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Playful pachyderms Elephants should have plenty of fun in the sun in Fellsmere Page 10

Star struck Local doctor attends Hollywood premiere of ‘Dolphin Tales’ with Harry Connick, Jr.Page 6

A Vero Beach sunrise as captured by Dawn Currie.

Home field advantage

 How money entices football teams to travel to Vero Beach Page 18

Smooth sailing in passing county budget  Page 3

Gala Gathering Cellist Michael Wiseman delights crowd at Space Coast Symphony concert Page 14

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ing from 5 percent to 13 percent. The county ultimately went with a 5 percent reduction, which was in line with other departments and agencies receiving county funding. “I think we did a pretty good job hammering out everything at the workshop, so by the time it got to the final public hearings everything was pretty much set,” said County Commissioner Peter O’Bryan. Both O’Bryan and Baird noted that the county was helped along by changes in the state retirement system. That change required government employees to pay 3 percent into their retirement fund, where before the county picked up that tab. This year the county will save the contribution which is expected

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most importantly to county residents -- no tax increase. “The goal set by the County Commissioners was not to have any tax increase,” said County Administrator Joe Baird. “And we achieved that.” Back in April it appeared there might not be such smooth sailing after Finance Director Jason Brown asked that Children’s Services’ funding be reduced by 13 percent in the coming budget. That request brought out children’s advocates to County Commission chambers with impassioned pleas to spare those whom they consider the most vulnerable in Indian River County. The Commission relented and had Children’s Services prepare budgets with various reductions rang-

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- Despite slashing the budget 19 percent, Indian River County commissioners met their goal of not raising taxes and quietly approved a $254.8 million spending plan without a single comment from the public. The new budget, which goes into effect Oct. 1, reflects a $60.3 million reduction from the county’s current fiscal year $318.7 million budget. Under the new budget, unincorporated county residents would pay property taxes at a rate of $6.31 for every $1,000 of taxable property value. That is a 0.4 percent increase from the current $6.28 rate, but due to the decline in property values, most people will not see their

taxes go up. Residents of Vero Beach, Orchid and Indian River Shores will pay less to the county because their own municipal governments provide much of their services. The budget was passed Sept. 14 and no one from the public showed up for the hearing. This was in stark contrast to last year when the county closed the lifeguard tower at Treasure Shores Beach Park. That decision was made over the protests of scores of people who showed up in chambers to speak out against the closure and thousands of others who signed a petition drive. This year’s budget passed with no meaningful cuts in service, just a handful of layoffs, and probably

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City Council restores lifeguard coverage in final budget FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The Vero Beach City Council, after hearing from the public to maintain lifeguard coverage of its beaches, restored $10,000 in the budget to avoid leaving some of its lifeguard stations unmanned. The council voted to move the money from a line item in the budget for sand dune restoration to the Recreation Department to return lifeguard coverage to the same status as the previous budget year. The vote came after a number of citizens came forward to request the council maintain lifeguard coverage

BUDGET FROM PAGE 3

to come in at around $4 million. “I think because of the pension

on its beaches either as a matter of safety for beachgoers or practicality in protecting the investment that has been made in promoting Vero Beach as a resort destination. The council briefly considered moving the money from a $19,000 holiday fund for Christmas decorations and then from a $25,000 payment to Mainstreet Vero Beach. However, both those choices were abandoned in favor of the dune restoration fund at the suggestion of City Manager Jim O’Connor . “As an option, we have $21,000 in dune restoration and we have not

used any of that this year,” O’Connor told the council. “We could reduce that to $11,000 and restore the lifeguards. We can come back to you if we need to do some dune restoration.” Council member Tracy Carroll made the further point that the money was not part of the major beach restoration projects the county and city have undertaken in past years. “That funding is not for adding to our dunes, but instead if a hurricane or major storm hits and we need to increase the coverage under our boardwalks,” she said.

At the meeting Council also approved a tax rate of $2.03 per $1,000 valuation compared with $1.94 this year. Declining property tax values, however, will mean on average, taxpayers should not be paying more property taxes to the city. The city will also be ending its furlough program in which city employees took one day of unpaid leave a month with the new budget. Instead of continuing the furlough program next year, various staff reductions will take place and a 5 percent salary reduction for all employees making $70,000 a year and more.

reform savings, we didn’t have to cut a whole lot of positions or services like we did last year with the lifeguards at Treasure Shores Park,”

O’Bryan said. “Without a big item like that to get everybody motivated, everyone thought it was a pretty good situation.” Also absent was any public acrimony between the county and the unions as was the case when the county asked public safety and Teamster-covered employees to forego raises and limit benefits in order to avoid layoffs. “We were fortunate in that other areas are still fighting with their public safety employees,” Baird said. “Our union cooperated and reached a settlement. Remember, employees aren’t getting a raise this year and they are having to contribute to the retirement plan at 3 percent, so their take home pay is actually less. But they cooperated because they understand the economic environment.” The one storm cloud from Baird’s perspective was taking $1.6 million from the county’s $30-plus million reserve fund to keep the budget in balance. Baird had avoided dipping into that rainy day account, but after years of reductions across the board, there was little wriggle room left or budget options available. “We didn’t start relying on reserves as early as other places have,” Baird said. “We used some

for Emergency Services this year and will dip into the general fund for the first time next year.” O’Bryan said that the reserves were such that it was time to begin using them instead of more layoffs or further reductions in services. “We are at the point now where laying more people off, I believe, is a point of diminishing returns,” the commissioner said. “We lost some lifeguards last year and so we have started reducing services. We are bare bones at Utilities and at Road and Bridge. It just seems to me that if you have a pretty substantial reserve, now is the time to use it. Otherwise, why have it?” Despite a healthy reserve account and aggressive budget cutting the last four years, Baird said he has yet to see a light at the end of the tunnel. In fact, it could be years before the county returns to revenue growth as opposed to revenue decreases. “We think we are going to be in the same situation the next two years where we have a reduction in our tax roll and overall we will be flat with revenue,” Baird said. “We don’t project a big turnaround. So we are probably looking at a reduction in our budget the next two years.”

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Quick, what does actor-musician Harry Connick, Jr. have in common with a Vero Beach veterinarian and beauty queen? More than you might think. Connick, Jr., known for those dreamy ‘ol blue eyes, will portray a composite character in the soon-tobe-released movie “Dolphin Tale,” based in part on Dr. Juli Goldstein, a Harbor Branch veterinarian. The film is about a team of scientists who rescued a baby dolphin from the Indian River Lagoon and taught it to swim with a prosthetic tail. Goldstein, herself a blue-eyed beauty who was crowned 2009 Ms. Florida, attended the L.A. premier of the movie last week. The Vero beachside resident is an assistant research professor at Florida Atlantic University Goldstein walked the premier’s blue carpet – instead of red, to represent the ocean – with the head of the Marine Mammal Research and Conservation Program at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Stephen McColloch. Also in attendance at the premier were the movie’s stars, Connick, Jr. and Morgan Freeman, as well as Quinton Aaron, from the film “The Blind Side,” Vanessa Williams, and Marcia Gay Harden. The incident on which the film is based began in December 2006, when a bottlenose dolphin became entangled in a crab trap that cut off circulation to her tail. Rescuers called her Winter for the season the mishap occurred. “Winter had to be transported to the Clearwater Marine Aquarium,” explains Goldstein. “Our own rehab facility (at Harbor Branch) was destroyed during the 2004 hurricanes.” Goldstein and McColloch were at a marine mammal conference in Cali-

fornia when Winter was discovered in the shallow waters of the lagoon. However, they returned immediately thereafter and helped in the long process of nursing her back to health. “Even a baby dolphin with no problems is tremendous work,” says Goldstein, who spent hours in the water coaxing Winter to drink from a baby’s bottle. “Any baby dolphin found alone or beached is un-releasable. Dolphins depend on their mothers to learn how to fish, how to defend themselves, how to get along in the wild.” Goldstein, who has used her beauty pageant title to increase awareness about marine conservation and education, was one of many scientists who helped with Winter’s frequent feeding schedule, wound care and dispensing of antibiotics. Those scientists, along with Clearwater Marine Aquarium CEO, David Yates, who also helped produce the movie, were encompassed by Connick Jr.’s character. Despite the team’s best efforts, Winter’s tail could not be saved. Filmed mostly in Clearwater, the movie tells the story of a young boy (Nathan Gamble) who is involved in Winter’s plight and his efforts to urge a doctor who specializes in prosthetics (Morgan Freeman) to make a new tail for the dolphin. In reality, two employees of Hanger Prosthetics, Kevin Carroll and Dan Strzempka, built Winter’s new tail and created a special gel, which dramatically improves the comfort and ease of wearing a prosthetic. Strzempka, who lost a leg in a lawn mower accident as a child, had a special connection with the dolphin. In helping Winter, he helped many people living with disabilities. That gel material is now also helping to ease the lives of war veterans who have lost limbs fighting in Af

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Eleven county seniors are Merit semifinalists VERO BEACH -- Vero Beach High School placed 7 of the 11 county students to be named semifinalists in the 2012 National Merit Scholarship Program. These seniors can now choose to continue in the competition for some 8,300 National Merit Scholarships,

worth more than $34 million, that will be offered next spring. Students were selected based on scores from the Preliminary SAT exams they took as juniors. Out of the 1.5 million juniors nationally who took the PSAT last year, about 16,000 were named semifinalists. The PSAT is divided into three sections: critical reading, math and writing skills.

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LOCAL NEWS DIGEST

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Board certified in internal medicine, Dr. Bradley Kast is a member of the internal medicine practice of Drs. Richard Franco, Stephen Ritter and Monica Pierini.

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Board certified by the American Osteopathic Board of Internal Medicine, Dr. Kast takes a ‘whole person’ approach to medicine and helps patients develop attitudes and lifestyles that can prevent and fight illness. A strong proponent of preventive healthcare, Dr. Kast received special training in the musculoskeletal system, the body’s interconnected system of nerves, muscles and bones. Dr. Kast provides medical care for: • Acute and chronic diseases (adults) • Hypertension • Diabetes • Preventive medicine • Pre-op clearances • Annual physicals • And other general primary care services Most insurance accepted. Now accepting new patients. Call 794.3364 to schedule an appointment.

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To become finalists, students must make high grades, post comparable scores on the SAT and get a recommendation from their principals. They also have to write an essay. About 90 percent of the semifinalists move on to the finalist level and more than half will win National Merit Scholarships and earn the Merit Scholar title, the release states. The Indian River County students named National Merit Scholarship Program semifinalists are: St. Edward’s High School: Kyle R. Aldrich, Paul A. Colella, Ethan M. Klein Vero Beach High School: Amira M. Al-Khatib, Daniel C. Boling, Heather M Fredrickson, Sami Hashmi, Emily A. Lunn, Ian C. Mackett, Charles H. Sanford Sebastian River High School: Christopher B. Touros

St. Edward’s SAT scores up for a fifth straight year St. Edward’s High School seniors who took the Scholastic Aptitude Test scored an average of 267 points higher than the state average and 214 points higher than the national average. It was the fifth straight year the local private school raised the average test score, which was 1,714 this year. This state and national averages this year were 1,447 and 1,500 respectively. “I think the increase in test scores is what we are most gratified by,” said St. Edward’s Director of Marketing and Communication, Sara Smith. “Every student at the school takes the SAT, compared to the public schools, where only college-bound students take the test.” The SAT test has three sections — critical reading, math, and writing. The highest score possible on each section is 800, and 2400 is the highest total score possible. According to 2008 test scores, only 294 students out of 1.5 million scored a 2400 on the SAT.

Widening of I-95 starts for Indian River County INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -Crews have begun moving construc-

tion equipment in place to start rebuilding seven miles of the existing four lanes of Interstate 95 from Orange Avenue in St. Lucie County to Indrio Road. That work, to be conducted at night, will take about two months. Once that’s done, the same section will be widened, taking an additional year. It’s the beginning of a 19-mile widening of the interstate from State Road 70, known as Orange Avenue, to State Road 60 west of Vero Beach that will cost an estimated $149.9 million and take about three years to complete. When finished, I-95 will have eight lanes from SR70 to Indrio Road and six lanes from there to the Vero Beach exit. The construction company will work only on one lane of the highway’s four lanes at a time. Only a half-mile to 1 mile of highway will be under construction each night. Motorists will see a long line of safety cones and barrels limiting traffic to one lane, and the speed limit will be 60 mph.

City considering tobacco-free parks VERO BEACH -- Signs designating portions of city’s parks and recreation areas as tobacco-free zones could be erected as early as November if the City Council approves a proposed resolution. The city’s Recreation Commission last week heard from proponents of such a resolution, but held off taking action until another meeting can be held with city officials to discuss the proposed signs. The commission is expected to consider making a recommendation to the City Council after that meeting. If a resolution establishing the tobacco-free zones is approved by the council in October, City Manager Jim O’Connor said he would like to have the signs installed in November. The Department of Health will pay for the signs created by the city.


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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- A full day of family friendly activities, including games, exhibitions, music and a food court, are planned as part of the Family Jamboree at the Indian River County Fairgrounds on Oct. 8. Parking and admission are free as

Dr. Edwin Massey, President of IRSC, will give the welcome and Dr. Bruce Fraser, Assistant Dean of Communications and Social Sciences, will give the keynote address for the Symposium of Service at the Kight Center on Sept. 23. The event was created through the Susan H. Johnson Endowed Teaching Chair that was awarded this year to Veronica Tempone, an associate professor of English, Modern Languages and Communications. Through the endowment, a Center for Civic Engagement was established at the college.   The inaugural symposium will feature breakout sessions for faculty and students. The faculty will learn how to implement service learning -- a teaching tool that reinforces coursework, meets community needs, and fosters civic responsibility. Students will learn about new and ongoing service learning projects and take part in a brainstorming activity to create projects, which the faculty may then implement.

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — New sediment samples will be dredged from the Intracoastal Waterway in 2012 to make sure no hazardous materials are dumped in a storage site near Sebastian. The Florida Inland Navigation District Board of Commissioners discussed several aspects of the Dredge Material Management Area IR-2, including a request by Indian River County commissioners to make information about the new sediment samples available to the public. Taking new sediment samples should help alleviate some public concerns about the 480,000 cubic yards of sand and silt FIND antici-

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Thousands are expected for Family Jamboree

Symposium for Service Slated at State College

New sediment tests for Intracoastal Waterway

pates dumping in the dredge material facility, said FIND Executive Director David Roach. “We have agreed to take more sediment samples,” Roach told FIND commissioners. “We’re negotiating how many and what kind. For the community as a whole, not only the members who are directly involved and concerned, but the community as a whole, I think getting additional sediment samples is the right thing to do.” The samples will be tested for elevated levels of contaminants such as heavy metals, pesticides and petroleum products. Residents have expressed concern about the dredge material facility under construction on a 180-acre site between U.S. 1 and the Indian River Lagoon. Among those concerns is whether there are any hazardous materials in sand and silt that will be dredged from the Intracoastal Waterway and dumped in the facility.

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VERO BEACH -- Police have been asked to increase enforcement activity along Live Oak Road and neighboring roadways in the Central Beach area, west of State Road A1A, to address residents’ concern about traffic speeding through the neighborhood. City officials also will consider putting additional stop signs at up to four locations to further slow down traffic in the area. The additional measures are being undertaken after a meeting last week with several dozen residents in the area bordered by State Road A1A, Beachland Boulevard, Live Oak Drive and Indian River Drive East. Those attending the meeting rejected the idea of installing speed tables along the road. The speed tables are flatter and less jarring than speed bumps, but residents viewed the brightly striped humps as ugly objects that could lower property values. Public Works Director Monte Falls said that police made 25 traffic stops in the area in July and August, but many people thought even more of a police presence was needed.

For more information contact Veronica Tempone at vtempone@irsc. edu or 772 462-7704. Registration is free and lunch will be provided.

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Traffic enforcement to increase on Live Oak Road

are most of the activities. New events planned for this year will include a 55-plus dance contest, a community yard sale and flea market, an artists and crafters bazaar and the Vero Beach Recreation Department Aerial Antics Circus. Lauren Chapin, TV star from “Father Knows Best,” will participate as one of the judges of the dance contest, which is sponsored by Champion Home Health Care. Dr. Joe Thomas was named a premier corporate partner and will host both the Main Music Stage and the Food Court for the event. Musical groups that are scheduled to participate include Old Barber Bridge, the Porch Pickers, Spare Change, M.J. Wicker, and Togetherness. For more information email famjam@cross-life.org, phone (772) 5630430 or visit www.FamilyJamboreeIRC.com.

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O’Connor said the city administration is proposing a resolution rather than an ordinance. An ordinance would make smoking or otherwise using tobacco in the zones illegal, while a resolution would merely establish the bans in these zones as city policy. Exactly where the signs would be located has yet to be determined.

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LOCAL NEWS

Fellsmere pays no attention to elephants in the room The prospect of establishing an elephant sanctuary in Fellsmere is big news around these parts, but some county residents and organizations are frustrated by a lack of community participation and transparency in the process. Fellsmere city officials approved the 225-acre elephant center in a former citrus grove on Sept. 9, one day after news of the project was announced to the public. The proposed National Elephant

DOLPHINS FROM PAGE 5

ghanistan and Iraq. Winter’s fortitude of spirit has inspired children and adults to accept the challenges of life with courage, dignity and grace. Now five years

Center will house up to 30 elephants for breeding, research and temporary respite. It is a program supported by 73 accredited zoos. Although not open to the public, the center may also provide educational opportunities to area students and a variation in the landscape along a future greenway. The elephant center will also generate income for Fellsmere Joint Venture on land designated by state and county planners as green space. Ultimately, final approval is con-

tingent on the results of an archeological survey before building can proceed. According to a letter from the state’s bureau of historic preservation, “there are three (3) archaeological sites, which contain human remains, in close proximity to the project area.” The land has never been subjected to an archeological investigation, but one will be required in areas where structures are being built and in areas designated for pasture. If cultural resources are discovered, a plan to “avoid, mini-

old, the dolphin has frequently appeared on television, her smile touching the hearts of millions. While Winter was able to swim without a tail by moving her body side to side, over time that unnatural movement would have injured her

spine, says Goldstein. The prosthetic helps Winter to navigate through the water by moving her tail up and down, like dolphins were meant to swim. The movie simplifies the process of saving a dolphin, which in actuality requires tremendous coordination of people, efforts and resources. Evidence of a dolphin in distress has to first be submitted to the National Marine Fisheries Service, whose approval must be obtained prior to intervening on a dolphin’s behalf. A rescue team consists of animal care handlers, veterinarians, boat drivers and sometimes even a specialized catch boat. Five years after Winter’s rescue, another dolphin, Hope, was stranded in the same area of the lagoon. That dolphin was also relocated to the Clearwater Marine Aquarium because of the status of Harbor Branch’s rehab facility. Now, with the facility up and running, Harbor Branch’s rescue team is gearing up for another mission next week to save a dolphin seen in the lagoon wrapped with monofilament fishing line. “The biggest threat to dolphins is human,” says Goldstein. For more information on Winter and marine conservation, check out Harbor Branch’s new iPad application available through iTunes.

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BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

STAFF PHOTO

Steve McCulloch, program manager of the Marine Mammal Research and Conservation Program at Harbor Branch, with staff veterinarian Juli Goldstein at the ‘Dolphin Tale’ Hollywood premiere.

mize, or mitigate adverse impacts,” will be necessary. A similar project was approved by St. Lucie County commissioners in January 2010. In that deal, county officials had worked with members of the elephant center for at least 8 months, classifying the proposal on 324 acres as a major site plan that invited public discourse. Animal activists both supported and opposed that center, with letters of commendation submitted by Jack Hanna, television host of “Into the Wild,” and Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Opposition was voiced by the Animal Rights Foundation of Florida, which stated, “true elephant sanctuaries provide a permanent home, do not participate in breeding and never allow the use of circus-style training methods to control elephants.” After five and-a-half hours of deliberation, commissioners approved the 10-elephant facility with a condition prohibiting the use of bull hooks, a metal probe that resembles a fireplace poker, as well as oversight and density restrictions. However, despite their declarations of enthusiasm about moving forward with the project, the center’s organizers apparently abandoned those plans to pursue a smaller tract of land owned by Fellsmere Joint Venture. “We never heard anything (about the elephant center’s change of plans) until reading in the paper about it opening in Fellsmere,” said Mark Satterlee, Director of Planning & Development Services for St. Lucie County. For various reasons, the potential for an elephant center in Fellsmere did not prompt the same amount of buzz as it did in St. Lucie County. Fellsmere City Manager, Jason Nunemaker, said the center’s use of land in former citrus groves is consistent with the tract’s current agricultural zoning, and therefore the proposal did not warrant a city council vote of approval. Without it being an agenda


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Currently, the elephant center has no agenda to work with circuses, said Piper, its “fundamental role being to provide care for animals as well as conservation work.” However, it would be something they could consider “if there are circuses that are similarly aligned.” Circuses are notorious for harsh training techniques and keeping elephants chained in rail cars, trailer beds or small pens for extended time periods. In the wild, they naturally travel up to 30 miles a day. According to Piper, there only are 35,000 Asian elephants and 600,000 African elephants left in the wild. Other species’ populations, such as the California condor, have been successfully revitalized by breeding in captivity, said Piper. In 1987, the 22 remaining condors were captured and bred at the San Diego Zoo and the Los Angeles Zoo. After reintroduction into the wild, there are a today a total of 181 condors living in their natural habitat.

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pertain to just this sanctuary, but to all sanctuaries.” Other sanctuaries in the area, such as Save the Chimps, located in Fort Pierce, provide a permanent home for rescued and retired animals. The chimpanzee organization’s mission statement says that it “will not buy, sell, trade, loan or conduct any commercial commerce of chimpanzees,” and it prevents breeding through various types of birth control. In contrast, the elephant center’s purpose is to breed Asian or African elephants “depending on what is needed to maintain populations in North American zoos,” said Craig Piper, vice chair of the elephant center board and CEO/president of the Denver Zoo. Piper says the organization’s conservation efforts will be focused overseas and through breeding programs at the center, alleviating the need to take elephants from the wild for zoo exhibits while building the species’ population in captivity.

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ship with the developer and did not question why the zoo consortium abandoned its plans in St. Lucie County. After hearing what had transpired with the elephant center, County Commissioner Gary Wheeler said that while Fellsmere has a right to do what it wants as an incorporated city, “government at all levels should be transparent.” Although the elephant center issue has not been officially discussed among members of the Indian River Neighborhood Association, said Honey Minuse, chair person of the organization, questions remain unanswered. “A lot of us are excited about the project, but why wasn’t it open for discussion? When something isn’t transparent, you can’t help but wonder what you are hiding,” she said. However, not everyone thinks the public was shut out of the process. County Commissioner, Peter O’Bryan, agrees with the way City Manager Nunemaker handled the approval process. “If we didn’t issue a permit because somebody out there said, ‘I don’t like this, let’s have a public hearing,’ we would never get anything done.” He said, “I can understand the people’s concern, but in Fellsmere’s plan if it is an approved use then that is what it is. If they are worried about how the animals are treated, then there are other agencies that can inspect the facility and take care of those worries.” In response to the announcement that Fellsmere approved the center, the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County issued a statement regarding its concern about the lack of public discourse, and the housing and breeding of non-native wildlife, particularly in a temporary versus a permanent sanctuary. “It is our position that such endeavors are more suitable and humane when accomplished in a species’ natural habitat.” Fritz Spitzmiller, local board president of the Humane Society, said the organization’s statement “does not

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item, the public was cut out from possible discussions. The public was also kept out of the loop by the process through which permitting was obtained. The National Elephant Center applied for permits directly in St. Lucie County. However, permitting for the Fellsmere facility was done through Sunshine State Wildlife Conservation, LLC, consequently flying under the radar of animal activists. On Sept. 15, a letter of objection was filed with the St. John’s River Water Management District by Vero Beach resident, Mike Winikoff, based on the granting of permits for an elephant center under a fictitious name and without a public hearing. “As it stands, there would be no public accountability or access to the center’s records, enabling it to operate under a shroud of secrecy,” he wrote. Fellsmere Director of City Development, Mark Mathes, previously worked with Fellsmere Joint Venture in creating a plan for up to 19,000 residences and business centers on former grove land before he became a city employee. That same land is where the elephant center will be situated. Mathes’ relationship with the developer and his approval of the project within 24 hours of receiving site design plans may have generated public comment had there been an opportunity to do so. Moreover, questions also might have been raised about the contents of a letter to St. John’s River Water Management District from David Tom of Construction Engineering Group, the project’s engineers. “Apparently, the press has found out about this project and we want to make sure this permit is in hand before there is a public announcement in the paper.” Although Fellsmere council member Sara Savage does not recall ever discussing the elephant center at a city council meeting, the residents she has talked to “think it’s great and are glad for the opportunity,” she said. “We don’t see any down side to it.” Savage knew of Mathes’ relation-


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Community Forum Things to know about elephants (soon) to be among us BY LISA RYMER

After all the elephant jokes have run their course, there are a few things you ought to know about our soon-to-be Fellsmere neighbors. First off, they’re big, really big – weighing up to seven tons and measuring as much as 30 feet long and 14 feet high, from ground to shoulder, with heads and ears differing in size depending on whether it’s an African or Asian elephant. African elephants are the largest land dwelling mammal in the world; Asian elephants are the second largest. It’s amazing that these animals are vegetarians, but they still get as big as a house. Their diet consists of grass, roots, fruit and bark, with an adult elephant consuming about 300 pounds of food a day. An elephant’s trunk has close to 100,000 muscles and serves a variety of functions: breathing, smelling, drinking and an arm-like appendage enabling them to grab things, such as more food, and to spray themselves with water. In addition to their cooling “showers,” another mechanism to reduce body heat is the elephant’s ears, a biological necessity in their natural hot-climate habitats. They are able

to flap their ears like a fan, while the large surface area of the ear allows for greater evaporation – or radiation -- of heat. In contrast, many coldclimate animals have small ears to reduce heat loss. Typically, only male Asian elephants have tusks, while both male and female African elephants develop these upper incisor teeth, which enable them to dig, debark and defend. Made of ivory, elephants have long been victim of hunters interested in only their tusks for trade.

In 1975, the Asian elephant was placed on the international endangered species list. Currently, there are approximately 35,000 left in the wild. The African elephant, whose numbers are estimated at 600,000, was listed on the international endangered species list in 1990. In 1989, the sale of ivory from elephant tusks was deemed illegal. Unfortunately, elephant tusks are still sought by poachers, partly fueled by a temporary lift on the ban of ivory sales in 2008, intended to deplete

Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

“Doing good by doing right.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

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old stockpiles from elephants that had died of natural causes. Elephants, on average, live 60 years. As a species, they are a matriarchal society, the herd led by the largest adult females (cows), who are fiercely protective of their young. The gestation period of a baby elephant (calf) is 22 months, weighing about 200 pounds at birth. Unlike many four-legged mammals, a female elephant’s udders are located between its front legs. Adult males (bulls) leave the herd at puberty, around age 13, to roam alone or congregate briefly with other males. Elephants are known to stampede, a herd impulse behavior where animals start running with no clear direction and for no apparent purpose. A stampede can be provoked by anything from an inexplicable fright reaction of one animal to a bolt of lightning. Stampeding elephant herds have been known to pummel everything in their wake, including vegetation, constraints and villages. The majority of African elephants live in the dry sub-Saharan savannahs, although there are smaller populations in the mountain regions and rain forests. Indian elephants also live in the grass-like prairies for the most part, although because of the monsoon season the animals are accustomed to wetter climates. Communication amongst the herd takes place through the trumpeting of trunks and, as has been recently discovered, through the sub-sonic rumblings that travel across the earth more rapidly than through the air. These rumblings are believed to be received through the sensitive skin on the elephant’s feet or through their trunks. The old adage referring to an elephant’s memory is actually based on fact. During times of drought, CONTINUES ON PAGE 11


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COMMUNITY FORUM

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EDITORIAL

How about just the facts

Apparently I had shifted from a running watch to an explorer model that is made for going out into the wilderness. It seems like a handy device to have conveniently on one’s watch, RABBI but there is a small MICHAEL BIRNHOLZ problem.  I am not sure of the accuracy of the compass. When I look at the compass, rather than allowing its mechanism to orient me, I find myself orienting to where I know north, east, south, and west are and then checking to see if the compass on the watch is lined up.  I am orienting it, instead of the other way around. It seems like a strange paradox or irony (depending how you want to define these terms), but I realize there are times we do this when we

read texts or do religious rituals. In Deuteronomy 26 there is a powerful ritual for bringing an offering of first fruit to the ancient sanctuary.  As one brought the first fruits of one’s trees to the priest one recited a summary of the history of the people of Israel.  It begins: Arame oved avi.  Rabbinic sages translated this Hebrew in two ways.  Either my father (Abraham) was a wandering Aramean;  or an Aramean (Laban) oppressed my father (Jacob).  In an extended commentary on this passage the Rabbis point out that depending on how we read the text, the story of the people of Israel begins with the need to leave the old behind and find something new or with the escape and survival from oppression.  I find this pattern throughout religion as many stories and rituals (usually some of the best) have multiple meanings or perspectives that help us orient ourselves to God, our values,

to a way to deal with and find the holy in our world. Typically, we expect religion to be the authority for orienting us in our world.  This does not always happen. There are times when to use texts or rituals or understand them or relate to them, we have to manipulate these texts and rituals much like the compass on my watch.  If we don’t get a meaningful or helpful heading at first we have to shake them up a little or try another angle to see if the stories or rituals are actually pointing us in the right direction.  It is a reminder that we have to be patient and creative when we use these incredible tools for dealing with challenges of life and searching for meaning in our world. Rabbi Michael Birnholz has served Temple Beth Shalom in Vero Beach since 2002. One of his goals is bringing Jewish values and wisdom to the wider community.

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When it comes to watches, sunglasses and pens I often find two schools of thought. The first is that these are everyday items so one should have the best, high quality and high cost items.  The other school, of which I belong, is that these items are prone to be lost, broken or wear out.  I have to go for lower cost and decent cost because whatever sunglasses or watch I have now will be a limited time offer.  This played out recently when after a few years of use my sports watch finally gave out. I replaced it with a new bargain watch with what I thought were the same basic set of features. I had a watch so I was good to go.  Then while studying with a Bar Mitzvah student the next afternoon I had a pleasant surprise.  When I looked to check the time I saw a small dial on the band that I had not noticed before.  It was a small compass. 

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BY RABBI MICHAEL BIRNHOLZ

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claiming FPL’s rate are soon to rise “significantly.” Somewhat? Significantly? Mr. Moline, could you please be more specific? Is anyone disputing that the city’s electric customers collectively pay nearly $11 million more for power than they would as customers of FPL? And is anyone seriously claiming that the city is likely to be able in the years ahead to consistently offer rates lower than FPL? We don’t hear Moline, or anyone, making that promise. While some want to frame the November referendum as a choice between handing the electric utility to FPL as a Christmas gift, or continuing to own and operate it in support of the city’s general fund, trust that these issues are far more complex than that. There is as much grey in these issues as there is black and white.

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Last week the Florida Municipal Electric Association released a video in which it unwittingly made a compelling argument for the city to distance itself from the organization as soon as practicable. FMEA’s executive director, Barry Moline, seems more interested in preserving the organization’s membership than in serving its members. In the propaganda video released last week Moline appears unwilling, or unable to present a balanced assessment of the facts. Perhaps it was FMEA’s accusation that FPL is using “smoke and mirrors” that put their propaganda piece over the top. Moline uses some smoke and mirrors of his own. In the video, which could easily be taken for a parody, the narrator allows that the city’s electric rates will increase “somewhat,” while

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the herd’s matriarch demonstrates a memory of watering holes even a great distance from where they have traveled in the past. Furthermore, research reveals that elephants display human-like emotions of joy, play, grief and rage. The birth of a baby generates great excitement in the herd, with other females bellowing happily. An elephant reunion with separated members of the herd inspires trumpeting and “yelling” from hundreds of yards away as the animals race toward each other, culminating in flapping ears and entwined trunks. 0The dead are also treated with dignity within the herd. Female elephants are known to search for leaves and twigs with which to cover the body of the deceased. The place where the herd’s dead are buried is memorialized for years to come by elephants who linger at the site in passing. In native cultures, the elephant has long been used as a labor animal,

dragging logs and carrying loads to help build structures. Elephants have also been held in royal esteem by both Hindus and Buddhists, who perceive the elephant as god-like in power, wisdom and compassion. As a mascot for the Republican party, the elephant first appeared in Harper’s Weekly magazine in 1874, when cartoonist Thomas Nast depicted the party as running from the democratic “ass,” Ulysses S. Grant, who was campaigning for a third term. The cartoon struck a political chord and stuck. The idea for the elephant as a mascot for the Alabama Crimson Tide started back in the 1930s when Atlanta Journal sports writer Everett Strupper likened the team to a stampede of wild elephants. The comparison held for decades culminating in the mascot Big Al making his debut at the 1979 Sugar Bowl. Lisa Rymer is a newspaper and television journalist who resides in Vero Beach. She can be contacted at LisaRymer@comcast.net.

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ELEPHANTS FROM PAGE 10


Social | Lifestyle

First play of season has sweet reception by sponsor BY CHRISTINA TASCON

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PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Patti Yencho, James Davis, Cindy Dampier and Sara Dessureau

TJ Yencho, Betty & Al Sammartino and David O’Connell

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FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Josh & Jewriem Bell with Aliana & David Delcamp at the pre-performance dessert reception

Jerry & Pat O’Connell with Victoria Pinter

Professional Insurance Advisors: Diane Purdy, Kathy Hopkins, Patti Scheible, Patti Yencho, Autumn Hite, Cindy Dampier, Robin Yencho & Susan Sanders

The sponsor for the Vero Beach Theatre Guild’s first show, Professional Insurance Advisors, offered a dessert reception as a pre-show treat for clients and guests last week. As homage to the Arthur Miller play “All My Sons” which centers around a wartime family dynamic, coffee and cake was served rather than wine and cheese. The 275-seat Vero Beach Theatre Guild offers their sponsors an evening reception. Sara Dessureau, who was the previous year’s president, said they were very lucky to have such supportive sponsors and that every show was already set for sponsorship this season. Although other organizations may have trouble finding sponsors, Dessureau said the VBTG had returning backers who kept coming back year after year. In fact, if there had not been a last minute opening, Professional Insurance Advisors might not have gotten the opportunity to sponsor a show this season. PIA co-owners Patti Yencho and Cindy Dampier said the planned to sign on for the next season now that they had found a space for them. Yencho said this was “a great chance to thank their clients with complimentary tickets to the show and the opening reception. As a company that has been in working with the Vero Beach Theatre Guild and other local businesses for 26 years” the partnership was a great way to show their community support. Dessuareau said the Guild had other opportunities for sponsorship, including some special performance nights and themed events. In March, the Guild will be holding a fundraiser which includes cocktails, costumes and dinner at the Vero Beach Yacht Club centered around the play,Titanic, A Musical.


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They have two grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

62nd Anniversary

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60th Anniversary

Harold and Marie Goelz of Vero Beach celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary Aug. 25. The couple was married at Messiah Lutheran Church in Milwaukee, Wis. They have been residents of Florida for 35 years. They have two children, Kathleen Bernhardt of Kenosha, Wis., and Donald Goelz of West Allis, Wis. They have three grandchildren.

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Joe and Lee Liguori of Vero Beach celebrated their 62nd wedding anniversary Sept. 4 with family, friends, and Bishop Gerald Barbarito at their niece’s home in Jupiter. The couple was married at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Long Island City, N.Y., and have been residents of Florida for 20 years. The couple have three children, Laura Dalton of East Point, Jay Liguori of Palm City and John Liguori of Tillson, N.Y.; and six grandchildren.

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cation. She is a Kindergarten teacher ANNIVERSARIES for Duval County Public Schools. Barnette-Cairns 45th Anniversary Crafton graduated from Sandalwood ALLEN, Texas — Shannon Barnette High School, Jacksonville, in 1999 and Bill and Sheila Bosworth of Vero of Allen, Texas, daughter of John Bar- works as a Field Services Supervisor Beach celebrated their 45th wedding nette of Dufor Best Buy Stores. The couple plan to anniversary on Aug. 27 with friends rant, Okla., and family at Bobby’s Restaurant in marry on March 10, 2012 and Anita Vero Beach. McCullough The couple was married at ImmacWEDDINGS of Allen, is enulate Conception Catholic Church in Zeno-Howard gaged to DanNorth Cambridge, Mass. SEBASTIAN, FL — Jennie Lesteriel Cairns of They have been residents of Florida leigh Howard of Jupiter, daughter for nine years. Vero Beach. of W. Dana Cairns is the Children include Jennifer Taylor and Jennie son of Denof Vero Beach and Christopher BosMurphree nis and Cathy worth of Vero Beach. Howard of Ann Cairns of Vero Beach. They have three grandchildren. Barnette graduated from Allen Vero Beach, 63rd Anniversary High in 2004 and from the University was married Kenneth and Jane Clark of Vero Beach Michael of Oklahoma in 2008 with a bach- to celebrated their 63rd wedding anniverelor’s degree in zoology. She is pursu- Robert Zeno sary Aug. 24 with friends and family. ing a doctor of podiatric medicine de- of Jupiter on The couple was married in Westgree at Dr. William M. Scholl College March 26, at wood Reformed Church in Westthe Tiffany of Podiatric Medicine in Chicago. Cairns graduated from John Carroll Room at Captain Hiram’s Resort in wood, N.J. They have been residents of Florida High in 2003 and from Florida State Sebastian with Roy C. Howard offifor 15 years. University in 2008 with a bachelor’s ciating. Children include David Clark of Zeno is the son of Bob and Shirley degree in biology. He is pursuing a White Bear Lake, Minn., Peggy Faroe of doctor of podiatric medicine degree Zeno of Jupiter. Patty Howard from Vero Beach was Clifton, N.J., and the late Stephen Clark. from Dr. William M. Scholl College of They have 12 grandchildren and maid of honor, Elizabeth Matthews of Podiatric Medicine, Chicago. The couple plan to marry Jan. 28, Vero Beach was matron of honor and eight great-grandchildren. Donna DeMarchi of Stuart also was 2012. 62nd Anniversary matron of honor. Lileigh Grace MatFaller-Crafton William and Shirley Whiteside of thews was flower girl. PONTE VEDRA BEACH, FL — David Koffman of Jupiter, James Vero Beach celebrated their 65th wedAmy Faller of Jacksonville, daugh- Walsh of Jupiter and Jeff Bowling of ding anniter of Bob versary with Port St. Lucie were all best men. and Cheryl and Readers were Will Howard, Shan- friends Faller of Vero neighbors at non Eisenhut and Maria Zeno. Beach, is enThe bride graduated from Vero the home of gaged to DanBeach High School in 1987 and from Mr. and Mrs. iel Crafton of the University of Florida in 1993 with Dick Hickman. Ponte Vedra The coua degree in music education. Beach, FL. She is employed by St. Lucie Coun- ple was marCrafton is ty School District in Fort Pierce as an ried in St. the son of Joseph’s Cathelementary music Teacher. Greg Crafton The groom graduated from Jupiter olic Church in of Jacksonville and Pamela Crafton High School in 1988 and from Ameri- Pawtucket, R.I. also of Jacksonville. They have been residents of Florida can Welding Society training in 2006 Faller graduated from Vero Beach as a certified welding instructor. for 23 years. High School in 2003 and the UniverChildren include Mary Louise Boyer He is employed by PAC Seating sity of North Florida in 2007 with a Systems in Palm City as a Certified of Pawtucket, R.I., and William J. WhBachelor’s Degree in elementary edu- Welding Instructor. iteside Jr. of Cumberland, R.I.

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ENGAGEMENTS

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Milestones


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Space Coast Symphony holds Opening Night Gala with guest cellist Trinity Episcopal Church provided a glorious backdrop for the Space Coast Symphony’s soaring Opening Night Gala this past weekend. The Sunday evening performance was enhanced by a solo cello piece from featured artist Michael Wiseman titled Cello Concerto No. 1, Op. 21. The piece offered an eightminute solo by Wiseman. In the 20-minute performance there were only a few moments when Wiseman did not play, so it was an extremely difficult and intri-

cate piece for the artist. Although challenging, Wiseman said he was happy to be asked to perform the concerto. Wiseman and the conductor, Aaron Collins, knew each other as kids who performed in Brevard together.   As they grew musically in the Brevard Symphony orchestra, they stayed in contact and watched each other rise in the stature of the music world. When Collins asked Wiseman to perform such a difficult piece, he was grateful for the opportunity. Wiseman called the selection one of

the great concertos of its time. The cello solo was extremely well received and Wiseman was rewarded with a standing ovation. Wiseman, who has worked with numerous Florida symphonies as well as featured on Opus Classics Live in New York and was with the Macao Orchestra in China as a cellist, also found a calling as a teacher at that time. In China, he not only found his love for teaching music, he also met, fell in love and married his wife there too. As a student he was fortunate

enough to appear in master classes for artists such as Yo-Yo Ma, Isaac Stern and the Juliard Quartet. Now as a teacher he has been directing a group called the Brevard Summer Strings, a workshop open to young string players. Many of these young students have been given a chance to perform alongside the professionals of the Space Coast Orchestra.   One such student, Rachel Ho, is only 14 years old and performed on violin during the performance. Collins likes to make the Symphony accessible to the public and

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BY CHRISTINA TASCON FOR THE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Ali & Ernest Furnsinn, Betty Dolen and Cathy Melbourne

Sylvia Green, Ed Field, Phyllis Cromer and Cha Hersey

VBHS Performing Arts Center’s Crystal Corrigan and Rick Chuma

Featured cellist Michael Wiseman with 14-year-old violinist Rachel Ho and her mother Huey Ho


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Artists named for Art Trail Tour FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Gustave, Joan Earnhart, Kathleen Staiger, Marie Morrow, Sara Shankland, Maria Sparsis, Barbara Krupp and Allan Teger. Limited tickets are still available to visit the 10 studios and meet the 12 artists. The tour will be open December 3rd from 10 am to 4 pm and tickets will go on sale November 1st at the Art Club offices and the Artist Guild Gallery.

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This year’s lineup for the Art Trail Tour is a group well known in the artist community as well as by many Vero Beach art buyers. From the Sexton Ranch, Sean and Sharon Sexton are local legends who start out the west leg of the tour, which ends with Timothy Sanchez’ glorious oceanfront studio. In between are Deborah Gooch, Ginny Piech Street, Al

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emotion he passes to his performers is a treat to the audience. Collins said that many of the soloists practice and perform on their own so it makes each performance unique. Within his part as conductor, he tries to bring his own dynamic, scope and architecture to the pieces and it shows in the performance. After the intermission, Collins happily announced a donor had pledged to match up to $10,000 in donations to cover the $22,000 per season it takes to underwrite the schedule making it not just a great opening reception but also a very successful one as well.

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is working hard to bring the next season’s work to as many people as possible. He plans to intersperse performances of well loved music like the Music Man and An Evening with Basie, Ellington and Friends with classics such as the Nutcracker and The Messiah at Christmas and operas such as Tosca. Diversifying is what Collins believes keeps audiences interested and coming to each performance. Watching Collins conduct his orchestra is fascinating and one can see the joy he takes in the performances.   By the end of the evening he has put everything he has into the night and watching his

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The orchestra prepares for the Opening Night Gala

Featured performer Michael Wiseman on the cello


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ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT

Taking a peek backstage at Riverside Theatre BY CHRISTINA TASCON FOR THE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Although the dressing rooms and seats were vacant, the Riverside Theatre’s Backstage Tour still offered the excitement of what it must be like to enter stage right on opening night. Oscar Sales, marketing director, began the tour with a short history of the Riverside which opened in 1973. What was once a small regional theatre has grown to be the largest ‘producing theater’ in Florida, he said. A ‘producing theatre,’ as Sales explained it, is one that is responsible for hiring the actors, designing the sets, coming up with the wardrobe and the props and then putting on the show. In the early days, everything from the props to the clothes were made by volunteers and stored in the theatre.  Due to storage issues, wardrobe is now designed and stored elsewhere locally but sets are still produced on site by staff crews. Visitors viewed the massive production rooms where the sets were designed, and heard interesting stories about how the theater operates during shows.  Many of the sets are very large, but are moved and manipulated by hand. From the front of the house to the newly designed Waxlax Black 2nd Stage, the whole theatre has been renovated yet the back of the house has remained the same working production house it has always been. A series of pulleys, slides and balanced weights, lift and move the set designs.  Just a week before the performance of each show, important technical rehearsals take place during Tech Week. Each actor and set movement is paced scene by scene to be sure that the performance is delivered flawlessly.  Although tedious, it is vital to the show’s success to do this kind of run through to fix any hitches that might develop. During the tour visitors were allowed to take a peek at the “Green Room” as well. This is a modern and comfort-

able spot for the actors to relax before the show and between scenes. During the play a feed of the performance is displayed on a television monitor is so the actors could determine when they were due on stage. The tour ended at the 2 Black Stage. Alan Cornell, who has been the artistic director for the Riverside for approximately 30 years, was the driving force behind this theater.  Although the main stage has always been home to big splashy productions, Sales said Cornell wanted a room to have more intimate and thought provoking performances. The theatre regularly has over 500 volunteers who help as ushers, ticket takers and various jobs for special events.  To become a volunteer, call the administration office at 772-231-5860. nd

The production room where sets are being built

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Oscar Sales tells the group about stage logistics

Celia Colicchio, Jack and Patty Hamerski

Visitors to the Riverside Backstage Tour begin with a short history on the theatre by Oscar Sales


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To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

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FRIDAY, SEPT. 23

House, 6250 Riverside Park Dr., free event and refreshments as you take a fascinating tour of the “back and front of the house.” See what it takes to put on live theatre performances and the practical aspects to put on a show. 772-231-6990. Sept 25: Pointe West Wedding Fair, 2-5 pm at The Club at Pointe West. Music, complimentary champagne, tour of venue and mock reception. Hors d’oeuvres, cake tastings, floral displays, music options, photographers and much more for the brideto-be & family. $10 per person/$15 couple. Reservations, 772-770-3401, email jessica@PointeWestFlorida.com Sept 28: Florida’s Research Entrepreneur’s Summit with Congressman Bill Posey at Indian River State College, 6155 College Ln., 8 am. Register at irscbiz.com. Sept 29: “Warm Nights Cool Mu-

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10 am-4 pm. Eco Boat Tour of the IRL ($10 per person). 772-242-2293. 5600 N US1. Sept 24: Kid’s Night Out with the Horses at Vero Equine, 8130 8th St. 5-10 pm. Ages 6+, $40. 772-5327720, www.veroequine.org. Sept 24: “Dinosaurs Are Us” preschool fun time and music at the Riverside Children’s Theatre, interactive storytelling with Miss Beth, creative drama, music and movement all with a dinosaur theme. 10-11 am, $10. 3280 Riverside Park Dr., 772-234-8052. Sept 24-30: Registration for “Scarecrows in the Garden at McKee Botanical Gardens,” 10 am-4 pm, Monday-Friday. Free entry cost for non-profit or a family. $25 for business organizations. 772-794-0601. For registration forms and rules go to www.mckeegarden.org. Sept 25: Riverside Theatre Open

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If you’d like to see one of your photographs published in Vero Beach Newsweekly, please send them to us at verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com. Photos need to be at least 200 dpi and in jpeg format.

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THURSDAY, SEPT. 22

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sic in the Park” – Vero Beach Museum of Art, Alice & Jim Beckwith Sculpture Park, 5-7 pm. Jazz guitar, Latin and flamenco music by the Don Soledad Group. $10 ticket, free hors d’oeuvres and cash bar for wine and mixed drinks. 772-231-0707, verobeachmuseum.org. Sept 30: Llama, Llama, Red Pajama Sleepy time Story Hour with Miss Julie. Kids get to dress in fun PJ’s as they listen to the story, enjoy refreshments and meet the story character, Llama. 6:30 pm, Vero Beach Book Center’s Children’s Store, 2145 Indian River Blvd, 772-569-6650. Oct 1: Special Olympics State Aquatic Championship, North Aquatic Center, 9450 95th St., Sebastian. Saturday, 9 am4:30 pm; Sunday, 8:30 am-1 pm. Food vendor on-site, no alcohol allowed. IRC Recreation Department is now recruiting volunteers. 772-226-1732. Oct 1: Bernard & Betty Egan Memorial Golf Classic to benefit the Samaritan Center at Hawk’s Nest Golf Club, 6005 Old Dixie Hwy., breakfast & awards luncheon included. $125 per person. Shotgun start at 8:30 am. 772-770-3039. Oct 2: Jeane Graves Charity Cupcake Challenge to benefit the Michael J. Fox Foundation. Incredible baking contest and sale. Buy, taste and vote for the best cupcake on the Treasure Coast at this charity event. $10 entry. Heritage Center, 14th Ave., 3-6 pm. 772-4733410 or email JanieTV@yahoo.com. Oct 6: Poetry reading by artist and Vero Beach pioneer Sean Sexton at the Tiger Lily Art Studios & Gallery at 7 pm, 1903 14th Ave., no admittance fee. Light refreshments. 772778-3443.

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Every Saturday: Oceanside Business Association’s Farmer’s Market, 8 am-noon. Located in the parking lot just south of Humiston Park on Ocean Drive. www.VeroBeachOBA. com, 772-532-2455. Every Sunday: Farmer’s Market from 9 am-2 pm in downtown Vero at the corner of 14th Ave. & 21st St. Contact Eric Hessler by email: eric@ mainstreetverobeach.org or call the Main Street office, 772-480-8353. Sept 15-25: “All My Sons” WW II drama by Arthur Miller at the Vero Beach Theatre Guild, 2020 San Juan Ave. Visit www.VeroBeachTheatreGuild.com for varied show times and cost or call 772-562-8300. Sept 22: Vero Beach Book Center presents Stuart Woods with his book “Son of Stone” from his series of Stone Barrington books at 7 pm, autograph and Q & A. You must purchase the book at the event or online for autograph. 772-569-2050, VeroBeachBookCenter.com Sept 23: Treasure Coast Human Resources Association, “Creating a Culture of Safety to Prevent Bullying, Harassment and Bias.” IRSC Mueller Center lecture from 7:30 am-1 pm. $50, contact Cynthia.Stalheber@willis.com. Sept 23-25: Treasure Coast Music Festival at the IRC Fairgrounds, 3 stages of music, 100 vendors and food booths. Dr. Hook, Molly Hatchet, Blackfoot, Pat Travers and more. Tickets $15 in advance and $20 at gate. 954-205-7813. Sept 24: Harbor Branch Oceanographic National Estuaries Day, celebrate the natural treasures in the Indian River. Tour research labs, learn about sea animals, kids’ arts & crafts, games, bounce house, food vendors.

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Sports

There is no place like home for Fighting Indians The Citrus Bowl is not only where the heart is for Vero Beach Fighting Indians fans, but where the school coffers are filled with lots of cold hard cash. The Fighting Indians’ recipe for success – the team holds a .721 all-

time winning percentage – is simple. Most Friday nights in the fall, we fill the Citrus Bowl with 5,000 fans, put a competitive football team on the field and add a rowdy marching band. The recipe’s most interesting ingredient is that Vero Beach plays as many as nine home games a year.

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BY MICHAEL BIELECKI FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

PHOTOS BY J. PATRICK RICE

Vero Beach will play nine home games this season.

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They routinely pay other teams to come here, enticing schools with a larger payout as a visitor than they could generate playing on their own home field. “Our record at the Citrus Bowl is a huge advantage for us,” Vero Beach athletic director Tim Tharp said. “Since I’ve been here (2006) we’ve had seven or eight home games every year. I know that’s a tradition in Vero, and playing more than the typical five home games is something I know our fans have come to expect.” Including Vero Beach’s pre-season Kickoff Classic, they will play an incredible nine home games this year—tops in the state. At a time when the Indian River School District has made massive cutbacks to athletic programs, the revenue generated from high school football games is invaluable. In fact, no athletic program pays for more programs in the county’s public school system than football. “We’re very fortunate—it’s no secret that our football season ticket holders generate a tremendous amount of income to help support our programs,” Tharp said. “That’s something we don’t take lightly, and something we’re very appreciative of in the community.” Legendary retired Vero Beach High School head football coach and athletic director Billy Livings said it was a simple business decision for him to play as many home games as possible when he was in charge. The fact that his players and fans experienced many more home games than average was a considerable bonus. “You have to pay off all your football debts before you can start buying things for other sports programs,” Livings said. “I would tell another (athletic director) that I’d give them $8000 to play us for two years.” Tharp uses a similar line of think-

ing when he makes the football schedule each year. “Financially, what we do is basically purchase the away game,” Tharp said. “There’s no standard deal and it varies based on who the opponent is and how far they had to travel. It puts a little money in their pocket and it helps them.” But is playing so many home games too much of a good thing? Can Vero Beach’s lack of recent playoff success (2-5 over the last five years) be attributed to not playing well on the road? “I think you have to go on the road some during the season, but I don’t think there’s any hard-backed data that says you have to play five away games to find out what it’s like to travel,” Tharp said. “If you played every game at home, I think there may be some credence to that. But if you load your team up on the bus two or three times a year, and you travel a little bit, I think that prepares them.” First-year coach Lenny Jankowski helped fill some empty slots in his schedule this year, and he could have scheduled more away games. By playing as many home games as possible, though, he feels that everyone is a winner in Vero Beach. “I was shocked at the opponents that wanted to come to our place,” Jankowski said. “We were able to give them something financially, so it was a win-win. What I heard more than that was having the opportunity of playing in a big-game environment. “It’s like being at a college game playing in front of that kind of crowd every week. To have our crowd behind us, it’s a pretty neat deal — the experience is second to none. I would think that 100 percent of the people would want see as many home games as they could at the Citrus Bowl.”


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Gavin Ross building a swim program at St. Edward’s BY MICHAEL BIELECKI FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Gavin Ross, who has gained international acclaim as a swim coach, began building his fourth program from scratch when he took over as varsity swimming coach at St. Edward’s in 2010. In Vero Beach, this wasn’t frontpage news, and to be sure, this is a town where sports like swimming find the back page of the sports section far too often. Football may be here, but where Ross comes from, swimming is a big, big deal. In fact, Ross is a big deal in his home country of South Africa. Among his achievements is coaching swimming legend Roland Schoeman. The name Schoeman may not mean a lot to most people around here, but it is solid gold in international swimming circles. Ross was Schoeman’s

high school coach at Willowridge High School through 1998, where he sent the star swimmer to the University of Arizona. Four Olympic Medals and five world records later, Sch-

oeman was a star. Enough about the South African swimming icon, what about his coach? For 25 years, Ross has coached young swimmers.

“I train everyone from little kids who are just learning how to swim, to a Colin MacKay, who missed going to the state swim meet by one tenth of a secCONTINUES ON PAGE 20

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The Citrus Bowl is sold out every Friday night during football season.


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This week at Vero Beach High School

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Who: Vero Beach High School (3-0) vs. West Boca High School (1-2) Where: Billy Livings Field at the Citrus BowlTime: 7:30 p.m. What they did last week: Vero Beach High School defeated Fort Pierce Westwood at home, 38-0. West Boca, defeated Lake Worth at home, 21-20. What you should know: West Boca played Vero Beach close the past two years, and the Bulls will be their toughest opponent so far this season. The Bulls, who have already played three strong Palm Beach opponents, rely on backfield workhorse Eugene Bethea (75 carries for 405 yards and one touchdown) to carry the one-dimensional offense. Bulls quarterback Zach Miner has thrown three interceptions, zero touchdowns, and has completed just 33 percent of his passes for 58 yards. Vero Beach has outscored its opponents 113-30 after three games, and quarterback Nick Madden has thrown for 824 yards and six touchdowns. The Fighting Indians have caused an incredible 13 fumbles on defense, recovering 10 of them.

STAFF PHOTOS

Gavin Ross has been head of the St. Ed’s swim program since 2010.

SWIM FROM PAGE 19

ond,” Ross said. “He’s a senior this year, so he’ll have another chance to qualify.” At St. Edwards he will concentrate on developing high performance techniques as well as athlete conditioning with all year training and competition. Athletic director Jeffery Lamscha said the job Ross has done with the swim team, “has been nothing short of dynamic.” Ross is just doing what he did in South Africa—building the best possible team, with the talent available. “Our objective here is to take them when we get them at the age of six, and send them off to college on a scholarship at the age of 18,” Ross said. “That’s pretty much what I was doing in South Africa. I sent ten kids over stateside (on a college scholarship) when I was over there coaching. I would take them to the college level, and leave it up to the college coach to

bring them up tot the next level.” Schoeman is living, breathing proof that Ross’ formula works. “I sent (Schoeman at age 18) to the Commonwealth Games in 1998, he swam the sixth fastest time in the 100-meter freestyle,” Ross said. “Then he came across to Arizona University, and within a year he was top 10 in the world in all four 50-meter events. In 2004 he came in second in the Olympics in the 100 meter freestyle.” Ross has a degree in sports science and has also coached rugby. The success of Sebastian River High School’s girls’ rugby team didn’t go unnoticed by Ross last season; he hopes to start a team at St. Edward’s in the very near future. “I’m going to start a ruby club on a very small scale, twice a week, and try to get the footballers to play during their offseason,” said Ross. “I think it will improve all of their skills, and I’m going to hold it 45 minutes per week starting in mid-November.”

St. Edward’s Sports Calendar The Pirates are idle in football this week, as they prepare for Cavalry Christian next week. Sept. 21–Boys Varsity Golf v. The Benjamin School and Okeechobee High School, 4:00 p.m., Vero Beach Country Club –Varsity Volleyball v. Port St. Lucie High School, 6:00 p.m., away Sept. 22–Girls Varsity Golf v. Lincoln Park Academy and John Carroll, 4 p.m., The Moorings –Varsity Swimming v. Westminster Academy, 4:00 p.m., home –Varsity Volleyball v. Florida Air Academy, 5:30 p.m., away Sept. 24–Varsity Cross Country, Fleet Feet Invitational, 7:45 a.m., South Fork High School Sept. 26–Boys Varsity Golf v. Vero Beach High School and Sebastian River High School, 3:30 p.m., Pointe West –Girls Varsity Golf v. Melbourne Catholic Central, 4:00 p.m., Crane Creek Reserve Golf Course –Varsity Swimming v. Holy Trinity Episcopal and Florida Air Academy, 4:00 p.m., away Sept. 27–Varsity Volleyball v. Melbourne Central Catholic, 6:30 p.m., away


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Before Art Club, Museum clash, theater groups had their own differences

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BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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For a small town, Vero Beach has a bountiful array of cultural activities to satisfy a love for the arts. From theater and museum exhibits to musical performances and dance, not only are the arts plentiful, but the organizations that nurture them are often recognized as leaders in the state. The proliferation of arts in this community, however, has been far more painstaking to achieve than what is immediately apparent. For instance, the Vero Beach Theatre Guild and Riverside Theatre were born from the same entity. And while we now have an abundance of quality theater to enjoy, there was a time when the anguish of a split was as dramatic as some of the performances. Currently, a similar evolution is happening between the Vero Beach Museum of Art and the group that helped breath life into this vital institution, the Vero Beach Art Club. “Between the museum and the club, I see a total parallel,” says Allen Cornell, artistic director and CEO of Riverside Theatre, who was hired in 1982 and oversaw the theater’s metamorphosis. “One is a volunteer, amateur, community organization; the other is an organization that is professionally oriented.” The Art Club, which recently celebrated its 75th anniversary, was the first nonprofit cultural organization to form in Indian River County. The Theatre Guild was the second. In 1958, a small group of thespians banded together and produced “John Loves Mary,” a wartime comedy of errors by Norman Krasna. “Sets were built and lines rehearsed in whatever empty garage

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Theatre Guild charted its own course to success

could be found,” writes Tom Rhodes in a playbill commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Guild in 2008. During the early years, plays were performed in the junior and senior high school auditoriums, at the naval base or wherever a stage made itself available. With support from the community, who eagerly filled seats, and the media, who regularly reviewed plays, the Guild established a foothold on the shifting sands of the Treasure Coast. In 1965, the city of Vero Beach offered to lease land in Riverside Park, a 54-acre parcel donated by the MacWilliam family for recreation and culture. The caveat: the nonprofit group was required to construct a building within one

year of signing the 99-year lease, at a rate of $1/year, says Joyce Levi, a longtime Guild member. Twenty eight Guild members pledged donations of $1,000 to construct a $28,000 building that would house a set workshop, rehearsal space and a storage facility. Carroll Otto, a retired insurance executive, and his wife, Dorothy, put up collateral for the bank loan. Today, that original building comprises the backstage area of Riverside Theatre. Still, the new building was too small for performances, forcing the continued use of available auditoriums. “We were still building sets that had to be trucked to the high school

for set-up and performance. Sometimes the stage was needed for daytime activity and we had to strike the set after each show and then set it back up for the next night’s performance,” writes Rhodes. Plans were hatched to build a 300seat theater that included “a stained glass tower by (local artist) Conrad Pickel,” recalls Levi. In 1966, the Vero Beach Concert Association was formed, the third cultural nonprofit organization in the area. Representatives approached the Guild about doubling the size of the theater, which would enable them to utilize the space for concerts. In order to build a 600-seat theatCONTINUES ON PAGE 22


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er, Guild members formed the Vero Beach Community Theatre Trust “with the help of a lot of local arts supporters,” says Levi. Funds raised for the 300-seat theater were turned over by the Guild to the Theatre Trust, says Levi, along with the lease for the land and the existing building. Similarly, the art club gave what money it had raised for its own modest building to the museum for construction of a dignified repository of fine art. In 1981, the museum signed a joint lease with the art club based on a $1 per year contract with the city. While this is a major difference between the theater’s divorce and the situation faced by the arts organizations, the Guild didn’t realize the full impact of this difference when it relinquished its assets. To build Riverside Theatre, “it took five fundraisers (the last one headed by Dan Richardson) and $850,000,” writes Mary Ellen Replogle, another longtime Guild member. She published a coffee table-style book entitled, “Riverside Theatre: 1973-2007.” In the fall of 1973, the Riverside Theatre season opened with a Guild production of “Tom Jones” on its new stage. “The Guild had an agreement to use the stage and to pay the trust 50 percent of its profits,” says Cornell, who arrived in 1982 from New York

City, where he was a freelance director, designer and a member of the theater department at Delphi University. Cornell was hired as production coordinator by the Community Theatre Trust, Riverside Theatre’s governing board. When Cornell came on board, “Riverside Theater was a fledgling organization with two or three paid staff people,” he says. For the first ten years of Riverside’s history, the Community Theatre Trust booked touring plays, Guild productions, other theatrical events and civic activities at Riverside. But, what transpired next was perhaps the most difficult chapter in the Guild’s history. As Levi remembers it, the Guild’s goal of producing community theater was progressing nicely, and the members were comfortable in their new surroundings. “The plays were usually good, but sometimes one wasn’t,” she says. “One night, a board member brought a friend from New York City, or from somewhere up north, to the theatre and saw one of the bad ones,” Levi says. “He said, ‘we could do better.’” Cornell says he was approached by

members of the Theatre Trust, who asked him how to move forward and upgrade the theater. Cornell told them “they needed more artistic direction and professional directors,” he says. “This stirred a debate between the Trust and the Guild. A vote was taken at a board meeting, in which the Trust decided to make me the artistic director in 1984.” Levi recollects that the Guild could no longer choose the plays, directors and actors for its productions. Riverside was going to bring in professionals. “This was not an acceptable alternative. It was against the mission of the Guild which has always been to give community residents an opportunity to work on stage and backstage,” she says. Cornell says that it was a difference in missions and goals that caused the split. As a community theater, “artistic decisions were being made by committee instead of by one individual who is solely responsible for a production’s quality,” he says. “When you have two mindsets, it’s very difficult. Not that one is better than the other, they’re just divergent.” In terms of the Museum of Art and

the Art Club, Cornell says that “at a certain point it comes down to economics. As the museum has grown, it has had to maintain the building and maintain quality. The standards have changed over the years.” From a business perspective, an organization has to assess the methodology for achieving its goals and realizing its vision. Cornell says that it’s difficult to meet those expectations when every aspect of the organization is not moving toward the desired result. “Riverside went through this in 1985. We had to make this decision,” he says. However, Cornell points out that there was no lease agreement between the Guild and Riverside. “The Guild were tenants, not leaseholders.” The joint lease complicates the museum and art club relationship. To further complicate matters, an agreement signed in 1985 between the museum and art club assures the club space in the museum. It doesn’t, however, specify the cost of that space. As the museum pursues its plans for a multimillion dollar expansion, it asked the art club to pay fees of $40,000 annually. When art club membership threatened to withdraw support from the museum, and word of the conflict hit the press, the museum reduced that amount to a nominal fee, in addition to what the art club already contributes for the use of the office.


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piano is still at Riverside, because there’s still no room for it.” After the Guild’s departure, Cornell was faced with producing shows with the help of two other staff members and a potential pool of community volunteers. Nonetheless, with people in the seats, Riverside could afford to hire professional actors. “Today, there are more than 60 paid staff during season,” says Cornell, who proudly announces that “Riverside is now the largest producing theatre in Florida,” based on the number of people employed, the number of people who attend theatrical events and the size of operation. Of the ten or so “really good professional theaters in Florida, Riverside is at the top of the list,” he says. There is consensus in the arts community that the more theater, the better. “We have two very good theatres here,” says Levi. “The Vero Beach Theatre Guild is one of the best community theatres in the country. Since 1958, it has been continually operating,” making it the longest running theater on the east coast of Florida.

“It turned out well, even though it was a difficult process,” says Levi in regard to the split. “Some 16,000 hours of volunteer labor were counted that summer as we built a new theatre,” write the Pecks. In December 1985, the Guild opened in its new home with a production of “John Loves Mary,” in honor of the first play it had ever produced. The stage was on the other end of the room from where it is now and the audience sat on church pews. Later, a state grant and a multitude of fundraisers helped make the necessary changes. “We did really good work,” says Levi, who has accumulated a slew of newspaper reviews over the years, praising the Guild for its efforts, dedication and professionalism. “We have a lot of former professionals who participate,” she says pointing to the amount of talent in the area. “People enjoy seeing their colleagues, friends, doctors and lawyers on stage.” Some of the professionals include George Carabin, a film and stage director and actor who was exiled from Romania in the ‘70s and has

worked with several prestigious theatrical institutions in the U.S. Carabin is directing the 2011-2012 season-opening “All My Sons,” currently playing at the Guild. Levi, herself, was professional actress in off-Broadway productions, before getting married and pursuing a career in radio broadcasting. She handled public relations and the playbill for the Guild for 20 years. Sadly, two stellar talents passed away this year, including Wally Gagel, an actor “with every actor’s card imaginable,” says Levi, and the incomparable Pam Rochowiak, whose portrayal in “Everyone Loves Opal,” made her unforgettable. Rochowiak died unexpectedly a few months ago after what seemed to be a successful battle with cancer. A survey conducted by the Guild a few years back sought to find out from what part of the community audience members lived. Somewhat surprisingly, “they were equally divided between the mainland, north county, west of town, the beach area and south county,” says Levi. “I assume it’s about the same today,” she says.

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While the art club is in the throes of a battle with the museum, vexed by being left off several re-written leases with the city, the Guild long ago split from Riverside to go its own way. Determined to find a home of its own, Pat Hazen, president of the Guild during this difficult time of transition, explored purchasing the Florida Theatre on 14th Avenue in downtown Vero Beach. But, the asking price was out of the Guild’s reach. “The other building, the former Central Assembly of God Church on San Juan Avenue was less expensive, but with lots of work needed to convert it into a live theatre,” writes Peter and Barbara Peck in a historical retrospective for the Guild’s 50th anniversary. Pastor Buddy Tipton, whose new church on State Road 60 had just been completed, worked with the bank and other Guild Members to secure a loan for the theater In June 1985, “we loaded everything moveable in pickup trucks and cars and transported it, except the grand piano,” says Levi, who still has the piano’s original bill of sale. “The


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Obituaries Murray Smith Murray Smith, 89, died Sept. 7, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in London, came to this country when he was 4 years old and lived in Vero Beach for over 13 ½ years, coming from Winnetka, Ill. He was an active member of the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills for 48 years and later became a member of Twin Oaks Tennis Club in Vero Beach. Survivors include his daughter, Victoria of Broad Channel, N.Y.; and one grandchild. A guestbook is available at www.aycock-hillcrest.com.

Blanche Wallace Evans Blanche Wallace Evans died peacefully at Indian River Medical Center on Sept. 5, 2011. She was born in Atlanta, Georgia, 17th July 1924 and married her husband, Charles Clement Evans on Dec. 27, 1944. They lived in Atlanta until they moved to Indian River Shores, in 1972. She was an active member of Trinity Episcopal Church, before transferring to St. Augustine of Canterbury Episcopal Church. She is survived by her beloved husband of over 66 years, one son, Charles Fries Evans of Greenville, S.C.; two daughters: Dr. Blanche W. Evans of Vero Beach and Carlene Evans Holden and her husband, Gregory Lewis Holden of Supply, N.C. Memorial donations may be made to St. Augustine of Canterbury Episcopal Church, 475 43rd Avenue, Vero Beach, Florida 32960.

Janet Sullivan Tellier Janet Sullivan Tellier, 72, of Vero Beach died Sept. 5, 2011 surrounded by her husband and her daughters. She was born in Staten Island, N.Y. In 1961, she married Francis Joseph Tellier. The couple celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on Aug. 5, 2011. In 2006, Janet moved to Vero Beach where she was an active golfer who enjoyed playing at the John’s Island Club and Quail Valley Golf Club. She was a parishioner of Holy Cross Church, and a volunteer at the Hos-

pice House in Vero Beach. The family asks that in lieu of flowers, consider a memorial donation in Janet’s memory to the VNA Foundation and Hospice, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. An online guestbook is available at www.strunk funeralhome.com.

David Alan Jeremy David Alan Jeremy, DDS, 73, died Sept. 8, 2011, at VNA/Hospice House in Vero Beach. He was born in Pontiac, Mich., and lived in Vero Beach for two years, coming from Grand Blanc, Mich. He was a dentist, practicing in Grand Blanc for 40 years, until retiring in 2001. Survivors include his wife of 53 years, Judith Jeremy of Vero Beach; sons, Stephen Craig Jeremy of Mansfield, Ohio, Brent Jeremy of Vero Beach and Jeffrey Jeremy of Sebastian; daughter, Julie Riddles of Oakridge, N.C.; sisters, Judy Young of Seven Mile, Ohio, and Susan Menson of Wilmington, Del.; and nine grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA/Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

the Catholic faith. Before retiring, he was a police officer for 22 years in the Suffolk County Police Department. He was a professional photographer and barber in New York. Survivors include his wife of 56 years, Jeanette Liotta of Vero Beach; sons, Anthony Liotta Jr. and Keith Liotta, both of Vero Beach; daughter, Lauren Mancuso of Vero Beach; brothers, Albert Liotta of Vero Beach and Ermineo Liotta of New York; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Rosanna Dancy Faye L. Battisti Faye L. Battisti, 89, died Sept. 13, 2011, at Viera Hospital in Viera. She was born in Okeechobee and had been a longtime resident of Melbourne. She was of Catholic faith. She worked as a hostess for eight years at the Riomar Country Club in Vero Beach. Survivors include her daughter, Carol Johnson of Vero Beach; sister, Blanche Trim of Rockledge; one grandchild; and one greatgrandchild.

Charles Joseph Bradshaw Olive Fleisher Megears Olive Fleisher Megears, 73, died Sept. 9, 2011 in Buford, Georgia where she spent her final days with her daughter and family. She was born in Jersey Shore, Penn., and lived in Vero Beach for more than 45 years. She helped cancer and hair loss patients for 43 years with her wig shop, ‘Olives Wig Shop’. She is survived by her son and daughter-in-law Douglas and Jan Fleisher of Vero Beach, daughter and son-in-law, Tammy and Billy Wadsworth of Buford, Ga., three grandsons, three granddaughters and three great grandchildren.

Anthony Liotta Sr. Anthony Liotta Sr. died Sept. 10, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach since 1984, coming from Northport, N.Y. He was of

She had been a resident of Vero Beach for the past few years. She was the widow of Henry G. Crapo, former Register of Deeds for Bristol County, Mass. She is the mother of Stephen R. Crapo and his wife Denise of South Dennis, Mass, and Vero Beach, and the late Robert H. Crapo, Sr., and James S. Crapo. Donations in her memory may be made to the Remembrance Fund of the Winthrop Street Baptist Church, 39 Winthrop Street, Taunton, MA 02780.

Charles Joseph “Charlie” Bradshaw, 82, died Sept. 10, 2011 at his home in Vero Beach. Vero Beach has been his home since 1980 after moving here from Miami Shores. Charlie is survived by his wife, Edith Oliver Bradshaw; his four children; John (Alicia) of Greenville, SC; Charlie, Jr., of Boynton Beach, FL, Joe (Laura) of Vero Beach and Arline (John) Mead of Cary, NC; 2 step daughters, Rachael and Chloe Powlas of Vero Beach and nine grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Dollars for Scholars, P.O. Box 1820, Vero Beach, FL 32961 and the Hibiscus Children’s Center, 1145 12th Street, Vero Beach, FL 32960. Condolences may be made at www.lowtherfuneral home.com.

Rachel F. (Reese) Crapo Rachel F. (Reese) Crapo, 94, died Sept. 8 in Vero Beach.

Rosanna Sullivan Dancy, 84, died Sept. 6, 2011, at Osceola Regional Medical Center in Kissimmee. She lived in Indian River County for 65 years, coming from her birthplace. She was an active member of First United Methodist Church in Vero Beach, Vero Beach Chapter 135 Order of Eastern Star, United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Daughters of the American Revolution. She worked for more than 25 years for the Indian River County School District, retiring in 1994. Memorial contributions may be made to First United Methodist Church, 1750 20th St., Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Lucille Hamers Lucille Hamers, 92, died Sept. 12, 2011, at her home. She was born in Jersey City, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach for 13 years, coming from Whiting, N.J. Survivors include her sons, Robert S. Hamers of Fort Pierce and Richard A. Hamers of Jetersville, Va.; daughter, Denise C. HamersFarber of East Amherst, N.Y.; eight grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.


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Katherine L. Slusser, 56, died Sept. 13, 2011, at Jacksonville Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Jacksonville. She was a lifetime resident of Vero Beach. She worked as a clerk for Indian River County for 17 years. She was a member of Forest Park Baptist Church in Vero Beach. She was a graduate of Vero Beach High School, Class of 1973. Survivors include her husband of 32 years, Walter A. Slusser Sr. of Vero Beach; sons, Eric Slusser and Steven Slusser, both of Fort Pierce and Walter A. Slusser II of Vero Beach; mother, Lavon A. Schaefer of Vero Beach; brother, Wade Shaefer of Vero Beach; sisters, Brenda DeLuca and Gayle Evers, both of Vero Beach; and nine grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County, P.O. Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome. com.

Barbara Jones Stark John A. Pusey John A. Pusey, 92, died Sept. 6, 2011, at the VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. He was born in Buffalo, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach since 1974, coming from Cary, N.C. He was a member of the Congregational Church. He was an Eagle Scout who later served as a scoutmaster for more than 20 years and had more than 40 Scouts achieve Eagle status. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds. com.

Barbara Jones Stark passed away on Sept. 12, 2011 at Hospice House in Vero Beach, after a long illness. She was born in Indianapolis in 1923. In 1944, she married Richard (Dick) A. Stark. In 1990, they retired to live full-time in Vero Beach. In Vero Beach, Barbara was active in the founding, funding and operations of the Vero Beach Museum of Arts. She served a term as Chairman of the Museum’s Community Committee. She was active in the Community Church of Vero Beach.

Margaret Anna Thomas, 75, died Sept. 13, 2011. She was born in Miamitown, Ohio, and lived in Vero Beach for 15 years, coming from Ohio. Survivors include her sons, Robert Beyer of Vero Beach, Kevin Beyer of Cleveland, Tenn., Vernon Wadsworth Sr. of Vero Beach, Roger Pope of Ohio and Jesse Williamson of Mississippi; daughters, Pamela Smith of Lumberton, Miss., Tamela Beyer of Cincinnati, Teresa Beyer of Vero Beach and Dedrea Beyer of Tennessee;30 grandchildren; and two greatgreat grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

Jason Troisi Jason Troisi, 31, died Sept. 11, 2011. He was born in Newton, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach since 1986, coming from New Jersey. He was the owner of Flummin Inc., which manufactured and serviced water slides for amusement parks. He attended St. Helen Catholic School, where he served as an altar boy; and was a member of Vero Beach High School Class of 1998. Survivors include his son, Anthony Troisi of Vero Beach; parents, Richard and Helene Troisi of Vero Beach; sister, Corinne Troisi of Vero Beach; and maternal grandmother, Margaret Nielsen of Vero Beach. Memorial contributions may be made to Anthony Troisi c/o Seacoast National Bank, 1206 U.S. 1, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

N E W S W E E K L Y

Alice L. Papola, 84, died Sept. 13, 2011, at Indian River Center in West Melbourne. She was born in Philadelphia and lived in Vero Beach for 25 years, coming from Toms River, N.J. Survivors include her son, Joseph A. Papola Jr. of Little Egg Harbor, N.J.; daughters, Susan Breeding of Seaford, Del., Carol Ewald of Seattle and Nancy Blazewicz of Melbourne; and seven grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 4700 N. Congress Ave., Suite 101, West Palm Beach, FL 33407. A guestbook is available at www.aycock-hillcrest.com.

Margaret Anna Thomas Katherine L. Slusser

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James Franklin Lehnert, 86, died Sept. 8, 2011, at the VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. He was born in Baltimore and lived in Vero Beach for 10 years, coming from Indiantown. He was a decorated World War II veteran, serving in the Marines. Survivors include his sons, Glenn, Robert, Gary, Mark, John and Larry; daughter, Laurie Koehn; sister, Janet Reilly of Tallahassee; 24 grandchildren; and 18 great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL

Alice L. Papola

She is survived by her husband of 67 years, Richard A. Stark, and their five children; Susan S. Woglom, Esq., Amherst, MA, Margaret L. Stark, CPA, Westlake Village, CA, Sarah S. Oldham, Esq., Westport, CT, Barbara S. Baxter, MD, Dallas, TX, and Richard J. Stark, Esq., New York, NY; along with 14 grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be sent to VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach or Community Church of Vero Beach.

V E R O

James Franklin Lehnert

Evelyn Geer McCartney, 91, died Sept. 12, 2011, at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. She was born in New York City and lived in Vero Beach for 49 years. She was a member of First Baptist Church of Vero Beach. Survivors include her son, Brian A. McCartney of Griffin, Ga.; daughter, Karen M. Rockhill of Vero Beach; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to First Baptist Church of Vero Beach Debt Retirement Fund, 2206 16th Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

Albertha Sanders, 84, died Sept. 10, 2011, in Vero Beach. She was born in Wabasso and was a lifelong resident of Indian River County. Survivors include her sons, Roy Lee Sanders and Marcus Sanders, both of Vero Beach, and Leroy Sanders of Louisville, Ky.; daughters, Gwendolyn Alcorn, Veronica Reid and Faye Brown, all of Vero Beach, and Adornis Sanders of Gettysburg, Pa.; sister, Louise Thompkins of Melbourne; 25 grandchildren; and 25 great-grandchildren.

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Joseph Francis Imbs II, died Sept. 11, 2011 at the age of 90. Beloved husband of Helen Cole Imbs and the late Jeanne Muckerman Imbs; father of Jeanne Imbs Weitzel (Steve), Joseph Francis Imbs III, Robert Christopher Imbs (Lisa), and Grace Imbs Lowell (John); grandfather of Cadi Imbs Olsen, Joseph Francis Imbs IV, William W. Weitzel, Audrey A. Imbs, Christopher Cole Imbs, J. Jarret Lowell, and Alexander J. Lowell. He was the third generation president and CEO of the J.F. Imbs Milling Company, which merged with Nebraska Consolidated Mills, now ConAgra Inc. in 1970. In lieu of flowers, memorials appreciated to Northern Michigan Regional Health System Foundation, 360 Connable Avenue, Petoskey, MI 49770, or to the charity of one’s choice.

Evelyn Geer McCartney

Albertha Sanders

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Joseph Francis Imbs II

32960. A guestbook is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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Gertrude G. Harris, 94, died Aug. 19, 2011, at her home. She was born in Grand Rapids, Mich., and lived in Vero Beach since 1975, coming from Greenwich, Conn. She was a member of Christ By The Sea United Methodist Church, Vero Beach. Survivors include her son, Bill Harris of Palm Bay; daughter, Sally Alford of Houston; four grandchildren; and 13 greatgrandchildren. A guestbook is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

S E P T E M B E R

Gertrude G. Harris


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Real Estate Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker: Address 2165 Via Fuentes

Subdivision River Mews Condo

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Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – September 8-September 14 Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

2045 Mooringline Drive Moorings 6/30/2011 $849,900 9/8/2011 $725,000 Norris & Company Norris & Company

List Date 1/26/2011

List Price $525,000

Sell Date 9/8/2011

Sell Price $470,000

Listing Broker The Moorings Realty Sales Co.

101 Laurel Oak Lane Bermuda Bay 7/12/2010 $675,000 9/9/2011 $620,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Norris & Company

Selling Broker The Moorings Reaty Sales Co.

V E R O

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N E W S W E E K L Y

Mainland Real Estate Sales – September 8-September 14

Address 1838 Grey Falcon Circle

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

13650 Indian River Drive N Inlet View 3/3/2011 $449,900 9/12/2011 $325,000 RE/MAX Riverside RE/MAX Riverside

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

6420 53rd Circle Cobblestone 5/16/2011 $269,000 9/8/2011 $251,000 RE/MAX Premier Prop Showcase RE/MAX Riverside

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

205 39th Court Mill Creek 7/27/2011 $230,000 9/14/2011 $237,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. George M. Beuttell, Broker

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

741 Ocracoke Square Kenwood Village 6/27/2011 $229,900 9/9/2011 $218,500 RE/MAX Crown Realty Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc.

Subdivision Falcon Trace

List Date 7/8/2011

List Price $209,900

Sell Date 9/8/2011

Sell Price $205,500

Listing Broker Re/Max 100 Riverside PSL-West

Selling Broker Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc.

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Vero Beach News Weekly Issue 25