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and they wanted the cheaper rates afforded by Florida Power and Light. “I went to approximately 1,000 doors around town,” he said. “The vast majority of the people in the City of Vero Beach wanted us to sell the electric utility. I put more store in having talked to the people of the city. There were roughly about 20 percent that didn’t want to sell for one reason or another.” He understands his marching orders, sell the utility to the most likely buyer and that is FPL. However, he also wants to make the best deal for the city to keep his platform plank

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VERO BEACH -- As the newest member of the Vero Beach City Council, Dick Winger has been hard at work learning about the Sunshine Law and the ins and outs of conducting the people’s business in the sometimes politically-charged council chamber. It is a new way of conducting business for the 73-year-old consultant who has a track record according to his resume of turning around failing or inefficient multi-million dollar operations into profitable companies. In this case, he is not necessar-

ily squeezing every last dollar out of a deal, but making sure that the will of the voters has been implemented. “I don’t think there was a mandate for me, I received just a hair over 50 percent of the votes,” Winger said. “I don’t think a 50 percent voter approval rating is much of a mandate. What I ran on was keeping Vero, Vero. Keeping our lifestyle and the level of services we have. The other thing was contributing to the best financial decisions we can make.” What he heard on the campaign trail ahead of last November’s election was the people thought their city-run electric rates were too high

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BY IAN LOVE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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He says voters made that clear, what is less clear is how to make that happen

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Dick Winger: Mandate is to sell to FPL


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WINGER

where about the middle. “Everything I have looked at says we should get closer to $150 million,” he said. “Florida Power and of keeping Vero, Vero with its smallLight wants to make the best deal town feel and world-class offerings. they can and I don’t blame them. But “I will tell you that anyone sitI think they are in the range of $25 ting on the City Council is expected million low. Florida Power and Light to move forward with a sale of the has never documented their figure electric utility as long as it is a viable from what I have seen. They have proposition for the citizens,” Winger never showed us the calculation.” said. “I am concerned right now that Winger’s calculations involve I don’t know if it is viable. It is not figuring opportunity costs and a that I necessarily think that is isn’t, I host of other details that are open just don’t know.” for argument as to their accuracy. It is from that vantage point that Whether he is right or wrong in his the first-term councilman has been assumptions would involve the two judged by some to be against making sides sitting down and doing some a deal with FPL or at least standing in the way of progress. Winger has STAFF PHOTO hard bargaining. He is among the been studying in detail the sale of Dick Winger noted at the time of his election that the people wanted to sell only council members to state publicly that the $130 million figure put Vero Electric since being appointed Vero electric to FPL. forth by FPL is low. to the Finance Commission by now “I don’t think anyone expects to Mayor Pilar Turner. One leg is the sale price. FPL has the transmission system for a total He has likened the sale of the pow- laid out a plan where it would pay the company estimates would cost get $184.9 million,” he said. “And let me say I don’t blame them for offerer plant to three legs on a stool, all of $100 million for the assets, $17 mil- around $130 million. which must hold up if the sale is to lion to cover unfunded pension liThe second leg consists of all the ing less than the utility is worth. But make sense as a “viable proposition.” abilities and other improvements to existing contracts the city must get it is incumbent upon Vero Beach to out of with agencies such as the Or- get the best price and at this point lando Utility Commission and the I am concerned that it will. If Vero Florida Municipal Power Agency. Beach is to remain financially viThose contracts are complex on a able as an independent municipality, number of levels and there are some it will need leaders who take credit estimates that it could take two years for more than turning the electric system over to a larger public utility to complete. “Comprehensive Care, The third leg involves beginning that can operate it more efficiently.” Uncompromising Service” As for the second piece of the neto consider decreases in the curCALL NOW gotiations -- getting the city out of rent $20 million General Fund that FOR OUR $97 NEW a sale would create. Right now the its existing contracts -- it has been PATIENT SPECIAL! city transfers approximately $5.4 documented how complex and difmillion into the General Fund from ficult those discussions will be. The 0% INTEREST FINANCING AVAILABLE electric utility revenues to, among City’s transactional attorney, RichDon’t let fear of the dentist keep you from achieving your dental other things, keep the city’s property ard Miller of Edwards Wildman goals. At Beachside Dental we are pleased to offer the latest in taxes among the lowest in the state. Palmer LLP of West Palm Beach, Winger is anxious to begin council has estimated it could take up to two IV CONSCIOUS SEDATION during your dental treatment. Find discussions about where the city years to complete those discussions. comfort that goes beyond a “pill”. Just the same, the council is pushmight cut back on resources should it lose about one-fifth of the money ing the city to reach an agreement Ask us about our services with FPL that would then be filled going into the General Fund. • IV SEDATION • EMERGENCY CARE Winger has done his own analysis with contingencies so either side • Veneers • Crowns and Bridges on the sale price and thinks FPL’s in- could get out of the deal should the • Cosmetic Dentistry • Children’s Dentistry itial statements about what it would cost of settling prove too onerous for • Dental Implants • Extractions pay the city (they have not officially either side. While those “big” ques• In-office Whitening • Denture Repair made a bid to Vero Beach) is about tions remain unanswered, the two • Root Canals • TMD & Chronic Pain $25 million below his calculations. sides are doing some of the necesMatthew J. Henry, DDS The city’s own consultant, GAI, has sary work that will also be part of placed a value of $184.9 million, so any deal. 772-234-5353 | www.beachsidedental.com | 5070 N A1A, Winger’s estimate comes in someCONTINUES ON PAGE 6 Indian River Shores, In the Oak Point Building next to CVS FROM PAGE 3


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WINGER FROM PAGE 4

“They are focusing on the details of the sale, like what the terms of the lease of the land are going to be, whether or not there will be a service office in Vero Beach, what is covered under the unfunded pension, what employees they are going to take. There are many issues in there that have to be dealt with,” Winger said.

Just the same, until those costs have been worked out, Winger is not in favor of a contract full of contingencies. “I see no value in a contingent contract,” he said. “The argument will be made that it moves the process along, but I don’t know if it really does if you don’t know what you owe. What you get to is I don’t see how FPL and Vero Beach get to any useful place without knowing the

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consequences of the second leg of the stool.” The final piece of the puzzle does not involve attorneys and complex contract negotiations. It does involve, however, the City Council beginning to take a hard look at the budget minus the electric fund transfer. To Winger’s way of thinking, property taxes have been kept low because of the yearly transfer and there is likely to be an increase in property taxes at least to partially offset the loss. “There is a practical limit to the viability of a town and how high the city taxes are,” he noted. “I have difficulty if we were to try to cover the $5 million shortfall by doubling the ad valorem taxes from 2.04 to 4.08. This town is not going to accept a number with a 3 or a 4 in front of it.” The fix clearly cannot come completely from raising taxes, but what cuts will the council be willing to make to balance the budget? “I think from looking at the city organizational chart we have too many levels of management and way too many sub-departments,” Winger said. “From talking to people, they expect some reduction in the size of the city, but they don’t want things that are going to hurt. For instance, they want lifeguards, they want Leisure Square, they want police patrols. I think there is a fair amount that can be done over the next few years that can make the city efficient and cost less to run. “I also think that when you get to the revenue side there are some things that can be done. For instance, there are revenue producers we can look into, taking programs we have and looking for donor help. Revenue is not limited to just raising taxes, there are other ways that revenue can be generated,” he said. Winger is keen to begin discussions on this as he ran on retaining the quality of life that makes Vero Beach a special place to him. “We haven’t gone for sprawl, we haven’t gone for maximum density,

we continue to do everything possible to make this a special place,” he said. “We have a tree beautification commission, we re-paint signs, we are concerned about the quality of life, not just for Vero Beach but for Indian River County.” The Council voted at its Jan. 3 meeting to gather in early March to begin to discuss some of these budget issues. As the newest member on the council, one of the frustrations Winger has had to deal with are the limitations the Sunshine Law brings to these complex negotiations. The only time he can discuss these issues with council members to bounce off ideas and reach a consensus is during scheduled public meetings. “The Sunshine Law is a real negative in trying to negotiate the sale of a $100 million-plus asset,” he said. “But it does serve the people well in day-to-day issues.” He also knows for all the complexities and possible land mines in the way of the deal, if the two sides want to reach an accord, it can be done. “I have been involved in 12 turnarounds,” he said. “What we are doing now is what I have been doing all my life, but without the Sunshine Law. They don’t always turn out like you think they will, but sometimes they turn out better.”


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• Nine out of ten adults residing both in Indian River County and zip code 32963 read the Indian River Press Journal either in print or online each week. • The number of Indian River County adults reading the Press Journal, in print or online each week, grew by 3% (or 2,400 more adults) since last year. • The Vero Beach Newsweekly reaches every home on the barrier island, plus communities such as Vero Isles, River Wind, Oak Harbor, Grand Harbor, Vero Beach Country Club, Indian River Country Club, Pointe West and Bent Pine. Source: Scarborough Research, 2011.

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Beachside businesses say they are booming BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

If fourth quarter sales on the island are any indication of what the new year has in store, we may be well on our way to economic recovery. From real estate to restaurants, hotels to jewelry stores, many businesses are seeing increases in revenue of up to 30 percent over last year. “We’re going gangbusters,” said Al Benkert, owner of Vero Beachside Sales-Rentals, who noted things started picking up in real estate home sales and rentals late November. “This will probably be our best year,” said Benkert, who opened his business in 2004. Last December (2010), he sent out 2,000 postcards declaring real estate had hit rock bottom. “People realize this is an opportunity to live on the island,” he said, attributing the increase in sales to northerners fed up with the severe cold of the past few winters. “Prices are down… but they’re going up.” Condo sales, he said, are still weak. Benkert, who is also vice-president of the Oceanside Business Association, indicated that the retailers he regularly speaks to say business is definitely better than last year. “Sales are significantly up over last year,” said Monica Smiley, sales and marketing director for Costa d’Este Resort Beach Resort, who anticipates a strong first quarter showing as well. The hotel had a 90 percent occupancy rate for the week between Christmas and New Year, and was sold out for the year end festivities. “We’re pacing ahead of forecasts in both group and leisure segments,” said Smiley, explaining that the hotel gives incentives of 25 percent off room rates for booking reservations early. Beachfront properties customarily have a shorter lead time, said Smiley, who draws on a market of people living within a three-hour-drive of the hotel. “People aren’t really planning vaca-

STAFF PHOTO

Kitty Wagner opened the Blue Star Wine Bar on Bougainvillea Lane this past December. tions. They’re saying, ‘I have to get away.’” The matrimonial business at the hotel is also pacing ahead of last year, with weddings now booked on weekdays as well as weekends. Changes at the hotel’s restaurant, The Wave Kitchen and Bar, are also attracting local business, including the introduction of a new chef, Mike Amaral. Beginning January 8, the restaurant will feature a Sunday brunch every week for $24.95 per person and an early bird supper menu Sunday through Thursday, with a prix fixe of $21.95 for a three-course meal with loads of choices. “We think this will help reintroduce past guests to the restaurant,” said Smiley. Awet Sium, general manager of the Vero Beach Hotel and Spa, is equally optimistic about first quarter sales in 2012. “We will do more this January than we have the last two Januaries combined,” he said. Coming out of one of the biggest

weeks of the year, the hotel had one of its best fourth quarters since opening in 2007. “The economy is changing, it’s getting slightly better,” said Sium, who offers incentives such as bottles of champagne, prize giveaways and VIP accommodations to guests. “More people are travelling,” said Sium, who forecasts “a phenomenal year from what we already have booked.” And while wedding reservations are actually down at the hotel over last year, Sium said that they’re booking higher quality weddings that come with a bigger price tag. For instance, one recent wedding featured the bride and groom riding a horse from the beach to the hotel’s shoreline patio. At the south end of the beach, M.T.’s Chophouse experienced a less drastic increase in sales, but an increase nonetheless. Winner of the 2011 Florida Trend magazine’s Golden Spoon Award for best restaurant, the steakhouse end-

ed the year up about 5 percent over 2010. Owner Mark Terheggen, a restaurant consultant and menu designer, said he was very hopeful after stellar sales this summer, which he attributed to occupancy rates at area hotels. But sales were uncharacteristically sluggish in September and October, before picking up in November. “We had a great December,” said Terheggen, who will celebrate M.T.’s third anniversary next month. To help augment business, Terheggen hosts a martini night on Thursdays featuring $5 martinis. On Friday evenings, he offers $5 appetizers, cocktails and desserts at the bar. He also sells gift cards at the restaurant and through an online company, offering a free $50 gift card for every $100 spent. “This is a hard business,” said Terheggen, who regularly frequents other island restaurants in support of his industry. “The more restaurants, the more choices,” he said. Veteran restaurateur, Kitty Wagner, made a bold statement about the local economy when she opened the Blue Star Wine Bar on Bougainvillea Lane this December. Featuring a wide selection of small vintner wines, artisian beers and nightly music, Wagner offers her unique twist on traditional favorites. Soy glazed salmon bites and lamb meatballs with a raisin reduction sauce – just some of the jewels she whips up with her usual flair for the unexpected. And when it comes to jewelry, clients of John Michael Matthews Fine Jewelry overwhelmingly chose diamonds this year. “Our customers seemed a little more upbeat,” said Matthews, who had quite a few sales of large-sized diamonds that made this December better than the previous two years. With sales up 25 percent for the year, it’s no wonder that he and other businesses are still jolly after the holidays.


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VERO BEACH — City Manager Jim O’Connor pulled a proposal this week that would have charged a new water and sewer fee on vacant properties after hearing loud and clear opposition from residents and developers who would have been footing the bill. The readiness-to-serve charge would have been imposed on vacant properties where city water and/or sewer lines are in place, but are not being used or even hooked up to by the property owner. Nearly 1,000 properties would have been impacted by the monthly fee of $9.77 for water and $15.83 for sewer service, or $25.60 combined. Under the proposal the city would have raised an additional $250,000. The fee was one of the suggestions in an optimization report done for the city by GAI Consultants, of Orlando. Part of that report also talked about possible reductions in staff through operating efficiencies. O’Connor said the city is looking at those aspects of the report, including contracting out lab work within the next few months and reducing staff by about six positions. He noted he would work on creating efficiencies in the system before considering again the readiness-to-serve fee. Developments would have felt the most impact from the proposed fee. Palm Island Plantation, LLC, would have had to pay nearly $12,000 annually under the proposal. Attorney Eugene O’Neill said the developers played by the rules 10 years ago when coming into the city and now city officials were

looking at changing the rules by imposing the fee. One of the reasons city officials had given for proposing the readiness-to-serve charge was that the lines and other infrastructure running through the vacant properties still had to be maintained and that cost was currently being absorbed by other rate payers. Some of the vacant property owners, however, disputed that any maintenance was being done on the lines that may be running through their properties. In other matters, the city voted against a request put on the agenda by Mayor Pilar Turner to provide up to $2,000 to the Indian River County Chamber of Commerce to support its efforts to attract new businesses to the area. Council members Craig Fletcher, Jay Kramer and Dick Winger voted against providing the funds, while Council members Turner and Tracy Carroll were in favor. The Indian River County Board of Commissioners voted in November to provide $1 for every $3 raised by the Indian River County Chamber of Commerce’s Economic Leadership Alliance, up to a maximum contribution of $25,000. Chamber of Commerce board members Jay Hart of Wells Fargo and Tony Donadio of Donadio & Associates are serving as cochairman of the campaign. They hope to raise $100,000 by the end of March, to increase the total combined public/private economic development budget for the chamber to $200,000. Aside from Vero Beach the group was expected to seek a contribution from the city of Sebastian as well.

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FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Phone system at a Mega Bank.

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City to hold off on charging readiness-to-serve fee

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LOCAL NEWS

Airport has played important role in story of Vero Beach

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Eastern Airlines started using Vero Beach as a refueling stop on its run from Jacksonville to Miami in the 1930s. This picture of the airport is from January 1941. BY MILT THOMAS VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Knowing that prior to 1911, Vero Beach was nothing but an endless swamp, it might be difficult to imagine that within 18 years, it would become a small, thriving community in need of an airport. We do know that certain early residents enjoyed flying, among them E.E Carter, whose father drained the endless swamp. According to his son, Marvin Carter, “Dad used to love barnstorming. He also had a glider that he launched with his Model T Ford.” In 1928, he was named chairman of a committee to explore the possibility of an airport. His committee recommended a 100-acre site just north of the newly created McAnsh Park subdivision, which itself was nothing more than a tangled web of paved roads and property stakes. Unfortunately, the City of Vero Beach could not afford the $5,000 cost to clear and grade the land, so it offered tax warrants for sale. That raised about half the cost and then Burton A. Becker, a winter resident from Sandusky, Ohio, purchased the rest.

So, construction of the new airport began in 1929, hindered only by the hand-to-mouth availability of funds. That problem was solved by another winter visitor, James D. Tew, who was president of the B.F. Goodrich Company. He traveled regularly in his private Lockheed Vega airplane called “Miss Silvertown,” and wanted an airport close to his winter home in Riomar. So he contributed to the airport fund and in return, when work was completed on March 3, 1930, the city named it the Vero Beach-Silvertown Airport. In the early 1930s, Eastern Air Transport Company, forerunner of Eastern Air Lines, offered passenger service between Jacksonville and Miami with a refueling stop in Cocoa. V.L. Holman, who knew Eastern’s most famous executive, Eddie Rickenbacker, talked him into refueling in Vero Beach instead. A small passenger depot was constructed so passengers could deplane during refueling and Holman arranged for attractive young ladies to hand out free orange juice. By 1932, Eastern made Vero CONTINUES ON PAGE 11


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The unpaved Vero Beach Airport runways in December 1935.

AIRPORT FROM PAGE 10

Beach a regular stop on its route. Officials at the time claimed that Vero Beach was the smallest airport in the country with passenger service. Could air mail service be far behind? Only if the minimum poundage required for each flight could be met. So, the Chamber of Commerce prepared a mailing list from cities on Eastern’s national route and addressed air mail envelopes containing advertising materials to people selected at random in those cities.

Then, Vero Beach presumably became the smallest airport in the country to offer air mail service. The next major development actually had its origins in 1929, when during an exhibition, General Henry “Hap” Arnold, head of the U.S. Army Air Corps visited town. He is generally credited with building the most powerful Air Force in the world, but back then, he was only looking for an airfield to train pilots. By 1942, he was successful in persuading Washington to build an air training base in Vero Beach, but they

gave it to the Navy instead of the Army. The small airport was then converted into a major training base that at one point housed 3,900 Navy personnel and 250 planes on 2,000 acres. Local folks remember the constant buzzing of aircraft in the skies over Vero. As Marvin Carter recalls, “We saw crashes all the time when planes went out of control. If they lost a plane at night they would drop flares suspended under parachutes. It was during the rationing days and those parachutes were made of silk. If one landed near us, my mother would

sew silk pajamas, underwear and all kinds of things from that material.” After the war, the large base with more than 100 buildings was transferred back to the City of Vero Beach. In an effort to recruit businesses to the facility, Bud Holman and others managed to talk baseball’s Brooklyn Dodgers into converting the military barracks into a spring training camp. It is difficult to imagine today’s multimillionaire baseball egos fitting into those Spartan barracks, but back then, it was the perfect spot and the DodgCONTINUES ON PAGE 12


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Piper moved its operations to Vero Beach in 1957. This is the original building where production of the Piper Cherokee first began.

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AIRPORT FROM PAGE 11

ers began spring training in 1948. Other businesses attracted to the vacant buildings at the airport included the Greene School of Dance. Hariot Greene recalled her experiences in her biography. “City Attorney Charles Mitchell wanted his daughter to have dance instruction, so he arranged for me to lease a little space in one build-

ing for a dance studio. I operated at that location for several years.” In another book about long-time Vero Beach veterinarian, Aris Lindsey, he tells of an unusual business operating out of a building at the airport. “It was Paramount Aquarium, a tropical fish company that flew its stock in from South America on weekends and then sold it all over the U.S. CONTINUES ON PAGE 13


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Note the sleek Vero Beach terminal circa 1971. The four businessmen in this publicity shot are getting ready to board a brand new Piper Cherokee.

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Yet another well known Vero Beach company, Blue Crystal, (originally Vero Beach Ice Company), was located in town near the old diesel power plant, but sold bottled water drawn from a well out by the Vero Beach airport. Nine years after the Dodgers came, another winter resident, William T. Piper, decided to move his research and development center to Vero Beach. That led to construction of a Piper Aircraft manufacturing plant to build his popular Cherokee model and the rest is, as they say, history. Eastern Air Lines discontinued passenger service in 1973 with a variety of small regional airlines stepping in to try and fill the void, but there wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough of a void to fill, so for now Vero Beach has no regularly scheduled airline service. However, with more than 160,000 operations a year of private and training flights, it is one of the busiest general aviation airports in the country. Hard to believe all this started with Eastern Airlines discontinued passenger service into Vero Beach in 1973. In the background the old terminal first used draining a swamp. for the passenger flights.

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City Council right to question readiness-to-serve charge They say that nothing dies harder than a bad idea. While it is easy enough to find examples of illconceived plans mindlessly followed to disastrous conclusions, the members of the Vero Beach City Council this week demonstrated that their minds are not crystalized. Democracy was in action as more than a dozen members of the public addressed the council, speaking in opposition to a proposed readiness-toserve charge that would have raised nearly $250,000 for the city’s water and sewer system. What had initially been presented a month ago as a standard fee similar to one charged by the county was shown to be quite different. Specifically, the county only assesses such a fee on properties for which utility capacity has been reserved. In contrast, the city’s proposed fee would have been assessed on nearly every vacant lot, regardless of whether they have been slated for development. This new fee would have unfairly and disproportionately impacted individuals and companies that invested in vacant land with no way of knowing that such a “tax” would someday be imposed. Make no mistake about it; with a sale of the electric system on the horizon, the city faces the urgent task of optimizing efficiencies. Almost surely the city will also have to raise taxes and perhaps even some user fees. Any move to raise revenue needs to be fair and reasonable. The proposed readinessto-serve fee simply did not meet that test. Next week, the recently reconstituted Utility Commission will hold its second meeting. Hope-

fully the commission’s newest members -- all of them intelligent and successful in their own professions -- will demonstrate open-mindedness and independent thinking. As the city works its way through crucial nego-

Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

“Doing well by doing good.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

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gins with M.” Now here’s a psychic demonstration you can try on your unsuspecting friends, especially kids under ten. First, take a banana and hide it in your pocket or jacket, someplace accessible but out of sight. Then ask the person to be psyched, “Name two fruits you like to eat.” If they say “banana and apple,’ then say “choose one of those.” If they say banana, you produce the hidden banana. If they say apple, then say, “that leaves…” and produce the banana. If you ask for two fruits and they say “pineapple and grapefruit,” then simply ask them to select two more until they choose the banana. They will be convinced

2. Real estate taxes will increase 40 percent, but only for residents of the city of Vero Beach. 3. Mitt Romney will ask Rick Scott to become his vice presidential running mate as a way to ensure a landslide victory for him in the state of Florida. 4. The Sultan of Brunei will close Piper Aircraft’s Vero Beach location and as a gesture of friendship will purchase majority ownership of FPL. 5. Tim Tebow will be cut by the Denver Broncos after throwing too many Hail Mary passes. 6. Fellsmere will host the first ever Elephant Leg Festival. Of course, not all these predictions will come true, but if only one occurs, I will always be remembered as the psychic who predicted it. Milt Thomas is a Vero Beach resident and an experienced freelance writer/author with a 20-year background in the music industry. He currently writes biographies, blogs, lectures, travels extensively and is an active member of the National Press Club.

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you are a psychic. Applying this illustration to “professional” psychics, the point is that if a psychic asks enough questions, he or she will hit on something relevant and make a statement about it. The most amazing result of this technique is that you will forget the many irrelevant questions and statements, but remember the few accurate ones. It’s human nature, like when your kids remember you promised to take them to see “The Muppets,” but forget the qualifier “…if you clean your room.” So, why am I bringing this subject up? Well, it’s the time of year when psychics and other prognosticators give their opinions on what will happen in the coming year. So based on the revelations passed on to me by Amelia Earhart (not the long missing aviator, but the above-mentioned author’s cat), I will make the following predictions for 2012: 1. FPL will purchase Vero Beach Electric and result in a 40 percent drop in rates for all customers, both in the city and the county.

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Did you know that I am a psychic? I never realized it until recently when I read a book entitled, “How to Become a Psychic.” I think it was one of those vanity publications since the publisher was listed as the author’s cat. From this book I learned that the most important quality a psychic can possess is not the ability to predict the future, but the ability to predict the obvious. For instance, if I say “2012 will bring you new challenges,” it is probably a safe bet that you will face new challenges. The challenge could be losing your job in a tough economy, but it could also mean your computer hard drive will crash. In either case, you will credit the author of that book for telling you in advance. If you have ever visited a psychic, which I did once, he or she will ask you a number of questions before making a “prediction.” In this book on how to become a psychic, it explains that unless a friend or relative gives you information ahead of time

about the person being psyched, you must ask a variety of your own questions to hit upon something of relevance. They must be generic in nature, such as “I see someone in your life whose name be-

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BY MILT THOMAS VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Obvious and not so obvious predictions for 2012


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Glaring gulf between the ‘Haves’ and ‘Have Nots’ I really love living here on the Treasure Coast. In so many ways, this is an absolutely lovely and idyllic community. Vero Beach is a charming old Florida town, nestled in an absolutely stunning natural environment. The Chamber of Commerce has an easy job marketing Vero Beach as a great place to live, work, and play. But being a part of this community is also to be aware of some jarring and painful social realities in our midst. First among these disquieting realities in our community is the huge and glaring gulf that exists here between the “Haves” and the “Have-Nots,” a gulf of profound economic disparity I am forced to witness almost every day as I ride my bike through our community. One favorite cycling loop of mine has me start out from my beachside condo (on the barrier island near Jaycee Park) and ride north up AIA several miles past some of the most expensive and exclusive gated communities in America. When I get to the Disney Resort with its $300-plus a night room rates and its gated 24-hour security, I turn left and cross the 510 Wabasso bridge over the Intracoastal Waterway. I then cross busy Route 1at the light and then immediately turn south onto the Old Dixie Highway through the towns of Wabasso and Gifford. On this portion of the journey I ride past the extremely modest (and in many cases ramshackle and

run-down) housing of the very poor of our region. As I weave my way further south and west through the center of Gifford I ride through one of the most poverty-stricken REVEREND SCOTT ALEXANDER neighborhoods of our region, perhaps of all of Florida – where I see leaking roofs covered with temporary blue tarps, broken windows covered up with plywood, junked cars in the driveways and clusters of people sitting out under the shade of their trees because they cannot afford air-conditioning. On an almost daily basis as I ride through our community I am reminded here in this place I call home of the incredibly painful and harsh disparities that exist between the rich and the poor -- the comfortable and the struggling. The harsh economic divisions that exist here in Vero Beach are sadly reflective of our entire nation. The most recent national census (completed in 2010) reveals that -- economically speaking -- America is becoming a nation terribly and radically divided against itself. The latest data released last year reveals that the income differential between rich and poor Ameri-

cans is now greater than at any time since they have been keeping such statistics, and is the greatest such disparity among all the Western industrialized nations. As one recent report bluntly put it, “Income inequality has been rising since the late 1970’s, and now rests at a level not seen since the Guided Age (1870 to 1900) a period in U.S. history defined by the contrast between the excesses of the super-rich and the squalor of the poor.” Here are the profoundly disturbing numbers concerning wealth distribution in America today according to The Wall Street Journal: .1 percent of the population (14,000 families) have 22.2 percent of the wealth 9.9 percent of the population (11.2 million families in the middle) have 73.8 percent of the wealth While fully 90 percent of the population (102.5 million families) must make do with just 4 percent of the wealth Other studies reveal that there are almost 50 million Americans (onesixth of the population) living below the official Federal poverty line, and another 50 million are what the New York Times recently called the near poor. That means that about 100 million Americans about one-third of our total population) live in deprived households suffering a daily scarcity of life’s necessities.

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None of us -- no matter how personally wealthy or comfortable we are -- can or should deny or ignore the truth that poverty (life-robbing, spirit-crippling poverty), is a social ill that is crippling and poisoning America’s national future. Ultimately, there can be no safety, no health, no enduring satisfaction, well-being, or prosperity until the national specter of poverty and profound economic inequality are acknowledged and addressed as the dangerous human and social diminishments that they are. How, I ask, can America be economically or socially healthy with such a high percentage of its citizens struggling on a daily basis to make ends meet? I passionately believe that America’s governmental, business, and cultural leaders – with the support of the rest of us -- must find ways to address the extreme inequalities of wealth that exist in our society, and institute practical, compassionate ways to ensure that all Americans have the opportunity to participate in the American dream. As a nation and a people, we can only be successful and prosperous if we realize our indissoluable economic and moral connections to one another. Rev. Scott W. Alexander is the minister of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach, and has been a minister, author, and educator for almost 40 years. He is an avid cyclist and outdoor enthusiast who loves living in Vero Beach.


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CONTINUED ON PAGE 18 PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Tate, Pamela, Jaime, and Kent Ellertson at The Moorings

Stephanie and Jess Frank and Cara and Tia Bruggeman shine at The Moorings

Three generations celebrate at The Moorings, Saf, Donna, Jackson, Leah and Omar Atassi

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Whether you spent the evening quietly watching the ball drop in Times Square at home with family and friends or hit one of the major parties around town, 2012 came in on a perfect Florida night. The weather was clear and pleasant and the sky was full of just as many bright stars as dazzling fireworks. And then there were the plethora of glitter-filled parties. We visited a small sampling of events and found everyone to be thrilled to be out on such a pretty night as they sipped champagne and toasted the new year. The Vero Beach Yacht Club has a

new club manager, Jeff Mather, and he and his staff put on an elegant event with the Len Turner and the American Express band.   The tables were brightly decorated with silver palms and streamers and guests were decked out in anything but boat shoes.  Black ties and evening gowns were de rigueur and everyone looked fabulous. The Peschio’s, who are members and their guests the Hartley’s, always spend New Year’s together.  “We have celebrated together for the last 15 years all over the country, but this year we wanted to be home at the club.” said Judy Peschio. At The Moorings Club, they held two

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VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Parties galore help Vero celebrate start of 2012


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Larry & Leticia Wood make a cute New Year’s couple at Costa d’Este

Costa d’Este patrons Trevor Hardee, Alex Posada, Joe Perkins, Victoria Engleman, Morgan Libbey and Ryan Scarpa

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Bobby & The Blister’s saxophonist had the ladies dancing at Costa d’Este

Ryan Wykoff, Chris Watkins and Ashlee Wykoff dine at The Wave at Costa d’Este

Simon & Marianne Atwill, Diane Smith and John Kronsnoble drinking mojitos poolside at Costa d’Este

John & Sheryl Bush, Barbara Andrews, Linda McMahan, joe Dineen and James McMahan at Costa d’Este musical revue in Crystal Room


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SOCIAL | LIFESTYLE the night and Times Square was projected onto the side of the pristine white walls of the building to count down with New York.

No matter where you were the night was a successful way to ring in 2012. We wish our readers a prosperous, healthy and happy new year!

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Ruth Ann Ranson, Penny Abs, Past Commodore Chuck Ranson, Monty and Jane Abs at VB Yacht Club

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many were also staying the night.   After dinner many strolled out to the party or sat by the beachside bonfire, one of the highlights of the Cobalt Room experience. Terri Barrett crafted tinsel covered hats for her crowd which stood out from all the rest.  “She is a local artist and Terri likes to make a big entrance,” said her friends as they sipped champagne. Costa d’Este topped the charts for things to do in one location.   The Crystal Room had a former Miss USO, Jennifer Patty, wowing the audience in a musical revue paired with dinner and dancing.   The Wave Dining Room was filled with diners and the cocktail lounge was packed with revelers.   Ashlee Wycoff was hosting a dinner party with her friends and family.   “Costa d’Este is our spot so we thought this was the perfect way to bring in the New Year,” said one of Wycoff’s guests. Poolside was a super high energy affair which went on until 3 a.m. and was very reminiscent of a glitzy South Beach nightclub.     Neon lights lit up

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consecutive “ball drops.”   The earlier 5:30 seating counted down a faux midnight at 8:30 pm and again at the real midnight so their guests who wanted to be home early could still get the feel of the New Year’s Eve celebration. Many families came to spend the night together over a lush dinner and cocktail party before heading out to various events. The three generations of the Atassi family consider New Year’s Eve at The Moorings their family tradition to end the holidays.  “This is our grand finale for the week we are visiting, we leave tomorrow morning to head back to the cold north.” said Leah Atassi. Many of the younger set had plans to be with friends after dinner, some at the beachside party spots. The two most frequently mentioned future meet-up spots were the Vero Beach Hotel & Spa and Gloria Estefan’s Costa d’Este Beach Resort. Heaton’s Reef at the Vero Beach Hotel offered music by Curtiss Hill and dancing under the moon as guests enjoyed the upscale atmosphere where

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Community Calendar Every Friday: Farmer’s Market from 3-6 pm in downtown Vero at the corner of 14th Ave. & 21st St. 772-480-8353. Every Saturday: Oceanside Business Association’s Farmer’s Market, 8 amnoon. Ocean Dr. & Dahlia Ln. www. VeroBeachOBA.com, 772-532-2455. First Friday of the Month: Downtown Gallery Art Stroll, art galleries and businesses open house receptions all through downtown. Free event, call 772-562-5525 or 772-299-1234 for info. Second Saturday of the Month: Oceanside Business Association Free Concert Series. 5:30-8:30 pm, music, vendors, food and drink. Ocean Dr. 772-532-7983. Dec 15-Apr 30: Sculpting Nature, 30 large scale art pieces in McKee Botanical Gardens, 350 S US1, $5-$9, 772-794-0601, mckeegarden.org. Jan 5, 6, & 13: Little League Spring Registration at the Courthouse Executive Center, 2145 14th Ave, 5:30-8 pm, $90. 772-559-5040. Jan 6-8: Vero Beach Antique Extravaganza, Indian River County Fairgrounds, 7955 58th Ave, Fri noon-5 pm, Sat 9 am-5 pm, Sun 10 am-4 pm. $6-$10. 941-697-6766. Jan 7: Milonga en Color, Royal Ballroom Dance Studio’s monthly Tango, 1533 US1, $15. 772-299-5772. Jan 7: Open Auditions for Oliver!, 1:30-3:30 pm at the VBHS Performing Arts Center, 1701 16th St., children in grades 2 to 8. 772-564-5449. Jan 8: “American Violet” will be shown at the Emerson Center’s Social Justice Film Series. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 1590 27th Ave. 7 pm. Free. 772-778-5880. Jan 8: Art in the Park, Vero Beach Art Club members show and sell their work at Humiston Park Promenade, free admittance, 3000 Ocean THURSDAY, JAN. 5

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View from the top of the Barber Bridge. Dr., 772-231-0303. Jan 9: AAUW Book Review Breakfast, “To My Daughter in France” held at the Richardson Center, IRSC Mueller Campus, 6155 College Ln., 9:30 am continental breakfast. 772532-4712, aauwverobeach.org. Jan 10: Bird Photography with Ron Bielefield, Island Images, 2036 14th Ave. Suite 101, $15. 772-643-6994, adventurephotographyworkshops.com. Jan 10: Harbor Branch Sunset Boat Cruise to Bird Island, 3:30-5:30 pm, $25, meet at 5600 N US1, Fort Pierce, Johnson Education Center. Reservations required, 772-242-2559. Jan 11: “Bible Proofs for Catholic Beliefs” a talk series by Father John Pasquini at St. John of the Cross Chapel, 7550 26th St., free. 772-299-7351. Jan 11: Beginner Genealogy, IRC Main Library, 1600 21st St., 9:30 am, first in a series, $35, register online.

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www.irgs.org. Jan 12: Vero Beach Museum of Art Annual Antique Show & Sale Preview Party, 6-10 pm, $75, 3001 Riverside Park Dr., 772-231-0303. Jan 12: Navy League’s TC Council Dinner, Heritage Center, 2140 14th Ave., social hour, 5:45 pm, followed by dinner & speaker MG John Cleland, “America’s War on Radical Islam.” $28. 772-231-6101. Jan 12: Transformation Celebration, Gala at The Moorings Club hosted by the IRMC Foundation, 100 Harbor Dr., 6 pm, $1,000 per person, Reservation, 772-226-4952. Jan 13: McKee’s “Jazz in the Garden” series begins with Davis & Dow, 6-8 pm, regular admission fee schedule, dinner available at café. 772-794-0601. Jan 13-15: Vero Beach Museum of Art Antique Show & Sale, Fri & Sat 10 am-5 pm, Sun 10 am-4 pm, $10. 3001

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Riverside Park Dr., 772-231-0303. Jan 14: An Evening in Cannes at Maison Martinique, 6:30-10:30 pm, dinner & dancing to benefit Environmental Learning Center, $125-$200 per person. 772-589-5050. Jan 14: Mel Theobald lecture/ demo at Darby Fine Art, 1902 14th Ave., 1 pm, Photographic Image Development. 772-480-0491. Jan 14-21: Quail Valley Charity Cup Week, Quail Valley River & Golf Club, Jan 14 – Kids’ Fun Run, 7 am, $15$25; Jan 16 – Gourmet Wine & Chef Dinner, 6 pm, $200 per person; Jan 18 – Shopping for Children, Oceanside Shops, 5:30-8:30 pm; Jan 19 – Duplicate Bridge, 9 am-2 pm, $65; Jan 19-21 – Tennis Tournament, 8 am, $175 per player; Jan 20-21 – Golf Tournament, 9 am, $300 per golfer; Jan 21 – Grand Gala Cocktail Buffet & Auction, 6-10 pm, 772-492-2020. Jan 16: Youth Sailing Foundation Open House, Vero Beach City Marina, 3599 Rio Vista Blvd., 10 am-2 pm, tours of shop and register for children’s free sailing classes. 772-567-9000. Jan 19: Treasure Coast Rock & Gem Society exhibition by Gary Dulac, handcrafted fine jewelry, Vero Beach Museum of Art, 3001 Riverside Park Dr., 7 pm, $5-$25, 772-231-0005 to register. Jan 19:  Tour of Adams Ranch to benefit Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, over 65,000 acres of cattle range land, BBQ lunch, $25$30, 9:45 am-3 pm. Reservations required 772-242-2559. Jan 19 & 26: King of the Hill Tennis Tournament, $5 admittance, The Boulevard Village & Tennis Club, 1620 Boulevard Ln., to benefit Youth Guidance. 772-770-5040, ircyouth.com. To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

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‘Full Monty’ opens at Riverside Theatre Jan. 12

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Unemployment, sexual orientation, parental rights, depression, selfworth, working-class angst and marital difficulties. These problems which beset today’s society form the core of an endearing musical which opens Jan. 12 on the Stark Stage of Riverside Theatre. Last week, two members of the cast of The Full Monty shared their thoughts on this near-to-life musical comedy with the Vero Beach Newsweekly. The Full Monty, based on a 1997 British hit film comedy, has been adapted to an American setting in Buffalo, N.Y. where steel mills are closing, leaving once-proud workers unemployed, scared and lacking in self-esteem. The book for the show was written by renowned playwright Terrance McNally and features music and lyrics by award-winning David Yazbek. With families to feed and no prospects for jobs, two out-of-work best friends along with their unemployed steel worker peers, hatch an idea to regain a paycheck and their masculine self-worth after espying their wives’ enthusiasm while attending a male strip show. Though the men are not possessed of the eye-popping physiques of the professional Chippendale male strippers, they nonetheless embark on a plan which unites them in purpose and support and leads to individual as well as collective triumph. So if one is hardly an “Adonis,” then how would a group of out-of-shape men entice an audience to come watch them strip? The answer, they decide, is to go one better than the Chippendale dancers and take it all off. But will they actually do “The Full Monty.”

What is ultimately revealed is far more than a climactic moment of titillation; what we see in all its fullfrontal realism is life. Stage and screen veterans Tim Ewing (playing former steel mill foreman Harold Nichols who hasn’t told his upwardly mobile wife Vicki that he’s jobless) and Jerome Harmann, in his Riverside Theatre debut as “Horse,” a lonely and unemployed mill worker and dance maven who finds a family of sorts among the rag-tag collection of men, agree that the show’s primary thrust isn’t pelvic. “The word that pops into my head is ‘validation.’ And I think everyone is looking for it. The show is about PHOTOS SUPPLIED what happens to men who have lost Standing from left to right: Jerome Harmann, Jim Newman, Joe Coots, Tim their jobs that won’t be coming back. Ewing. Front row: Brian Golub and Anthony Festa. And when that bubble burst, people yQQXN v# wMJNXQQ were living in fantasy land yet there hJMYGZTNV yJHTIHTZ vTJXZHMJ had been such a sense of pride and hfivcwpjr xpr wpd^ dqtydft sif y rftyd ekyll diaj@ responsibility that they had,” Ewing said. The reality of having to adapt to a world in which all that was known and familiar is gone is monumental, Harmann said. “Can we maintain that (previous) standard of living? Nowadays, everyone has to retrain and refocus,” he said. Although Ewing and Harmann are portraying unemployed men, the show’s actual pertinence in today’s foundering economy is all too real and perhaps even more relevant than when The Full Monty was originally released as a film in 1997. Ewing described the angst of his character who is married to a materialistic woman. “I addition to everything, I lose a sense of trust because I’ve lost my job and don’t have the nerve to tell her. I get dressed every day as though I’m going to work. And what happens is a man doesn’t feel like a man and then xc^ dpwntde ijlpjt yd fTFXJITYXdUX\HJX#ZMP if wyll **9#9}%#(||! CONTINUES ON PAGE 22

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the bedroom suffers,” Ewing said. The entire dynamic of the men’s employment situation weighs heavily on their respective lives and each at-

tempt to cope in different ways which invariably become counterproductive. “Jerry just gives up and turns to crime,” Harmann said. “Horse is filled with dismay, failure and a sense of confusion as well as a tremendous

amount of anger and we direct it at each other as well as internalize it.” Amid the swirl of feelings and frustrations, the men nonetheless begin to form a cohesive, supportive unit. “But we realize we’ve got to get creative and it’s the guys getting creative to put on a cockamamie show. We’re trying to make $50,000 and will if we sell out the show. What happens in the process is we form this crazy bond,” Ewing said. That shared support amid their troubles is a saving grace, both agreed. And the circumstances portrayed in the show reflect a mirror image of life in present-day America. “That’s my ride. Horse has no one and these guys become my family,” Harmann said. “They are struggling but even the people living above their means are directly tied to the way government had been functioning.” Ewing thinks people have lost perspective because of the bombardment of the media’s mixed messages. “We’ve been wired and hooked up to news feeds. But there’s no differentiation between what’s important and what isn’t. We hear about Lindsay Lohan more than about how many are being killed in war on any given day,” he said. What The Full Monty is able to do is portray the reality of everyday life. “This show is all heart,” Ewing said.

“This is about the people and the power of theater to bring people together. It’s a big show and everyone’s story gets told.” Harmann agreed that the fiction of the show itself is nonetheless a reality in the context of life today. “This show is so relevant to today and what people are going through – people who can’t find work in some cases for years. We deal with what people go through and the issues are human,” Harmann said. So do they bare all? In a nano-second of brilliantly flashed light, they do. By this time, however, they have totally bared their souls and lives more revealingly than any striptease act. Riverside Theatre’s production of The Full Monty is directed and choreographed by Keith Andrews. The design team includes Ken Clifton (music director); Cliff Simon (scenic design); Lisa Zinni (costume design); Richard Winkler (lighting design); Julie Duro (asst. lighting design); Craig Beyrooti (sound design) with Kyle Atkins (stage manager) and Cassie Apthorpe (asst. stage manager). The Full Monty performs Jan. 12 – Feb. 3 on the stark Stage at Riverside Theatre located at 3250 Riverside Park Drive in beachside Vero Beach. For more information, call the box office at (772) 231-6990 or visit online at www.riversidetheatre.com.


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ATLANTIC CLASSICAL ORCHESTRA

VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES

TREASURE COAST JAZZ SOCIETY 772-234-4600 tcjazzsociety.org Jan 7: Bill Allred’s Classic 8 pc Jazz Band, Vero Beach Yacht Club, 3601 Rio Vista Blvd., noon Jan 28: The Ken Peplowski Quartet,

VERO BEACH OPERA

RIVERSIDE THEATER 3250 Riverside Park Drive 772-231-6990 riversidetheatre.com Jan 23: Distinguished Lecture Series, Gen.  Stanley McChrystal, call Box Office for more info Children’s Theatre: Jan 6, 7 & 8: “My Son Pinocchio,” 7:30 pm, $5-$16 Comedy Fun Zone: Jan 6 & 7: Julie Scoggins and Myke Herlihy, 7:30 or 9:30 pm, $15 Stark Main Stage: Jan 12-Feb 5: The Full Monty, 2 pm, 7:30 & 8 pm, $57-$73 Skyline Room: Jan 17: New York Supper Club with Christine

verobeachopera.org 772-569-6993 Box Office: 772-564-5537 verobeachopera.org Jan 15: The Barber of Seville, 3 pm, Vero Beach High School Performing Arts Center, $30-$50 Feb 4: Broadway, Operetta and Zarzuela, pm, Vero Beach High School Performing Arts Center, $30-$50

VERO BEACH THEATRE GUILD 772-562-8300 2020 San Juan Avenue verobeachtheatreguild.com Jan 12-22: Born Yesterday, $20-22, Hilarious play about uneducated mob gal being educated by book-smart tutor

SPONSORED BY '2*!

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1590 27th Avenue, Vero Beach (772)778-5249 www.TheEmersonCenter.org

N E W S W E E K L Y

Community Church 1901 23rd Street 772-778-1070 irsavero.org Jan 7: Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, 7:30 pm $50 each, season tickets $260-$290

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INDIAN RIVER SYMPHONIC ASSOCIATION

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EMERSON CENTER at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1590 27th Avenue 772-778-5249 TheEmersonCenter.org Jan 14: Arianna Huffington, Celebrated Speakers Series, 4 & 7 pm, $65   Jan 26: Cynthia Barnett – “Blue is the New Green” Florida Humanities Series, 7 pm, Free

SUNRISE THEATRE 116 South 2nd Street Fort Pierce 772-461-4775 sunrisetheatre.com Jan 5: The Nylons, 7 pm, $29/$35 Jan 8: Ft Pierce Jazz & Blues Society, Tribute to Benny Goodman, 2:30 pm, $25-$50 Jan 10: Swan Lake, The State Ballet Theatre of Russia, 7 pm, $39-$55 Jan 14: Ruben Studdard, 8 pm, $39/$29 Jan 19: ABBA: The Concert, 7 pm, $49/$39 Jan 20: Richard Nader’s Doo Wop & Rock ‘n Roll, $75/$38/$45 Jan 21: Gordon Lightfoot, 8 pm, $59/$49

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Community Church 1901 23rd Street 772-778-1070 communityconcertseries.org Jan 7: Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, 7:30 pm, $50 Jan 13: The Phantom of the Opera, Tom Trenney, organist with film, 7:30 pm, $25

SPACE COAST SYMPHONY Various Locations 321-536-8580 SpaceCoastSymphony.org Jan 6: New Year’s with the Three Tenors, Trinity Episcopal Church, 2365 Pine Avenue, 3 pm, $20 Feb 5: Pines of Rome, Trinity Episcopal Church, 2365 Pine Avenue, 3 pm, $20

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As a native of the country that gave the world democracy Arianna Huffington has lived life from both sides of the political spectrum. Her ideology was originally rooted in conservatism that moved to the left into liberalism. In fact, she and her conservative counterpart Mary Matlin are co-hosts of a weekly syndicated radio show appropriately titled Both Sides Now which looks at political issues from the right and the left of the political aisle. The Athens-born Huffington – who in 2003 ran as an independent candidate for governor of California, is also founder of The Huffington Post, an online blog featuring liberally-minded writers, elected officials and celebrities. She is the ex-wife of former Republican Congressman Michael Huffington. In February of this year, Huffington sold the Huffington Post to AOL for $315 million while remaining on editor-in-chief. On Jan. 14, Huffington will share her views on world affairs, the American middle class and the 2012 Presidential elections at the Emerson Center’s Celebrated Speaker Series. Performances are held at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Saturdays at the center which is located at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach at 1590 27th Ave. in Vero Beach. Recently, Huffington shared some thoughts with the Vero Beach Newsweekly via a phone conversation from her AOL offices regarding how the average citizen can reclaim the “American Dream.” “I think the priority has to be rebuilding the economy and finding jobs for people. We see many, many students graduating from college who can’t get jobs and that creates a sense that upward mobility isn’t possible. “There was an expectation that we’d get out of it (a recession period) much faster but a lot of traditional jobs are

no longer available,” Hu f f i n g ton said. S h e noted that Americans seem to be seeking an idealistic notion of a leader, however. “We are PHOTO SUPPLIED looking Arianna Huffington for a leader in the mirror – a romantic notion of a leader on a white charger that will ride in to save us. We need to update that and say what we can do to restore upward mobility because many now are worse off than their parents,” Huffington said. The 2012 elections will be important to help define which direction America and their leaders need to go. “I feel that this will be an election in which ‘movement’ politics will be important. We need a clear sense of priorities and kind of a North Star is needed for a leader because at the moment, there has been the demonization of government. Our highest priority should be to rebuild America,” Huffington said. The Emerson Center’s 2012 Celebrated Speakers Series will feature presentations by Huffington; columnist and commentator Mark Shields; astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson; former Congressman Joe Scarborough who hosts MSNBC’s Morning Joe; and celebrated journalist Bob Woodward. Single tickets are available for $65 each and the entire series may be purchased for $275. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit online at www. TheEmersnoCenter.org or call the box office at (772) 778-5249.

Ebersol, 6:30 pm, $250, 772-231-5860

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866-310-7521 acomusic.org Jan 5: Pianist Lindsay Garritson, Waxlax Center of the Performing Arts, 8 pm, $55

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Arianna Huffington to Entertainment Calendar speak at Emerson Series


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Men and women enjoying boom in cigar bars BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The up side of a down economy is that people tend to gain a new appreciation for life’s small pleasures. This may explain the sudden proliferation of cigar lounges in Vero Beach -- from wine bars on the island, smoke dens by the river, to a new billiards hall in the Vero Bowl complex. But, while traditional cigar lounges were set up like man-caves promoting male bonding amidst the noxious gasses, contemporary models are much more female friendly. “So many ladies are into the flavored cigars now,” says David Rodriguez, owner of Havana Club Cigars in the former Modernage Building on Indian River Boulevard. “On weekends, 40 to 50 percent of my clientele is women. Ten years ago, you would never have seen that.” Due to the U.S. embargo on products from Cuba, known for producing premium cigars, most cigars sold in America are made from tobacco grown in Nicaragua, Honduras, Brazil and the Dominican Republic, with some of the best cigar wrapping leaves grown in Connecticut. Rodriguez, who is originally from Cuba where his family grew tobacco, says sales are up 60 percent since his opening in October 2010. His cigar lounge is decorated with brown leather club chairs, mahogany fixtures and a big screen television so smokers can relax, watch a sports game, even play a game of chess. He also offers free wireless internet access, impressive Cuban coffee (the machine cost $3,000) and beautifully appointed lockers where patrons can store personal belongings, including their own liquor supply. What appeals to women, however, is the lack of fumes lingering in the air. No stinky hair, no smelly clothes, and no shortness of breath from inhaling second-hand smoke. “I have a clean air system that cost over $10, 000,” explains Rodriguez, who is as concerned for his clients as he is about his neighbors, a chocolate shop and a hair salon. In addition, he has two smoke eaters in the lounge that help keep things fresh. Florida clean air laws permit smoking inside establishments dedicated to the sale of tobacco products and inside those that meet the legal definition of a stand-alone bar. Stix, a new billiards hall and bar located in the same complex as Vero Bowl and owned by developer Mike Rechter, will accommodate cigar smoking after the clean air system is installed this week.

STAFF PHOTO

Bob Marshbanks has owned the Pipe Den and Cigars for 34 years. “Cigars are becoming more popular every year,” says James Fiduccia, manager of Stix, who ran a pool hall for 12 years in Miami. He plans to host various events to draw aficionados, who are welcome to bring their own cigars. In contrast to Havana Cigar Club, which features about 25 cigar brands and 30 different custom blends specially hand rolled in Miami for Rodriguez, Stix sells only one kind of cigar. “Mi Lugar Cigar,” which translates as “My Place Cigar,” is grown from premium Cuban tobacco in Nicaragua, the flavor hints of spice and chocolate. The band around the cigar, which in the old days prevented aristocratic men from staining their white gloves when smoking, can be customized for local buyers. The brainchild of local businessman Paul Tripaldi, Mi Lugar Cigars are kept in patent-pending humidors which he manufactures locally. “Cigars are similar to wine,” explains Tripaldi, whose company, Cigarmidor, makes a Plexiglaslike cabinet with a Spanish cedar insert to maintain consistent humidity levels. Just as the level of humidity impacts the cork of a wine bottle and, consequently, the taste of the wine itself, humidity determines the way a cigar burns and its flavor. Tripaldi’s humidors come in two sizes, a five foot kiosk and a countertop model, which is featured at Stix. Other businesses selling the cigars in Tripaldi’s humi-

dors: Riverside Café, Cork, Pipa Movida and the newly opened Blue Star Wine Bar on Bougainvillea Lane. “Where does a premium cigar smoker go and not impinge on other people?” asks Tripaldi, who also helps businesses create indoor and outdoor smoking experiences using air handlers and high velocity exhaust fans. One of Tripaldi’s kiosks is on display at the Pipe Den and Cigars, the longest standing downtown businesses aside from Vero Furniture Mart. Bob Marshbanks, the proprietor for 34 years, mentored Tripaldi and helped him get his start. He sells more than 2,000 kinds of cigars, as well as an endless selection of pipes and smoking apparatus. While Marshbanks does carry smaller-sized cigars for women, he caters to a mostly male clientele, who stop in his shop between sales calls for a smoke and good conversation. In addition, he has a vibrant mail order business and he supplies area golf course pro-shops with cigars. Like other cigar lounges in town, including the Cigar Cantina on 43rd Avenue, Marshbanks offers comfortable seating, reading material and a variety of soft drinks and hot beverages. “A lot of places sell cigars,” says Gary Solis, who opened the Cantina at the height of the real estate boon and has just recently seen a slight uptick in his market. “But, you can get a better grade of cigar at a cigar shop.” And when it comes to life’s small pleasures, why skimp?


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Cobalt Restaurant: A brilliant blue jewel by the sea BY MARK JOSEPH

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our choice of two glasses of Cabernet Alexander Valley, moderately priced at $10 per glass. Having enjoyed this wine at other restaurants, this vintage did not disappoint us. Although here for dinner, a familiar breakfast item on the list of appetizers -- “bacon and eggs” -- caught our eye and piqued our interest, as did a beet salad, one of our all-time favorites. Enjoying our wine, our appetizers arrived along with some of the best bread in the area. The sliced artisan bread was piping hot and crusty, yet with a soft chewy center. Our shared bacon and egg appetizer was actually a twist on a traditional breakfast favorite. It consisted of a slice of tender and crispy pork belly and a single egg, perfectly poached and still warm. This delightful dish included a crispy fried chicken skin. We savored every bite. We also shared the beet salad featured a presentation that included roasted beets that were fresh and crisp, with arugula, goat cheese, blood orange sections and pecans. We were impressed with our waiter’s attention to detail as he cleared

the table and announced that the Chef would begin our entrees immediately. For dinner we both chose fish: I selected the sautéed Florida flounder and my dinner companion the yellow fin tuna steak. The freshly caught tuna were ample, thick slices each with a chilly red center and a warm crust of peppercorns and spices. The dish included a large wedge of fennel, lightly caramelized on the grill with a natural

hint of licorice. The dish also included almonds and citrus and then finished in olive puree. My choice was the Florida flounder which included two generous pieces of fish, lightly breaded and sautéed to a golden brown. The fish was fresh and delicate and included a nice portion of quinoa (pronounced keen’waa) which had a delicious nutty flavor, artichokes served two ways and CONTINUES ON PAGE 26

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N E W S W E E K L Y

On a recent crystal clear evening, a deep blue sky and a gentle ocean breeze beckoned us to the water’s edge in search of fresh seafood. We wanted to be as close to the sea as possible, so we chose Cobalt Restaurant and Lounge, the signature restaurant of The Vero Beach Hotel and Spa. An upscale resort located at 3500 Ocean Drive, the Vero Beach Hotel and Spa offers first-class dining in a beautiful ocean-side setting. The dining room is one of the most elegant in the area. We were promptly and warmly greeted by a very professional hostess who led us to a quiet table in the corner. Cobalt is a favorite of guests staying at the hotel and the restaurant is also well supported by local diners. The hotel and restaurant are popular for weddings, formal parties and special events and boasts pristine views of the beach. The restaurant offers inside and outside seating and includes a large cabana beach bar. As we took our seats we were struck by the dining room’s dark rich woods, elegant lighting and large windows that overlooked one of the most beautiful beaches in the area. Outside on the beach, the hotel’s wrought-iron fire pit was warming patio diners and though we were seated inside, the long flickering flames that were visible from our corner table provided a spectacular backdrop against the crashing ocean waves. Dressed in the traditional Cobalt blue shirt, our waiter welcomed us and suggested cocktails. After scanning an extensive wine list, we made


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parsnips. The vegetables were as outstanding as the fish and this wonderful dish could easily be voted as best of Florida seafood. When presented with the list of desserts and after having been so enchanted with the bacon and egg appetizer, we could not resist the sound of a dessert simply titled: peanut butter and jelly. It consisted of a large peanut butter tart hugging the corner of a generous scoop of creamy Concord grape ice cream and completed with coulis - a fresh fruit puree. The

peanut butter and jelly desert was far from simple; it was simply delicious. My dessert, the raspberry and apple buckle, came recommended by our waiter and was right on target. It consisted of warm apple streusel with sweet, tart raspberries and enhanced with crème Anglaise and the rich raspberry coulis. This delicious concoction was topped with ice cream and candied ginger. It was sweet, tart and rich - the perfect combination. Our evening of dining at this magnificent ocean side resort was complete and after a very friendly thank you and farewell from the hostess on our way

out, we left realizing why this jewel of Vero Beach is so loved by the locals. Dinner for 2 before tip and alcohol: $100

Cobalt Restaurant & Lounge

Brunch Sat-Sun: 8:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.

The Vero Beach Hotel & Spa, a Kimpton Property

Dinner Mon-Sun: 5:30-10:00 p.m.

3500 Ocean Dr., Vero Beach FL 32963 772-231-5666 Breakfast Mon-Fri: 7:00-11:00 a.m.

Lounge Sun-Thur: 10:00 a.m.-11:00 p.m. Fri & Sat: 10:00 a.m.-midnight

Lunch Mon-Fri: 11:30 a.m.-2:00 p.m.

Most Major Credit Cards

Cuisines of Vero Sunday Traditions and Weekdays Specials

Simple, Savory & Seaside Offering a menu directly sourced from local farmers, fisherman and artisanal purveyors.

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school and their personalities would just blossom as they went through his basketball program. I think that’s a big credit to him.” “He always seemed to have fun at what he was doing,” Jankowski added. “His take on life has always been upbeat and positive and I think that rubs off on people.” For Avril, being a coach isn’t just about winning and being a principal isn’t just about keeping a school in order. It is about something far more special to him. “I’m pretty big into memories,” Avril

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am, but the nice thing is I didn’t get into education to be a coach,” Avril said. “I was an English teacher and coaching was always just something I did for fun.” To Avril, being the school playwright is just as pleasurable as coaching -- if not akin to it. He remembers who played various roles in his play just as he remembers who played point guard or power forward on his league championship teams. Some of his former students have even come back to teach, and, in turn, put their own children through his programs. “I think the thing that I admire most about Coach Avril -- and this is the No. 1 quality you can have as a coach and as a person -- is that he always got the best out of his athletes,” said Vero Beach High School Athletic Director Lenny Jankowski, who taught and coached football and baseball at John Carroll while Avril was still there. “Not only from an athletic standpoint, but he also brought the best out of them as people as well. I would see these shy freshmen and sophomore girls come into the

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PHOTO BY MIKE BIELECKI

St. Helen basketball coach Howard Avril has won 18 league titles in 30 years.

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VERO BEACH -- Modern society is full of specialists and the sports world is certainly no exception. Rare is the “jack of all trades,” because it usually comes with the unfortunate tag of “master of none.” Even rarer is the Renaissance man -- the person who can take on virtually any task or title and completely own it. St. Helen Catholic School principal Howard Avril has been one of those rare Renaissance men at his school for the last three decades. In addition to his duties as the school’s lead administrator, he’s been the athletic director, boys’ basketball coach, girls’ basketball coach, boys’ flag football coach, taught English and written school plays. Oh, and don’t forget that Avril coached girls’ basketball at John Carroll High School in Fort Pierce for 22 years, too. Spreading himself over several academic and coaching positions over the course of 31 years is impressive enough, but the fact he held most of these posts concurrently is simply remarkable. Avril’s first year coaching the Falcons started humbly enough, with him stepping up, filling a need and being told he would only be coaching on a temporary basis. “The school sort of needed somebody and it went on longer than anyone expected it to,” Avril said. “The principal asked me to do it for a year and they would find somebody else. One thing led into another and I just keep on doing it because it is a passion.” Avril, 61, grew up the son of a New Jersey high school football coach and playing whatever sport was in season. His family later moved to Vero Beach, where he played offensive tackle on the 1969 football team that went undefeated in the regular season. “Sports is part of who and what I

said. “The National Catholic Educational Association does a theme each year, and one year it was a picture of a pair of Converse sneakers hanging on a hook with a couple of desks next to it with a slogan that read, ‘Catholic School is a Community with Memories.’ That just has always stayed with me, and I tell the girls every season, ‘this is your memory.’” With so many years having gone by, is Avril looking to lighten his load? He stepped down as boys’ coach at St. Helen some six seasons ago, giving way to his assistant and former player John Negherbon. He did the same at John Carroll four seasons ago when he retired as John Carroll’s girls’ coach. As passionate as Avril is, he must be planning a retirement party soon, right? “The first year I didn’t coach at John Carroll I drove around at night a lot of times,” reflected Avril. “I would come up to the school, ride an exercise bike or do something. It took a good season to get over not coaching at John Carroll -- I was just itchy. Coaching affects you, and it is a nasty bit of business because it is hard to get out of your system.” As master of his own destiny, Avril likes the fact that he’ll get to choose when he steps down. Just don’t expect him to do it too soon.

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Howard Avril does it all at St. Helen


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Obituaries R. Bradford Burnham R. Bradford Burnham, 90, died Dec. 21, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in Larchmont, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 17 years, coming from Hudson, Ohio. He was president of the Samuel Moore & Co., Aurora, Ohio. He was a volunteer for the Habitat for Humanity and was head of the Moorings chapter of Habitat for 10 years. He was a member of Christ Church, Vero Beach. He was a graduate of Yale University, Class of 1944, and was a member of the Treasure Coast Yale Club. Survivors include his wife of 17 years, Joan Burnham of Vero Beach; sons, Rufus Bradford Burnham III of New York City and David Campbell Burnham of Fishers Island, N.Y.; daughters, Robin Burnham Owen of Bozeman, Mont., Sarah Burnham Malinowski of Fishers Island and Rachel Burnham Van Voorhis of Mattapoisett, Mass.; brother, David Campbell Burnham of Rehoboth, R.I.; 16 grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Habitat for Humanity, Indian River Chapter, 4568 N. U.S. 1, Vero Beach, FL 32967. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Joan Conroy Campbell Joan Conroy Campbell, 87, of Vero Beach and Sorrento, Maine passed away Dec.16 surrounded by her family. Joanie was born in New York City and graduated from Briarcliff Junior College. She married Jack Campbell and they had five children who she shepherded around the country as a military wife. She volunteered many hours working with disabled children. She loved all sports and was very active in the tennis and golf programs at John’s Island. She is survived by sons, Michael (Barbara) of Newburyport, MA, Chip (Molly) of Tulsa, OK, and daughters Leslie Campbell of Winter Park, Lynn Campbell (Hugh Stevenson) of Washington, DC and Leigh Ferguson (Gary) of Vero Beach, five grandchildren, her sister-in law Pauly Carlisle of Bangor,

Maine and several nieces and nephews. Services will be held on January 14, 2012 John’s Island Golf Club at 11:00 am with a reception following the service. In lieu of flowers please send donations to “The Make a Wish Foundation”, 4742 N. 24th St., Suite 400 Phoenix, AZ 850164862 An online guestbook is available at www.Strunkfuneralhome.com

Yolanda ‘Yo’ Fedele Yolanda “Yo” Fedele, 87, died Dec. 20, 2011, in Palm Bay. She was born in Bronx, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 41 years, coming from South Plainfield, N.J. She was of the Roman Catholic faith. Survivors include her husband of 65 years, Joseph A. Fedele of Vero Beach; son, Jerry Fedele of Longwood; daughter, Jo-Ann Moore of Melbourne; and two grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of St. Francis, 1250-B Grumman Place, Titusville, FL 32780. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Barbara K. Gerstell Barbara K. Gerstell, 74, died Dec. 24, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Easton, Pa., and lived in Vero Beach for 18 years, coming from Greenwich, Conn. She was an active member of the Garden Club of Indian River County, Vero Beach, and also an avid bridge player at the Vero Beach Bridge Center. Survivors include her daughters, Daphne Ford of La Canada, Calif., Alison Gerstell of Darien, Conn., and Andrea Topper of San Francisco; sister, Susan Preusse of South Carolina; and four grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Vero Beach, P.O. Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Jayne Gillespie Jayne R. Gillespie, 49, died Dec. 19, 2011, in Vero Beach. She was born in Barberton, Ohio, and lived in Florida and Vero Beach most of her life. Survivors include her mother, Pat Gillespie; daughters, Karolyn Cundiff

and Kari Cundiff; son, James Cundiff; special friend, Steve Kozlow; and three grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the family in care of the funeral home.

Donald C. Mayer Donald C. Mayer, 76, died Dec. 23, 2011, at Holmes Regional Medical Center in Melbourne. He was born in West Allis, Wis., and lived in Vero Beach since 1974, coming from Titusville. He served as chief of anesthesia at Jess Parrish Memorial Hospital in Titusville from 1961 to 1974 and was on the board of the Florida Association of Nurse Anesthetists before joining Punches, Molina, Jaffe, Rossway Anesthesia Group in Vero Beach, retiring in 1997. He was a member of St. Helen Catholic Church in Vero Beach, where he served as president of the Parish Council, and was with the Greeting Committee and Knights of Columbus and a Eucharistic minister. He also was a member of the Indian River Medical Center Auxiliary. Survivors include his wife of 49 years, Mary Ann Mayer; son, Michael Mayer; daughters, Kathleen Fennell and Julie Hartley, all of Vero Beach; sisters, Janice Hansen of Valrico, Nancy Sellers of Cullowhee, N.C., and Patricia Williams of Port St. Lucie; and five grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Samaritan Center, 3650 41st St., Vero Beach, FL 32967. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Lenora Snyder Lenora V. Snyder, 80, died Dec. 20, 2011, at the VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. She was born in Waterloo, Ind., and moved to Vero Beach in 1957 from Auburn, Ind. She was a member of St. John of the Cross Catholic Church, Vero Beach. Survivors include her sons, Randall Snyder of Sebastian, Gary Snyder and Anthony Snyder, both of Vero Beach; daughters, Gail Snyder of Sebastian, Diana Hammond of Chiefland; brothers, Harry Szeman of Fellsmere, Louis Szeman of Waterloo, Ind; sister,

Rose Smeltzer of Vero Beach; seven grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA/Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. Condolences may be sent through www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Almerinda Tracey Almerinda Correira Tracey, 90, died Dec. 22, 2011, at Consulate Health Care. She was born in Fall River, Mass., and lived in Vero Beach for 56 years, coming from Attleboro, Mass. She was baptized as a Jehovah’s Witness in 1950 in New London, Conn., and had been an active member in the local congregation. Survivors include two grandchildren; and sisters, Irene Kidd and Alice Corrigan. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Norman R. D’Allessandro Norman R. D’Allessandro, 58, died Dec. 17, 2011, at his home. He was born in Milford, Mass., and lived on the Treasure Coast since 1992, coming from his birthplace. He was a former manager of Toys R Us of Jensen Beach and Vero Beach and a teller at a local bank. Survivors include his wife of 11 years, Cindy D’Allessandro of Fort Pierce; daughter, Jennifer Ellis of Vero Beach; son, Matthew D’Allessandro of California; stepdaughter, Jami Stoltz; stepson, Justin Stoltz, both of Fort Pierce; brothers, Kenneth D’Allessandro of Milford, David D’Allessandro and Bobby Tondreau, both of Cocoa Beach, and Michael Tondreau of Rochester, N.H.; sister, Carol D’Allessandro of Fort Lauderdale; and five grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Treasure Coast Hospice, 5000 Dunn Road, Fort Pierce, FL 34981. A guestbook is available at www.yatesfuneralhome.com.

Lawrence Burgund Lawrence D. Burgund, 84, died Dec. 26, 2011, at Treasure Coast Hospice in Stuart. He was born New York City and moved to Vero Beach in 1972, coming from Spring Lake, N.J. He served in the Marine Corps in the Pacific during the


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Jack Lee Atchley, 72, died Dec. 23, 2011, at his home. He owned and operated Jack’s Marina on the Indian River in Vero Beach. He was broker/ co-owner of Atchley International Realty with his son. He also was a real estate broker in Tennessee. He was retired as an Auditor for the State of Tennessee. Survivors include his wife, Myra Atchley; son, Alan Atchley; daughters, Alison Albano and April Sugamura; and nine grandchildren.

Michael Bradley Michael J.P. Bradley, 77, died Dec. 26, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. He was born in Harrisburg, Pa., and lived in Vero Beach for seven years, coming from Fort Pierce. He was part owner in his family’s auto parts store, Bradley Auto Parts in Pennsylvania. He was a lifelong member of the National Rifle Association and served on the Police Auxiliary in Pennsylvania. He attended St. Helen Catholic Church and was a member of the Knights of Columbus. Survivors include his wife of 10 years,

David A. Davis David A. Davis, 76, died Dec. 14, 2011, at the VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. He was born in Covington, Ky., and lived in Vero Beach for 25 years, coming from Georgia. Before retirement, he was a Marine drill instructor and later was a yacht boat captain on several vessels. He was a Vietnam veteran with the Marines. He was of the Protestant faith. He was a member of the Vero Beach Wood Carvers. Survivors include his wife of 15 years, Susan Davis; son, Dan Davis of Atlanta, Ga.; daughters, Buffy Perez of Virginia Beach, Va., Krista Gray of Medford, Minn., Karen Fendley of Fort Pierce, Erika Ross of Vero Beach and Stephanie Pope of Leonardtown, Md.; brother, Lou Davis of St. Simons Island, Ga.; sister, Norma Brand of Fairfield, Ohio; several grandchildren; and several great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice House, 901 37th St., Vero Beach, FL 32960.

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Jack Atchley

Rose A. Donovan, 89, died Dec. 29, 2011, at the VNA/Hospice House in Vero Beach. She was born in New Haven, Conn., and moved to Vero Beach in 2010, coming from East Haven, Conn. Survivors include her daughter, Maureen D. Kane of Vero Beach; son, Mark Donovan of Guilford, Conn.; sister, Bernadine Costa of North Haven, Conn.; two grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA/Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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Thomas Chubb Richards of Vero Beach and Elkins, N.H. passed away peacefully on Dec. 25, 2011. He was born March 17, 1926 in East Orange, N.J. and enlisted in the Navy to serve four years during World War II. Following his service in the Navy he married his high school sweetheart, Diana (Wheatley) and they celebrated their 62nd anniversary in October. He worked in New York City as a financial and investment manager for a private family. He lived for forty years in Chatham Township, New Jersey where he served on the Board of Education. In 1993 he moved to Vero Beach where he was a member of the Moorings Club and Trinity Episcopal Church. He is survived by his wife, their three daughters: Louise Preissler, East Lyme, Conn.; Carol Cline, Berkeley Heights, N.J.; Janet Molstad, Madison, N.J.; six grandchildren, a great-grandson; and his sister Gertrude Decker, Woodstock, Md. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to The Pleasant Lake Protective Association, Elkins, N.H. or McKee Botanical Garden, Vero Beach.

Rose Donovan

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Rebecca “Becky” I. Greene, 77, died Dec. 24, 2011, at her home. She was born in Watauga County, N.C., and lived in Vero Beach for 52 years, coming from Boone, N.C. She was a member of Ryanwood Fellowship Freewill Baptist Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include her husband of 60 years, Thomas Greene; sons, Thomas Greene Jr. of Fort Pierce and Mike Greene of Vero Beach; brother, Norman Isenhour of Boone; three grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Memorial contributions may be

Thomas Chubb Richards

Esta L. Martin; sons, Mickey Bradley of Port St. Lucie and Phillip Bradley of Eustis; daughters, Betsy Moody and Mary Ellen Stoken, both of Port St. Lucie; brothers, Frank and Pat Bradley; sister, Eileen Terjak; eight grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be sent to the St. Helen Catholic Church at 2085 Tallahassee Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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Rebecca I. ‘Becky’ Greene

Karen R. Plantz, 71, died Dec. 26, 2011, at the Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Columbus, Neb., and lived in Vero Beach for seven years, coming from Port St. Lucie. She was a member of the American Legion. Survivors include her husband of 48 years, Bernard Plantz; son, Steve Plantz of Vero Beach; daughter, Lashelle Halligan of Crete, Neb.; brother, Gary Robertson of Columbus, Neb.; three grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County, Attn: Connie Cotherman, Asst. Development Director at P.O. Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Treva L. Stephenson died Dec. 24, 2011 at Hospice House in Vero with family by her side. She is survived by her loving husband, William, sons Mike Chnupa (Jan), Scott Chnupa (Lisa), stepchildren, Sheri Stephenson Tanner (Jerry), Bill Stephenson, Jr., Suzzane Gowan (Dwayne), Kristy Barber (Steven) and Scott Stephenson (Ashley); sister’s, Oddessa Andersen (Robert), Patsy Brown and brother Dale Hobbs; grandchildren, Michael, Jr., Candace, Tyler, David, Mandy, Corey, and Tanner; and great grandchildren, Jarrett, Jake, Melanie, Trace, and Tristen. She lived in Vero Beach for more than 45 years and her careers consisted of the banking business, aviation and finally the citrus industry. Contributions may be made in her name to the Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960 and St. Helen Catholic Church, 2000 20th Street, Vero Beach, FL 32960. An online guestbook is available at www.strunk funeralhome.com.

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Lucille K. Ehring, 93, died Dec. 26, 2011, at The Place of Vero Beach. She was born in Baltimore and lived in Vero Beach for five years, coming from Eastchester, N.Y. During World War II, she worked for Glenn L. Martin Aircraft Corp. She co-owned “Ehrings,” the family restaurant in New York City until her retirement in 1988. She graduated from the University of Maryland. Survivors include her son, Edward L. Ehring of Vero Beach; three grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA/Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Karen R. Plantz

Treva L. Stephenson

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Lucille K. Ehring

made to VNA/Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

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Korean War. He was a real estate broker at John’s Island in Vero Beach for 30 years. Over his lifetime, he owned many thoroughbred horses and was involved in the racing industry in Florida, New York and California. He was a special agent investigator in the FBI in New York City, serving under J. Edgar Hoover. He was a member of Holy Cross Catholic Church in Vero Beach. He attended Michigan State University on a football scholarship and later transferred to Seton Hall University, where he was named and inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame. Survivors include his daughters, Marie, Pat, Laura and Ann, all of Martin County, and Kathie of Atlanta, Ga. Arrangements are by Forest Hills Funeral Homes, Palm City Chapel. A guestbook is available at www.foresthillspalmcityflorida.com.


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Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – December 22-December 28 Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

70 Beachside Dr., #203 Orchid Island 1/3/2011 $989,900 12/23/2011 $935,000 Orchid Island Realty, Inc. Bob Niederpruem Norris & Company Debbie Bell

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

800 Date Palm Rd. Veromar 5/12/2011 $595,000 12/27/2011 $554,500 Norris & Company Cheryl Burge Shamrock Real Estate Corp. Christine McLaughlin

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

724 Tides Rd. Silver Shores 5/3/2010 $475,000 12/22/2011 $475,000 Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl Mike Thorpe Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Alina Smith

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1779 Cypress Ln. Seagrove 10/23/2011 $475,000 12/22/2011 $450,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Rosanne Moler Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Christine Hughes

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

895 Island Club Ln. Island Club of Vero 10/1/2011 $379,000 12/28/2011 $357,000 Norris & Company Debbie Bell Norris & Company Chip Landers

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

5601 Highway A1A, 100 N Robles del Mar 3/18/2011 $120,000 12/22/2011 $100,000 Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Beverly Lombardo Weichert Hallmark - VB Realtors Eva Meyers

Mainland Real Estate Sales – December 22-December 28 Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent: Address 5588 57th Ave.

Subdivision Vero Lago

List Date 8/11/2011

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

5825 Magnolia Ln. Bent Pine 10/19/2009 $375,000 12/23/2011 $355,000 Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl Claudia Pascal Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt Joseph Schlitt List Price 219,900

Sell Date 12/23/2011

Sell Price 205,000

Listing Broker/Agent The Lafferty Group RE & Cnsltg/Peter Nacion

8290 Meredith Pl. Stoney Brook Farm 6/19/2011 $275,000 12/28/2011 $265,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Kimberly Taylor Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Lori Davis

Selling Broker/Agent Re/Max Crown Realty/Sean Prescott

Humane Society Pets Of The Week

Sadie

Lulu

Georgia

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Blue

Bear

2 Years Old Domestic Shorthair Female

1 Year Old Domestic Shorthair Female

5 Years Old Turkish Van Mix Female

1 1/2 Years Old Domestic Shorthair Female

10 Months Old English Foxhound Mix Male

7 Years Old German Shepard Mix Male

These and other animals are available for adoption at the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County located at 6230 77th Street. For directions and information call (772)388-3331


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Closeout Items Won’t Be Restocked, Hurry In!

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We’ve tagged hundreds of 2011’s products with reduced in-store pricing, 20-75% below our already great prices. Clearance items are limited and won’t be restocked, so come early for the best selection!

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New-In-Box Overstocks & Closeouts +Huge Savings On Display Model Electronics

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20-75% OFF


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ARTS|ENTERTAINMENT

THE FULL MONTY FROM PAGE 21

the bedroom suffers,” Ewing said. The entire dynamic of the men’s employment situation weighs heavily on their respective lives and each at-

tempt to cope in different ways which invariably become counterproductive. “Jerry just gives up and turns to crime,” Harmann said. “Horse is filled with dismay, failure and a sense of confusion as well as a tremendous

amount of anger and we direct it at each other as well as internalize it.” Amid the swirl of feelings and frustrations, the men nonetheless begin to form a cohesive, supportive unit. “But we realize we’ve got to get creative and it’s the guys getting creative to put on a cockamamie show. We’re trying to make $50,000 and will if we sell out the show. What happens in the process is we form this crazy bond,” Ewing said. That shared support amid their troubles is a saving grace, both agreed. And the circumstances portrayed in the show reflect a mirror image of life in present-day America. “That’s my ride. Horse has no one and these guys become my family,” Harmann said. “They are struggling but even the people living above their means are directly tied to the way government had been functioning.” Ewing thinks people have lost perspective because of the bombardment of the media’s mixed messages. “We’ve been wired and hooked up to news feeds. But there’s no differentiation between what’s important and what isn’t. We hear about Lindsay Lohan more than about how many are being killed in war on any given day,” he said. What The Full Monty is able to do is portray the reality of everyday life. “This show is all heart,” Ewing said.

“This is about the people and the power of theater to bring people together. It’s a big show and everyone’s story gets told.” Harmann agreed that the fiction of the show itself is nonetheless a reality in the context of life today. “This show is so relevant to today and what people are going through – people who can’t find work in some cases for years. We deal with what people go through and the issues are human,” Harmann said. So do they bare all? In a nano-second of brilliantly flashed light, they do. By this time, however, they have totally bared their souls and lives more revealingly than any striptease act. Riverside Theatre’s production of The Full Monty is directed and choreographed by Keith Andrews. The design team includes Ken Clifton (music director); Cliff Simon (scenic design); Lisa Zinni (costume design); Richard Winkler (lighting design); Julie Duro (asst. lighting design); Craig Beyrooti (sound design) with Kyle Atkins (stage manager) and Cassie Apthorpe (asst. stage manager). The Full Monty performs Jan. 12 – Feb. 3 on the stark Stage at Riverside Theatre located at 3250 Riverside Park Drive in beachside Vero Beach. For more information, call the box office at (772) 231-6990 or visit online at www.riversidetheatre.com.


Vero Beach News Weekly