mental and emotional

stress, Kaufman emphasizes positive thinking. “Stressful thinking takes a toll on your body,” she said. Kaufman will also touch on natural hormone replacement therapy for women entering menopause. The idea that stress is in the mind is the basis for Julie Cielo’s discussion on mindfulness, “the practice of seeing things as they are, not as we want them to be,” she said. A yoga therapist and massage therapist, Cielo’s portion of the program is interactive, teaching breathing, meditation, and applying mindfulness to every activity. For those who would like something a bit more conventional when it comes dealing with pain, chiropractor Dawn Gordon discusses “optimal living through nutrition, exercise and chiropractic care.” Gordon was a gymnast, dancer and cheerleader at Florida State University, but remained injury free by having regular chiropractic adjustments. She will also teach how to maintain a healthy body weight by “appropriately combining foods and combining exercises to increase metabolism,” she said. Marjorie Rodd, a physical therapist specializing in spine and neck issues, focuses on simple daily tools and basic principles for a healthy back devoid of pain. In addition, acupuncture is more fully explored by Jessica Pesha and Stephanie Buttaccio, both of whom are acupuncture physicians and doctors of Oriental medicine in Vero Beach. The conference also includes a seminar on financial health, conducted by Pam Doughty and Annette Miller. To purchase tickets or for more information, call (772) 564-8383 or register now online at www.WomenLeadingWellness.com.

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Wellness program to focus on women’s health


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Dining Mimmo’s Scampi Grill, comfort is the main ingredient BY MARK JOSEPH

Tucked away behind a multiuse building near downtown Vero Beach and almost hidden from view, is Mimmo’s Scampi Grill. A neon sign over a doorway at the corner of 11th Avenue and US 1 is the only clue pointing you to this little Italian gem. Entering the modest rear entrance to the end of a long narrow hallway, we were greeted by “Mimmo” the chef-owner, a cheerful white-haired gentleman who welcomed us as if we were old friends. As we took our seats we were awed by the small, colorful, eclectic, yet artistically done dining room that felt more like a grandmother’s house in a quaint Italian village. A very friendly server soon appeared bringing water and asking about drinks. After listening to her lively descriptions of spirits, one unusual offering was an Italian beer, a LaRosa, which is a dark ale with a nutty flavor. After such a tempting choice, we skipped the wine list and decided on the Italian beer. The bottled ale delivered and poured into glass mugs was indeed dark and bold and a very nice way to begin our meal. The owner of Mimmo’s Scampi Grill is Chef Domenico “Mimmo” Amelio. Mimmo came to the US in 1966 from Naples, Italy and after working in restaurants in New York and New Jersey, he eventually settled in Vero Beach. In addition to the Scampi Grill which he opened 12 years ago, Mimmo has also been involved in the creation of menus for restaurants owned by family members, including the recently reviewed Pomodoro Grill and the Bella Napoli which are also located in Vero Beach. In addition, Chef Mimmo and

his family also offer a “Chef’s School” where aspiring cooks can learn the true art of cooking, from simple to complex dishes, as taught by Mimmo and his family. The featured appetizer for the evening was a bruschetta, though we soon discovered it was not in the traditional style of flat bread served in most Italian eateries. When the bruschetta arrived, it was far from the typical thin crusty bread and chopped tomatoes. This version started with thick cut slices of Italian bread topped with a generous amount of gently roasted cauliflower, caramelized onions and chunks of tangy goat cheese in garlic infused olive oil. The vegetables and cheese were literally spilling off the tall slices of bread and a fork was definitely required. We were experiencing bruschetta to the max! An additional appetizer chosen was the shrimp scampi, the restaurants namesake. The scampi was also a bit different than usual fare. Grilled perfectly, this scampi was served with field greens in a buttery, lemony garlic sauce. The tailless shrimp were tender with a rich coating of garlic and lemon. The bed of field greens soaked up the garlic sauce nicely to provide a natural dressing for the salad. Our server explained that all entrees included a side order of pasta and a dinner salad; a pleasant and welcome surprise for those that are looking to add pasta to their entree without having to order it as an extra side dish. Another nice touch was the ability to substitute the dinner salad with one of the larger menu salads, for a small ‘upcharge’. After hearing the choices, we both chose to upgrade to a blueberry apple salad and a Caprese salad that included homemade mozzarella. The blueberry salad was a meal unto itself; a large plate of greens with plenty of plump reconstituted blueberries, slices of fresh Fuji apples, candied

walnuts and gorgonzola cheese, all in a light vinaigrette sauce. The contrast of flavors between the tartness of the berries and vinaigrette paired well with the candied walnuts and cheese. This large salad with the excellent bruschetta appetizer we enjoyed would have easily satisfied a hearty appetite. The Caprese salad included slices of firm homemade mozzarella with a bit of oil. However, the presentation was disappointing, especially compared to that of the blueberry salad. The two single slices of tomato included with the mozzarella were a bit past their prime and probably should have been used in a sauce instead. The few wilted pieces of lettuce also did nothing for this dish. The entree choices included several selections each of pasta, as well as chicken and veal dishes, though fresh seafood seemed to be the theme of this aptly named Italian restaurant. Several fresh fish selections included two nightly offerings of grouper: I opted for the grouper Oscar that included crab meat, asparagus spears and a side of angel hair pasta. The dish was large and plentiful with a generous portion of grouper, pasta and finished in a white wine cream and lemon-garlic sauce. The grouper and crab were good, although the taste and texture of the fish seemed slightly lost in the mix of pasta and lemon garlic sauce. Overall the dish was still a satisfying comfort food. My companion ordered the lemon chicken, which was a homey portion of fresh chicken breast, pounded till tender and sautéed in a creamy, lemon garlic sauce. Again garlic and lemon were the star flavors here. Even though the portion was large, the last bite still left us wanting more. The sweetness of the cream sauce and the tartness of the lemon, complemented this perfectly cooked chicken and pasta well. It was simply superb and yet another comfort food dish.

The dessert menu was an abundance of Italian favorites, including traditional tiramisu, and something different fried Italian empanadas. The tiramisu, an Italian staple, was simple in taste and equally simple in presentation yet still very good. An ample amount of whipped cream complemented the coffee-laced lady fingers and mascarpone cheese. The Italian empanadas were deep fried, flaky little pillows of heaven! Stuffed with the rich flavor of nutella, the empanadas came with a generous helping of berry compote and then drizzled with chocolate sauce and topped with a dollop of crème fraiche. The tart berries, mixed with the sweet chocolate sauce blended very well with the flaky empanadas. The desserts were the ultimate comfort treat and a fabulous way to end the ultimate comfort meal. We look forward to another trip to grandmother’s house soon! $75 before tip $20 beer / wine

Mimmo’s

Scampi Grill

Restaurant with beer and wine 2054 11th Ave., Vero Beach FL 32960 772-563-9766 Hours: Monday through Saturday, 5-10 p.m. Open Sundays during season only. Most major credit cards. Reservations strongly suggested especially on the weekends Catering & gift certificates available.


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Obituaries Francis Kaczka Francis Braun Kaczka, 50, died Jan. 20, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in McKeesport, Pa., coming to Vero Beach in 1989 from Hawaii. He served in the Marine Corps. He was a personal trainer for the Indrio Gym and Fitness Center in Fort Pierce and Gold’s Gym in Waikiki, Hawaii. He was a member of the Vero Masonic Lodge and of the Baha’i faith. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Spinal Injury Association, Shepherd Center, 2020 Peachtree Road N.W., Atlanta, GA 30309. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Avis Northrup-Vanik Avis Northrup-Vanik, 93, died Jan. 16, 2012, at the VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. She was born in Bradford, Pa., coming to Vero Beach in 1960 from Jersey Shore, Pa. Before retiring, she worked for the Indian River County School Board, first as the receptionist before becoming the executive secretary for several department heads. She was a member of First Presbyterian Church of Vero Beach where she served as a deacon and was a part of the choir. She was a member of the Indian River Medical Center Auxiliary (Pink Ladies), a member of the Vero Beach Country Club and the School Board Lunch Bunch Retirees. Survivors include her daughter, Patti Voyles of Vero Beach; sister, Marcia White of Gaithersburg, Md.; stepdaughter, Nancy Baker of Fort Collins, Colo.; stepson, Bill Vanik of Sarasota; two grandchildren; four step-grandchildren; and four step-great-grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Percy Pagan Percy Pagan, 87, died Dec. 29, 2011, at Fort Pierce Health Care. She was born in Puerto Rico and lived in Vero Beach for more than 50 years, coming from Puerto Rico. Before retiring, she was a warehouse worker in

the floral industry. She attended the Church of God. A guestbook is available at www.aycockfuneralhome.net.

Adrienne Reiszel Adrienne Reiszel, 77, died Jan. 7, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center, Fort Pierce. She was born in Queens, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 14 years, coming from Huntington Station, N.Y. Before retirement, she was a customer service representative for Estee Lauder in Millville, N.Y. She was a member of St. John of the Cross Catholic Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include her husband, John Reiszel of Vero Beach; daughters, Cindy Jordan of Stamford, Conn., Karon Forney of Biloxi, Miss., Joan Cerrone of Harris, N.Y., and Janice Gentile of Forestburgh, N.Y.; sons, Paul Reiszel of Lexington, N.C., and John Reiszel Jr. of Holbrook, N.Y.; sister, Marion Thompson of Connecticut; 13 grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Vero Beach, P.O. Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961.

Fletcher Winston Somers Fletcher Winston “Winny” Somers (Pooh Bear), a lifetime Richmond native who loved his summers in Deltaville and winters in Vero Beach, passed away on January 13, after 82 years of a very full life. He is survived by his two daughters, Lynda Donahue (JD), Judy Allen (Todd), grandchildren, Juli Cruciotti (Josh), Davis Allen (Lindsey) and two great granddaughters, Sadie and Anna, There will be no public service at his request.

Edward Rowe Edward D. Rowe, 89, died Jan. 4, 2012, at the Indian River Medical Center. He was born in Lowell, Mass., coming to Vero Beach in 2007 from Fort Lauderdale. Before retiring in 1986, he worked as an electrician. He served in the Navy during World War II. He was a member of King’s Baptist Church in Vero Beach. Survivors

include his wife of 66 years, Edna S. Troutman Rowe of Vero Beach; and sons, Edward Rowe of Vero Beach, David Rowe of Langhorne, Penn., and James Rowe of Visalia, Calif. Memorial contributions may be made to the National Parkinson’s Foundation Inc., 1501 N.W. Ninth Ave./Bob Hope Road, Miami, FL 33136-1494. A guestbook is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Jackie Stephens Jackie Dale Stephens, 58, died Jan. 18, 2012, at VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. He was born in Mendota, Calif., and lived in Vero Beach since 2011, coming from Springville, Calif. Survivors include his sisters, Curly Long of Vero Beach, Rita Lowe of Springville and Caroline Loop of California. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

JoRita O’Brien JoRita O’Brien died Jan. 3, 2012, at her home. She was born in Baltimore and had lived in Florida since 1991, the past three years in Vero Beach. She was an artist and a mother. Survivors include her sons, David Shawn O’Brien of Fort Lauderdale, Andrew Keith O’Brien of Houston and Wayne O’Brien of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; and daughter, Tracey Jo O’Brien of Peoria, Ill.

Juanita N. Allen Juanita N. Allen, 96, died Jan. 24, 2012, at the Royal Palm Convalescent Home. She was born in Concord and lived in Vero Beach since 1919. She was a homemaker. She attended the 20th Avenue First Church of God, Vero Beach. Survivors include her son, Bobby Allen of Vero Beach; five grandchildren; and five greatgrandchildren. A guestbook at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Beverly Aaron Beverly Aaron, 81, died Jan. 22, 2012, at her home. She was born in Chester, W.Va., and lived in Vero

Beach for the past 23 years, coming from Chester. She was a homemaker. She was a member of the Vero Beach Bridge Club. She also was a member of St. Helen Catholic Church. Survivors include her husband of 61 years, Donald Aaron of Vero Beach; daughters, Kelly Reabe of Windermere and Christine Laughlin of Chester; and son, Richard Aaron of Vero Beach. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA Hospice, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.aycock-hillcrest.com.

Sylvia Carlene Arnold Sylvia Carlene Arnold, 74, died Jan. 22, 2012, at her home. She was a lifetime resident of Roseland. Survivors include her daughter, Patricia Guinan of Soddy Daisy, Tenn.; and one grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Judy Bleau Judy Bleau, 85, died Jan. 22, 2012. She was born in Montreal, and lived in Vero Beach at Ranchland Park from the late 1970s. She moved back to Toronto in 2007. Survivors include her children, Gerry and Larry; and three grandchildren.

Josephine S. Cappello Josephine S. Cappello, 89, died Jan. 24, 2012, at the VNA Hospice House. She was born in Paterson, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach since 2006, coming from New Jersey. She was a homemaker. She was of the Catholic faith. Survivors include her daughter, Lena Tumino of Manchester, N.J.; sons, John Cappello of Wanaque, N.J., George Cappello of West Jordan, Utah; 11 grandchildren; and 19 great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.


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Theodore Hoppe, III, 85, died Jan. 19 at Indian River Medical Center. He and his wife, Raleighine moved from Houston, to retire in Grand Harbor. For over three decades Mr. Hoppe was a sales executive for General Motors Corporation; including positions in Washington DC, New York City and

Mary Cecile Peale, 93, died Jan. 22, 2012, at the Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. She was born in Charleston, S.C., and moved to Vero Beach in 2009, coming from St. Petersburg. Prior to her retirement, she had worked as a registered nurse for the Veterans Administration in St. Petersburg and had done private duty nursing in the St. Petersburg area. She was of the Catholic faith. Survivors include her son, Bill Peale of Micco; sister, Rosemary Singleton of Conway, S.C.; brothers, John and Phillip Kennedy, both of Charleston, S.C.; three grandchildren; and a great-grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of one’s choice. A guestbook is available at www. seawindsfh.com/obituaries.php.

Stephanie M. Reese Stephanie M. Reese, 43, died Jan. 18, 2012. She was born in Vero Beach and was a lifetime resident of Indian River County. She attended the World of Fire Church of Vero Beach. Survivors include her husband, Ron-

Pauline A. Starr Pauline A. Starr, 91, died Jan. 24, 2012, at the Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in the Bronx, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 22 years, coming from Lunenburg, Mass. She was a member of St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, Fort Pierce. She was a longtime member of the Ladies Auxiliary of Indian River Medical Center, having volunteered more than 15,000 hours. Survivors include her sons, C. Dennis Starr and Rick Starr, both of Vero Beach, Arthur L. Starr of Lyman, Maine, Peter G. Starr of Biddeford, Maine, and George Starr Jr. of Saco, Maine; seven grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, 2525 25th St., Fort Pierce, FL, 34981. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

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Theodore Hoppe III

Mary Peale

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Barbara S. Herron, 60, died Jan. 23, 2012, at Kindred Hospital-Melbourne in Melbourne. He was born in Danville, Ill., and lived in Vero Beach

Ethel M. McCollum, 94, died Jan. 21, 2012, at Atlantic Healthcare Center, Vero Beach. She was a lifetime resident of the Vero Beach area. She was employed for many years as a waitress and bartender at the Ocean Grill, the Barrett Steak House, Vero Beach and several citrus packinghouses in the Vero Beach area. She was a former member of Trinity Episcopal Church, Vero Beach and the Order of Eastern Star in Sebastian. Survivors include her sons, Danny Knight of Rome, Ga., Jerry Knight of Roseland; brother, Rufus McClellan of Lawrenceville, Ga.; sisters, Louise Ercolin of Reno, Nev., Carolyn Perry of Lawrenceville; nine grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Robert J. Smith, 90, died Jan. 23, 2012, at the VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. He was born in Milford, Neb., and lived in Vero Beach for 10 years, coming from Illinois. Before retirement, he worked as a television broadcaster. He served in the Marine Corps. Survivors include his daughters, Sallie Hyatt of Vero Beach and Connie Johnson of South Bend, Ind.; and two grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to H.A.L.O. Animal Rescue, 710 Jackson St., Sebastian, FL 32958. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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Barbara S. Herron

Ethel McCollum

Robert J. Smith

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John M. Finnigan, 87, died Jan. 22, 2012, at the Isles of Vero in Vero Beach. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and lived in Spanish Lakes in Fort Pierce for 25 years, and five years at the Isles of Vero. Before his retirement, he worked as a supervisor for the New York Telephone Co. He served in the Army during World War II. He was a member of the New York Telephone Pioneers and the Italian-American Club of Vero Beach. Survivors include his sons, Jack Finnigan of Coram, N.Y., Kevin Finnigan of Fire Island, N.Y., Mark Finnigan of Lancaster, Pa., and Bob Baber of West Virginia; daughters, Ellen Donnelly of Jamesport, N.Y., Number Four of Long Island, N.Y., Sheila Sweeney of East Rockaway, N.Y., and Jill Peterson of Colorado; and nine grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Skin Cancer Foundation, 149 Madison Ave., Suite 901, New York, NY 10016. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

ald Reese of Vero Beach; sons, Willie Shelly and Bobby Shelly, both of Vero Beach; mother, Delores Green Thomas of Vero Beach; father, Robert Thomas Sr. and stepmother, Renell Thomas of Vero Beach; brothers, Michael Thomas and Kelvin Thomas, both of Vero Beach, Robert Thomas Jr. and Ronald Chambliss, both of Gifford; sister, Natalie Thomas of New York; and three grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www. stonebrothersfuneralhome.com.

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John M. Finnigan

Houston. Mr. Hoppe served as Commodore of The Stony Brook Yacht Club in Stony Brook, NY. He was a member of the Grand Harbor Golf & Beach Club, and served as chairman of the advisory committee there. He was also a member of the “Grady Bunch” Boat Club. Mr. Hoppe was an avid boater, golfer and family man. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Raleighine; their three daughters and their sons-in law Tracey and Louis Statzer of Washington DC and Nantucket, MA, Layne and Norman Uddstrom of Pittsburgh, PA and Kimberly Hoppe of Aliso Viejo, CA; sister Ruth Nichols of Edison, NJ; nephew Marc Menkemeller of Dallas; surrogate son Clayton Fischer; four grandchildren, Lily Statzer, Chad Uddstrom, Sarah Uddstrom and Abby Uddstrom. Memorial contributions may be made to the Hibiscus Children’s Center at 696 8th Court, Vero Beach, FL 32962. Online condolences may be sent at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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for 28 years, coming from Chesterton, Ind. She was employed by QVC of Port St. Lucie as a home representative for eight years. She was a member of Girl Scouts of America and was a troop leader in Vero Beach for more than 20 years. Survivors include her husband of 30 years, John E. “Big John” Herron of Vero Beach; sons, Curtis J. Huff Jr. and John C. Huff, both of Vero Beach; daughter, Connie J. McCord of Vero Beach; parents, Marvin and Dorothy Williams of Logansport, Ind.; brothers, Butch Williams of Twelve Mile, Ind., and Tom Williams and John Williams, both of Logansport; sister, Robin Collier of Tulsa, Okla.; and 11 grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to What A Cause Fund at any Bank of America. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

F E B R U A R Y

Sally J. Decker Sally J. Decker, 59, died Jan. 24, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Indianapolis and lived in Vero Beach since 2010, coming from, Leesburg. Before her retirement, she worked for GE in Bloomington, Ind. She was of the Christian faith. Survivors include her mother, Norma Decker of Vero Beach. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Diabetes Association, 1701 N. Beauregard St., Alexandria, VA 22311. Services: Out-of-town arrangements are by Jenkins, Lester and Sons Funeral Home, Bloomfield, Ind. Burial will be in Switz City Cemetery, Switz City, Ind. Local arrangements are by CoxGifford-Seawinds Funeral Home, Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.


HOME OF THE WEEK

Palm Coast Development at River Club presents its Somerset model

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As you enter Palm Coast Development’s newest model, the Somerset in River Club Vero Beach, you immediately sense its warmth, elegance and bounty of well-constructed details. The Somerset, decorated by Decors by Jacqueline, which has also furnished the models of the beautiful Ocean Park, is built by Palm Coast, the exclusive builder of the new River Club and the builder of Ocean Park. Husband and wife team Bob and Jackie McNally own both design/ build companies. “We love what we do and strive to create spaces

that people can really enjoy and call home, “said Jackie. The Somerset reflects their passion and dedication. In the Somerset, direct views from the entrance to the gorgeous backyard create a sense of endless space while reflecting the beautiful landscape and lanai. It feels as if there is a second living room with cypress ceiling as well as a significant dining area, full outdoor cooking area and a private pool bath. The interior living room features a high, inverted hip ceiling and a masonry fireplace with beautiful man-

tle, built-in shelving, and remarkable millwork detailing. Jackie selected a thoughtful combination of subtle greens, grass cloth for the wood laden den, even raspberry in the separate dining room, which all complement the home seamlessly. The spacious kitchen/ family room features a generous kitchen work area, professional appliances, and hand-rubbed finishes on the cabinets as well as a separate butler’s pantry. While the kitchen opens to the family room each space seems integral to the next

The large master bedroom was designed to reflect the client’s wish for a nicely separated space from the rest of the home. Generous in size, the angled bay window sitting area overlooks the magnificent backyard. The closets are huge and the master bath features all the same unsurpassed attention to detail as the rest of the home. The Somerset is one of two models presented at the River Club which was purchased and has been significantly re-vitalized by Ironshore Capital LLC. Contact Peter Orrick 772-480-6370 for more information.


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Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – January 19-January 25

Address 2285 St. Christopher Ln. 906 Tulip Ln. 825 Island Club Sq. 1026 Flamevine Ln., #102 4450 Highway A1A 1776 Seagrove Dr. 5151 Highway A1A, #507

Subdivision St. Chris Beach Pelican Cove Island Club of Vero Spindrift Condo Ocean Club Seagrove Vera Cruz Condo

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1800 Cutlass Cove Dr. Moorings 11/1/2011 $1,100,000 1/20/2012 $1,100,000 The Moorings Realty Sales Co. Judy Hargarten The Moorings Realty Sales Co. Erika Ross

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

4800 Highway A1A, #415 Seaquay Condo 2/4/2009 $545,000 1/23/2012 $545,000 Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl Realty Claudia Pascal Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Diane De Francisci

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

920 River Tr. Indian Trails 12/20/2011 $499,000 1/19/2012 $487,500 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Scott Reynolds Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Karen Burke

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

725 Gayfeather Ln. Woodhaven Manor 6/24/2011 $499,000 1/25/2012 $475,000 Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Roger Smith Norris & Company Gretchen Hanson

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

5536 Highway A1A, #117 La Mer Condo 4/21/2010 $439,000 1/23/2012 $400,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Christine Hughes Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Christine Hughes

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1120 Leeward Ln. Castaway Cove 12/27/2011 $379,000 1/19/2012 $372,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Scott Reynolds Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Scott Reynolds

List Date 5/1/2011 11/17/2011 11/22/2011 12/1/2010 1/3/2012 4/4/2011 11/29/2011

List Price $390,000 $293,600 $349,000 $350,000 $285,000 $320,000 $169,000

Sell Date 1/25/2012 1/25/2012 1/24/2012 1/24/2012 1/23/2012 1/20/2012 1/25/2012

Sell Price $350,000 $339,000 $330,000 $300,000 $285,000 $275,500 $162,000

Listing Broker/Agent Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt SEB/Louise Muller Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Helen Ederer Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Lange Sykes Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Christine Hughes Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Diane De Francisci Palm Pointe Realty/Cheryl Gerstner Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Karen Smith

Selling Broker/Agent Norris & Company/Rosanne Roberson Peters, Carlton & Mugford, RE/Kristin Casalino Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Lange Sykes Premier Estate Properties/Kay Brown Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl Realty/Claudia Pascal Palm Pointe Realty/Cheryl Gerstner Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Beverly Cambron

Mainland Real Estate Sales – January 19-January 25

Address 6160 56th Ave. 12420 Roseland Rd.

Subdivision Eagle Trace Fleming Grant

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

5340 Harbor Island Ct. Harbor Isle at Grand Harbor 12/16/2011 $598,000 1/20/2012 $525,000 Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Diane De Francisci Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Diane De Francisci

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1670 Stonewall Dr. Old Savannah 7/15/2011 $399,000 1/20/2012 $368,000 Waterman Real Estate Inc. Andy Jansky Realty Connection Rosemarie Wilson

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1246 River Reach Dr. Riverwind 11/9/2011 $379,900 1/20/2012 $330,000 Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB Margo Sudnykovych Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl Rlty Yane Zana

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1196 Riverwind Cir. Riverwind 3/21/2011 $379,000 1/20/2012 $330,000 Norris & Company Cheryl Burge Norris & Company Cheryl Burge

List Date 5/3/2011 8/1/2011

List Price $274,900 $249,900

Sell Date 1/19/2012 1/25/2012

Sell Price Listing Broker/Agent $250,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Scott Reynolds $230,000 RE/MAX Crown Realty/John King Jr

Selling Broker/Agent Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Scott Reynolds RE/MAX Crown Realty/John King Jr


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Top Chefs battle, qualify for Pointe West finale BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The Homeless Family Center’s Top Chef Qualifying Event was a foodie’s paradise Monday evening at the Elk’s Lodge. As ten chefs vied for four final spots on the dinner menu and three chefs looked for a final dessert win, almost 300 hungry guests tasted their way

Chefs participating at the qualifying event were the prelude to the final Top Chef Challenge to be held on Feb. 27 at The Club at Pointe West. The four entree finalists were Pipa Movida’s Chef Jay Herman; Osceola Bistro’s Chef Chris Bireley; The Tide’s Chef Leanne Kelleher and Hale Groves River Market’s Chef Chad Darwent.

late, Gina Battle, took home the dessert prize and won the honor of serving a confection at the final event. Her entry of Belgian Chocolate Spiced Soup, Vanilla Cream with a Caramel Drizzle wowed the crowd and garnered the votes to put her on top. Carnival Confections Chef Sean Pierce challenged with an assortment of fruit topped cheesecakes and a

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PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Chair Neda Heeter (left) with Top Chef Qualifying Homeless Family Center volunteers through the room of delicacies.

win, we will take solace in eating the leftovers,” said Pierce before the tastings, “but it is all for a good cause.” Winning items included The Tides’ slow roasted pulled pork with creamy cheddar grits, Pipa Movida’s smoked salmon in a savory black sesame seed cone; Hale Grove’s walnut oil poached beef tenderloin with serrano ham and roasted New York strip with truffle demi-glace, southern style grits and roasted asparagus by Bireley of Osceola Bistro. The participating chefs were all happy so many people came out for the benefit and were also able to sample their food, some of them for the first time. “The seafood paella was so good,” said Molly Pratt, “it’s nice to try the foods from new places. I have not been to La Bodeguita de Vero yet but I will now.” Homeless Family Center’s Director Lorne Coyle was impressed by the turnout. “I have not tried the food yet because it is ‘family hold-back time,’ so we can be sure everyone who paid get to eat,” he said, “but I will, if there is anything left. It is so fantastic to get this kind of a response.” You must have advance reservations for the main event, call 772-567-5537 ext. 326 to make arrangements.

Owner of Faith, Hope, and Choco- jeweled treasure theme. “If we don’t Humane Society Pets Of The Week

Hamlet

Topper

Neeko

Big Milo

Oreo

Callie

1 Year Old Pointer Mix Male

Unknown Cockatiel Unknown

7 1/2 Years Old Domestic Shorthair Male

12 Years Old Domestic Shorthair Male

7 Years Old Cocker Spaniel Mix Female

3 Years Old Domestic Shorthair Female

These and other animals are available for adoption at the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County located at 6230 77th Street. For directions and information call (772)388-3331

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Vero Beach News Weekly  

Vero Beach News Weekly

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Vero Beach News Weekly

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