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Classic cars The Vietnam Veterans Association honors dads with antique car showPage 23

Play ball Vero Beach Sports Village opens its softball and little league fieldsPage 29

PHOTO BY CHRISTINA TASCON

The McKee Garden Water Lily Celebration attracts enthusiasts from throughout the county. Page 21

 Candidates for Sheriff disagree on the issuePage 7

How safe is the barrier island?

Another first Children’s Theatre to host the inaugural Riverside Dance FestivalPage 27

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whelmingly opposed,” he said. Chris Tanner of the Indian River County Tea Party said his organization would be making a statement on the views of their membership, but would not do so until after a Town Hall meeting the School Board has scheduled for June 28. He noted his organization has grown substantially and leadership did not want to make a policy decision until it had a chance

NO For Rejection and he did not believe that there would be any opposition to the continuation of the millage rate on the property taxes.” School Board Vice Chair Carol Johnson arranged for a meeting with Adams and the Chamber of Commerce Vero Beach & Indian River County President Penny Chandler to discuss the continuation of the millage rate. Johnson noted that the Chamber of Commerce has posted no objec-

N E W S W E E K L Y

YES For Approval

B E A C H

Shall the School District 0.60 ad valorem millage be continued for essential operating needs such as teachers, instructional materials, and technology in order to provide all students with high quality educational opportunities beginning July 1, 2013, and ending four (4) fiscal years later on June 30, 2017, with annual reporting to the citizenry?

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The School District of Indian River County, Florida Essential Operating Needs Referendum Election

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The tax continuation referendum reads as follows:

tion to the tax continuation referendum. Additionally, Mike Lafferty, president-elect of the Indian River County Realtors Association, stated that the local Realtors group has not staked a position for or against the referendum. The Indian River School District has announced it will hold a Town Hall meeting on Thursday, June 28 at 7 pm. at the Dodgertown Elementary School cafeteria to present information on the referendum which will appear on the Aug. 14 ballot. For those unable to attend that meeting there is a video about the proposed millage rate continuation narrated by Carter Morrison, the school district’s deputy superintendent for finance, on the school district web site at www.indianriverschooldistrict.org. The process of including the school millage referendum required a vote by the Indian River County Commission which approved the measure by a 4-1 margin. Commissioner Gary Wheeler was the dissenting vote because he wanted the issue to be on the November presidential election ballot which would have allowed the school district to have more public meetings to discuss the issue. The placement of the referendum on the ballot also required the approval of Supervisor of Elections Leslie Swan to ensure that the issue was in compliance with legal requirements. Since it is on the ballot in the August primary election, voters will be able to get a sample ballot in advance of early voting which begins on Aug. 3.

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to assess “the views of the entire membership before releasing anything to the media.” Tanner also acknowledged that “some of the Tea Party membership would be attending the Town Hall meeting on June 28.” John Burns of the South Beach Property Owners Association indicated that “the organization has not formulated a decision on the issue.” He did go on to say that “the people in the south end of the county are highly supportive of the public education system

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY – The Indian River School District request to maintain a tax set to expire next fiscal year has yet to draw opposition from county watchdog organizations. The School Board voted unanimously to seek voter approval of a referendum that will allow the continuation of a 60 cent per $1,000 of assessed value tax on residential property. This funding is necessary, school officials claim, to offset the loss of revenue from the federal stimulus package which was received the past two years as well as reduced funding from the state of Florida education budget. Schools Superintendent Fran Adams said, “The costs would be essentially 21 cents a day for property owners and would help the school district meet the unfunded mandates handed down from the state, keep 31 instructors and bolster classroom materials.” The school district estimates the revenue will generate approximately $32.7 million and provide essential services through June 30, 2017 if voters approve the continuation of the millage rate. County taxpayers have been paying this assessment going back to 1990 when voters approved a bond referendum to build Sebastian River High School and Oslo Middle School. In 2010 voters agreed to a two-year extension of the levy to meet critical needs the school was facing after the recession reduced its budget. Political organizations such as the Indian River County Taxpayers Association and the Indian

River County Tea Party have yet to take a position on the matter, though both have a history of being against tax increases. Glen Heran, president of the Indian River County Taxpayers Association, said the group had not yet articulated a formal decision but “the inclination was that the membership would be against the referendum.” He went on to say at the last taxpayers’ meeting he asked for a show-of-hands vote on the issue and only one prison was neutral. “The majority were over-

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BY PAT LAVINS VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Local News Groups considering position on school tax referendum

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LOCAL NEWS

City grants approvals for Sailing Foundation

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BY J.G. WALLACE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- After navigating a wandering course over the past several months it now appears smooth sailing for the Youth Sailing Foundation of Indian River County and its quest for a home in Vero Beach. City Council held a public hearing at its meeting Tuesday on a resolution which approved transferring some elements of the city’s comprehensive plan to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. Those changes would permit the city to add small scale recreational use activities to an existing governmental utility. A public hearing was also held on an ordinance which would amend the text of the City of Vero

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Beach zoning code to permit recreational uses compatible with a city owned utility in an Industrial Zoning District. No members of the public spoke during either public hearing and both measures passed by a 5-0 vote. The limitations of permitted uses include only existing buildings with a total floor area of less than 7,500 square feet. Planning and Development Director Timothy McGarry presented both items for approval. The ordinance amending the text of the land development regulation will require a second public hearing, which will be held at the Council’s July 17 meeting. McGarry said the state has 30 days to comment on the proposed change and he doesn’t expect the Foundation to begin sailing activities at the site until sometime in August. McGarry said the Sailing Foundation will be able to begin site improvements including painting and construction of a required firewall in the interim. The recently approved lease agreement with the Foundation provides for a 31,400 square foot site and a 3,700 square foot metal building at the southwest corner of the 17th Street Wastewater

Treatment facility. The foundation will pay $1 per month toward the lease plus $25 in monthly electric charges, and will be required to pay for water and wastewater services. Volunteers from the Foundation will paint the building, construct a firewall, and make other repairs. The Foundation also must provide insurance coverage, which a recent estimate pegged at $1,115 per month. City Manager Jim O’Connor said it’s a good arrangement for the Sailing Foundation and the city. The building was slated to be demolished, but its proximity next to a canal with easy access to the Indian River made for a good fit for the Foundation. And it ended a search for a home that ran into conflicts with proponents of a boathouse for rowing and supporters of an off-leash dog park at MacWilliam Park. In April the Vero Beach City Council approved the lease for the unused building at the 17th Street site. Before that plan could advance the city needed to attend to the housekeeping details regarding land use matters which were addressed on Tuesday. Charlie Pope, Chairman of the Youth Sailing Foundation of In-

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dian River County, said he wasn’t clear on an exact timeline, but was optimistic that the organization could soon begin operations at the new facility. The Foundation teaches young people how to build and operate small sailing vessels. In other business, the Council heard from Councilman Richard Winger about his concern over the police pension fund. Winger noted that the city’s contribution rose from $212,000 in 1996 to a projected $810,000 in the upcoming fiscal year. Winger said he believes that “what has been given shouldn’t be taken away,” but he recalls the police agreeing to help find $100,000 in possible cuts. “I’m trying to set a course of direction for the budget process rather than come to any conclusions tonight,” Winger said. “But if this city with a potential sale or a successful sale of the electric (utility) is facing a $4 million deficit in a $20.7 million budget when that occurs in 2014, it’s a large, large number, one of the things this city is going to have to face with the sale of the electric is that things will change.” “Either taxes will have to go up or services will have to go down,” Winger said. City Manager Jim O’Connor attributed the rising cost of the city’s contribution to a reduced return the city’s investments rather than any mismanagement by the city. Council agreed to have the police insurance actuarial give a presentation at an upcoming workshop, and Council favored working with all departments to reduce operating expenses and find potential savings during next month’s budget workshop meetings.


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N E W S W E E K L Y

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LOCAL NEWS

Shores Public Safety union rejects initial contract offer BY IAN LOVE

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VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

INDIAN RIVER SHORES -- The bargaining unit for the Indian River Shores Public Safety union has turned down an initial offer by the town that would have frozen wages for three years and limited accrual of vacation and sick days. The current collective bargaining agreement is set to run out on Sept. 30 and both sides say they expect a deal to be reached, but currently they remain far apart on basic issues such as the length of the contract, raises, pension payments and how vacation and sick time will be used. “The town wanted to freeze wages for three years, the town wanted the contract to be for three years and they came back with four. On vacation and sick time, the town is not going to let them use it for retirement; they can bank it and use for what it was meant, but it can not be used for retirement,” said Town Manager Richard Jefferson of the initial offer made on May 15. In response, the bargaining unit for the Public Safety employees asked that the contract run for four years with no raises the first two and 3 percent increases in fiscal years 2015 and 2016. It also rejected the change in vacation time accrual, but did offer to have sick pay capped at 700 hours. In its response, the Coastal Florida Police Benevolent Association, which represents the town Public Safety workers, noted: “Though disappointed, we understand the town’s effort to reduce spending. With the omission of salaries and benefit costs of the five retiring senior employees which includes the Chief of Pubic Safety, one captain, on sergeant and two public safety officers, the Association feels these staff reductions should provide ample savings for per diem replacements and current budget expenses.”

The town has decided not to replace the departing Public Safety employees and instead will cover their shifts with part-time workers. At least one council member is willing to go on record that the city cannot afford to continue its current payments into the pension plan and the practice of allowing employees to bank vacation and sick days. Shores Councilman Dick Haverland says that because of the pay structure of past collective bargaining agreements, Indian River Shores’ Public Safety employees have enjoyed a dramatic increase in pay over the last five years at a time when many public workers have seen wage freezes and an increase in contributions to benefit packages. “I am presuming at the beginning of the five-year period we had a competitive salary structure because we have had a very stable and a very good labor force,” Haverland said. “However, since that time our guys have received 42 percent worth of increases. Our guys have received a deal that is unbelievable and above market. I don’t begrudge them that, they negotiated that with Council and that is what Council gave them. “We have gotten way out of sync and we need to deal with that,” he added. He also noted that Indian River Shores, unlike most every other municipality in the state and across the country, has not instituted layoffs or furloughs as government budgets have been pared when the housing market went bust and property values and tax revenues decreased. In Vero Beach, City Manager Jim O’Connor has laid out a plan that would reorganize the police department by reducing the rank of nine officers, saving the city an estimated $90,000 a year. That request has brought out ardent opposition from

STAFF PHOTO

The town of Indian River Shores and its Public Safety Department are in negotiations for a new collective bargaining agreement. The current contract expires on Sept. 30. the union, which claims, among other things, that such a move would damage morale as officers see their chance for advancement curtailed. The city, on the other hand, is looking at reducing the impact of a potential revenue shortfall and still maintain the same number of officers patrolling the streets. Haverland says that without concessions from the Public Safety union and given a growing deficit in funding the pension plan that the town must cover means taxes would have to be increased “quite materially.” In February, the town’s Public Safety and Fire Pension Board reduced the expected return on investments in the fund for Public Safety employees from 7.75 percent to 6.5 percent. A lower, albeit more realistic, anticipated rate of return on investments meant town officials must use emergency funds this year to cover an expected $250,000 shortfall in the town’s pension obligations. For those reasons, Haverland said his view is that the two sides are very far apart in negotiations and the consequences could be costly. Others on the town’s bargaining committee contacted by Vero

Beach Newsweekly did not take such a dire view of the negotiations and did not think the differences were so great they could not be addressed and settled before the contract runs out. The Shores’ CFBPA representative, Shawn Hoyt, a detective in the Public Safety unit, also said he thinks the two sides will come to an agreement and there are plans to give the city a second response ahead of the next collective bargaining negotiation set for June 28. Hoyt admitted it is not the usual course of events to provide a second response while negotiations are underway before hearing back from the other party. He would not provide details of what might be included in the union’s second response, but as the union turned down almost every change the town had put forth initially it could signal some concessions are forthcoming. June 28 could become important in the negotiations as the town is scheduled to have a closed meeting at 9 a.m. to discuss the negotiations and then hold its third collective bargaining session at 1 p.m. The town council is also scheduled to meet that day at 3:30 p.m.


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NEWS ANALYSIS

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Is the barrier island vulnerable, under protected? Saturday nights,” Loar said. The move to 10-hour shifts, Loar adds, has not only helped reduce overtime expense some $800,000 annually, but has also enabled the patrol division to stagger shifts to

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CONTINUES ON PAGE 8

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Loar contends protection is enhanced when more deputies are on patrol during the times of the day when calls for service peak. “It just doesn’t make sense to have as many deputies working early Sunday mornings as we have late

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Imagine you are awakened at 2 a.m. to what sounds like a burglar lurking outside your barrier island home. Startled, you reach for the phone and call 911. Who will arrive to help? If you live in Central Beach, help will come from the Vero Beach Police Department or from the town of Indian River Shores Public Safety Department. If you live in the unincorporated areas of the barrier island, either south of Vero Beach or north of Indian River Shores, deputies from the Indian River County Sheriff ’s Office will respond to your call. Vero Beach Police and Indian River Shores Public Safety Department personnel patrol the 12-mile stretch of the barrier island from the south Vero Beach city limit near the Castaway Cove subdivision to the town of Indian River Shores just south of Wabasso Beach. Barrier island residents south of Vero Beach and north of Indian River Shores are protected by the Indian River County Sheriff ’s Office. How well the Sheriff ’s Office is protecting the areas of the barrier island for which it is responsible is a question that has now become an issue in the race between incumbent Sheriff Deryl Loar and his challenger, former Lieutenant Bill McMullen. McMullen contends Loar’s move to 10-hour shifts for patrol deputies has left the barrier island without adequate protection. Explaining his position to the Republican Executive Committee last week, McMullen criticized Loar’s strategy of staggering shifts so that more deputies are working during the times of the day when there are typically more calls for service.

On the more lightly covered shifts, response times are delayed, McMullen said. He believes the Sheriff ’s Office should use two 12-hours shifts, staffing both with the same number of deputies and giving equal coverage around the clock.

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BY MARK SCHUMANN VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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LOCAL NEWS

Three police agencies, Indian River Shores Public Safety, Vero Beach Police and the Indian River County Sheriff's Office, are responsible for patrolling different areas of the barrier island.

NEWS ANALYSIS FROM PAGE 7

marshal manpower when statistics show it is most needed. Loar also points to agreements his office has with Indian River Shores and Vero Beach to assist each other. If requested, officers from the three departments

would come to one another’s assistance. Covering the unincorporated areas of the barrier island has always been a logistical challenge for the Sheriff ’s Office, according to Loar. Neither the north nor the south areas of the barrier island are large enough, or densely populated enough, to be separate

patrol zones. Once the draw bridge on the Wabasso Causeway was replaced with a high span bridge in 1970, and later, when the Barber Bridge opened in Vero Beach in 1992, the Sheriff ’s Office began covering the north an south zones with different officers. “It takes less time to drive from Wabasso to Orchid Island than it does to drive there from the 7-Eleven on south A1A. By covering the north and south island as a part of two separate patrol zones, we actually improve response times,” Loar said. Combining them into one zone would enable the Sheriff to say he has a deputy assigned specifically to the island at all times. While perhaps more palatable politically, that approach wouldn’t necessarily lead to better protection for island residents. Because the unincorporated areas of the barrier island are 12 miles apart, the Sheriff ’s Office has for decades included them in separate patrol zones, each incorporating portions of the mainland. During the times of the day when the patrol zones are not as heavily covered, either the north or the south zone may be “collapsed” into still larger zones. McMullen maintains this practice leaves the barrier island without adequate law enforcement protection. Loar argues

that with the additional ranch and grove and K-9 officers on duty at any given time, there is adequate back up for the deputies responsible for protecting the island. A review of Sheriff ’s Office records for February shows that from both the north and south zones there averaged less than two crime-related emergency calls a day. In order to provide closer patrols for the island, it would seem Loar’s choices are to re-allocate personnel or to hire additional deputies. Because fewer calls for service originate from the island zones as compared to some mainland zones where there are more businesses, one would question the wisdom of allocating a disproportionate share of resources to protecting the island. Assigning more deputies to the north and south barrier island could be seen as pandering to one group of voters. And while island residents do as a group pay more in county property taxes, no one has yet argued, at least not publically, that the safety of an island resident is more important than that of someone living west of Vero Beach, regardless of how much they pay in taxes. Editor’s Note: Over the course of four days, candidate McMullen could not be reached for comment.


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N E W S W E E K L Y

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B E A C H

VERO BEACH -- The Vero Beach Museum of Art has set the lineup for its 2013 International Lecture Series, featuring talks on the arts and humanities. This upcoming season’s lectures and lecturers are: Chef ’s Table: Exploring the Intersections of Art and Food, February 11, 2013, presented by Master Chef, author, and educator Jacques Pépin; Mapping the Modern, February 25, 2013, presented by the Director of The Museum of Modern Art (NYC) Glenn D. Lowry; Old Masters: Aging and Creativity, March 4, 2013, presented by Senior Correspondent of the PBS News Hour Jeffrey Brown; and The Orchestra Revealed, March 11, 2013, presented by the Conductor of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra JoAnn Falletta. Series and individual lecture tickets for the general public go on sale beginning Sept. 4 at $240 for the entire series or single tickets at $65 each.

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Vero Beach Museum of Art names 2013 lecture series speakers

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- The Indian River County Chamber of Commerce will hold its annual “state of the county” luncheon on Friday, July 13 at noon the Courthouse Executive Center located at 2066 14th Avenue in downtown Vero Beach. County Commission Chairman Gary Wheeler and County Administrator Joe Baird will provide an overview of the state of Indian River County. Cost to attend is $15 per person. Chamber members and the public are invited to attend. Reservations are required. Call the Chamber at (772) 567-3491 ext 110 to make your reservation. The event is sponsored by Florida Power & Light Company.

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Chamber of Commerce to hold state of the county luncheon

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VERO BEACH -- Jetson TV & Appliance and the county’s Supervisor of Elections office are collaborating to provide assistance with registering to vote, absentee ballot requests and other inquiries ahead of the Aug. 14 primary. Complimentary refreshments will be provided, including boutique beverages and coffees from Organic Gold and freshly baked goods from Sweet Creations of Vero Beach. “With such important elections on the horizon, this is a fantastic opportunity for citizens to familiarize themselves with the updates to Florida election laws, renew expired absentee ballot requests and update voter information,” said Supervisor of Elections Leslie Swan. “I believe that it is our patriotic duty to get out and vote, and our community embraces that,” said owner John Jetson. “That’s what makes Indian River County a special place. It is a community that cares.” For more information call (772) 567-3200.

Advance series tickets are currently being offered to members of the Vero Beach Museum of Art on the Museum’s website (www.verobeachmuseum.org). Museum members may take advantage of a 10 percent advance discounted series cost of only $180 for all four lectures through Sept. 3, 2012. Presentations will be hosted in the Leonhardt Auditorium, with two presentations by the same speaker at 4 p.m., and at 6 p.m. A wine reception with an opportunity to meet the speaker will bridge both presentations at 5 p.m. For further information about the 2013 International Lecture call (772) 231-0707 ext. 136.

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Jetson to host voter registration event at downtown store on June 26


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CenterState Bank has moved out of its former offices and into a new 14,000-square-foot building located at 855 21st Street. The official grand opening and ribbon cutting will be held on July 11.

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Volunteers needed for Youth Guidance pool party for deserving students INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- More than 150 volunteers are needed to help present the Youth Guidance Good Grades Pool Party on Aug. 11 at the Gifford Aquatic Center. The annual event brings together volunteers, teens and children to recognize and reward those enrolled in Youth Guidance for their good or improved grades. Children will be recognized for their good (straight A’s or A/B honor roll) and/or improved academics, conduct and attendance. The students with the greatest improvements and straight A’s will also receive other honors including a luncheon sponsored by the Exchange Club of Vero Beach. Youth Guidance is also holding its polo shirt drive for children and will be distributing the shirts at the pool party. The shirt drive is to help every child start school with a new shirt. Polo shirt donations are being accepted until Aug. 9 at the Youth Guidance office located at 1028 20th Place in Vero Beach. Every size (children and adult) shirt is needed. Donations of navy blue or white, long or short-sleeved collared shirts for kids in grades K-12, preferably new and without a logo or emblem, are being accepted. Donations of gift cards or funds will also be accepted to purchase additional polo shirts for the children in Youth Guidance. Persons interested in volunteering, donating or becoming a mentor may visit www.ircyouth.com or call (772) 770-5040 for more information.


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VERO BEACH -- The John’s Island Community Service League has awarded Harvest Food & Outreach Center a grant of $18,700 for its Passport to Prosperity program. The Passport to Prosperity program offers on-the-job training for low income families and provides preparation for recipients to join the workplace. In 2012, Harvest Food anticipates more than 200 people will graduate from the 12-week program after having completed 16 “core” classes and four “choice” classes. “We really appreciated the application of the old proverb ‘if you give a man a fish, you feed him for a day, but if you teach him to fish, you feed

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Harvest Food receives $18,700 grant from Fashioned Service” John’s Island Community Service League “OldImports & Domestics

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Superior Auto Service Family Owned and Operated

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VERO BEACH — The Vero Beach High School Drama Department will present Disney’s Aladdin, in a special arrangement with Music Theatre International, on Friday, June 22 at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, June 23 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, June 24 at 2 p.m. in the VBHS Performing Arts Center. The performances are the conclusion of the annual drama camp and involve more than 100 Indian River County students. The camp staff includes Dee Rose-Imbro, director; Andrew Currie, choreographer; and Karen Wiggins, music director. Tickets to the performances are $8 general admission and are available in the VBHS Performing Arts Center Box Office located at 1707 16th St. in Vero Beach. Visa and MasterCard are accepted payments for tickets. Call (772) 564-5537 to purchase tickets.

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Vero Beach High School Drama Department to present ‘Aladdin’

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Waves car wash on U.S. 1 donated part of its proceeds last Saturday to help the Vero Beach High School football team.

VERO BEACH -- The Campaign for Grade-Level Reading has named Vero Beach a Community Solutions PaceSetter for its work in addressing the challenges that keep many low-income students from learning to read. Vero Beach is one of 124 cities, counties and towns nationwide that has committed to increase significantly the number of low-income students who read on grade level by the end of third grade. The city will be honored at a national conference in Denver June 30-July 2 when the full network of communities will gather with nonprofits, foundations and federal and state policymakers. Vero Beach has been dedicated to grade-level reading by the third grade through collaboration with The Learning Alliance, a grass roots organization started by local parents. In 2010, The Learning Alliance designed a Summer Scholars tutoring program, modeled to provide low-cost, summer tutoring to the children most in need. “We are all so incredibly grateful to The Learning Alliance and because of them, there is no doubt in my mind that we will be able to achieve a 90 percent literacy goal,” said School Board Chairman Jeff Pegler. “The School District’s partnership with The Learning Alliance continues to be a critical part of our students’ success.”

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him for a lifetime’,” said Anne Melanson, co-chairperson of the JISCSL Philanthropy Committee. “We really see this proverb at work in Harvest’s Passport to Prosperity program and are delighted to support its effort.” The John’s Island Community Service League is a nonprofit, memberdriven organization involved in raising funds for distribution to charitable agencies in Indian River County concerned with the health, education and human services primarily of women, children and families in need. Since 1995 JICSL has awarded over $5.7 million in grants to local charitable agencies. For more information about the services offered by Harvest Food, call (772) 770-2665 or go online at irc.harvestfoodoutreach.org.


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Cold laser therapy helping pets heal faster Treatment helps with blood circulation around wounds, feels ‘like a warm massage’ LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The use of cold laser therapy has been around for nearly half a century in treating people with chronic pain from rheumatoid arthritis and sciatica. Now, the same therapy is becoming more common in veterinary medicine. For the past two years, the Florida Veterinary League has used cold laser therapy – a low level light-emitting diode – to treat joint and nerve pain, as well as to promote healing post surgery. “It really helps take down inflammation,” said Brandi Softic-

Edgell, a veterinary technician at the clinic who has been using the $20,000 machine with great success on her patients… and her own pets. “The laser boosts the immune system by increasing red blood cell counts, which helps speed up the healing process.” Softic-Edgell, a graduate of St. Edward’s and a technician for the past 18 years, said the Florida Veterinary League has treated as many as 100 animals with this painless modality. “It feels like a warm massage,” she said about the treatment, which requires no sedation and

entails waving a laser wand over the affected area in a constant movement. In order to make the treatment effective for each individual animal, the technician calibrates the machine according to weight, fur length, skin color and size. The laser’s red light helps with blood circulation due to the red wavelength penetrating deep beneath the surface of the skin. Molly, a 90-pound Rottweiler, was arthritic when she arrived at the clinic, barely able to walk. Now, much improved, Softic-Edgell said the owners are pursuing the second series of laser therapy for their pet. “It’s not going to degrade anything,” she said about the continued use of cold laser, which is different from the type of laser used to cut skin or break up bladder stones. The cost of the cold laser therapy at the clinic is $40 per treatment, with a six-treatment package running $180. “That’s less than half what other clinics are charging,” said SofticEdgell. Sweet Pea, a three-legged Basset Hound she owns whose left front leg was amputated after being hit by a car, made a full recovery using cold laser therapy. “Leg amputations and ear ablations, where the ear canal is removed, are the most painful surgeries for animals,” said SofticEdgell. However, Sweet Pea did really well because of a combination of laser therapy and honey wraps. Honey, a natural expectorant,

pulls the infection out of a wound and promotes growth of healthy tissue in surrounding areas. After a session of cold laser therapy, Softic-Edgell applied honey to Sweet Pea’s wound, sealing it first with wet gauze wraps, on top of which dry gauze was wrapped. “The healing time was faster than Neosporin,” said Softic-Edgell about the wound. She was also able to coax hair growth on the dog’s scar tissue, which is almost impossible. Another patient, a cat named Hammy, had a “huge open wound, where you could see the femur” Softic-Edgell sail. After cold laser therapy, “it was completely healed in two weeks.” Likewise, cats that undergo declawing procedures – a necessity for many diabetic pet owners wary of getting scratched -- experience less pain when their claws are scanned with laser post-surgery. However, the most common problem Softic-Edgell treats with cold laser therapy is the area of cruciate ligaments (CCL) around the knees. “With no laser therapy, but only physical rehabilitation, it takes between six months and a year before the animal can put weight on the affected leg,” she said. “With laser and rehab, an animal can be up and going in six months or less.” Unfortunately, there are also drawbacks. “Laser emits some radiation,” said Softic-Edgell, which prohibits children under the age of ten from being in the room when it is being used.


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Brandi Softic-Edgell gives Abby, a 7-year-old Yorkshire Terrier, a cold laser treatment as part of the services provided by the Florida Veterinary League.

Also, because radiation can bounce off reflective surfaces and into a bystander’s eye, it is recommended that anyone in the vicinity wear glasses. Moreover, there are also contraindications – or reasons NOT to use laser. “With any type of growth or tumor, laser will make them grow larger,” said Softic-Edgell. She has also had the experience of laser not doing anything to impact the animal’s health. “Laser is not a cure-all for everything,” she said. “It requires three or four treatments. Don’t expect a

miracle after the first one.” But for Hannah, a Dachshund who underwent an $8,000 spinal surgery to clean the area around her bulging discs, post operative laser therapy provided her the best opportunity to walk again. “After the surgery, there was a lot of edema and swelling setting in,” said Softic-Edgell. “Even after the first three or four laser treatments, there was still a lot of tissue that was angry, swollen and red.” Now, however, many sessions later, the area is calmed down and healing.

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There are two or more sides to almost every story

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It is a thin board that doesn’t have two sides to it. And isn’t that the truth when it comes to the news? Recent news reports calling into question Sheriff Deryl Loar’s leadership and administration have some wondering if there might not be another side to the story. By quoting sources critical of Loar without revealing that those sources are supports of challenger Bill McMullen, recent reports in an island weekly leave readers without the informaiton they need to decide for themselves the veracity of the newspaper’s sources. For example, one might be better able to put into context statements made by deputy Ron Bair, if the story in which he was quoted explained that he is a contributor to McMullen’s campaign. The latest stories alleging Sheriff ’s Office personnel altered public records suggest collaboration, or at least close communication between a reporter for an island newspaper and attorney Bob Meadows, whose sister is McMullen’s campaign manager. When we contacted Meadows a

month ago looking into an earlier set of similar allegations he disavowed any connection to or involvement in McMullen’s campaign. With the August 14 Republican primary election now less than two months away, Meadows has asked the State Attorneys office to investigate the handling of public records in the Sheriff ’s Office. The matter has been turned over to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. One cannot help but wonder if Meadows, who describes himself as a “strong supporter” of McMullen, isn’t acting on McMullen behalf. If so, he is using someone’s playbook from the 2008 campaign, when the Florida Department of Law Enforcement was asked to investigate Loar who was then head of the Florida Highway Patrol’s Treasure Coast Division. The charges were ultimately determined to be unfounded. While it appears Meadows may be collaborating with the island weekly in its reporting on the Sheriff ’s Office, by his own admission candidate McMullen requested the public records that were the basis of the island week-

ly’s reporting. “Sure, I requested the data (records),” McMullen said answering a question during a debate hosted last week by the Indian River County Republican Executive Committee. In addition to raising charges during a political campaign, the reporting in question, by quoting disgruntled deputies, creates the impression that protection of the barrier island is seriously neglected by the Sheriff ’s Office. There is, of course, another side to the story, as there is to almost every story. Crime rates are down despite the fact that the Sheriff ’s Office budget has been reduced from $44 million to $37.5 million. As part of his strategy for reducing Sheriff ’s Office spending, Loar two years ago cut $800,000 in overtime expense, partly by putting deputies in the patrol division on 10-hour shifts. Patrol deputies had been working 12-hour shifts, with overtime scheduled into every two-week pay period. Many deputies don’t appreciate having to give up overtime every pay, and they would prefer to work

Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

“Doing well by doing good.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

Ian Love, Managing Editor 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com Mike Bielecki, Sports Editor 321-6105 mbwordsmith@gmail.com Christina Tascon, Writer/Photographer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Marsha Damerow Graphic Designer Judy Graziosi Graphic Designer Lisa Rymer Contributor Milt Thomas Contributor

Scott Alexander Contributor Michael Birnholz Contributor Barbara Yoresh Contributor Martine Fecteau Account Executive

To contact one of our contributing writers please call 772-978-2251 or send an email to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 (martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com) or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233 (Mark.Schumann@scripps.com)

12-hour shifts three days in a row, followed by four days off. To hear some deputies tell it, the move to a four-day workweek is unreasonable. Yet, deputies in St. Lucie County and most deputies in Brevard County work 10-hour shifts. Martin County deputies are scheduled for five 8-hour shifts a week. McMullen has pledged to return to 12-hour shifts. How he will accomplish this without also increasing expenses is a question he has yet to explain. Loar’s strategies for staffing and containing expenses may or may not make for the best policy. In the arena of competing ideas the Sheriff must make his case for himself. It is the press’s responsibility to report facts in context, and to help readers put them in perspective. For example, it is true that Sheriff ’s Captain Jeff Luther advised a watch commander to closely patrol a car show held at the Moorings Club. According to Luther, he was responding to a request made by organizers of the event. To suggest, as the island weekly did, that Luther was attempting to create the impression the barrier island is more closely patrolled that it really is, is to present the facts out of context. Because the distance between the truth and a half-truth can be as little as a millimeter, or as much as a mile, the public would be well advised this election season to take statements and charges made by candidates and their advocates with a healthy dose of skepticism seasoned with a grain of salt.


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During the June 5 City Council meeting Vice Mayor Craig Fletcher said he was opposed to a proposal being considered by the Planning and Zoning Commission that would allow threestory buildings on the west side of Ocean Drive and the east side of Cardinal Drive. Two days later Fletcher flipflopped his position. Etch a sketching his earlier pronouncements in favor of following the 2005 Vision Plan and the 2007 Master Plan, the council’s most flexible member abandoned that position, siding, at least for the time being, with those in favor of the Ocean Drive/Cardinal Drive Overlay District now being considered by the Planning and Zoning Commission. To his credit Fletcher can at times demonstrate a great degree of open-mindedness. In fact, the Vice Mayor’s willingness to entertain positions other than the ones he has earlier staked out could be seen as admirable. After all, anyone whose thinking never changes is probably brain dead. On the other hand, who wants to be so open-mind that their brain falls out? While he was serving as president, it was said of Bill Clinton that whichever aide got to him last with a compelling argument was sure to have his way. If you don’t stand for something, you will fall for anything. Which brings us to the point of whether there is any merit in respecting the hard work and hundreds of hours of community input that went into developing the 2005 Vision Plan and Beachland Boulevard Master Plan adopted in

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2007. This is exactly the position taken by Brian Carman, executive director of the Indian River Neighborhood Association. And it is the view of Ital Veron, George Christopher and others who see the proposed Central Beach overlay district as “an affront” to those who worked in good faith to develop the Vision Plan and Master Plan. Those plans call for buildings of no more than two stories on the west side of Ocean Drive and the east side of Cardinal Drive. Neither of those plans has been codified in law. Current zoning laws actually allow for buildings of up

to four stories, but with a 35-foot in height limit. Many who participated in developing the 2005 Vision Plan and the Beachland Boulevard Master Plan expected those plans would be enacted as city ordinances. That has not happened. Others, including some current members of the Planning and Zoning Commission, see the Vision Plan and the Master Plan as nothing more than “suggested guidelines,” rather than firm rules to be followed. This, of course, is pretty much how former President Richard Nixon viewed the Constitution. Though the Vision Plan and

Master Plan hardly deserve the reverence afforded the United States Constitution, they are, at least, the result of extensive efforts to seek community input and build consensus around a shared vision for the community. Setting aside so much community input and consensus building to instead favor the whims of the planning director, or the Planning and Zoning Commission or even the current City Council, does seem to make a charade of the visioning process. The Vision Plan and the Master Plan should stand for something, otherwise we will wind up falling or flip-flopping for anything.


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Is it possible to bridge the great political divide? BY REV. SCOTT ALEXANDER

Anyone who is paying even the least bit of attention to American culture and politics knows that at the present time, America is bitterly divided between “liberals” and “conservatives.” Beginning with the near total paralysis in Washington between warring Republicans and Democrats, moving on to the sometimes ugly accusations of American “talk radio,” right down to the nasty “letters to the editor” which fly back and forth in our daily newspapers here on The Treasure Coast -- our nation seems increasingly polarized, with both “the right” and “the left” demonizing and dismissing each other. It doesn’t seem enough these days for each side’s partisans to argue their principles or “the facts on the ground” -- in today’s poisonous political and cultural environment both sides are quick to label the

other as ignorant, immoral, unpatriotic or evil. But one important and thoughtful voice is calling us back to civility, respect, understanding and (yes, REVEREND even) compro- SCOTT ALEXANDER mise. Dr. Jonathan Haidt, a social psychologist at the University of Virginia, has extensively studied the moral viewpoints and values of both liberals and conservatives, and what he finds (in a nutshell) is that both “right-leaning” and ”left-leaning” Americans have clear and honorable moral principles, intellectual depth and integrity, and a sincere desire for what is best for our society. In his important new book, “The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided By Politics and Re-

ligion” (Pantheon books) he makes the case that the real difference between liberals and conservatives is simply one of moral emphasis and inclination, not of one side being “good” and the other “bad.” He identifies six fundamental ideas that commonly undergird moral systems -- care, fairness, liberty, loyalty, authority and sanctity -- and points out the liberals and conservatives both value these six moral stances, but to different degrees. In an interview with Bill Moyers Haidt explains his research and articulates his hope that political partisans on both American extremes might begin to respect and understand one another’s convictions and thus begin to move the nation back from polarization and demonization which has poisoned and paralyzed our government. I have no illusions, or desire even, that American liberals and

conservatives will suddenly stop arguing over the great social and economic issues of the day. There are very real philosophical disagreements and differences between the right and the left that will continue to dominate American politics and cultural life – that is the nature of these times. But I hope that as a people, we will purposefully take a step back from the poisonous precipice of hate and condemnation on which so many now stand, and realize that both liberals and conservatives are good, moral and patriotic people who sincerely want what is best for this still great nation of ours. Rev. Scott W. Alexander is the minister of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach, and has been a minister, author, and educator for almost 40 years. He is an avid cyclist and outdoor enthusiast who loves living in Vero Beach.

Thinking about Vero while cruising on the Yangtze River BY MILT THOMAS

As I sit in a cruise ship sailing along the Yangtze River in southern China, I can’t help but think: here I am, writing a column for the Vero Beach Newsweekly while I am sitting in a cruise boat sailing along the Yangtze River! So much of what we buy today is made in China it should come as no surprise how much this transfer of wealth has affected both our countries. Shanghai is the most obvious case in point. It is a city of 23 million people that looks like it was built from scratch about three weeks ago. The fact is, just about every building (except for the historic Bund district), all the broad, clean streets and perfectly manicured neighborhoods did not exist 20 years ago. Without exag-

geration, every car and truck on the crowded streets is new, at least less than five years old. Toyota is very popular here, along with Mercedes, Hyundai and even American brands MILT THOMAS like Chevrolet and Buick. Shanghai is a monument to capitalism, but it is a hollow edifice. It did not flow from a free society that nurtured capitalistic ideals. Instead, it was manipulated into existence by a government that only wanted enough prosperity to keep its billion people happy without yielding any dictatorial power. The Chinese people are warm and friendly, intelligent and hard work-

ing. They have earned whatever success they achieved by overcoming suffering on a scale unimaginable in the West. Millions died at the hands of the Japanese beginning in the 1930s. After World War II, tens of millions died in the civil war that brought the communists to power and tens of millions more died in the so-called “Cultural Revolution” that ended in 1978. Everyone I have spoken with has vivid personal memories of their suffering or the suffering of their parents and grandparents. Poverty is still endemic for 50 percent of the population who live on the farm, but they no longer have to fear murderous rampages from invaders or from their own government. So, today the Chinese people are generally better off than at any

time in their history, but they must still be wary of their government as in the past; careful not to say or do anything that might be interpreted as dissent, even when innocuous. The Chinese people have plenty of practice dealing with this underlying authoritarianism. Unfortunately, deference to authority is in their genes and can only be exorcised if the day comes when they experience true freedom. Until then, they can take our money, but all the money in the world cannot buy a truly democratic way of life. Milt Thomas is a Vero Beach resident and experienced freelance writer/author with a 20-year background in the music industry. He currently writes biographies, blogs, lectures, travels extensively and is an active member of the National Press Club.


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Up and out of the canyon together

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From the north rim of the Grand Canyon, I looked down Bright Angle trail, tracing as far as I could the dusty orange path that would lead us to a footbridge spanning the Colorado River and eventually to the south rim 24 miles away.  I took a deep breath of gratitude, realizing that I was finally beginning a long-dreamedof adventure.

Packing tents, sleeping bags, food and drinking water, my wife Cheri and I, along three fellow hikers, Mahesha, Meg and Paulette, and our guide Jayci, set out down the trail that would take us on more or less the same path F.E. Matthews and his team of surveyors blazed in November 1901, as they sought a route of escape from a winter storm.  Four days later we would reach the south rim, having learned more about patience,

partnership and persistence.   Mahesha, a computer programmer from New Jersey, took the point position.  A native of India, he has lived in the United States 12 years, and has already seen more of the national parks than most Americans experience in a lifetime.  When the United States cavalry was battling Native American Indians, point was a dangerous position in line.  For our small band

of adventurers, though, taking the front of the line only meant you couldn’t linger at the back, as I preferred to do, stopping often to record on my camera the breathtaking landscapes offered around every corner of the trail. Paulette and Meg, friends from British Columbia, followed Mahesha.  Avid hikers, they put in many miles preparing for their Grand Canyon adventure, but none of the CONTINUES ON PAGE 18

Jayci Ferrimani and Meg Paulsen

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More than 4 million people a year visit Grand Canyon National Park, the second most visited of the national parks.


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conditioning they did in Canada’s cooler climate could fully prepare them for the heat that was awaiting us the second day of the hike as we entered the “oven,” a long, narrow stretch of Bright Angle Canyon. There the heat of the noonday sun radiated off the canyon walls, driving up our heart rates, and finally

the canyon, not to dash across it.  What I didn’t realize, though, was that I was also there to receive a powerful lesson in how much more important the journey is than the destination. Because Jayci had been able to evaluate Meg’s fitness on the first day of hike, he knew if we slowed the pace, stopped often to rest, cooled Meg down with water and

causing Meg to show early signs of heat exhaustion. An experienced guide, Jayci knew how to help Meg; cooling her down by pouring water on her head and down her back.  We stopped as often as Meg needed to rest, usually whenever we came to a spot of shade.  We were not, after all, on a race to the south rim.  We were there to experience

No community is an island. For a balanced report of local news of interest and importance to you read the Newsweekly. Because the neighborhoods of our greater community continue to become more, not less connected and interdependent, the Newsweekly covers ALL of Vero Beach. Don’t settle for just a fraction of the news you need. Read the Newsweekly, your community weekly newspaper from cover to cover.

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The Vero Beach Newsweekly gives you the barrier island and more. To learn more, call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233.

encouraged her, we could work our way out of the “oven,” and make it safely to a campground nestled in a grove of cottonwood trees near where Bright Angel Creek flows into the Colorado River. Jayci knew Meg could make it out of the “oven,” though she was hardly as confident in herself. Watching the experienced backcountry hiker coach and coax Meg along, I thought about the times in my life when others believed in me more than I believed in myself.  There have certainly been stretches in my journey when I have been helped by others who showed me how to keep moving, to keep putting one foot in front of the other, moving forward one step at a time, one day at a time. Meg’s goal for that day was to hike from where we camped the first night to Bright Angel campground. Jayci and the rest of us held that agenda for Meg when she could not hold it for herself.  Sometimes the biggest gift we can give someone is to not buy into his or her self-limiting assessments.  In her farewell column last week, Lisa Rymer, who is now the marketing director of the Sunrise Theatre, wrote quite personally about her challenge in finding full time work.  As she so poignantly observed, many of our friends and neighbors are without work through no fault of their own.  And for many of them, the short term prospects of finding jobs that pay well enough to support their families are not good. According to a report released last week by the Federal Reserve Bank, the average income of middle class households slid from $49,600 in 2007 to $45,800 in 2010.  Over the same three years the net worth of the median American family fell from $126,400 to $77,300.  Clearly


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the current “balance sheet” recovery is doing little to help middle class Americans regain financial stability. For many, one of the necessary strategies of coping with the current economy is to adjust expectations and count our blessings.  Others, however, are on the verge of the emotional and financial equivalent of heat exhaustion.  Many of them may never make it out alone. What if we saw ourselves like the cross canyon hikers fortunate enough to not yet have succumbed to the heat?  What if we, like Jayci, assumed responsibility for helping others make it out of the economic canyon we are in?  Would we find ways to lend encouragement and support, letting the unemployed and underemployed know we believe in them

even when they cannot believe in themselves? On the third day, Meg woke up still feeling weak and shaky.  Wondering if she could, she asked Jayci what it would take to get a helicopter ride out of the canyon.  While as many as 250 hikers a year are evacuated from the canyon by helicopter, Jayci knew Meg need not to be one of them. To lighten Meg’s load, the rest of us took on much of the weight she had been carrying in her backpack. Together we set out across the Colorado River for Indian Garden campground, a literal oasis in the desert, where we would spend our third night out under the most majestic star-lit skies I have ever seen. Miraculously, by the morning of the fourth day Meg had regained CONTINUES ON PAGE 20

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Jayci, Mahesha, Paulette, Meg and Cheri hiking out of the canyon together.

many who are still without work FROM PAGE 19 are in danger of becoming so cyniher strength and confidence.  We cal and discouraged that they can broke camp in the dark and set no longer see a way to keep putting out for the south rim under the one foot in front of another. dim light of the morning stars.  Those who are more educated, Meg seemed like a new woman.  more fortunate, more privileged, With all of the pep and spring in more gifted and more talented her step she had when we set out can go on ahead and make the three days earlier, Meg led the way steep climb out alone.  But if they up the steep, winding trail that do, we will be no stronger as a would take us 5,000 feet up and community or as a nation for their out of the canyon. solitary efforts.  Let’s face it.  With a local unemThe greatest challenge facing ployment rate of 10 percent, and America is not the threat of termore than 50 percent of our coun- rorism, or the emergence of China ty’s children living in households and India.  Rather, it is selfishness, with incomes so low they qualify and self-seeking from within that for subsidized school lunches, we most threatens to hold us back are deep in an economic canyon, and drag us down as communiand many of our fellow citizens ties and as a nation.  I am hardly are suffering from the financial a socialist, but I do believe this:  equivalent of heat exhaustion. If we make it through these diffiSure, the stock market has re- cult economic times, and are able gained nearly all of its losses from eventually to restore hope in the 2008 and 2009.  But the rebound American dream, there will be no in equities has hardly benefited solo heroes.  If we make it, we will the average American family.  And make it together.

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Crowd comes out to enjoy McKee’s water lilies

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Visitors watched water lily potting demonstrations by Edna Carsner throughout the day BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Once again, nature put on its most stunning display at McKee Botanical Garden’s annual Water Lily Celebration. McKee officials opened the gates ahead of time so guests could get a glimpse of the early blooming varieties and also miss some of the midday heat. Visitors were treated to lessons in potting water lilies by specialist Edna Carsner and also were able to purchase the plants and some goldfish for their own ponds. It was a special way to spend a late spring morning as guests delighted at the breathtaking blooms and were also given a lesson on how to paint lilies by artist Rick Kelly. Photographer Bob Webster was

anxious to start taking pictures. “I am just blown away by the beauty of these water lilies,” he said snapping away. Webster had already entered three shots in the photo contest which was on display in the Hall of Giants. McKee’s famed mahogany table was completely filled with pictures of the lilies which guests were asked to vote on for the People’s Choice award. “McKee not only has the best selection of water lilies in the state,” said McKee Executive Director Christine Hobart, “we are actually recognized as having some of the best varieties in the whole southeastern U.S.” “Having them view the beautiful McKee water lilies is equally important as having the potting and care lessons today,” said Hobart. “We want our guests to see this is something they can attain in their own gardens.”

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Emily Salvador with mother Eileen & grandmother Caroline Kusen


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BE PREPARED When the Threat of Severe Weather First Strikes.

LIFE-SAVING ALERTS

RADARS

TRACK MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

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Photographers flocked to the main pond which holds a wide variety of water lilies as well as hand blown glass globes

Pat Faehale with daughter Emily of Aquatic Systems Resources

StormShieldApp.com Artist Rick Kelly painted a scene of pond and plants as visitors looked on and asked questions


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PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

The “No Club Car Guys” Frankie D., Dave Silva, Andy Garcia, Don Shaw and Izzy Cosme

The Elks Lodge and the Vietnam Veterans Association celebrated Father’s Day by putting on a barbecue and Classic & Antique Car Show. Over 50 cars registered and set up along the perimeter of the Vero Beach Elks Lodge on Sunday as fathers and their families were able to show off dad’s pride and joy. Some came to display their cars and some came to look and dream. The No Club Car Guys came to have fun. “Isn’t that what it is all about,” said Frankie D. whose club policy is “No rules, No dues, No Problem.” Craig Waskow organized the event. He is an Elks trustee, serves on the foundation for the Vietnam Veterans

Association and is also president of the local Antique Auto Club of America. Bringing the three groups together was a labor of love for him. “We started this event last year,” said Waskow. “Dads want to do what dads want to do…the car show and the cause went hand in hand for them.” Many came to support the Vietnam veterans. The money raised will be split evenly between the Elk’s charities and the Vietnam Veterans benefits and services. “All the money raised will stay right here in Indian River County,” said Waskow. Pat Margiotta brought his custom car but he said it really was about the cause for him too. “I always support the vets,” he said smiling. “Everything about me is America!”

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Veterans, dads relax at antique car show

Jerry Wich, Vice Mayor of Indian River Shores, drives in his 1961 Corvette

Danny Biel, Barbara & Frankie Delong, John Matthews, Wayne Cooper and Roger Bye cool off in the Elks Lodge with some lunch

Three generations of the Ferrara family, Gary, Bella, Alex Mike and Tony Ferrara enjoy the show and BBQ

Father and son, John J. Licardi and John Licardi Sr., work on their ‘65 Mustang Coupe together


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Community Calendar EVERY FRIDAY ! Farmer’s Market

JULY 4 ! Riverside Park

3-6 pm, downtown Vero, corner 14th Ave. & 21st St. 772-480-8353.

Beginning at 5 pm, bounce houses, food & refreshments, arts & crafts, Firework Display at 9 pm with simulcast on 93.7. 772-567-2144.

EVERY SATURDAY ! Oceanside Business Association

JULY 7 ! Riverside Children’s Theatre

Farmer’s Market, 8 am-noon. Ocean Dr. & Dahlia Ln. 772-5322455.

Dance Festival, paired dance performances by professional & student dancers of Ballet Nebraska, 7 pm, $8-$12, Stark Stage. 772-231-6990.

JUNE 21 ! Cookies for Soldiers

Drop off cookies or monetary donations for soldiers overseas, Elks Lodge, 1350 26th St., 9:30 am. 772-562-8450.

JULY 12 ! Harbor Branch

JUNE 22-23

PHOTO BY MELINA NELSON BAIR

! Rascals Revue

Riverside Children’s Theatre, Anne Morton Theatre, 3280 Riverside Park Dr., $8, top pop songs. 772-231-6990. ! Comedy Zone SUMMER NIGHTS!

Grilled food from Hale Groves and treats from Kilwin’s available. Mike Rivera and Trish Keating, 7:30 & 9:30 pm, $15 plus food, prices vary. 772-231-6990. JUNE 22-24 ! Disney’s Aladdin, A Musical

Fri 7:30 pm, Sat 2 & 7:30 pm, and Sun 2pm, VBHS Performing Arts Center, 1707 16th St., $8. 772564-5537. JUNE 23 ! Florida Family Law Seminar

To help residents understand the state’s laws, Majestic Theatre, 9:30-10:30 am, adults only. Reservations, 772-569-1101. ! Space Coast Symphony Orchestra

Wind Players, “An All-AmeriTHURSDAY, JUNE 21

If you’d like to see one of your photographs published in Vero Beach Newsweekly, please send them to us at verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com. Photos need to be at least 200 dpi and in jpeg format.

can Salute” music by Bernstein, Gershwin & Sousa, free, 2 pm, Trinity Episcopal Church. 772252-7276. ! Vietnam Veterans of America

Chapter 1038 bowling event at Vero Bowl, 1:30 pm to help local veterans, $15, prizes & raffles. Sandra, 772-562-8794. ! Hot Dog Party & Book Signing

Harbor Branch, 11 am-1 pm. Professor Clark the Science Shark, children’s book, $5 donation includes hot dog, soda and chips. 772-242-2559. JUNE 24 ! Theatre-Go-Round

Joey’s Bistro, “Dancing in the Streets,” musical revue from the 60s, 4 pm cocktails & dinner, show at 6 pm, $22.50-$45. Reservations, 772-252-9341.

FRIDAY, JUNE 22

SATURDAY, JUNE 23

JUNE 27 ! Karen White, book signing

Sea Change, 6 pm, Vero Beach Book Center, 2145 Indian River Blvd., free but $15 autographed signed copy. 772-569-2050. ! Mike Block & String Camp

Distinguished Cellist & Composer. Performance at VBHS Center for the Performing Arts, 7 pm, $10 tickets sold at door. 772-5645497. JUNE 29 ! Red White & Blue Ball

Patriotic themed dance, Community Center, 2266 14th Ave., ages 18+, 7:30 pm, $10. 772-770-6517. ! Downtown Friday Fest

Historic Mainstreet Vero Beach, 14th Ave., food, vendors, music, drinks and fun for the family, 5:30-8:30 pm. 772-480-8353.

Showing of “Dolphin Tale” plus mammal rescue speaker, Johnson Center, 1-3 pm, free, hot dogs & popcorn. 772-242-2559. JULY 14 ! Campfire Saturdays with Miss Julie

Vero Beach Book Center, Children’s Store. Stories, sing-a-long, snacks & more, 11 am. 772-569-6650. JULY 20-21

! Riverside Children’s Theatre Little Shop of Horrors, Summer Stage, Anne Morton Theatre, 6280 Riverside Dr., $6-$9/$12-$18. 772231-6990. JULY 21 ! Indoor Air Conditioned Garage Sale

Vero Beach Community Center, over 50 tables, sign up to participate or come to shop. 8 am-12:30 pm. 772-770-6517. ! Bioluminescent Kayak Tour

Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, depart Vero Cracker Barrel at 4:30 pm, return midnight, $35. Reservations, 772-242-2559. To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 24

MONDAY, JUNE 25

TUESDAY, JUNE 26

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27

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PHOTO SUPPLIED

The performances for the Riverside Children’s Theatre’s production of “Xanadu Junior” will be from June 22 to June 24.

Olivia Newton-John and Gene Kelly. The Tony Award nominated musical version debuted on Broadway in 2007 where it ran for more than 500 performances. Since that time, the show has played worldwide. The story centers on Clio, a Greek Muse who descends from the lofty heights of Mt. Olympus to the circa 1980 California beachside town of Venice. Assuming a less classical persona as Kira, an Australian roller skater, the fun begins when she falls into forbidden love with a “mortal” named Sonny, a struggling chalk artist who dreams of creating a roller disco. Sonny’s suicidal despondence stems from his dissatisfaction with his sidewalk chalk mural of the Greek Muses who are the daughters of Zeus. Looking down from Mt. Olympus, Clio convinces her eight sisters to let her visit Sonny as inspiration although she will appear in disguise according to proscribed Muse protocol. But petty family jealousies arise over Clio’s status in the pecking order as well as over Zeus’ promise of “Xanadu” - whatever that is - to Clio. So the sisters conspire to undermine Clio by tricking her into falling in love with Sonny – something a Muse mustn’t do with a mortal lest she end up eternally in the nether world. From there, the plot twists and turns, but in the end, “Xanadu” is found: an enveloping atmosphere of true love and the ability to share and create art. Those attending the performances are heartily encouraged to catch the magic by dressing in their favorite 1980s-style get up for a costume contest. Performances will be held Friday and Saturday, June 22 and 23 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, June 24 at 1:30 p.m. on the Anne Morton Stage located at 3250 Riverside Park Drive in Vero Beach. Attendees are also invited to come early for a 6:30 p.m. grilled dinner served by Hale Groves River Market next to the Riverside Theatre box office. For more information, call the box office at (772) 231-6990 or visit online at www.riversidetheatre.com.

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theatre which was chosen to debut a pilot production of the show that could be used as a template for others to perform. “This all comes about as a result of a nice relationship we’ve developed with iTheatrics. It’s a workshop production that the kids can sing easily although there is roller skating and not all of them have done that before but it’s fun,” she said with a laugh. “This is most special because we’ll be in print and promotional materials.” With RCT’s busy summer schedule which has included recent productions of “Winnie the Pooh,” an upcoming inaugural dance festival and other summer programs, the inclusion of “Xanadu Junior” into the roster was a bit of a challenge. “This was not planned but we weaved it into our schedule,” Downey said. The original “Xanadu” is a musical comedy with a book by Douglas Carter Beane and music and lyrics by Jeff Lynne and John Farrar that was based on the 1980 movie of the same name which starred

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The very name conjures images of exotic locales and Oriental opulence: Xanadu. Visited in 1275 and vividly described by Marco Polo and immortalized in a 1797 poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge that described its pleasure garden, Xanadu – located north of Beijing in Inner Mongolia - was the summer capital of Kublai Khan who ruled during China’s Yuan Dynasty. Noted for its splendor and magnificently decorated palace, Xanadu’s mystique transcended its ancient origins to become a metaphor for a dreamlike place or sensibility. But the allure of Xanadu also became linked to a Broadway musical show and 1980 cult-favorite movie in which Chinese references have morphed into Greek gods and muses as well as roller skating in a 1980s-era production. If it all sounds very confusing; it is! But

what fun, and the young cast of River Children’s Theatre’s “Xanadu Junior,” which performs June 22 and 23 at 7:30 p.m. and June 24 at 1:30 p.m., will be very pleased to sort it all out for you via a fully staged and costumed workshop production. Thanks to the reputation RCT has earned through its professional quality classes and productions, the theatre has a special arrangement with Music Theatre International and iTheatrics to perform the show which will be a pilot production. Publicity and photos from the show will be used in the public scripts of “Xanadu Junior” for other theatres to rent to produce the show. Now in rehearsals, the show is directed by RCT staffer Kevin Quillinan and is choreographed by Angelo Cerniglia. Debbie Quillinan is music director for the performance. RCT Education Director Linda Downey is excited about the latest accolade for the

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BY BARBARA YORESH VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Vero Beach Theatre Guild honors its best and brightest BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Everyone came out to honor the Vero Beach Theatre Guild stars as part of its local version of Broadway’s Tony Awards. The event is known locally as the Genie Awards. It was high glitz at the award show held last Saturday at the Elk’s Lodge as honorees tensely waited to hear their names called. The Vero Beach Theatre Guild is completely made up of non-paid volunteers, so receiving a Genie Award is the equivalent of a very public pat on the back. Guild President and the night’s organizer, Madelyn Rogers, made sure this year’s event was extra special. “This was a challenging year with a variety of well-written classics,” said long time Guild member Mark Wygonik. “I was so proud of everybody and all their hard work.” “Our Genie banquet is a celebration of the completed season and our way of thanking our many volunteers and also for recognizing top performances both on and off the stage,” added Guild member Carole Strauss. Genie Award winners Leading Actor in a Drama – James Anthony Davis – All My Sons Leading Actress in a Comedy – Kara Henson - Born Yesterday Leading Actor in a Musical – Robin Volsky – Titanic Leading Actress in a Musical – (Tie) Donna Roberts Mitchell – Titanic &

Dana Rogers – 1940’s Radio Hour Supporting Actress in a Drama – Shelley Adelle – All My Sons Supporting Actor in a Musical – James Anthony Davis – 1940’s Radio Hour Supporting Actress in a Musical – Glynis Sherman - Titanic Character Actor in a Comedy – Anthony Aruffo – Bell, Book & Candle Character Actress in a Comedy – Isabel Garrett – Bell, Book & Candle Character Actor in a Musical – George Andrew – Titanic Character Actress in a Musical – Colette Loo - Titanic Actor in a Secondary Role in a Comedy – Jeffrey “Cap” McGann – Born Yesterday Actor in a Secondary Role in a Musical – (Tie) Jerry Nashel – Titanic & Matt Zyble – 1940’s Radio Hour Actor in a Cameo role in a Drama – Chris Dunleavy – All My Sons Actress in a Secondary Role in a Drama – Holly Cameron – All My Sons Actress in a Secondary Role in a Musical – Gerry King - Titanic Outstanding Male Vocalist – Robin Volsky - Titanic Outstanding Female Vocalist – Dana Rogers – 1940’s Radio Hour Outstanding Male Newcomer – Anthony Aruffo – Bell, Book & Candle Outstanding Female Newcomer – Isabel Garrett – Bell, Book & Candle Outstanding Rookie – Brad Hanawalt - Titanic Outstanding Set – Denise Lee – Bell, Book & Candle Outstanding Production 2011 - 2012– All My Sons – George Carabin

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PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Mark Wygonik, Gerry King, Mary Moriarty and Greg Steenburgh

Committee Members: Ben Earman, Crystal Kepler, Madelyn Rogers, Tricia Allison and Ed Dessureau

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Dana Rogers, Carole Strauss and Glynis Sherman


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BY BARBARA YORESH

“My background was here, there and everywhere but my parents lived in Vero and I had worked at RCT about eight summers because dance companies usually take a summer break,” Schnell said. “When I was ready to hang up my dance shoes I wanted to come back to Florida.”

plan. First we wanted to structure classes like a dance conservatory and then expand performance opportunities for dance students,” Schnell said. The final phase – a dance festival – is the culmination of Schnell’s longheld goal.

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“We wanted to bring in professionals and students who would board and stay (for two weeks) to bring to Vero what the rest of the country has – an intensive program.” Adam Schnell, director Riverside Children’s Theatre Dance Conservatory

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Working closely with RCT Education Director Linda Downey, Schnell brainstormed to find ways to distinguish the theatre’s dance program. “We tried to come up with ways that would set it apart from others and came up with a three-phased

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taught dance and theatre and has worked as a choreographer. But when an opportunity arose in 2009 to return to Florida to become director of the Riverside Children’s Theatre Dance Conservatory, Schnell was ready for a new challenge.

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The inaugural Riverside Dance Festival will culminate in a dance performance on July 7.

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In yet another ground-breaking achievement by Riverside Children’s Theatre, an inaugural “Riverside Dance Festival” will be held from June 24 through July 7 under the artistic direction of Adam Schnell, director of RCT’s Dance Conservatory. The show will feature an exciting pairing of dance professionals with aspiring dance students. The two-week festival will showcase the talents of local dance students and students who have auditioned throughout the country who will get personal experience about what it takes to become a professional dancer through intensive classes, workshops and rehearsals. Students and their professional dance teachers will create choreography which will be presented in a performance on Saturday, July 7 at 7:30 p.m. Four contemporary dance artists from two prestigious American dance companies will present for students technique classes in ballet and contemporary dance as well as master classes and create choreography in mixed repertory. Schnell will be joined by Prometheus Dance of Boston co-Artistic Directors Diane Arvanites and Nikki Sell and Ballet of Nebraska founder and artistic director Erika Overtuff and Ballet Master Matthew Carter to present the two-week festival. “This is my new pet project,” said Schnell via phone from Nebraska. The former professional dancer, who earned a dual bachelor of arts degree from Empire State College in arts management and dance education, is an earlier graduate of the Walnut Hill School for the Arts as a ballet major. He danced with ballet companies throughout the United States and performed worldwide as a guest artist with various dance and ballet companies. For more than a decade, Schnell

“We wanted to bring in professionals and students who would board and stay (for two weeks) to bring to Vero what the rest of the country has – an intensive program,” Schnell explained. Schnell noted that serious dance students need this exposure and discipline. “It’s a given that from the age of 12 or 13 that dance students do something intensive and dance six to eight hours a day. We show kids what it is the pros do and on the educational side it’s great because the kids share life with professional dancers,” Schnell said. The ability to provide such an experience is an asset to the community and a testament to the growing success of RCT, Schnell said. “There are no resident professional dance opportunities between Orlando and Miami and we have the ability to do these sorts of things and to develop an audience that is missing this art,” Schnell said. “So much has changed in only three years at RCT in dance. It’s astounding to me.” The premiere of the Riverside Dance Festival is likely to be the first of even more unique events presented by RCT which is the educational arm of Riverside Theatre and which offers classes, camps and training opportunities in the areas of dance, theatre and music for all ages on a year round basis. “I want to pass this on to kids who dance in Vero. It’s such a joy to bring the dance world to them,” Schnell said. The culmination of the session will be a performance July 7. Tickets are $12 for adults and $8 for students. To purchase tickets or for more information, call the Riverside Theatre box office at (772) 231-6990 or visit online at www.riversidetheatre.com. Riverside Theatre is located at 3250 Riverside Park Drive in Vero Beach. Riverside Children’s Theatre is next door.

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Dance festival coming to Riverside Children’s Theatre


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Cuisines of Vero

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Simple, Savory & Seaside Offering a menu directly sourced from local farmers, fisherman and artisanal purveyors.

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great breakfast, great lunch

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29 !

Sports

2 0 1 2 ! V E R O B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y

VERO BEACH -- “Play Ball!” was the command from Indian River County Commissioner Bob Solari as the ribbon was cut last week on the new $2.6 million addition at Vero Beach Sports Village. City of Vero Beach and Indian River County dignitaries turned out to celebrate the introduction of the four multi-purpose baseball/ softball fields, which broke ground in late 2011 and were completed earlier in the spring both on time and on budget. A press box, concession area and restrooms complement the four fields that will be used for youth baseball and girls’ softball of all ages. The Dodgers and Phillies of the Gifford Central Little League christened the field, playing the first tee-ball game at the new quadruplex. “It is fun to be with you on such a special occasion,” said Minor League Baseball President Pat O’Connor. “Things like this just don’t happen, and there are a lot of people who are responsible for this. This was a project that took cooperation from both the city and the county through a land swap and through various agreements which had to be done and undone. On behalf of our new partnership, Vero Town LLC, Peter O’Malley sends his regards. Mr. O’Malley is very passionate about what’s happening here and we are very excited to have him back in the picture.” Minor League Baseball spent an estimated $150,000 per month operating Vero Beach Sports Village in 2010 and 2011, during which time the facility lost approximately $1.5 million. This year the facility appears to have turned the corner, and Vero Beach Sports Village is trending toward a profitable year. “Things at the beginning were a little rougher than we anticipated, but with perseverance we stand here today and we celebrate another milestone and the vision that Pat O’Connor had,” said County Commissioner Peter O’Bryan. “While these fields certainly add to that vision, with the year-round, multi-sport facility, let’s not forget the positive impact it has on Indian River County. As Minor League Baseball has

2 1 ,

BY MICHAEL BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

J U N E

Dodgertown expansion heralds new beginning

PHOTO BY MICHAEL BIELECKI

The Dodgers and Phillies of the Gifford Central Little League received the honor of playing the first tee-ball game on the new fields at the Vero Beach Sports Village.

ramped up their spring, high school and college spring training program, I don’t think it is any coincidence that in March we had our secondhighest tourist tax collection ever.” March was a big month for Vero Beach Sports Village. The complex hosted an umpire school, high school and college spring break tournaments, the Italian national baseball team, the Chinese national boxing team among others. And they are just getting started. “With these new fields we know they will continue to attract more visitors, which will benefit all of the citizens of Indian River County,” O’Bryan said. “So I think I can speak for the entire board of county commissioners, and state the county is proud to be partners with Minor League baseball and we look forward to a very long and successful partnership here at Vero Beach Sports Village.” The four new fields can facilitate fast-pitch softball all the way through the college level, along with little league baseball. Movable pitching mounds allow all four fields to oper-

ate as either baseball or softball diamonds. “If you look at all of the other fields here, they all had 90-foot base paths,” said Vero Beach Sports Village Vice President Craig Callan. “This is like doubling the inventory of our piece of paradise. It is really going to make an impact for hoteliers, retail stores, gas stations, and restaurants. We hope (visiting teams) come back over and over again.” The summer will be a busy time for both the new and old fields at Vero Beach Sports Village. On the new quadruplex, 9-12 year-olds will compete in two separate tournaments-the Battle of the Beach from June 22-24 and the Independence Day Classic on July 4-8. There was also a Nike baseball camp for players age 6-18 which ran from June 17-20. It is estimated that Indian River County will make about $850,000 in tourist revenue when the AABC Sandy Koufax World Series comes to town July 24-29. Vero Beach Sports Village has a three-year contract for the 25-team event, with an option to be extended for 10 years.


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Obituaries Henry Edward ‘Harry’ Dewland Henry “Harry” Edward Dewland, 86, died May 28, 2012, at his daughter’s home. He was born in Weehawken, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach since 2003, coming from Point Pleasant, N.J. He was a veteran and served in the Army during World War II. He was a tractor-trailer driver with Sterns Trucking for 35 years. Survivors include his daughter, Sharon “George” Flores; two grand children; and five great grand children. A guestbook is available at www.seawindsfh.com.

fied public accountant. Survivors include his wife, Jacque Young of Vero Beach; sons, Charles Young and Patrick Young, both of Raleigh, N.C.; stepsons, Darrell Owens of Seattle and Durwood Owens of Georgia; brothers, Bob Young of New Orleans, Charles Young of Vero Beach and Tony Young of Okeechobee; six grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Hilde Babin Hilde Babin, 87, died June 4, 2012. She was born in KoenigsStephen Maillet berg, Germany, and lived in Vero Stephen J. Maillet, 61, died May Beach for 37 years. A guestbook 30, 2012, at his home. He was born is available at www.lowtherfunerin Brooklyn, N.Y., and lived in Vero alhome.com. Beach for 26 years, coming from Paul H. Beck Melbourne. He was a retired Army Reservist. He was of the Catholic Paul H. Beck, 85, died May 26, faith. He received his bachelor’s 2012, at The Place at Vero Beach. degree in international affairs from He was born in Newark, N.J., and Georgetown University. He later lived in Vero Beach for one year, received his master’s degree in coming from Southern Pines, accounting from Rollins College, N.C. Survivors include his wife of and became a CPA. Before retire- 65 years, Mary Ann Beck of Vero ment, he worked as the finance Beach; sons, William E. Beck of director for the City of Vero Beach East Glacier, Mont., and Frederick for more than 20 years. Survivors Lambert of Half Moon Bay, Calif.; include his wife of 30 years, San- and daughter, Susan Cleaver of dra Maillet; daughters, Alexandra Southern Pines. Memorial contriMaillet, Kimbally Maillet and Cara butions may be made to Solutions Maillet, all of Vero Beach; brother, for Animals, c/o Cindy Bristow, Robert Maillet of Palm Bay; and P.O. Box 2062, Southern Pines, NC four grandchildren. Memorial 28388. A guestbook is available at contributions may be made to the www.strunkfuneralhome.com. American Cancer Society, WinnLorinda Bigler Dixie Hope Lodge 2121, S.W. 16th St., Gainesville, FL 32608-1417. Lorinda Jennings Bigler, 70, died A guestbook is available at www. May 30, 2012. She was born in Briscoxgiffordseawinds.com. tol, Conn., and lived in Vero Beach and West Hartford, Conn. SurviDennis Young vors include her husband, Harold Dennis Flaherty Young, 71, died E. Bigler Jr.; brother, Miles P. JenMay 26, 2012, at his home. He was nings Jr. of Bristol, Conn.; stepa lifetime resident of Vero Beach, sons, Stephen Bigler and William and was a self-employed certi- C. Bigler; stepdaughter, Diane B.

Whatley; seven stepgrandchildren; and two stepgreat-grandchildren.

is survived by her loving husband of 39 years, Lynn Goodnough, her beloved children, Kathie Conner of Cherry Hill, NJ, Don McCauley of Chapel Hill, NC, Janet Bennett of Hammonton, NJ, Bob McCauley of Northport, NY, Joanie McCauley of Mt. Laurel, NJ and her stepson Scott Goodnough of Garden City. She is also survived by 11 grandchildren, 5 great grandchildren, 3 nieces and 3 nephews. She was a member of the 1st Presbyterian Church of Vero Beach and the Bent Pine Golf Club in Vero Beach where she headed the Nine Holers Group for several years. Donations can be made in her name to the Alzheimer’s Association 2501 27th Ave., A-8, Vero Beach, FL 32960

Reverend Canon Hollis H. Buchanan Reverend Canon Hollis H. Buchanan, 84, of Orlando, died on June 1, 2012. Father Buchanan, a sixth generation native Floridian, was ordained an Episcopal priest in 1954. He served as a chaplain in the U.S. Army and the U.S. Air Force Reserve and spent his life serving his Lord and the Episcopal Church. He served as a priest in Miami, FL, Winter Park, FL, Vero Beach, FL, Florence, SC, and Summerton, SC, retiring from active ministry in 1992. He is survived by his two sons, William and Robert (wife Cindy), three grand children, and Jeffrey Robert Casella one nephew. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the EpisJeffrey Robert Casella, 57, died copal Relief and Development Fund May 30, 2012, at Indian River or your local Humane Society. Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in Suffern, N.Y., and Lillian Augusta Carrello lived in Vero Beach for 20 years, Lillian Augusta Carrello died coming from West Palm Beach. May 26, 2012, at the VNA/Hos- He worked as a sales manager with pice House in Vero Beach. She Dependable Mitsubishi for sevwas born in Washington, D.C., eral years. Survivors include his and lived in Vero Beach for 25 mother, Marian Casella of Vero years. She attended St. Helen Beach; sister, LouAnn ChurchCatholic Church and St. John of illo of Vero Beach; daughter, Kari the Cross Catholic Church. She Pollack of Alaska; stepdaughter was a member of the Military Of- Kim Cushman of Bonners Ferry, ficers Association of America and Idaho; and five grandchildren. the Vero Beach Theatre Guild. Memorial contributions may be Survivors include her daughters, made to the Vero Beach Volunteer Carol Sell of Wilton, Conn., and Fire Department, 1500 Old Dixie Colleen Brennan of Vero Beach; Highway, Vero Beach, FL 32960. and five grandchildren. A guest- A guestbook is available at www. book is available at www.strunk- coxgiffordseawinds.com. funeralhome.com. Aline Helen ‘Skippy’ Doak Constance M. Goodnough Aline Helen “Skippy” Doak died Constance M. Goodnough, 84, May 28, 2012 at the Hospice House, of Vero Beachl, formerly of Garden Vero Beach. She was born in CumCity NY, passed away June 4, 2012 berland, Maryland, and wintered in Ewing, NJ following a long de- in Vero Beach for 29 years coming cline from Alzheimer’s disease. She from Colonial Heights, Virginia.


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OBITUARIES

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Leonard Hirsch Dr. Leonard Hirsch, 85, died May 27, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in the Bronx, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 18 years, coming from Edison, N.J. Before retirement, he was an obstetrics and gynecology doctor. Survivors include his son, Eric Hirsch of Vero Beach; daughter, Karen Breen of Aurora, Colo.; three grandchilWilliam Lee Monroe Sr. dren; and one great-grandchild. A guestbook is available at www. William Lee Monroe Sr., 90, coxgiffordseawinds.com. died June 1, 2012, at Brookshire Assisted Living in Melbourne. He Alden Edgar ‘Denny’ Gordon was born in Nocatee and lived Alden Edgar Gordon, known as in Palm Bay for 10 years, coming “Denny” to all, died peacefully at from Vero Beach. He had taught home in Vero Beach after a long drafting, architecture and shop at struggle with Alzheimer’s disease Vero Beach High School before on Tuesday, May 29, 2012. She his retirement. He was a member moved to Vero Beach with her of the Experimental Aircraft Astwo children, Cameron and Kris- sociation in Vero Beach. He was tin, and became an Associate Edi- of the Methodist faith. Survivors tor of Indian RiverLife Magazine. include his wife of more than 60 She also worked as a part-time years, Vera Fay Monroe of Palm faculty member at St. Edward’s Bay; sons, William Lee Monroe School. From there, she moved on Jr. of Palm Bay and Robert Peter to become the Director of Public Monroe of Vienna, Ill.; daughter, Relations at John’s Island. While Jewel Monroe of Washington; there, she conceived the idea of eight grandchildren; and a greatan in- house publication, and be- grandchild. A guestbook is availcame the Editor of “The John’s Is- able at www.seawindsfh.com.

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Jack ‘J.C.’ Franks Jack “J.C.” Franks, 70, died May 29, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was

Donald B. Lewis Donald B. Lewis, 98, died June 5, 2012, at the VNA/Hospice House in Vero Beach. He was born in St. Louis and lived in Vero Beach for 24 years, coming from Jupiter. He served in the Army during World War II in Japan. He was of the Protestant faith. He was a member of the Shrine Club and was a 32nd Degree Mason. Survivors include his wife of 30 years, Marjorie Lewis. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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Corinne Irene Faine Corinne Irene Faine, 84, died June 4, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center. She was born in Ohio and lived in Vero Beach for four years, coming from Ohio. Survivors include her son, Philip E. Faine of Jacksonville; three grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to the Veteran’s Victory Center, 6200 20th St., Room 471, Vero Beach, FL 32966. A guest book is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

lander” magazine. She is survived by her son, Cameron Parker Gordon, daughter, Kristin Gordon Seiz, grandchildren Paul Parker Seiz and Kelly Alden Ann Seiz, sister Lauren Edgar Chapman, and many nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made in Denny’s memory to the ACS-125 at The American Cancer Society , 3375 20th Street Suite 100, Vero Beach, FL 32960 772-562-2272 x2405 or VNA & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960.

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Peter Ross Faber Peter Ross Faber, 75, passed away May 31, 2012, at his home in John’s Island, Vero Beach. Upon retirement, he moved to Vero Beach and Dorset, Vermont. He worked for Buck Consultants in New York City for 30 years until retiring in 1998. He was a member of John’s Island and Bent Pine Clubs in Vero Beach. He was a member of Ekwanok Country Club in Manchester, Vermont. He is survived by his wife, Kathryn (Hourin) of 52 years; son, Stephen and daughter-in-law Jeanne of Pennington, NJ; son, Paul and daughter-in-law Deborah of Honolulu; brothers Stephen of Clearwater

Darlene Louise Ernst Darlene Louise Ernst, 75, died June 1, 2012, at the VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. She was born in Oak Park, Ill., and lived in Vero Beach for 14 years, coming from Steamwood, Ill. Survivors include her husband of 17 years, Edwin H. Ernst of Vero Beach; sons, Mark Leitzke, Doug Leitzke and Chris Leitzke; daughter, Vicki Arnold, all of Wisconsin; brother, Donald Jensen of Vero Beach; nine grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

born in Joiner, Ark., and lived in Kenansville, having lived in Vero Beach from 1971 to 2004, coming from Lake Wales. Survivors include his wife of 53 years, Edna Franks of Kenansville; son, Clifford Franks of Vero Beach; daughters, Norma Jean Smith of Auburndale and Lois Rice, Wanda Johnson and Carolyn Mofield, all of Vero Beach; brothers, Sonny Franks of Mulberry, and Billy Joe Franks and Gordon Franks, both of Illinois; sister, Lorretta of Winter Haven; 13 grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

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David Lee Epps David Lee Epps, 58, died May 28, 2012, at his home. He was born in Tulsa, Okla., and lived in Vero Beach for 28 years, coming from his birthplace. Survivors include his mother, Louise Garrison of Claremore, Okla.; brothers, Ed Epps of Sand Springs, Okla., and Don Michael Epps of Tulsa; and former wife, Christine Epps of Vero Beach. Memorial contributions may be made to the Busch Wildlife Sanctuary, 2500 Jupiter Park Drive, Jupiter, FL 33458. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

and Christopher of McLenne; and four grandchildren, Lauren, Emily, Kevin and Ruby. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960, or to the St. Edward’s School Fund for Teaching Faculty, St. Edward’s Drive, Vero Beach, FL 32963. An online guestbook is available at www.strunk funeralhome.com.

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She was a member of Our Savior Lutheran Church, Vero Beach and the Military Officers Association Auxiliary. Survivors include her husband of 67 years, Colonel (Ret.) Robert L. Doak of Vero Beach, as well as a son, Robert L. Doak II and his wife, Cindy Doak of Church Road, Virginia. Memorial donations maybe made to the Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, Florida 32960. An online guestbook is available at www. strunk funeralhome.com.


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M A R C H 8 , 2 0 1 2 ! V E R O B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y

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34 2 0 1 2

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Real Estate

Address 940 Turtle Cover Ln., #112 125 Park Shores Cir., #23E

Subdivision Beachwalk Park Shores

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

175 Springline Dr. Anchor the Moorings 12/30/11 $2,300,000 6/8/12 $1,950,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Matilde Sorensen Phoenix Acquisitions, Inc. Elaine Amy

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1490 Treasure Cove Ln. Treasure Cove 8/22/11 $1,575,000 6/12/12 $1,495,000 Premier Estate Properties Kay Brown Daley & Company Real Estate Cheryl Michel

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

865 Riomar Dr. Riomar 11/1/11 $1,499,000 6/7/12 $1,170,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Matilde Sorensen Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Matilde Sorensen

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1245 Spanish Lace Castaway Cove 11/16/11 $435,000 6/8/12 $390,000 Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB Kathy Nystrom Vero Coastal Homes Allan Grieve

List Date 7/9/11 11/2/09

List Price $359,000 $299,000

Sell Date 6/8/12 6/11/12

Sell Price $329,000 $242,500

Listing Broker/Agent Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Jim Knapp Norris & Company/Rosanne Roberson

Selling Broker/Agent Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Patty Valdes Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Sally Woods

Mainland Real Estate Sales – June 7-June 13 Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

V E R O

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Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – June 7-June 13

Address 1440 St. Catherine’s Cir. 470 31st Ave. 4160 Chablis St. SW

Subdivision St. Catherine’s Island Oak Harbor Fox Haven The Vineyard

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

489 12th Pl. SE River Shores Estates 2/7/12 $595,000 6/8/12 $540,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Carl Sciara Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB Ginny Mitchell

List Date 4/29/11 4/9/12 8/1/11

List Price $279,000 $224,900 $225,000

Sell Date 6/8/12 6/8/12 6/8/12

Sell Price $270,000 $220,000 $210,000

Listing Broker/Agent Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Jim Knapp Vero Beach Hotel & Spa RE Co/Ashley Lombardo Peters, Carlton & Mugford RE/Brad Shearer

835 St. Anne’s St. Anne’s Island Oak Harbor 12/12/07 $399,000 6/8/12 $348,000 Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Larry Larson Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Jim Knapp

Selling Broker/Agent Daley & Company Real Estate/Sally Daley Peters, Carlton & Mugford RE/Brad Shearer Real Living All Florida Realty/Billie Rutledge

Humane Society Pets Of The Week

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Sam

Tipper

3 Years Old German Shepard Mix Male

7 Years Old Ragdoll Mix Male

1 Year Old Domestic Medium Hair Female

3 Years Old Domestic Shorthair Female

5 1/2 Years Old Beagle Mix Male

7 Months Old Hound Mix Female

These and other animals are available for adoption at the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County located at 6230 77th Street. For directions and information call (772)388-3331


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A key measure of a newspaperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s readership is the percentage of subscriber households in the market. For decades the Press Journal has remained a leader among Florida newspapers. With Sunday circulation of 30,813 and weekday circulation of 25,474, the Press Journal is one of the most popular newspapers in Florida. Reach more of your

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