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Ghouls galore The Recreation Department hosts its 53rd Halloween Parade on the streets of downtown VeroPage 14

Halloween on the beach Barrier island celebrates spirit of spookiness with haunted houses and legendary bashes Page 16

Sparkle this season Sassy Boutique unveils the Trina Turk collection that elegantly suits the active lifestyle Page 25

Decision time for city voters Page 3



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What does the referendum vote on November 8th mean for you? More than a year ago, the City Council asked FPL to pursue a potential purchase of the electric system in Vero Beach to help lower electric bills for residents. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been working closely with the City to put together an agreement that is in the best interest of both Vero Beach and our current customers. The referendum on November 8th will help move the negotiations forward. The referendum is not to approve the full purchase and sale agreement. Instead, it simply gives the City approval to lease the land on the power plant site to FPL, removing a potential roadblock if the sale moves forward. If you are one of the many residents who have voiced support for continuing to pursue a sale of the electric system in Vero Beach, you will want to make sure your voice is heard on November 8. Visit www.FPL.com/verobeach for more information.

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sale is beneficial to the citizens of Vero Beach?

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The approval by citizens on the leasing the property to Florida Power & Light, with whom the city is in the beginning stages of negotiations for the purchase of the municipality’s electric system and its 33,000 customers, is considered a necessary step should Vero Beach decide to sell. What has raised concern on one side of the issue is why the vote has to be taken now. There currently are no terms to the lease and no way for voters to judge what impact the sale might have on city finances, payroll, and potential cuts

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_______ No, for rejection

Vero Beach voters will also be deciding on two City Council seats among four candidates. Running for re-election are Tracy Carroll and Brian Heady against former Council member Ken Daige and newcomer Dick Winger. Carroll and Heady have voted with the majority to make it City Council policy to sell the electric utility to FP&L. They also have come out in favor of a yes vote on the referendum. Daige and Winger have also come out in favor of selling the power plant, but want to see the details of the deal before giving their final seal of approval. They are not in favor of a yes vote on the referendum, preferring that the public be provided more details on the sale and its ramifications before placing a ballot question in front of voters.

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They are 65 words that have let loose passionate debate with both sides claiming the future of Vero Beach hangs in the balance. On Nov. 8 Vero Beach City residents will be asked whether or not to approve leasing the city-owned land at the power plant site to a third party should the City Council decide it is in residents’ best interest. The wording is as follows: Do you approve of the lease of the City of Vero Beach power plant site north of the 17th Street Bridge, west of the Indian River, and east of Indian River Boulevard, with the City retaining ownership of the land, for the purposes of selling the City electric utility if the City Council finds that such a

in city services. Further, the Council does not have to come back to the voters (though it could do so if it so chooses) for their approval once the details of the sale have been negotiated. On the other side, those pushing for the sale of the electric system say a yes vote for the referendum is simply a necessary step in the process. There is nothing sinister in the timing, but that it was an attempt to be economical and save voters some money by piggy-backing the referendum with the already scheduled vote for two City Council seats. They point to the language at the end of the referendum that says the lease will be executed only “if the City Council finds that such a sale is beneficial to the citizens of Vero Beach.”

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Electric referendum, two City Council seats set for Nov. 8 vote


LOCAL NEWS

Vero Beach Police investigating rash of Central Beach break-ins VERO BEACH -- Vero Beach Police are asking residents to secure their homes and vehicles after a series of home and vehicle break-ins in the Central Beach section of the barrier island over the weekend. Last Friday morning the police department alerted members of its Central Beach Crime Watch that a home at 245 Holly Road was broken into and among the items taken were computer equipment, a watch, a wallet and jewelry. Police say entry was gained when the burglar entered the victim’s unlocked vehicle, removed the garage door opener, opened the garage door and entered the house. Police received a call at 2:17 a.m., reporting the break-in. Police also reported finding evidence of the crime in the 300 block of Indian Lilac Road and the 300 block of Conn Way, “indicating the suspect left

the area on foot.” Residents were then alerted that sometime early Friday morning there was a burglary attempt at 3845 Indian River Drive, where they found a screen was cut, but there was no entry into the residence. Police say the two Friday morning incidents were related. The following overnight, police were again called out to Central Beach after receiving a report of burglaries to two unlocked motor vehicles at 4:42 a.m. In the course of their investigation police uncovered the following early Saturday morning incidents: -- a burglary to a residence was reported in the 4100 block of Shoreland Drive. A computer was reported as stolen. -- a burglary of an unlocked motor vehicle was reported in the 4800 block of Sunset Drive. Electronic devices were reported as stolen.

-- a burglary of an unlocked motor vehicle was reported in the 700 block of Shore Drive. Entry was gained into the garage, however no entry was gained inside the residence. No items were reported as stolen. -- an attempted burglary was reported in the 300 block of Conn Way. The suspect(s) removed a screen on the rear of the house, however no entry was gained. -- a burglary of an unoccupied garage and vehicle were reported in the 400 block of Live Oak Road. A utility vehicle was stolen, but recovered by officers. -- a burglary of an unlocked motor vehicle was reported in the 600 block of Fiddlewood Road. Golf equipment was reported as stolen. (This burglary is believed to have occurred between Oct. 28 and Oct. 29.) Police do have an eye witness ac-

count of the suspected burglar. He is described as “male, thin build, approximately 5-foot-10 and wearing a light colored hooded sweatshirt and dark colored pants.” No other description was available. The suspect abandoned computer equipment, several small electronic devices, and bags before police arrived on the scene. “The one thing about these breakins is that they were unsecured vehicles,” said Matt Harrelson of the Vero Beach Police Department. “A golf cart was taken in one case and then used to go to other crime scenes. The one thing we are trying to stress to our residents is to secure your property.” As of press time, there were no arrests, but Vero Beach Police were continuing to investigate the burglaries.

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The state’s elections law prohibiting the use of public funds for a “political advertisement” or advocacy of a referendum set to come before voters was the subject of diametrically opposed interpretations by two local government attorneys. Specifically, was it permissible for the Board of County Commissioners to adopt a resolution urging City of Vero Beach voters to approve a Nov. 8 referendum to lease the city-owned power plant site to Florida Power & Light for the purpose of selling the city electric utility if City Council determines it would benefit the city? And similarly, could city council members express their own referendum preferences at a public meeting in Council chambers? Section 106.113 of Florida’s state election statues is tricky and subject to varying interpretations. But based on a consultation with a state elections attorney, County Attorney Alan Polackwich gave the go-ahead to county commissioners to craft and adopt a resolution which recommends that Vero Beach voters approve a Nov. 8 referendum. The resolution was unanimously adopted by commissioners at their Oct. 18 meeting. That approval was in direct contrast to more conservative recommendations made to city council members via memo by acting Vero Beach City Attorney Wayne Coment prior to an Oct. 25 Special Call meeting regarding the electric utility and referendum question. Section 106.113, Florida Statutes, which became effective July 1, 2009, states that “a local government or a person acting on behalf of local government may not expend or authorize the expenditure of, and a person

or group may not accept, public funds for a political advertisement or electioneering communication concerning an issue, referendum, or amendment, including any state questions, that is subject to a vote of the electors.” “Public funds” includes money under the jurisdiction or control of the local government, according to the statue’s provision, and that definition has been broadly interpreted, according to Coment. “This term would include moneys used for public facilities, paid officials and staff, photocopiers to copy agendas and backup materials, advertising, televising and replaying the meeting and similar expenditures,” Coment wrote in his memo to council members. After seeking guidance from state elections counsel and at the request of County Commission Chairman Bob Solari, Polackwich on Oct. 12 drafted a memo to the board of county commissioners which included a proposed resolution stating the board favored the sale of the city’s electric utility and supported approval of the city’s referendum. “I spoke to Florida Elections commission counsel and Gary Holland who is general counsel for the Florida Division of Elections. They had no problem and I had no problem making the resolution. “If the question is can we pass a resolution, I took a look at the law and was comfortable we could do that,” Polackwich said. County administration buildings are served by the city’s power grid and would realize rate savings of $500,000 annually if the utility were sold to FP&L, according to Solari. “We’re one of the larger (city utility) customers and we would save a significant amount of money. When it’s

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BY BARBARA YORESH VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

N O V E M B E R

City, County take differing views on public advocacy

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LOCAL NEWS


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LOCAL NEWS DIGEST Commissioner Solari to seek a second term INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — Bob Solari, who was elected to the County Commission in 2008, has announced he will run for a second term in office. Solari, 59, earlier this month became the first person to file campaign paperwork for any of the commission’s three open seats in the 2012 election. This allows him to seek petition signatures well before they are due June 8, the end of qualifying week. If re-elected, Solari said he plans to build on the commission’s efforts to reverse an image that Indian River County is a difficult area to start a business. Solari, who presently serves as Commission Chairman, said he favors freemarket capitalism and limited government. Indian River County commissioners make $56,122 this year. District 5 includes the county’s barrier island south of County Road 510, plus the stretch of mainland south of 45th Street and east of U.S. 1.

Indian River school board to consider local legal representation INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — The Indian River County School Board voted 4-0 last week to prepare a request for proposals for legal services with the goal of obtaining local representation. Board Vice Chairman Carol Johnson did not attend the meeting. Board members noted while they are soliciting proposals, it doesn’t mean they are changing firms or unhappy with the current legal team of Orlando-based Brown, Garganese, Weiss and D’Agresta. That contract expires in March.

Introducing Vera Bradley at The Beach Shop on the Beach

In other action, the board voted to change district boundaries and numbers to reflect changes made earlier this month by the County Commission. With the changes, Matt McCain moves from District 2 to District 3; Johnson moves from District 3 to District 4; Claudia Jimenez moves from District 4 to District 5 and Jeff Pegler moves from District 5 to District 2. Karen Disney-Brombach’s district remains unchanged. The board also approved a new rule requiring student athletes to report felony arrests within 24 hours.

Environmental officials tell county it must expand recycling program INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — State environmental officials are requiring the county to expand its recycling program to include items like concrete, drywall, wood and roofing materials. The county currently is collecting household items like glass jars, plastic bottles, cereal boxes and metal cans. Todd Westover, general manager of Treasure Coast Refuse, which runs the landfill for the county, is in the final stages of negotiating an addition of concrete-demolition recycling to its existing county contract. County commissioners agreed to an increase of $2.50 per ton to extract metal, cardboard and concrete from incoming solid waste and ship them to processors. A recent county survey shows Indian River County takes in 23,500 tons per year of construction debris, compared with 16,000 tons for St. Lucie County.

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County awards $77,000 jobs grant to Girard Equipment INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — Tankvalve maker Girard Equipment Inc. of Vero Beach, which has grown from six to 27 employees since 2007, received a $77,000 jobs grant from the County Commission to help with its further expansion. Company President Timothy Girard said he expects to add 20 employees in the next three years. “We’re not recession-proof, but we are recession-resistant,” he said. The money will be paid out annually over a three-year period on a job-byjob basis after jobs have been in place for one year. Girard Equipment makes valves, vents, gauges, hoses and other equipment for the tank truck and airline and petroleum industries.

Construction on I-95 from Sebastian north to begin in early 2012 INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — In early 2012, the state will start widen-


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a major customer and 60 percent of the customers are not represented by the city, it’s appropriate to speak up. “My understanding is the point of law is directed at the governmental unit proposing the referendum and the resolution was a unanimous vote consistent with the way the commissioners had expressed themselves,” Solari said. Polackwich’s city counterpart, Coment, also spoke to Holland and advised city council members not to advocate passage or rejection of the referendum issue during their Special Call meeting. “The only issue we were geared to is the expenditure of public funds. I decided to err to the side of the most protection possible by being conservative and giving the best advice. “Our goal is to keep people out of court. There are so many different opinions (on the statute) but there is no

sense in creating more conflict if you don’t have to,” Coment said. Holland was not familiar with the specifics of the issue but told Vero Beach Newsweekly that it was crucial to “look at the definition of a political ad” within the statute’s provisions. “Mere passage of the (county) resolution is not a political ad it’s what they do with it afterwards,” Holland said. City Manager Jim O’Connor who was out of town completing his move to Vero Beach from Virginia during the Special Call meeting concurred with Coment’s advice. “Obviously we have two different opinions and I think Mr. Coment did a good job,” O’Connor said. O’Connor was asked whether it was common practice for one governmental entity to officially attempt to influence the voters of another governmental jurisdiction. “In my career I’ve never encountered that before,” O’Connor said.

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REFERENDUM FROM PAGE 5

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — Bill Glynn, a former Republican Party chairman in Broward County who became active in local beach restoration projects, died Oct. 27. He was 83. Glynn helped push through the county’s controversial beach-restoration project and was a former head of the county Beach and Shore Preservation Advisory Committee. “He was very, very dedicated to beach issues,” Beth Mitchell, a commissioner with the Sebastian Inlet District, said. “He left no stone unturned when it came to hunting money for a project. He was very tenacious.” Glynn, a resident of Summer Place, also belonged to the Barrier Island Coalition, the North Beach Civic Association and Save Our Shores. He moved here in 1989 from Fort Lauderdale, where he had served as chairman of the Broward County Republican Party.

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Bill Glynn, Summer Place resident, who pushed for beach restoration project

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ing I-95 north of Sebastian and replace the high-rise bridge at the county line, according to the Florida Department of Transportation. The 12-mile-long project will begin at the north county line and go to Malabar in south Brevard County. That will link up with the expansions of I-95 that have already been done throughout most of Brevard County. The new project, from Malabar south, is expected to cost $51.8 million to build, plus $4.6 million for buying rights of way along the highway, said Florida Department of Transportation spokesman Steve Olson. The work will add one lane in each direction, turning the four-lane divided highway into six lanes. The new lanes are to go into in the grassy median between the north and southbound lanes. Motorists should start seeing construction during the early months of 2012, Olson said. The exact date of the project’s commencement hasn’t been set.

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LOCAL NEWS DIGEST


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Hibiscus Center helping children for 25 years

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PHOTOS BY MARK SCHUMANN

Cyntheria Collier, Hibiscus Village Mental Health Technician; Tom Maher, Hibiscus Children’s Center CEO; True Ann Price, Hibiscus Village Shift Supervisor; Kenneth Brown, Hibiscus Village Lead Mental Health Technician; Carla Blouin, Hibiscus Village Therapist. BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Through the tireless effort of staff, volunteers and a generous fundraising network, the Hibiscus Children’s Center has been aiding abused, neglected and abandoned children for 25 years. The center is comprised of a network of residential shelters, outreach programs and foster care training sessions throughout Indian River, St. Lucie, Martin and Okeechobee counties in support of an ever-growing population of families in crisis. Currently, the center accommodates 63 residents, with children under the age of 12 residing at the 36-resident capacity Jenson Beach

shelter, and those 12 and older living at the 72-resident capacity Hibiscus Children’s Village in Vero Beach. “We are the emergency room of child abuse,” said Tom Maher, CEO of the nonprofit organization, which provides a range of services to children and families dealing with abuse. “Some of it so egregious, it cannot be discussed.” Last year, Hibiscus provided 17,000 safe nights to children from across Florida. There is definitely a need for these services, as evidenced by a spate of stories in the press about children who fall victim to abuse. In fact, it was a newspaper story about the tragic death of an Orlando toddler in a potty training incident

in 1985 that inspired child advocate LaVaughn Tilton of Jensen Beach and a dedicated group of friends to ultimately develop the Hibiscus Children’s Center. In that case, a three-year-old boy, who had just been taken from his living arrangement because of abuse, was returned home prematurely because there was no bed available for him in a grossly under-funded system. Tenacious supporters The Hibiscus Children’s Center was built and remains sustained by the tenacity, influence and deep, abiding concern of the center’s supporters for the well-being of all children, with particular urgency for those who are

immediately in harm’s way. In 1989, Hibiscus Children’s Center opened its first shelter in Jensen Beach. In 2004 the Hibiscus Children’s Village opened in Vero Beach as a cluster of eight homes which were donated by a generous community through a $5 million capital campaign. The Vero Beach facility rounded out regional programs and housed even more children to provide some semblance of normalcy in their lives. “Some of these kids have never had the same bed from night to night, or a closet to hang their clothes in,” said Carole Casey, who got involved with Hibiscus nine years ago and helps drive fundraising efforts.


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Indian River Medical Center welcomes

M. Nasir Rizwi, M.D., FACC to Indian River Medical Associates M. Nasir Rizwi, M.D., FACC Pulmonary Medicine • Internal Medicine • Cardiology

• Cardiology

Board certified in internal medicine in 1997 and in cardiovascular diseases in 2002, Dr. Rizwi has been practicing medicine in Sebastian since 1983 and a member of IRMC’s medical staff since 2000. He will continue to practice at both current locations; in his office and at his Cardiac Diagnostic Center.

Finding foster families One of the challenges Maher faces in the upcoming year is difficulty recruiting foster families due to loss of income or home ownership in families that would otherwise be interested. While Maher recognizes the problem of child abuse cannot be entirely eradicated, he maintains we can certainly diminish it through prevention and rehabilitation efforts. Data indicates the rate of rehabilitation is good when abused children CONTINUES ON PAGE 10

Medical Office

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Dr. Rizwi specializes in pulmonary medicine, internal medicine and cardiovascular diseases. He was an early proponent of using thrombolytic (clot buster) therapy for heart attack patients in emergency rooms.

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• Internal Medicine

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• Pulmonary Medicine

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M. Nasir Rizwi, M.D., FACC

Dr. Rizwi received his medical degree from the University of Karachi Dow Medical College. He completed his internal medicine internship at St. Francis Hospital in Trenton, NJ, and served his internal medicine residency at Hahnemann University affiliated hospitals in Philadelphia. Following residency, Dr. Rizwi taught residents and medical students at Hahnemann Medical College and the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, as Chief Resident in Internal Medicine. He subsequently completed a pulmonary medicine fellowship at Mt. Sinai Medical Center in Miami, FL, working under Dr. Marvin Sackner and Dr. Adam Wanner, who at that time were hailed internationally as leading lung specialists and authors of many books and research literature. With a strong interest in cardiovascular disease, Dr. Rizwi completed a second fellowship—a cardiovascular fellowship at Mt. Sinai Medical Center in Milwaukee, WI, training under Dr. Dudley Johnson, a pioneer of coronary bypass surgery, as well as leaders in interventional cardiology and electrophysiology.

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Board Certified in Cardiovascular Diseases, Internal Medicine

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quarter of its annual budget which is $7 million this year. At the very time when government funding to special needs groups is being slashed, it is unfortunately when the need in society is the greatest. Support for the maintenance of a four-county expansion plan requires a broad range of partnerships and plenty of fundraising events to generate excitement and raise awareness about the cause. Among the past year’s initiatives, the literacy program ensures that children are taught reading skills, a demonstration of the level of commitment Hibiscus has to life enrichment programs for its children. Last year’s Impact 100 grant helped launch a career preparation program that has businesses mentoring teens living in the village. With the support of seven partner agencies -- including Indian River State College, the Sheriff ’s Office, Workforce Solutions and the Kiwanis Club of Vero Beach - 15 kids are now employed in the community. Other partners, such as PNC Bank, help the kids by teaching them how to open checking and savings accounts, and to “understand America’s free economic system,” said Maher. Maher said Hibiscus also opened an office in Okeechobee. The need for immediate response met a certain threshold, so the organization determined it should have a stronger outreach presence in the community where many of the children may originate.

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“You hear how the money you helped raise is spent on these children and you just feel so good. It’s amazing what’s being accomplished,” she said. While the current economic downturn has resulted in a loss of government funding for the care of abused children, the financial pressures on families has risen and shown its face in the form of increased domestic violence, child abuse and homelessness. Fortunately, Hibiscus has been able to navigate many of the economic perils through consolidation of responsibilities and an active donor network. The previous campaign to raise capital seemed so effortless. Now, the organization has become a template for others to model themselves after, a text book example, if you will, how a nonprofit meets its goals with the cooperation of staff, the board, its guild and foundation. The success of Hibiscus Children’s Center is dependent on the commitment of a dedicated corps of relentless advocates, including Raquel Tilton, Colette Koch, Suzanne Bertman, Stacey Barnett, Heloise Halcomb, Daisy Whitehill and her husband, Cliff Whitehill. It is the effort of these volunteers and hundreds of others like them who keep the Hibiscus programs vibrant. These leaders now look to the future with more plans to be there when a neglected child is in need of help. “It’s harder to raise funds now than it used to be,” said Tilton, who has been active in Hibiscus since 1997. “We just have to work harder.” Tilton helped raise the funds that built the village and continues to benefit the cause by recruiting loyal supporters of Hibiscus. She points to the statistics and the innovative ways the children are nurtured and loved at the center so they don’t perpetuate the cycle of abuse. “You can see and touch where your money is going,” said Tilton. Hibiscus employs 200 people, including 40 therapists, and relies on private donations for more than a

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HELPING HANDS


HELPING HANDS

HIBISCUS FROM PAGE 9

are provided with therapy, stability and a safe place to live. Ultimately, these same people are the future of our society. It is incumbent upon a community to provide these innocent victims with every opportunity to live happy, productive lives without perpetuating the cycle of abuse on someone else. “This is serious business,” Maher said.

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Girls Night Out There are few communities that make philanthropy as fun as Vero Beach and setting the bar is the Hibiscus Center. Everything the organization produces is visually stunning and wonderfully upbeat, mostly because it is blessed with a legion of volunteer angels and board members whose support of a growing population of abused children Judy Phillips, Hibiscus Village Literacy Coordinator; Tom Maher, Hibiscus Chil- is so heartfelt. dren’s Center CEO; Lisa Deleon, Hibiscus Career Pathways to Independence In typical Hibiscus style, this year’s “Girls Night Out” shopping extravaCoordinator; Carla Blouin, Hibiscus Village Therapist. ganza promises not to disappoint, with over 55 vendors and a new venue to ihtj ij accommodate the event’s enormous ecjvy^e growth. The fourth annual pre-holiday buying bonanza is now being held Wednesday, |~} Nov. 9 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Sun Jet Center on Cherokee Avenue near the airport. For the past three years, the event has been held at Holy Cross Church. But with 33 more vendors than last year (and another 20 on a waiting list), the Hibiscus Guild was looking at possible ways to expand. “The airplane hangar where this year’s event is taking place was generously donated at no cost to Hibiscus by Peter Holman, whose family owns Sun Aviation,” said Casey, co-chair of this year’s “Girls Night Out” with Sue Sharpe and Linda Teetz. The hangar’s added space allows the Wednesday night shopping spectacle to broaden its horizons by adding a DJ, tons of merchant participation and a more sophisticated approach by area businesses to reach target markets. “It used to be, we’d buy a few platters of hors d’oeuvres to serve throughout

the event,” said Casey. But this year, 16 local restaurants are donating their specialties – “like a mini Taste of Vero.” Vendors represent loyal supporters of the Hibiscus Children’s Center, as well as an assortment of charitable newcomers from near and far offering makeovers, massages, resort wear and dollhouses. “It’s only three hours long,” said Casey, explaining why she and her cochairs agreed to cap the number of vendors at 55. “We wanted it to be fair to the current vendors making sure everyone has enough time to visit every booth.” “And yes, men can come shop too,” she said. Raising funds for the children Girls Night Out is centered on women getting together to shop for the latest fashions with a chance for fantastic bargains. However, it has a serious purpose in that it helps to fund the children’s crisis center. Vendors pay a fee to put up a booth, sell their inventory or offer their services and promote their businesses outside of the venue. In addition to vendor fees, Hibiscus raises money by selling raffle tickets to win door prizes, which every vendor at the show and other merchants in the community contribute to in some way, meaning there are loads of opportunities for ticket holders to win something. The Hibiscus Guild also hosts its own booth, reselling items from grandma’s attic with the proceeds benefitting the organization’s many programs. Girls Night Out is just one of a series of fundraisers put on by the Hibiscus Children’s Center to help fund its mission to help the most vulnerable in our society. The other big event is the winter gala, for which the imaginations of the Hibiscus ladies take flight each year whipping up the most exotic themes. This year’s gala is entitled “A Night in Vienna”, featuring baroque music and rococo décor, capturing, as usual, all the zest and enthusiasm supporters have for the cause.


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Artist rendering of Hibiscus Children’s Village by Braden & Braden Architects circa 2003


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Community Forum

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Is it black, or is it white? Let’s get our questions right BY MARK SCHUMANN

It has been suggested to me that in raising questions about the Nov. 8 referendum the Vero Beach Newsweekly is not in accord with the prevailing view. To that, my  first response is to question the assumption that the majority of voters will be willing to give this City Council the unqualified permission it seeks in the Nov. 8 referendum. Secondly, I would submit that if we are all thinking alike then perhaps none of us are thinking. Let me be clear.  The Vero Beach Newsweekly is not opposed to selling the city’s electric system.  In fact, we have repeatedly said the party is over, the gig is up, and the time has come for the City of Vero Beach to get out of a business that it is increasingly challenged to manage effectively. However, while we support selling the electric system, we cannot endorse a referendum that is being sold to voters under false pretenses and is not consistent with the spirit and intent of the City Charter. In the Nov. 8 referendum voters are being asked to approve leasing the power plant site as an integral part of an agreement the City Council hopes to negotiate with Florida Power and Light. That question seems straight forward enough. But it is not.

In fact, some members of the governing boards of organizations that have supported the referendum are themselves unclear that if the Nov. 8 referendum is approved, the City Council has neither the obligation, nor the inclination to return to voters for final approval of a sale. At the same time that voters are being misled to believe the City Council needs passage of this referendum in order to continue negotiations with FP&L, they are also being given the false impression that at the end of this process there will be a second referendum. The reality is that there are no such plans to come back to voters for final approval once an agreement has been negotiated between the city and FP&L. One proponent of the Nov. 8 referendum said to me, “It comes down to this. Either you want to sell the electric system, or you don’t.” Believing that voters should be given the details of a lease agreement before being asked to approve it does not preclude one from holding the position that a sale of the city’s electric utility is good idea. To insist that supporters of a utility sale must also endorse the Nov. 8 referendum is to cast this issue in black and white. In fact, it is far more complicated.

A lot of talking, and not much listening While there has been a lot of talking in the current debate over the power referendum, listening appears to be in short supply. In the context of the current debate, I doubt if many who are speaking out so stridently in support or in opposi-

Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

“Doing well by doing good.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

Ian Love, Managing Editor 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com Mike Bielecki, Sports Editor 321-6105 mbwordsmith@gmail.com Christina Tascon, Writer/Photographer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

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To contact one of our contributing writers please call 772-978-2251 or send an email to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

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tion to the power referendum could begin to explain each other’s position, or even identify the concerns underlying those positions. The more both sides talk at each other, rather than listen to each other, the more polarized the debate becomes. Some opponents would have you believe a sale of the electric utility will cause the city to slide into bankruptcy. On the other side, the claim is made that if the city continues to own and operate the electric system, high electric bills will more or less lead to a collapse of the local economy.

Sorting facts from opinions Council members Brian Heady, Tracy Carroll, and Pilar Turner called a meeting of the City Council last week to give the public an opportu-


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EDITORIAL ENDORSEMENTS

Vero Beach City Council: Ken Daige, Richard Winger

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Suggest you have even the slightest reservations about the timing, wording, or politicking behind Nov. 8 referendum, and you may well be tagged as a “closet obstructionist.” If you express support for a second referendum once all the facts are on the table, you could be branded as someone mindlessly clinging to Vero Beach’s drug of choice, the utility transfers that have kept property taxes artificially low and have been a

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Like parachutes, minds work best when open

disincentive to down-sizing city government. The converse is also true. Hint that you think holding a referendum at this point in the negotiations makes sense, and you may find yourself accused of wanting to bankrupt the city or heartlessly fire friends and neighbors who work for the electric utility. Because we are sometimes certain we fully understand what someone is thinking, we literally and figuratively read or hear only the headlines of what they are saying. Among the numerous calls I have received about the Newsweekly’s editorial position on the power referendum, one person registered a particularly strong objection. It wasn’t long into the conversation, though, before the caller revealed that he had only read the headline and not the editorial itself. We might all do well to remember that minds are like parachutes, in that they work best when they are open.

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that approval of this referendum is not important enough to justify misleading people into supporting it based on the false assumption that there will be second referendum. If winning an argument or an election becomes more important than knowing and speaking the truth, it isn’t long before we’re sliding down the slippery slope of employing halftruths in the service of victory.

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While we are aware that reasoning minds can and do see this issue differently, it seems to us that both the timing and the wording of the power referendum only serve to exclude the voting public from any further

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clear that approval of this referendum is all the authorization the City Council needs to complete a buy-sell agreement that includes as a component a lease of the power plant property.  That is a fact each voter should clearly understand, which ever way they choose to vote. Supporters of the referendum are making statements that could easily lead voters to believe a second referendum will be held.  And it seems those misleading statements are being made in order to encourage people who might not otherwise vote in favor of the referendum. Some have suggested that this is a subtle, irrelevant nuance. Really? No doubt, the city would be wise to get out of the power business. Approval of this referendum, though, is not necessary for the city and FP&L to continue negotiations toward that desired goal. Furthermore, accuse me of getting hung up on subtle, irrelevant nuances if you like, but I am also convinced

Power Referendum: No

input in the historic decision to sell the city’s most valuable asset. This referendum is being sold to the public with two false pretenses. First, despite what voters are being led to believe, the Nov. 8 referendum is not necessary in order for the city’s negotiations with FP&L to continue. Second, though many proponents of the referendum would have the electorate believe otherwise, if this referendum passes, voters will likely never be asked to approve a fully and finally negotiated lease of the power plant land, and voters will almost surely never be given an opportunity to weigh in on the final terms of a purchase agreement for the city’s power system. Unfortunately, because the Council has put forward a poorly timed and vaguely worded referendum, the only means voters have of being able to approve the final agreement with FP&L is to vote “no” on the Nov. 8 referendum.

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Beyond a sale of its electric utility, the City of Vero Beach will face important decisions about levels of service, staffing, and taxation. It is simplistic, then, to cast this as a single-issue election. Incumbents Tracy Carroll and Brian Heady have both positioned themselves as single-issue candidates, and both seem to believe they were elected to divest the city of its utilities in their own way, on their own timetable, and at their own price. Of particular concern to us is Carroll’s dismissiveness of the appraisal work done by the very consulting firm the city hired to put a value on its electric system. Then, in perhaps a low point in local politics, Carroll and Heady forced City Manager Jim O’Connor to rescind his offer to answers questions at a voter forum hosted by an opponent

of the Nov. 8 referendum. The city needs and deserves to be governed by Council members who are open minded and committed to consensus building. In the Nov. 8 City Council election we endorse challengers Richard Winger and Ken Daige. Winger and Daige will move the Council forward more deliberatively in its negotiations with Florida Power & Light. Looking beyond the sale, we also believe Winger and Daige will better serve the city as it seeks to resolve many other important issues that will determine the future of Vero Beach for generations to come.

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nity to ask questions about the Nov. 8 referendum. A few of those who spoke at the meeting seemed genuinely interested in learning more about why the referendum is on the ballot now, and how it might ultimately affect the residents of Vero Beach and the city’s power customers in the unincorporated areas it serves. Though some who spoke were seeking more information, many took to the podium to advocate deeply entrenched and thickly encrusted positions. What I also heard at that meeting was more than a little confusion caused by the blurring of facts and opinions. Parties on both sides of the debate are cloaking opinions in carefully crafted language intended to make their claims appear to be statements of fact. For example, to say that this referendum is a necessary first step is not a statement of fact. It is an opinion. According to Acting City Attorney Wayne Coment, passage of this referendum is not necessary in order for the City Council to have begun, or to continue negotiations with FP&L. In taking a position in support of the referendum, one business organization has said, “This referendum itself is not an approval or a disapproval of the electric sale...” That assertion implies that since the referendum does not give approval of the utility sale, such authorization will be required of the electorate at some point. That is simply not true. We hear that, “Voter approval of the referendum would not authorize the city to sell its utility system…” When asked what they think that statement means, most people say it means that once negotiations are concluded, the Council will be required to ask voters to authorize the final agreement.  Not so. The above two statements are at best half-truths, because they seem to lead people to believe something that is not true. It would be more accurate, and more forthcoming, to make it crystal

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Taxpayers’ Association in favor of electric referendum To the Editor: The voters of Indian River County will vote Nov. 8, 2011 on a ballot referendum that reads as follows: “Do you approve of the lease of the City of Vero Beach power plant site north of the 17th Street Bridge, west of the Indian River, and east of Indian River Boulevard, with the City retaining ownership of the land, for the purpose selling the City electric utility if the City Council finds that such sale is beneficial to the citizens of Vero Beach?” The Board of Directors has gone on record in support of the referendum for the following reasons:

1. Passage of the referendum allows the City of Vero Beach to pursue the possibility of a sale to Florida Power and Light of its electrical utility system. If the referendum fails then in all probability a sale would be prevented. This would be unfortunate for the city residents and current users of the city electric system if it would later be proven that the sale of the power plant is in everyone’s best interest. There is no guarantee of a sale even if the referendum passes. 2. Arguments can be made on both sides of the question of whether a sale of Vero’s electrical plant should take place. This is a fair question and one that should receive increased in-

put from all interested parties. The public discussion can only occur and continue with a yes vote and no interested party is harmed by the passage of the referendum. 3. The Taxpayers’ Association exists to provide information to the public concerning the expenditure of tax revenue by our local governments. This is accomplished by our association meeting monthly to review and discuss various budget issues by County and municipal governments and the School Board and Hospital District. We also sponsor public meetings throughout the year with guest speakers of public officials and candidate forums.

4. Everyone is in favor of making the “right choice” on November 8. No one favors waste in government spending. “Nothing is easier than spending the public’s money: it does not appear to belong to anybody. The temptation is overwhelming to bestow it on somebody”- Calvin Coolidge 5. The Taxpayers’ Association only requests that the public discussion be allowed to continue concerning the issue of the sale to FP&L. Vote YES on the referendum to continue the public discussion. Respectfully, Daniel Stump, President The Taxpayers’ Association of Indian River County, Inc.

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR

County offer for city water utility is ‘ridiculous’ To the Editor: County Commissioners have aided and abetted those who scream loudest. They play a game which degrades the civility of the community at large. The BOCC has also instigated movement to force the City of Vero Beach to dispose of its water and sewer assets to the county. The rationale is somewhat unethical, and serves the agenda that big government and big money is better. These utility services were initially provided to county and Indian River Shores in response to their own request. There is a legal method for closure, outlined by the state under which the city serves the county and the Shores. Mayor Tom Cadden has led with professionalism. Why can’t the BOCC lead similarly? Are they incompetent, mad, or just power hungry?

A memo by former County Attorney Will Collins on October 8, 2009 states, “County would not acquire the infrastructure; the city could no longer provide the service, but the infrastructure is the city’s unless we acquire it.” Mr. Polachwich on September 23, 2010 in an eight-page memo says the same, “the infrastructure belongs to the City unless the County buys it. City service would of course stop at the end of the franchise period.” (My emphasis.) Knowing all this, the BOCC still makes a ridiculous offer to purchase the COVB water system and take over the Shores for less than the value of the South Beach infrastructure. To underscore this ridiculous game, the county provides almost no services south of the city limits except maintenance of a few original dirt roads east of the Moorings. The main road is owned by the

state; most subdivisions are gated and own their own streets. As a result, the City made its own “ownership” arrangements with the sub-division associations and the County has NO “right” to anything. Indian River County, in essence, just collects the ad valorem taxes. Utility systems historically last for 50 to 100 years with occasional repairs. Most of the south county system is less than 20 years old. It is valuable. There is a movement floating around the BOCC and staff seeming to say the “bigger a system is, the more efficient it is.” This was the warped thinking of a group led by Gary Wheeler which attempted to bring all municipalities under the county hat. Is this Democratic thinking by a bunch of Republicans? Around 1985 I accompanied the late Darrell Fennell to a town meeting at Orchid, held in the grove

manager’s house on the river. We had seven people in attendance and the reason for the meeting was that the county and state were making noises about rescinding the Orchid town charter. There was a unanimous vote by this small group to fight it all the way to the Governor’s office if necessary. Mr. Fennell and the group then appeared before the County Commission, they voted to ask Rep. Dale Padgett to pull the bill. He did, and look at Orchid today! Self determination and courage is a wonderful thing. We have some council and commission members who put egos before service. We did quite well for years, without high flying developers and freeloaders. We still can! Warren Winchester Warren Winchester is a former mayor of Vero Beach


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BY RABBI MICHAEL BIRNHOLZ

choose to put the referendum on the ballot now? Why not wait until terms of the lease are known? So the question to be asked is will the failure of the referendum kill the sale to FPL? Or is this just more hype and assumptions? It is disingenuous to scare people into thinking all negotiations will stop if the referendum fails. Let’s wait until such time that the terms of the lease are known and then put out a referendum. No more scare tactics please. This sale is very complicated. With the recent news regarding the possibility of other companies who may be interested in purchasing Vero Beach Electric Utility, wouldn’t you be cutting off your

nose to spite your face if you went ahead with a lease at this time? The sale is still probably years away. As has been stated, most of us will be dead before we get cheaper electric rates. One of Vero’s highly paid transactional attorneys stated that though FP&L would like to have an agreement ready for consideration as soon as possible, it may not be ready until the end of the year. Some have stated perhaps the sale of Vero Beach Electric Utility System may take as long as two to three years. Hmmm. When the sale of the electric utility takes place, wouldn’t we want the conditions of the lease to be negotiated as part of the sale? For

instance, voters should know how many years will be on the lease, the financial impact of the lease/ sale, and who is responsible for dismantling the plant at the end of the lease. It’s time to say… enough to scare tactics and just say no to the referendum. This referendum is definitely putting the cart before the horse. The voters in the City of Vero Beach should not vote on any referendum regarding a lease of THEIR land until such time that they know the terms of the lease. This referendum needs to be voted down. Bea Gardner Vero Beach

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To the Editor: There are those that say if the Nov. 8 referendum on the power plant fails it will kill the sale to Florida Power & Light, or at least severely damage it. I say that is hogwash. There is no lease at present between the city and FP&L. This Council needs to show the voter’s terms of a lease before asking the voters for permission to lease the land. On the one hand the Council says a lease is needed in order to sell to FPL, but on the other it is not giving any details on the lease just yet. The Council is saying the terms of the lease will be negotiated down the road. Why did this Council

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Are ‘scare tactics’ being used regarding referendum?

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR

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not, what needed to be repotted or just thinned out) I saw a new sprout. After at least six months but maybe even more the Cassia, long given up as a failure suddenly decided it was time to grow. As I check on these new plants, so long dormant, I realize that all of my time management and awareness has to be steeped in patience and perseverance. I have to work conscientiously on what is in my control, but I also have to create space to let the world grow and develop around me. It is the balance of the two, the harmony of what I give to the world and what the world offers back that brings success to my worthy endeavors in their time. Rabbi Michael Birnholz has served Temple Beth Shalom in Vero Beach since 2002. One of his goals is bringing Jewish values and wisdom to the wider community.

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some seeds that seem to germinate as soon as you plant them in the ground. Within a few days you have a growing plant with new leaves and buds all over it. Other seeds take a little longer. After a week or so a sprout will appear. Then, one must be patient as the roots have to develop so that the plant can flourish. In the last year I have witnessed a whole new growth process. I collect seeds from interesting plants that I see along the way. One pod came from a Cassia plant. I would set up a tray with all kinds of seeds: vegetables, herbs, flowers. My results would vary, but after a week or so I would know what worked and what failed. Time after time the pots with the Cassia seeds would be empty. Maybe they just don’t grow from seeds. Then, this summer as I was weeding through my pots (what was alive and what was

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One of my favorite pieces of wisdom is that we get to the place we are supposed to be when we are supposed to get there. Typically, as I offer this advice I am thinking of the story of the People of Israel who wandered for forty years and two generations on their journey from slavery in Egypt to redemption in the Promised Land. I find countless examples and experience throughout life that resonate with this message: in driving errands, courses of study, working on projects. We either want to get to a place faster than we can or slow the world down to delay and postpone as much as possible. Think about how many time-keeping devices we have around us, how much we talk about being better managers of time, how we classify friends and loved ones as early birds or chron-

ically late. As we manage our lives and mark time we decide that we are or should be in the driver’s seat. We are supposed to be in control. As I reflect on the tasks of life and RABBI our management of MICHAEL BIRNHOLZ time an unexpected teacher came to mind. You may know that I love gardening. Part of my interest in gardening focuses on seeing what I can grow from seeds or cuttings. Some of the experiments work while others just shrivel and die. When you spend time sowing, nurturing and watching seeds to see if they germinate, you gain interesting insights into time and control. I am constantly surprised by the time frame of seed growth. There are

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Tasks of life and the management of time


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Vero Beach Halloween parade soggy, but fun BY CHRISTINA TASCON

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VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Kaitlyn Albrecht was among the winners for her great Medusa costume

This float braved the rain and the riders came out smiling

The rain stopped just in time for little goblins and ghouls to march happily along downtown Vero last Saturday. Moments before the Recreation Department’s 53rd Halloween Parade & Costume Contest began, it had been alternating between sprinkling and steady rain. Nevertheless, Laura Bella and her grandson, Chase Donnon, were the first ones waiting for the festivities. She said they traditionally park in the same spot every year to watch the parade. A few minutes before 10 a.m., the skies lightened and the water turned off as if on cue from Recreation Director Rob Slezak. It was a shorter than normal parade since many floats canceled, but the enthusiasm from the little ones and their parents never faltered. At the end of the route was what every kid was looking for the most – bags of candy. The Community Center was packed wall to wall with wonderful costumes as the judging took place. Slezak said he has seen it all. “Creativity seems to be the thing that brings out the most laughter. Each year we seem to get a costume or two that distinguishes itself from every other one. We fully expect that to happen again this year.” The kids were all adorable but you know some parents had been up all night putting some of the costumes together. A shimmering jellyfish floated by next to a glowing green Medusa with a head full of snakes as Dana Daniels, from Treasure & Space Coast Radio, wrangled spiders, pirates and super heroes on stage. Finally the winners were announced and they were awarded prizes and what Halloween is all about, more candy.


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All the winners hit the stage

Alexander Ruggieri, Antonia Oliveri and John Paul Ruggieri

Brenda & Betsy Perez


SOCIAL | LIFESTYLE

Barrier island celebrates Halloween in style

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BY CHRISTINA TASCON

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VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Dale Hooker, Michelle Baba, Susie Wilson, Lisa Green and Deirdre McDonaugh at the Cobalt Room party

David Lee, Suzann Clements, Manager Joe Smith, Jamie Weber, Joel Brown and Robby McGorry at Waldo’s party

From Riverside Children’s Theatre’s Haunted House to the Ocean Grill’s legendary Halloween Party, the Barrier Island gets in the spirit of spookiness. The theme this year was right out of Jack Sparrow’s haunted fantasy as pirates and wenches enjoyed frightening the hordes of landlubbers who were ushered through the haunted shipwreck at RCT’s Halloween spooktacular. From the torture room to the jailhouse, the costumes and staged sets were extremely polished. At Waldo’s, the Pirate theme was a little more adult and the busty wenches and boozing pirates danced to the sound of Celtic Mayhem. Joe Smith said the weather was a factor this year since they could not use their patio, but everyone was having fun anyway. The Cobalt Room at the Vero Beach Hotel and Spa is known for its poolside theme parties. They had also planned a big outdoor costume contest and Halloween Party, but the weather brought it indoors to the beautiful dining room and bar area. Tao Potgieter, the restaurant manager, said they just had to make the best of it and even though they had to cancel the DJ and buffet, the costume contest still went on. Winners Wayne Bradford and Becky Bazyler’s evil vampire costumes were very realistic. Huddled together in a dark corner when you first walked in the room, they gave you a start. Becky said she did the makeup and hair for them both and it had a chilling effect. They won $100 and a one night stay at the hotel. One of the best beachside Halloween events is held at the Ocean Grill each year. The elaborate costumes and spider web décor are legendary and it seems all of barrier island residents in the mood for a party make an appearance.


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Debbie Bartlett, Emily Eriksen and Ileana Dejesus at Ocean Grill

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Wayne Bradford and Becky Bazyler won Cobalt Room’s costume contest

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Vero Beach Ski Club fashion show draws a crowd

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BY LISA RYMER

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As the temperature hovered around 80 degrees last week, an insufferable humidity choking the air, record numbers showed up at the Vero Beach Ski Club’s fashion show at Joey’s. A blast of air conditioning and a brightly colored collection of winter outdoor wear by Peter Glenn drew an eclectic crowd of county residents to the Miracle Mile eatery for the equally, if not more compelling, prospect of kicking off season with friends and acquaintances at a mid-week happy hour event. “The show drew a great crowd for the restaurant,” says Karl Steene, a member of the 10-year-old ski club, an affiliate of the Florida Ski Council. Comprised of 20,000 skiers statewide, the association is “the largest ski council in the country,” he says. Among the familiar faces at the gathering was County Commissioner Peter O’Bryan and Supervisor of

Elections, Leslie Swan. The eternally elegant Swan is currently embroiled in a campaign to keep her job against candidate Sandi Harpring. “The ski club is not just about skiing,” says David Moulton, president of the club, which boasts between 50 and 75 members. Throughout the year, club activities include a kayaking cookout on a barrier island, an airboat ride potluck, and some kind of social gathering every month. The ski club also books three major trips a year, one an international ski adventure, and two domestic. This year, Banff is on the itinerary. “The vacation packages offer a diverse range of activities other than skiing, including sled rides, shopping, and just mingling with other outdoors people sharing food and drink,” says Jeanie Shearer, the club’s vice president. For more information about the club, visit them online at www. verobeachskiclub.com.

PHOTOS BY LISA RYMER

Ty Warren hams it up in shades of citrus

Mike Swan, Susan Chenault, Freddie Woolfork and John Treadwell


SOCIAL | LIFESTYLE

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Julie Poteat models a Peter Glenn ski jacket

Barbara Kaplan, Karl Steene, Leslie Swan, Phil Flynn

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Tammy Adams ready to hit the slopes in Elaine Jones models a Peter Glenn ski (772) 567-3070 1360 US Highway 1, Vero Beach (Across from Crispers & 12th Street Publix) sk-bunny-chic Peter Glenn attire ensemble


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Community Calendar Every Friday: Farmer’s Market from 3-6 pm in downtown Vero at the corner of 14th Ave. & 21st St. 772-480-8353. Every Saturday: Oceanside Business Association’s Farmer’s Market, 8 amnoon. Ocean Dr. & Flametree Ln. www. VeroBeachOBA.com, 772-532-2455. Nov 2&3: “Going Baroque” Show, 5:30 & 7 pm. $15-$45, performers, dinner. Baroque Music, Cultural Dances. IR Charter High School, 6055 College Ln., 772-567-6600. Nov 4: Downtown Gallery Art Stroll, 5-8 pm, Historic Downtown, free, refreshments & entertainment. Gallery 14: 772-562-5525 or Artist Guild Gallery: 772-299-1234. Nov 4: Darby’s Fine Art Opening Reception for Joel R. Johnson, Contemporary Watercolorist, 5-8 pm. 1902 14th Ave., 772-480-0491, darbyfineart.com. Nov 4: “Building 429 Fall Tour” (Christian Rock Band) at VB High School’s Performing Arts Center, 7 pm, 1707 16th St. Tickets $12 - $25 at iTickets.com or 800-965-9324. Nov 4: Gallery 14 five year celebration featuring abstracts by DL Watson and traditional realism by Alice Ferguson, 5-8 pm. 1911 14th Ave., 772-562-5525. Nov 4, 11 & 18: Master of the King of the Hill Tennis Tournament, The Boulevard & Tennis Club, 1620 Boulevard Village Lane, $8, 5:00 & 6:30 pm. Tennis tournament, raffles, cash bar and dinner. For Youth Guidance. 772-770-5040, ircyouth.com Nov 5: Children’s Art Fair, “Going Baroque” 10 am-3 pm, IR Charter High School, 6055 College Ln., 772567-6600, fairytale craft fair, sand castle art, photo booth, royal costumes. Food vendors, yo yo and hula demos, free to public. 772-567-6600. THURSDAY, NOV. 3

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STAFF PHOTO

Brad and Joann Marshall speak with Jack Tripp, center, about his 1963 Lotus Super 7 featured in the “British Invasion” car show held in Riverside Park Saturday, October 29. Nov 5: Fighting Indian Football Boosters Annual golf tournament at Sandridge to benefit VBHS Football, $75-$85. Dave Morby, 772-571-7323, fightingindiansfootballboosters@yahoo.com. Nov 5: Dolphin Dash 5K run and 1 mile walk. Riverside Park, 7:30 am, $20-$25, to benefit Gifford Middle School Band. gmsband.com. Nov 5 & 6: Pet Photos with Santa Paws at the Humane Society, 6230 77th St., 11 am-4 pm, $15, reservations requested, 772-388-3331 x20. Nov 6: Ride for Recovery Poker Run to benefit The Source, Kiwanis Hobart Park, 5350 77th St., 10 am, $10, family games, food. 772-569-9365. Nov 6: Choral Classics Concert, VB High School Performing Arts Center, 1707 16th St., 2 pm, $10-$12. 772-5645537. Nov 7: AAUW free breakfast/book

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review, “Mockingbird: A Portrait of Harper Lee,” 9:30 am. Richardson Center, 6155 College Ln., 772-5324712. No tickets or RSVP required. Nov 7: “Chocolate, Champagne & Chefs” at Quail Valley River Club to benefit Big Brothers, Big Sisters, 6 pm, 7 chefs serve up chocolate concoctions, $150 per person. 772-7706000, bbbsbigs.org. Nov 7: 20th Anniversary Celebration Homeless Family Center, 6:30 pm, $150, Orchid Island Beach Club, 1 Beachside Dr., 772-567-5537 x326. Nov 8-Dec 6: “Art & Artfulness, Tales of Creators, Critics, Collectors - and Con Artists,” Film Studies. 1:30 & 7 pm Tuesdays, $50-$60, Vero Beach Museum of Art, 3001 Riverside Park Dr., 772-231-0707. Nov 8: Vivaldi in Vero performed by the VBHS Orchestra, Performing Arts Center, 1707 16th St., 7:30 pm.

SUNDAY, NOV. 6

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$10-$15, 772-564-5537. Nov 9: Girls Night Out, Sun Jet Center, 3350 Cherokee Dr., 6-9 pm o benefit Hibiscus Children’s Center. Multiple vendors with complimentary hors d’oeuvres and wine. $25 in advance, $30 at door. 772-492-1662 Nov 9: Impact 100 Membership Breakfast, featuring Emmy-Award winning journalist Faith Daniels, 8:30 am, Quail Valley River Club, 2345 Highway A1A, 772-231-4262. Nov 10: Cynthia Hurst Book Signing of “The Platinum Project: Men in the 21st Century,” Vero Beach Book Center, 7 pm, 2145 Indian River Blvd. 772569-2050, verobeachbookcenter.com. Nov 10: Women’s Rights Luncheon at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 1590 27th Ave., noon, $15 by Nov 3rd. 772-492-1683. Nov 11: Veteran’s Memorial Island Sanctuary Veteran’s Day Salute, Speaker John Darling, 9 am, hosted by the Indian River county Veteran’s Council. 772-569-9533. Nov 11-12: Firefighters’ Chili & Salsa Cook-off, 5-9 pm. Friday PreParty and Jr. Firefighters Challenge and Saturday Chili Cook-off and Contest. Fun family events, entertainment and great food and drink both nights. www.ircffa.org. Nov 12: Veteran’s Ball at The Elks Club, 1350 26th St., social hour starts at 5:30 pm with a buffet dinner & entertainment to follow ceremony. $25 per person. For advance tickets, 772562-8794. Nov 12: Oceanside Business Association Free Concert Series - 6:309:30 pm, music by “Other People”, children’s Christmas toy drive, vendors, food and drink. 772-321-7952. To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

TUESDAY, NOV. 8

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 9

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on radio. The show isn’t about the dialogue as much as the music and singing and overall feeling.” With a cast younger than the WWII era generation, Fielden’s task as a director was to first make the 1940s come alive for her performers. “I had to boost people up in age and teach them the terminology of the 1940s. It was something you had to be around to have known,” she said.

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previously directed Theatre Guild shows as well as many others for professional as well as community theatres, likes the WWII era and believes it will resonate with local audiences. “This show is a ‘feel good’ show and a remembrance of better times despite the war,” she said. “The songs are songs everyone will remember and I love the clothing of those times – all of it. There’s a lot of singing and old-time sound effects that were used

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America was at war in Europe and the Pacific, FDR occupied the White House and members of what was to become the “Greatest Generation” were dancing to the big band sounds of Glenn Miller, Woody Herman and the Dorseys. It was the 1940s -- the era of World War II and silk stockings with seams -- and its essence will be recaptured by Vero Beach Theatre Guild cast members in “The 1940s Radio Hour,” which opens Nov. 10. Directed by Deanna Fielden and featuring a large cast of performers, “The 1940s Radio Hour” is a musical by Walton Jones and will particularly appeal to audiences who recall those halcyon days of pre-television era

radio when sound effects and ones’ imagination helped paint a picture as vivid as anything on a screen. The show – which is set at Christmastime in 1942 - depicts a secondrate New York City radio station and its harried producer-announcer-general manager Clifton Feddington who is trying to record a holiday broadcast for overseas troops while at the same time deal with the dueling personalities of his radio performers. Making his task a challenge are a drunken lead singer, a delivery boy who dreams of becoming an on-air personality and a second banana type who wants to play the lead. It’s all fun and games at the final holiday broadcast of the Mutual Manhattan Variety Cavalcade. Fielden, a theatre veteran who has

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Theatre Guild revives good old days with ‘The 1940s Radio Hour’

PHOTOS SUPPLIED

Jim Daly plays Clifton Feddington, the harrassed producer of radio state WOV.


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Rachel Ellsworth, James Davis and Dana Rogers are part of the cast of “The 1940s Radio Hour” at the Vero Beach Theatre Guild.

THEATRE GUILD FROM PAGE 23

The appropriately “aged” cast features several Theatre Guild veterans including Jim Daly as Feddington; James Davis as Johnny Cantone; Rachel Ellsworth as Connie Miller; Scott Freshley as Neal Tilden; Isaac Holliday as Biff Baker; Joannie Keys as Zoots Doubleman; Dana Rogers as Ginger Brooks; Gary Bruce Sayles as B.J. Gibson; Colette Schweizer as Ann Collier; Neil Stannard as Lou Cohn; Larry Thompson as Pops Bailey and Matt Zyble as Wally Fergusson. A large supporting ‘cast” includes Laura Cooney, stage manager; Sara Dessureau, producer; John Toohey, musical director; Joannie Keys, pianist; Denise Lee, production; Anne Talbot, props; Ann McCabe, costumes; Edward Dessureau, sound; Nicole Hall, lighting; Madelyn Rogers, hair and make-up; Gerry King and Denise Lee, choreography with Tina Cookson and Clara McCarthy assisting. Although America and the rest of the world has changed in the subsequent

70 years since that 1940s era, Fielden believes those WWII days with overseas American troops are evocative of today’s deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. Americans want their service men and women to “come home.” “The show is somewhat parallel to (President) Obama bringing home the troops from Iraq by the end of this year. It is art imitating life and it’s a good reminiscence of a by-gone era,” Fielden said. She is certain that Vero Beach-area theatergoers who attend the show – many of whom have recollection of those times – will leave with a song in their hearts. “I think it will be a great show and audiences will really enjoy it. People will all be singing when they come out of the show. It’s all the sounds and music they once heard,” Fielden said. The Vero Beach Theatre Guild is located at 2020 San Juan Ave. in Vero Beach. For ticket and show information, call the box office from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday at (772) 562-8300.


ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT

VERO BEACH OPERA GUILD 772-569-6993 Box Office:  772-564-5537 verobeachopera.org Nov 5: Live at the Met: Wagner’s Siegfried, noon, Majestic Theatre, 772-770-0774

VERO BEACH THEATRE GUILD 772-562-8300 2020 San Juan Ave verobeachtheatreguild.com Nov 10 - 25: The 1940’s Radio Hour, $20-$22, Walton Jones 1940’s play about a radio broadcast.

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Concerts: Nov. 29, Dec. 18 & Mar 11

1590 27th Avenue, Vero Beach (772)778-5249 www.TheEmersonCenter.org

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VERO BEACH MUSEUM OF ART 3001 Riverside Park Dr 772-231-0707 verobeachmuseum.org Dec 4:  Happy Holidays at the Museum, Santa, activities, refreshments, 10-4 pm, free public event   

B E A C H

VERO BEACH CHORAL SOCIETY Trinity Episcopal Church 2365 Pine Avenue 772-569-8165 Nov 3 - 5: “Better Music Reading in Three Days” $15 Varied time over 3 days. Dec 9 & Dec 11: Winter 2011 Concert, “Tidings of Joy: Sounds of the Season,” at Dec 9 at 7:30 pm and Dec 11 at 3 pm

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RIVERSIDE THEATER 3250 Riverside Park Drive 772-231-6990 riversidetheatre.com Anne Morton Theatre: Nov 18-20: Festival of Trees, Gala Friday 6:30 pm, $75-$150, Festival Sat & Sun: 10 am-5 pm, $3-$7 Children’s Theatre: Dec 9-18: Nutcracker In Swingtime!, $12-$18   Stark Main Stage:   Oct 27-Nov 13: Boeing-Boeing, 2 pm, 7:30 pm and 8 pm, $57-$73 Second Stage: Nov 4-5: Comedy Zone, Ron Feingold and Jerry Costello, 7:30 & 9:30 pm, $15

Emerson Center at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1590 27th Avenue 772-778-5249 TheEmersonCenter.org Nov 13: Featured solo by cellist Aziz Sapaev, 3 pm, $15-$20.

From big name journalists such as Arianna Huffington and Bob Woodward to talking heads like Mark Shields and Joe Scarborough to star gazer and astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson, the Emerson Center’s Celebrated Speaker series has lots of lively conversation set up this season. Arianna Huffington will begin the series on January 14, 2012. Huffington is the co-founder and editor-inchief of The Huffington Post and a nationally syndicated columnist and author of 13 books. In May 2005, she launched The Huffington Post, which was acquired by AOL in early 2011 and she now is in charge of that operation. The Huffington Post is a news and blog site that has quickly become one of the most widely read, linked to and frequently-cited media brands on the Internet. Her latest book, Third World America, published in September 2010, chronicles the struggles of America’s besieged middle class. Columnist and commentator Mark Shields follows on February 4, 2012. Shields has worked in Washington through the administrations of nine presidents and has covered or participated in the last 11 presidential elections. He was an editorial writer for The Washington Post where he began writing his column which is now distributed nationally by Creators Syndicate. Neil deGrasse Tyson will appear on stage three weeks later on February 25, 2012. Tyson was appointed by President Bush to serve on two commissions to study the future of the U.S. Aerospace Industry and its new space vision. Tyson, the author of dozens of professional publications, is the recipient of nine honorary doctorates. Tyson’s latest book Death by Black Hole and Other Cosmic Quandaries was a New York Times bestseller. Former Florida congressman and

current morning talk show host Joe Scarborough will speak on March 10, 2012. He is co-host of M S N B C ’s Morning Joe, a show which features interviews with top newsArianna Huffington makers and politicians along with in-depth analysis of the day’s biggest stories. Scarborough is also the author of The New York Times bestseller The Last Best Hope: Restoring Conservatism and America’s Promise, as well as the 2004 book Rome Wasn’t Burnt in a Day which predicted the collapse of the Republican majority and U.S. economy due to reckless spending in Washington. Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward will conclude the series on March 31, 2012. Woodward provided crucial contributions to two Pulitzer Prizes won by The Post. Woodward is associate editor at the paper and has authored or co-authored 16 books, twelve of which have been national bestsellers. His latest book, Obama’s Wars, focuses on President Barack Obama’s critical decisions about the wars abroad and the worldwide fight against terrorism. The series is sponsored by Wilmington Trust and there are ticket packages from which to choose. Single tickets are $65 and will be made available for sale on December 1. For more information go on-line to www. TheEmersonCenter.org or call the box office at 772-778-5249.

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OCEANSIDE BUSINESS ASSOCIATION Beach Concert Series Ocean Drive in front of Humiston Park VeroBeachOBA.com Second Saturday of every month Free concert, 6:30-9:30 pm, food & drink vendors. No coolers allowed, bring your own chair or blanket.   

Trinity Episcopal Church 2365 Pine Avenue 321-536-8580 SpaceCoastSymphony.org

TREASURE COAST CHORALE First Baptist Church 2206 16th Avenue 772-567-4341 Nov 13: “Here Comes the Bride” wedding music, 7 pm, free with offering taken

TREASURE COAST SYMPHONY

Community Church 1901 23rd Street 772-469-2317 irsavero.org Nov 20: Brevard Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 pm $50 each, season tickets $260-$290

SPACE COAST SYMPHONY

BY IAN LOVE FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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INDIAN RIVER SYMPHONIC ASSOCIATION

SUNRISE THEATRE 116 South 2nd Street Fort Pierce 772-461-4775 sunrisetheatre.com Nov 3:  Todd Rundgren’s Utopia, 7 pm, $39-$49 Nov 4, 5 & 6: Late Nite Catechism, 8 pm, 3 & 8 pm and 3 & 7 pm, $35

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EMERSON CENTER at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1590 27th Avenue 772-778-5249 TheEmersonCenter.org Nov 6: Cellist Ian Maksin, $20.  4 pm Nov 20: “An Afternoon with Basie, Ellington, & Friends,” Jazz on Sundays, $20 in advance/$25 at door/Students Free.  2:30 pm

Nov 11 & 12: “Out of This World” 7 pm, $20$25, free for students under 18

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COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES

Community Church 1901 23rd Street 772-469-2317 communityconcertseries.org Nov 18: Atlantic Ringers, 7:30 pm, free with suggested $5-$15 donation

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Arianna Huffi ngton kicks Entertainment Calendar off Speaker Series

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MT’s Chophouse is a gentlemen’s club where ladies are welcome BY MARK JOSEPH

In a secluded corner of beautiful South Beach sits MT’s Chophouse which is setting the standard for fine dining in Vero Beach The “MT” of MT’s Chophouse is Mark Terheggen, the owner and mastermind of both the store in Vero Beach and a second location of the same name in Gainesville. Mark or “MT” -- as he prefers opened the Vero Beach location 3 1-2 years ago at the same location that once housed former restaurants known as “The Menu” and “Rips BBQ”. All the recipes have been developed personally by MT who has extensive experience as an executive chef. Upon entering the small, beautiful lobby of The MT’s Chophouse, we were soon greeted by a friendly hostess who led us to a comfortable cozy table. “The Chophouse” has a look and feel of a gentlemen’s library; a masculine, yet classy lounge and an elegant dining room with high-back booths that engulf you in complete comfort. For our wine selection, we chose the ‘Slingshot’ Cabernet, 2007 which soon became one of our new favorites; the wine was smooth and a perfect choice for dinner that evening. A pleasant surprise were thick leather-bound books that when opened, revealed a brightly illuminated menu, making your dinner selections much easier to read. The back-lighted menus were whimsical yet practical in the low-lit dinning room.

We began our meal by selecting two featured appetizers: a creamy Lobster Bisque which was thick and rich with chunks of sweet lobster meat. The crispy sourdough bread served upon arrival was perfect for retrieving the last few drops of bisque from the bottom of the bowl. Our second appetizer was an unusual Lobster ‘BLT’ served open-faced and included fresh lettuce, red tomatoes, a slice of apple-wood bacon and a generous portion of lobster, all resting on two planks of thick-grilled bread with a tangy sauce. The presentation was a bit different, but still delicious. For my entree, I chose MT’s Pistachio Ahi Tuna: center-block pieces and sushi-grade, the tuna was encrusted with pistachios blended with a smoky, honey chipotle sauce. The crust was crisp and sweet yet savory and the encased delicate tuna tasted fresh from the ocean. My dinner companion chose a Chophouse favorite, a large, thick Ribeye steak that arrived with beautiful grill-marks, cooked to perfection with a cool red center. Aside from being famous for their chops and fillets, all Chophouse entrees include a choice of two separate sides or “Comfort Side Items”. These signature dishes are far more than just your average starch or veggies and the list is quite impressive. To accompany the steak, a choice of Grilled Vidalia Onion: split in slices, marinated in olive oil and grilled over an open flame. Also selected was the Tomato Mozzarella Stack: a vine-ripened tomato and asparagus spears, sprinkled with warm crumbled bleu cheese, just a hint of basil and balsamic reduction. Both were a perfect

compliment to the meat. The “Mac And Four Cheese” - a Chophouse favorite - was a comfort food side that proved to be a wonderful choice with my Ahi Tuna. The dish lived up to its reputation; tender penne pasta with truffle oil, a mix of Gruyère, smoked gouda, white cheddar and cream cheeses and then baked until the top layer was golden brown. Also selected was the tender baby spinach, sautéed perfectly al dente with fresh chopped garlic and parmesan cheese. After a huge satisfying meal, we initially decided to skip dessert. However, after being tempted by our waiter with descriptions that sounded far too delicious to pass up, we simply could not resist yet another treat. Just when you thought Cheesecake could not get any better, along comes Banana’s Foster Cheesecake: rich and creamy with fresh sliced bananas and a smooth glaze. All that was missing was the flame! My choice was the Chocolate Paradise: a super-rich concoction consisting of a carefully crafted

ring of moist dark chocolate cake, with a creamy lava-like chocolate filling and topped with sweetened whipped cream. Garnished with succulent fresh berries, this dessert is soon to be on my list of Vero’s Best! The delightful treats were both beautifully presented and large enough to share and both provided the perfect ending to a wonderful dining experience at MT Chophouse. Dinner before tip: $130. Wine selection: $49

MT’S CHOPHOUSE 1555 Ocean Drive Vero Beach FL, 32963 Ph: 772-231-2725 www.mtchophouse.com Full bar with extensive wine list Open 7 days a week in season beginning at 5 p.m. Nightly specials, including $5 Martinis on Thursdays. Most major credit cards accepted Reservations suggested.


Holiday fashion adds sparkle to resort wear at Sassy Boutique

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PHOTOS BY LISA RYMER

Toni Houdyshell, Deana Marchant, Jane Segura and (seated) Stephanie Knapp model Trina Turk’s winter collection.

Simple, Savory, Seaside BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Winter resort wear in Palm Springs is seasonally suited for Vero Beach, with both cities sharing similar climates, demographics and a fervor for festive philanthropy. At Sassy Boutique, this year’s return of season in Vero Beach was kicked off with the debut of the Trina Turk collection of winter resort wear, heralding the arrival of northerners for their warm weather getaways. Turk, a Palm Springs native, beau-

tifully captures a feminine aesthetic that is subtle, contemporary, and perfectly appointed for an active lifestyle. Sassy Boutique is the exclusive retailer of Trina Turk in Vero Beach Inspired by Audrey Hepburn, a former seasonal resident of Palm Springs, Turk’s classic, understated dresses and other apparel reflect a desire to be pretty, alluring, current, and comfortable. “The beauty of Trina Turk is that the clothes fit so many different CONTINUES ON PAGE 28

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FROM PAGE 27

Store Manager Jane Segura and Stephanie Knapp model holiday apparel by Trina Turk.

kinds of bodies,” says Deana Marchant, owner of Sassy. “Although the lines are contemporary, they’re not too young.” Hemlines, for the most part, hit just above the knee, and sleeveless bodices provide ample opportunity to display toned and tanned limbs of health conscious women who partake in tennis, golf and boating. This season features jewel tones, basic black and a bit more pizzazz than seen in recent collections, with sequin, rhinestones and even feathers punctuating holiday fashion. “Clothes are more embellished in all the collections this year,” says Marchant. “It may be that we’re trying to spark the economy, certainly we’re staying happy and positive.” The asymmetric cut remains Toni Houdyshell wearing a classic strong this season, with several cocktail length dress from Trina Turk one-shoulder dresses by Trina winter collection. Turk. The designer also continues to dazzle with bold prints reminiscent of other aspects of Hepburn’s era. Sassy Boutique was one of 29 merchants with the Oceanside Business Association that recently raised over $7,000 for the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer campaign. Funds raised at the walk were bolstered by the Shopping for a Cure sales event held by participating beachside stores last month. The store is also hosting a booth at the upcoming “Girls Night Out,” a holiday shopping extravaganza benefitting the Hibiscus Children’s Center, scheduled for Nov. 9 from 6-9 p.m. at the Sun Jet Center by the Vero Beach Municipal Airport. “We’re bringing out the cashmere,” teased Marchant about her tantalizing plans for the booth.

SASSY BOUTIQUE Deana Marchant, chic owner of Sassy Boutique, models a Trina Turk jumpsuit.

3375 Ocean Drive Vero Beach (772)234-3998


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largely viewed as a success, especially given that the athletic department’s budget is 25 percent of what it was when he took over in 2006. Jankowski faces similar challenges with an ever-shrinking athletic budget. His state-ranked football team will still be the catalyst for Vero Beach’s entire athletic program, where the school draws an estimated 80 percent of its revenue for its other sports. Further, Vero Beach High School keeps its high academic standing because Indian River County Schools can cut heavily from the athletic programs. Instead of letting go of teachers the

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“We expect that Mr. Jankowski is going to do a great job, as he’s got the experience -- he was an A.D. when we brought him to Vero Beach,” Seymour said. “Of course, (his previous experience as athletic director at Walton High School) was definitely a consideration because if we brought someone in who didn’t have that kind of experience, someone would have to show that person. The expectation was that he would take part in (the job of athletic director), but we didn’t know that Tim Tharp would be leaving as soon as he did.” Although Jankowski’s five years as Walton High athletic director was considered when he was hired as Fighting Indians football coach back in January, Seymour claimed his current position gained him no additional consideration. “Just like the other candidates, he went through the interview process and talked about what he has done before,” Seymour said. “Most of the people who did apply didn’t have A.D. experience, and he had that under the Florida High School Athletic Association.” Tharp’s tenure as athletic director is

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PHOTO BY MICHAEL BIELECKI

Lenny Jankowski served as athletic director for five years at Walton High

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VERO BEACH -- When Vero Beach High School hired Lenny Jankowski in January as head football coach, it turns out they were also hiring Tim Tharp’s replacement as athletic director as well. Jankowski, 39, took over for Tharp on Oct. 27. “Losing Tim was a great blow to the school,” Jankowski said. “He’s done a great job with athletics and I think a lot of (the success) we see and what we have here is due to his hard work and efforts.” Tharp, who has been a coach and educator for 26 years, spent his first day at South Fork High School on October 24 after spending the past five years at Vero Beach. “It was a very difficult decision after probably two or three weeks of just wrestling with it,” Tharp said. “But I’ve got an opportunity to go into administration at South Fork. The athletic director jobs in Martin County are administrative in nature, and that opens up a great opportunity for me. “That being said and being that it is October, it isn’t ideal for me going down there and it isn’t ideal for the person behind me.” Late October is a time where fall sports are finishing and winter sports are just beginning, which means there are a lot of teams playing their weekly schedules. With Tharp leaving at this particular time of year, there is not only no time for training, but also no time for mistakes. Although there was a selection committee for athletic director position, the final decision to hire Jankowski was made by Vero Beach principal Eric Seymour.

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past few years, the school has slashed things like pay for assistant coaching positions and money for new uniforms. Support groups like the Fighting Indian Football Boosters and Vero Beach High School Girls Lacrosse Booster Club are relied upon by the school district to provide thousands of dollars for these programs, so the continued success of these two traditional powerhouse programs will be vital for Jankowski during his tenure as athletic director. Looking toward the future, Jankowski will have to find replacements at some point for both baseball coach Jeffery Steinman and basketball coach Chuck Loewendick, who will both enter their 23rd year at their respective posts this season. Not that either one needs to be replaced due to performance, the two have just short of 1000 wins between them, but it is a given they’ll have to retire sooner or later. “We do have some great programs with great coaches at Vero Beach High School, and I’m excited to learn more about the rest of the programs,” Jankowski said. “Our boys’ golf team advanced to states last week, our girls’ soccer team was state runner-up last season, and of course our girl’s lacrosse team is a perennial state champion. We have a great community and a tremendous fan base. I know it will be a lot of work and we have a great administration. I think it is going to work really well.”

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He takes over after mid-year departure of Tim Tharp

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Timing right for Jankowski to become Vero High Athletic Director


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Nick Madden quietly passing his way into record books BY MICHAEL BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- Just two weeks before Vero Beach High School’s pre-season contest against Jensen Beach, nobody knew who would start at quarterback for the Fighting Indians. There were two candidates, and both had shown flashes of brilliance. E.J. Pryor, a converted running back, had thrown for over 250 yards in the spring game against New Smyrna Beach and was a very good open-field runner. Pryor’s 311 yards of rushing on over 6 yards-per-carry were impressive for a running back, and that kind of running potential at quarterback was intriguing. Nick Madden had started several games at quarterback for John Carroll the year before, throwing for 838 yards and four touchdowns in relief of injured four-year starting quarterback Justin Osking. At 5-foot-10, 210-pounds, he had also run for 427 yards and three touchdowns, mostly as the team’s fullback before Osking’s injury moved him to starting quarterback. Though it was nip and tuck, in the end Vero Beach football Coach Lenny Jankowski picked the slightly more experienced Madden. “Nick really wasn’t named the starting quarterback until a week before

the Kickoff Classic against Jensen Beach,” Jankowski said. “He’s done it all the right way, through hard work and leadership.” Madden threw for a school-record 346 yards in the first regular season game against Port St. Lucie, erasing Jeff Searcy’s 1997 mark of 342. From there, Madden continued his assault on opposing defenses by throwing for nearly 1,900 yards with 19 touchdowns and just one interception. “At John Carroll we ran, ran, ran the ball,” Madden said. “Going to the spread offense, I knew it was going to be challenging. For the first time in my life I had to study my plays, but I had to study for a straight month. I’m doing well now, but I still make some bad reads.” With just two games to go in the regular season, Madden trails Andy Wilson’s team records of 2,217 yards and 26 touchdowns -- but they are within his grasp if the Fighting Indians make the playoffs. To make the playoffs, though, Vero Beach must beat a tough Treasure Coast team this Friday. “They’ve got some pretty good athletes at Treasure Coast -- we watched a lot of film today,” Madden said. “They’re strong and they are fast. Their quarterback (Travares Copeland) is being recruited as a receiver, and he’s better throwing on the run.

They will put up a good game, but if we can attack the line of scrimmage and if I can hit my receivers, I think we’ll do just fine.” Jankowski agreed with his signal caller, and pointed to Madden’s leadership as one of the team’s singlegreatest intangible qualities. “Nick is obviously a talented kid, he can make all of the throws and he’s got tremendous work ethic,” Jankowski said. Madden credits his offensive line, receivers, and coaches for his standout season. His recruiting is starting to pick up, with Appalachian State showing the earliest interest. “You definitely want to get to college and get your education paid for (playing football),” Madden said. “Some kids don’t sign until May.” “I feel confident Nick is going to be a college player,” Jankowski added. “Nick is a winner, and that’s his No. 1 quality. He does all of the things a 6-foot-4 guy can do, and he is going to make some college coach very happy.” Madden has kept his focus on what is next all season, and for him the goal has been the same. “The most important thing now is winning,” Madden said. “I want to win a state championship for my team, and I’ll play my heart out for them on the field for them to do it.”

Nick Madden Correction In the Oct. 20 edition, Billy Livings’ daughter Libby Livings-Eassa was incorrectly identified as Livy. Also in that tribute section former player Eric Barkett was identified as David. We regret the errors.

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America’s Best Auto Body Shop Inc.

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Perfection Paint & Body

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8:30 p.m. vs. Team Velocity vs. Edward Murphy MD Surgery vs. Jim Rott Home Improv. vs. Wal-Greens / BCM Storage

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Wednesday, November 9th 6:30 p.m. Perfection Paint & Body vs. Team Velocity Real Living All Florida vs. Orchid Island Construction My Electrician vs. Wal-Greens / BCM Storage

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1st Church / Don’s Import Auto Serivce

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Edward Murphy M.D. Surgery

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Kathleen Modesitt State Farm

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Jim Rott Home Improv. & A/C Inc

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Cunningham’s

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Orchid Island Construction

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Vero Beach Sports Calendar Thursday, November 3 – Girls’ Soccer at. Astronaut, 5:30 p.m. Friday, November 4 – Football at Treasure Coast, 7 p.m. Monday, November 7 – Boys’ Soccer at Edgewood, 5:30 p.m. – Girls’ Basketball at Melbourne, 6 p.m. Tuesday, November 8 – Girls’ Soccer vs. St. Lucie West Centennial, 5 p.m. Wednesday, November 9 – Girls’ Basketball at Melbourne, TBA

Clark Chiropractic State Farm Precision Cuts Services Strickland Automotive

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7:30 p.m. vs. Perfection Paint & Body vs. Real Living All Florida vs. Florida Eye Institute

Select Floors Cunningham’s

8:30 p.m. vs. Clark Chiropractic vs. Indian River Dentistry

Monday, November14th 6:30 p.m. Real Living All Florida vs. Stevi B’s Florida Eye Institute vs. My Electrician Edward Murphy MD Surgery vs. Lowther Funeral Home Team Velocity vs. Clark Chiropractic

October 27th Bill Baysura with Dale Sorensen Real Estate Sparta 6, Vero Radiology Associates Razorbacks 0 Spartans Scoring: TD Zach Miller Outstanding Players: Andrew Lawson and Tucker Velde Razorbacks Outstanding Players: James Hassell and Raines Holmes AT&T Real Yellow Pages Tigers 13, Children’s Discovery Volunteers 6 Tigers scoring: TD Hiram Wadsworth, TD Joshua Lattimore, PAT Tate Sanders Outstanding Players: Tracen Cameron and Ty Romans Volunteers Scoring: TD Andrew Klipstine Outstanding Players: Grayson Wolfe and Jason Mercuri October 29th Photography by Michael Siegel Buckeyes 0, Wells Fargo Irish 0 Buckeyes Scoring: 2TD Steven Spangler, 2TD Devin Willis, PAT Jean Galbard Outstanding Players: Major Croom and Jordan Darrell Irish Scoring: TD Jack Carpenter Outstanding Players: Vance Mullanack and Rylan Watkins Indian River Federal Credit Union Seminoles 0, AT&T Real Yellow Pages Tigers 0 Seminoles Scoring: TD Franklin Johnson, TD Dwight Sapp Outstanding Players: Louis Brown and Brandon Neely Tigers Outstanding Players: Tyler McLaughlin and Dylan Reeves

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7:30 p.m. vs. Strickland Automotive vs. Edward Murphy MD Surgery vs. State Farm vs. Precision Cuts Services

October 25th AT&T Real Yellow Pages Wildcats 0, Indian River Federal Credit Union Wolfpack 0 Wildcats Outstanding Players: Adam Rodgers and Chayse McGirt Wolfpack Outstanding Players: Christopher Jacobs and Alek Nieves Yellow Jackets 14, Law Offices of Darryl J. Jacobs Nittany Lions 0 Yellow Jackets Scoring: TD Trey Brady, 2 PAT Mark Hanlon, TD Evan Smith Outstanding Players: Alek Fettig and Ethan Gilbert Nittany Lions Outstanding Players:Mitchell Reeves and Alex Partlow

Stevi B’s State Farm Precision Cuts Services Indian River Dentistry

8:30 p.m. vs. 1st Church / Xpress Mattress vs. Jim Rott Home Improv. vs. 1st Church / Don’s Imports vs. Orchid Island Construction

October 29th Wells Fargo Chargers 0, Vero Beach Radiology Associates Titans 0 Chargers Outstanding Players: Andrew Bickel and Rodney Brown Titans Outstanding Players: Carson Yates and Deion Collins

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7:30 p.m. vs. Select Floors vs. Perfection Paint & Body vs. Real Living All Florida vs. Cunningham’s

Tot-Time

TBALL Juniors October 25th AT&T Real Yellow Pages Steelers 14, Linus GMC Giants 9 Steelers Scoring: Vontravius Richardson 70 yd. kick off return for TD, Vontravius Richardson 2 PAT, Jacobi King 12 yd Giants Scoring: Colin Hiegel 15 yd. Field goal. Austin Strazulla 3 yd. TD Wells Fargo Jaguars 28, Indian River Federal Credit Union Jets 8 Jaguars Scoring: Tommy Spencer 8 yd. TD, Tommy Doane 11 yd. TD, 2 PAT, Trey Grantham 35 yd. TD, Hudson Fennell 2 PAT., Cody Mason 1 yd. TD Jets Scoring: Ryan Thomas 40 yd. TD, Kyle Barkett 2 PAT Midgets

Monday, November 21st 6:30 p.m. Perfection Paint & Body vs. Team Velocity 1st Church / Xpress Mattress vs. Cunningham’s Precision Cuts Services vs. Edward Murphy MD Surgery Lowther Funeral Home vs. State Farm Wal-Green / BCM Storage Edward Murphy MD Surgery State Farm Jim Rott Home Improv. Select Floors 1st Church / Don’s Imports Strickland Automotive

7:30 p.m. vs. 1st Church / Xpress Mattress vs. 1st Church / Don’s Imports vs. Precision Cuts Services vs. Lowther Funeral Home 8:30pm vs. Clark Chiropractic vs. Jim Rott Home Improv. vs. Stevi B’s

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Jr. Mighty Mites October 24th FloridaScapes Lawn Service Gators 25, Indian River Federal Credit Union Seminoles 7 Gators Scoring: TD PAT Morris Payne, 2TD Dylan Redmon, TD Eli Taylor Outstanding Players: Caleb Adair and Jacob Jenkins Seminoles scoring: TD Franklin Johnson, PAT Rianche Anatase Outstanding Players: Gage Gaines and Brandon Neely Photography by Michael Siegel Buckeyes 0, Wells Fargo Irish 0 Buckeyes Scoring: 2TD Jordan Darrell, TD Steven Spangler, TD Major Croom, 2 PAT Raheem Davis Outstanding Players: Devin Willis and Parker Smith Irish Outstanding Players: Zachary Burden and Ramesh Gulati

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Orchid Island Construction Edward Murphy MD Surgery Jim Rott Home Improv. Lowther Funeral Home

FLAG FOOTBALL

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Indian River County Recreation Department Football Scores

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Indian River County Recreation Department Men’s Fall Schedule 2011

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October 24th ACE Plumbing Patriots 19, Indian River Federal Credit Union Cardinals 0 Patriots Scoring: Cornelius Brown 20 yd. TD, 1 PAT., Tyler Burch 12 yd. TD., Isaih Mills 15 yd. TD Wells Fargo Cowboys 6, Norris & Company Real Estate Vikings 0 Cowboys Scoring: Ian Peterson 60 yd. punt return for TD.. October 27th Play It Again Sports Packers 14, AT&T Real Yellow Pages Dolphins 7 Packers Scoring: Sean Parker 12 yd. TD, Quinten Jones 2 yd. TD, Quinten Jones 2 PAT Dolphins Scoring: Daniel Bacon 40 yd. fumble recovery TD, Peznoopeg Trosper 1 PAT The Crockett Group Insurance Rams 8, Indian River Federal Credit Union Cardinals 7 Rams Scoring: Alexios McDonald 6 yd. TD, Braden Dick kick 2 PAT Cardinals Scoring: Hunter Kastensmidt 45 yd. fumble recovery TD, Tyler Gautier kick 2 PAT


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Obituaries Carole Lynne Bostick Carole Lynne Bostick, 68, died Oct. 22, 2011, at her home. She was born in Dayton, Ohio, and lived in Vero Beach for 53 years, coming from Ohio. She graduated from Vero Beach High School in 1961. She worked for the State of Florida Employment Security Division, retiring in 2001 after 17 years of service. She was a member of Living Water Ministries and main benefactor for the new church location on Oslo Road. Survivors include her daughter, Jayme L. Wessell; and three grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Living Water Ministries, 555 Oslo Road, Vero Beach, FL 32962. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Lucia Hobart Bravo Lucia Hobart Bravo, 89, died Oct. 25, 2011, at her home. She was born in Troy, Ohio, and lived in Vero Beach for 14 years, coming from her birthplace. She was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Vero Beach. She was on the board of directors of McKee Botanical Gardens; the Vero Beach Museum of Art education board; a member of the Smith College Club of Vero Beach; the Indian River Land Trust; and past president of the Hobart Landing Home Owners Association. Survivors include her sons, Alexandre H. Bravo of Vero Beach and Stephen L. Bravo of Wolfeboro, N.H.; daughters, Elizabeth B. Benson of Vero Beach, Sylvia B. Larsen of Concord, N.H., and Hylton B. Hard of Seattle, Wash.; brothers, William H. Hobart Jr. of Troy and Peter C. Hobart of Rome, Italy; 12 grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to McKee Botanical Garden, 350 U.S. 1, Vero Beach, FL 32962. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Dianne McCracken Brown Dianne McCracken Brown of South Natick and East Orleans, Mass., and formerly of Wellesley, Mass., and Vero Beach died peacefully at home on Oct.

21, 2011. A lifelong interest in the arts sparked a rewarding career in interior decorating, active participation in the Museum of Fine Arts Ladies Committee, a leadership role in the reestablishment of the historical McKee Botanical Garden in Vero Beach. She is survived by her very beloved husband, Jacob B. Brown, Jr. of South Natick, Mass., was the devoted mother to Elise Sillers of Austin, Texas, Jacob B. Brown III of South Natick and the late Amy Boit of Wellesley, Mass.,and grandmother to seven grandchildren. The family is planning a private service.

William A. Cleary Jr. William A. Cleary Jr., 83, died Oct. 22, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and moved to Vero Beach 21 years ago from Rockville, Md. He received his bachelor of science degree in naval architecture and marine engineering in 1951 at Webb Institute and also was a graduate of the Naval War College in Newport, R.I. He served in the Navy during the Korean War and held the rank of captain, USNR. In 1989 he came to Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, where he taught as an adjunct professor. Survivors include his spouse, three children, several brothers and sisters, and numerous grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds/obituaries.php.

Joe Ann Kelly Joe Ann Kelly, 92, died Oct. 22, 2011, at the VNA/Hospice House in Vero Beach. She was born in Jonesboro, Ark., and lived in Vero Beach for more than 20 years, coming from Binghamton, N.Y. She was a Chinese water colors artist. She was one of the founders of the Artist Guild Gallery in Vero Beach, a member of the New York Pen and Brush and the Vero Beach Art Club. Survivors include her daughters, Kelly Ann Tate of Vero Beach and Karen O’Neil of Westtown, N.Y.; four grandchildren; and two great-

grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Research Consortium, 3855 Health Science Drive, Moores UCSD Cancer Center #0820, La Hoya, CA 92093. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds/obituaries.php.

Leila M. MacAdam Leila M. Fuge MacAdam, 95, died Oct. 22, 2011, at Florida Baptist Retirement Center. She was born in Enfield, Conn., and lived in Vero Beach for 19 years ago, coming from Longwood. Survivors include her daughters, Margaret “Lynne” MacAdam of Galesville, Md., Andrea Errol Fettig and Katherine Anne MacAdam, both of Sarasota; son, Robert Wilson MacAdam of Harwood, Md.; two grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. A guestbook is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Philip C. Nedell Jr. Philip C. Nedell Jr., 71, died Oct. 23, 2011. He was born in Jacksonville and lived in Vero Beach for 66 years, coming from his birthplace. He was a 1959 graduate of Fellsmere High School. He served in the Air Force. He worked as a marine mechanic and retired owning his own business, P&J Marine. He also was a local commercial fisherman. He was a member of New Hope Ministries in Winter Beach. Survivors include his wife, Janie Nedell of Vero Beach; daughters, Gladys “Skipper” Ellis of Port St. Lucie, Phyliss Franks of Peoria, Ill., Michelle N. “Mickey” Servos of Vero Beach and Angie Hughes of Sebastian; and four grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Veterans Council of Indian River County, 1800 27th St., Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Sharon L. Owens Sharon L. Owens, 72, died Oct. 25, 2011, at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. She was born in Dayton, Ohio,

and lived in Vero Beach for 15 years, coming from Toledo, Ohio. She was a member of Kingdom Hall Jehovah’s Witness, Sebastian. Survivors include her sons, Terry Owens of Sebastian, John Owens of Houston and Jeff Owens of Fostoria, Ohio; daughters, Deborah Owens of Toledo, Cheryl Noe of Delta, Ohio, and Karen Mayrand of Dearborn Heights, Mich.; 10 grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren; and five great-great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com. Arrangements are by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory, Sebastian.

John ‘Johnny’ Post John “Johnny” Post, 83, died recently at the VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. He was born in Clifton, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach since 1960. He worked as a postal clerk for 29 years, 21 of which were spent at the Beach Station in Vero Beach until he retired in 1989. Survivors include his daughter, Diane Ford; and one grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to the Mental Health Association, 820 37th Place, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Albert John Todd, Jr. Albert John Todd, Jr., a long time resident of Indian River Shores, died peacefully in his John’s Island home on October 23rd, at the age of 99. He is survived by his brother Winship (Mary Lou) of Richland, Mich., and a sister, Patricia O’Neil (John), of Sausalito, Calif.. He leaves his three children, Priscilla (Ian) Blair and A. John Todd III (Jane) of Kalamazoo, and Henry W. Todd (Pamela) of Falls Village, Conn.; eight grandchildren and 12 great- grandchildren. He was an early resident of John’s Island, purchasing his first house there in 1970. He moved to Florida perma-


33

OBITUARIES

!

William “Billy C” Compton, 63, died Oct. 23, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in Bluefield, W.Va., and lived in Vero Beach for 12 years, coming from Kentucky.

Patricia Halpin, 74, died Oct. 28, 2011, at the Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in New York City and lived in Vero Beach for 5 1/2 years, including Lakes of Pointe West, coming from Plainview, N.Y. She was a parishioner of St. John of the Cross. Survivors include her husband of 53 years, Matthew Halpin; sons, John Halpin, Brian Halpin and Kevin Halpin; daughters, Ellen Halpin, Doreen Cass and Karen Murray and 11 grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital , 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105. A guestbook is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Manon R. Seebeck Manon R. Seebeck died Oct. 25, 2011, at her home. She was born in New York City and was a winter resident of Vero Beach. She was formerly of Winnetka, Ill., and Short Hills, N. J. Survivors include her husband, Robert Frederick Seebeck; son, Robert Fred-

Alyce Williams Alyce Carlson Williams, 86, died Oct. 29, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Rahway, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach for 38 years, most recently at Vista Del Mar and Harbor Chase, coming from East Liverpool, Ohio. She was a schoolteacher at Beachland Elementary School in Vero Beach until retiring in 1985. She attended Trinity Episcopal Church in Vero Beach. She was a longtime member of the Vero Beach Yacht Club, where she was an avid bridge player. Survivors include her son, Kenneth S. Simmen of Vero Beach; daughters, Leslie S. Miller of Oakland Gardens, N.Y., and Joy S. Hamburger of Ridgewood, N.J.; former husband, Fred Simmen of Vero Beach; four grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to Environmental Learning Center, 255 Live Oak Drive, Vero Beach, FL 32963. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

N E W S W E E K L Y

William “Billy C” Compton

Patricia Halpin

B E A C H

Donna Sue Banack, 76, died Oct. 27, 2011, at VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. She was born in Fort Pierce and was a lifetime resident of Vero Beach. She was a member of First United Methodist Church in Vero Beach. She was a graduate of Vero Beach High School, Class of 1952, and attended the University of Florida in Gainesville. Survivors include her husband of 56 years, Sidney Mitchell Banack Jr. of Vero Beach; son, Rusty Banack of Vero Beach; daughters, Cheryl Roseland and Stephanie Banack, both of Vero Beach; sister, Sandra Yencho of Vero Beach; and five grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Association for Retarded Citizens, 1375 16th Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960. Services: A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Paul Leo Caron, 65, died Oct. 27, 2011, at VNA Hospice, Vero Beach. He was born in Peterborough, N.H., and lived in Vero Beach for the five years, coming Leesburg and Merrimack, N.H. Before retirement, he was a carpenter for more than 40 years in the greater Boston area. He was an Army veteran. Survivors include, wife of 40 years, Shirley Caron of Vero Beach; son, Patrick Caron, of Hamilton, Mass.; daughters, Katherine Converse of San Antonio and Michelle Caron of Maricopa, Ariz., and nine grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA Hospice, 901 37th St., Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.aycock-hillcrest.com.

Mary C. Timperio, 66, died Oct. 28, 2011, at the VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. She was born in the Bronx, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach since 2010, coming from Highland, N.Y. She was an artist of oil paintings. She was a member of the Vero Beach Museum of Art and many other local and international art guilds. She was a Jehovah Witness. Survivors include her parents, Dominick and Rose Mary Martorana of Vero Beach; daughter, Amberly Timperio of Vero Beach; sons, Louis Timperio of New Windsor, N.Y., and Richard Timperio of Highland, N.Y.; sister, Joanna Evans of Vero Beach; brother, Dominick Martorana of Highland, N.Y.; and two grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA/Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

V E R O

Wayne “Bud” Varley, 83 passed away on Oct. 22, 2011. He is survived by his wife Joan of 46 years and their 5 children, Glen Berry, Robin Varley, Allison Thomas, Brian Varley, Patricia MacDonald and six grandchildren. He was a volunteer driver for the Indian River County Volunteer Ambulance Squad for eight years. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Indian River County Ambulance Squad, P.O. Box 2240, Vero

Donna Sue Banack

Paul Leo Caron

Mary C. Timperio

!

Wayne ‘Bud’ Varley

Russell Cowan Wright, 85, died Oct. 21, 2011, at VNA Hospice House. He was born Ashburn, Ga. and moved to Vero Beach 20 years ago, coming from Northport, N.Y. He was a veteran of the Army during the Korean War and retired from the Army Reserves as brigadier general. He retired in 1990 as a mechanical engineer in the aerospace industry. He served as president of the Walkers Glen Homeowners Association and attended the First Presbyterian Church. Survivors include his wife of 60 years, Hildur K. Wright; three children;, six grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

erick Jr. and John Seebeck; daughter, Beth Sawyer; and seven grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Hadley School for the Blind, 700 Elm St., Winnetka, IL 60093.

2 0 1 1

Miguel Angel Torres, 79, died Oct. 21, 2011, at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. He was born in Puerto Rico and lived in Vero Beach for eight years, coming from Trenton, N.J. Survivors include his wife, Clara Torres of Vero Beach; daughters, Noelia Bas and Violet Altunabus, both of Pennsylvania; sons, Claudio Torres of New Jersey and Miguel Torres of Pennsylvania; brothers, Jose M. Torres of New York, Luis Torres and Claudio Torres, both of Puerto Rico; sister, Glengloria Torres of Puerto Rico; stepdaughters, Jeannette Schuster of Trenton, N.J., Brenda Elias of Robbinsville, N.J., and Patricia Schuster of Florida; stepsons, William Schuster and Donald Schuster, both of Florida; 12 grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

Russell Cowan Wright

He was an Army veteran. He worked as a coal broker. Survivors include his mother, Jo Ann Compton of Vero Beach; and companion, Ginny Yanuchi of Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

3 ,

Miguel Angel Torres

Beach, FL 32961 or VNA Hospice House, 110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, Florida 32960.

N O V E M B E R

nently from Kalamazoo upon his retirement in 1977 as president of the A.M. Todd Company, the global mint essential oils business established by his grandfather in 1869. He served 10 years on the Indian River Shores town council, six years as the ViceMayor, he retained a strong interest in the welfare of the community, actively participating in fundraising for the United Way and serving on the Finance Committee of the First Presbyterian Church of Vero Beach. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorials be directed to the Indian River Memorial Hospital, 1000 36th Street, Vero Beach, FL 32960 or to Kalamazoo United Way, Inc., 109 Westnedge Avenue, Kalamazoo, MI 49007. An online guestbook may be signed at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.


34 2 0 1 1

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Real Estate

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

N O V E M B E R

3 ,

Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – October 20-October 26

Address 5400 Highway A1A

Subdivision Vista del Mar

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

11860 Seaview Dr. Seaview 9/29/2008 $3,900,000 10/21/2011 $3,075,000 Dale Sorensen tReal Estate Inc. Matilde Sorensen Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Matilde Sorensen

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

4121 Ocean Dr. Chelsea Condo 6/21/2010 $699,000 10/21/2011 $635,000 Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Helen Ederer Seaside Realty Mac Thompson

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1180 Reef Rd., #A24 Billows 11/8/2010 $350,000 10/20/2011 $330,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Grier McFarland The Moorings Realty Sales Co. Judy Hargarten

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1945 Anglers Cove Anglers Cove 5/6/2011 $320,000 10/20/2011 $250,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Christine Hughes Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Mara McAuliffe

List Date 3/31/2011

List Price $99,900

Sell Date 10/25/2011

Sell Price $96,000

Listing Broker/Agent Billero & Billero/Christina Ripple

Selling Broker/Agent Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc,/Mary Pat Slater

Mainland Real Estate Sales – October 20-October 26 Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

5320 Harbor Village Dr. W, #302 Harbor Village at GH 2/25/2011 $595,000 10/21/2011 $500,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Bill Baysura Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Bill Baysura

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

7340 33rd Ave. Copeland’s Landing 1/24/2011 $389,000 10/25/2011 $335,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Matilde Sorensen Re/Max Riverside Skip Gray

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

446 32nd Ave. SW Oak Meadow 7/25/2011 $269,900 10/20/2011 $269,900 Re/Max Classic Kelly Fischer Weichert Hallmark-VB REALTORS Lorry Gartner

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

4225 Amelia Plantation Ct. Amelia Plantation 3/14/2011 $269,500 10/21/2011 $242,000 Weichert, REALTORS Hallmark-VB Dyan Chester Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Stephanie Elliott

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

3011 Golf View Dr. Country Club Pointe 6/1/2011 $259,000 10/21/2011 $230,000 Norris & Company Lillian Ellis Norris & Company Cheryl Burge

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1763 Belmont Cr., SW Millstone Landing 6/21/2011 $225,000 10/20/2011 $220,000 Real Living All Florida Realty Bob Lewis Laurel Agency NMLS AGENT

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1424 St. David’s Lane Grand Harbor St. David’s 3/31/2011 $249,000 10/20/2011 $213,000 Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Stacey Clawson Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Joan Chesley

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

695 Kenwood Dr. SW Kenwood Village 2/6/2011 $235,000 10/20/2011 $200,000 RE/MAX Premier Prop. Showcase Karen Mathers Norris & Company Gretchen Hanson


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