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New baseball academy opens in Vero BeachPage 24

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TO ADVERTISE CALL MARTINE FECTEAU 772.696.2004 MARK SCHUMANN 772.696.5233

Inside

T H U R S D A Y



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Enjoying a tropical evening Tropical Night Luau is one of the final charity events of the fundraising seasonPage 18

Glass with class New exhibit by Rick Beck set to open at the Vero Beach Museum of ArtPage 22

PHOTO BY CHRISTIE GONZALEZ

Dr. Juli Goldstein, a Harbor Branch veterinarian, is crowned Ms. United States Continental. Story page 14

 Discussion centers on management, new employeesPage 3

City Council considers benefit cuts

Seeking the job of sheriff Bill McMullen is ready to challenge for the county’s top law enforcement positionPage 7

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Teamsters Local No. 769. Those employees are covered by a threeyear contract that is in effect until Sept. 30, 2013. “We are setting forth a policy of the City Council when we negotiate union contracts. This will be one of those areas that we will do good faith negotiations when we come to the bargaining table, but I think we are setting a standard that everyone should be well aware of as we enter into those negotiations,” O’Connor said. A topic that did not come up at the meeting was an item placed on the agenda by Vice Mayor Craig Fletcher to discuss a standby plan for the electric utility should negotiations with Florida

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ity that we need to address,” said Turner. “Our current liability is $2.8 million dollars, which is 70 percent of our ad valorem taxes.” The changes do not affect vacation and sick time city workers have already accrued. City Manager Jim O’Connor noted that those hours are an “asset” workers have earned under terms agreed upon by the city and cannot be taken away. However, the changes do send a signal that the city will take a strong stand on benefit reductions when negotiating with workers’ unions starting next year. More than half of the city’s 430 workers are covered by unions. About 200 are represented by

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VERO BEACH -- In a move that could signal contentious labor negotiations next year, the City Council on Tuesday voted unanimously to limit non-union employees’ vacation and sick time benefits. The newly enacted policy will allow non-union workers to accrue up to 180 days of sick leave and carry over up to five days of vacation time per year with the approval of the city manager. Employees can cash in up to 30 days of accrued vacation time at the time of retirement under the proposal. An employee could potentially reach 30 days of accrued time if he carried over five vacation days and had been with

the city long enough to earn five weeks of vacation. The accrued sick leave would have no cash value when the employee leaves the city’s employment. The changes take effect on July 15. Under the present system employees can cash in up to 1,350 or 1,440 in accumulated sick and vacation hours depending on whether they work 7 1/2-hour or 8-hour days. Mayor Pilar Turner said that payouts for such benefits have cost the city more than $2 million during the past five years and the city faces a liability of $2.8 million for future payouts. “This is an unfunded liabil-

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Power and Light fail and a deal cannot be struck. Fletcher said in his agenda item he wanted to “task the Utility Commission with the job of composing stand-by plan(s).” “I have had a plethora of phone calls and some issues have come up,” Fletcher told the Council. “Some are legal and some are with Florida Power and Light and some with the Florida Municipal Power Agency. I am not fully prepared to discuss those right now, but I will at the next meeting.” Fletcher has stated his goal, as is that of the City Council, is to sell Vero Electric to FPL. However, as some of the thorny issues of getting out of existing contracts and ultimately reaching a deal with FPL have come to light, his asking to consider other options could indicate that deal is in trouble. O’Connor painted a rosier sce-

nario of the FPL negotiations when asked for an update on the talks. “I feel that we are making progress,” he said. “I think we are further ahead today than we were three months ago. I feel very comfortable with the timeline of September of this year to have the flag to move forward or if we hit some insurmountable snag being able to explain that to council.” The city and FPL are in an exclusive agreement to negotiate the sale of the power plant that is set to run out on September 30. O’Connor also said he is actively seeking a replacement for Power Resources Director Jim Stevens, who retired on May 1. The City Manager said he was ready to offer the job to two candidates but was turned down by both. “It is a very specialized field and we don’t have a whole lot of candidates,” O’Connor said after the meeting. Councilman Dick Winger brought up the idea of hiring a

Utility Director to oversee the operations as the city moves forward with FPL. However, the topic went nowhere with the council. O’Connor said at this point he would rather not have a Utility Director in place as it would remove him from the FPL negotiations. “I feel like I have to be handson at this particular time until we get through this FPL process,” he said. “What I don’t need is another layer between me and that. What I need are the guys who actually know how to get things done and the intricacies to be able to answer questions when they come up.” The council also voted 3-2 against a measure brought forth by Winger to instruct the Planning and Zoning Board to maintain the current height restrictions for Ocean and Cardinal Drives as set forth in the Vision Plan. The city’s 2005 Vision Plan

proposed new buildings in that district be limited to two stories on Ocean Drive and three stories on the east side of Cardinal Drive and two stories on the west side. The city’s planning staff has since recommended a uniform three-story limit, with the third floor restricted to residential or hotel guest use. The majority of the current Planning and Zoning Board members have indicated they agree with this idea. In voting against the measure, Fletcher stated he was not in favor of instructing the Planning and Zoning Board how to go about reaching its recommendations. He noted that when the proposal reached the council, members would have the chance to accept or reject the plan. Voting in favor of the measure were Councilman Jay Kramer and Winger; those voting against were Fletcher, Turner and Councilwoman Tracy Carroll.

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Covering of Vero Beach Because no community is an island The neighborhoods that make up our greater community continue to become more, not less connected and interdependent. Don’t settle for just a fraction of the news you need. Read the Newsweekly, your community weekly newspaper from cover to cover. Inside T H U R S D A Y

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Swing time versio the Anne Morto n of the holiday classic n Theatre ! coming to Page 29 ! FORUM ! CALEND 17 TO ADVE RTISE CALL ! ENTERTAAR 26 MARTINE FECTE INMENT 29 MARK SCHU AU 772.696.2004 MANN 772.69 6.5233

The Vero Beach Newsweekly gives you the barrier island and more. To learn more, call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233.


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County approves second jobs grant in two weeks Michigan manufacturing firm considering moving some operations here FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -The economic news for Indian River County seems to be improving. For the second time in two weeks the Indian River County Board of County Commissioners has approved a jobs grant to boost local employment. The grant approved this week was to entice a Michigan-based company to move some of its operations -with a total of as many as 52 jobs -- to the Gifford area. On May 22 commissioners approved a grant of up to $38,000 to Nylacarb Corp., a local company that wants to add 12 positions over the next 12 to 15 months. Nylacarb uses a custom plastic injection molding process to pro-

duce parts for the automotive, aviation, medical, and agricultural industries. Nylacarb Corp. has been in business locally since 1987 on the 1700 block of 98th Avenue and currently has about 30 employees. The Michigan company has not been identified but is said to be an ammunition manufacturer and is considering moving its researchand-development and shipping operations from Orlando to the county. The company has been in talks with officials for over a year. The grant the county approved could be worth as much as $294,800 to the company if it relocates to the Vero Beach-Indian River County Enterprise Zone. That area includes the Municipal Airport and the Gif-

ford community. The county’s job grant program requires a company to hire the employees first and keep them on staff for a year before there’s a payout. Records show all the proposed jobs are expected to be filled by December 2014. The payments by the county would be stretched out over four years ending in fiscal year 20172018. “Though we are not at liberty to announce the name of the company at this point, rest assured they will be a great asset to our economic base,” said Helene Caseltine, the Chamber of Commerce Vero Beach & Indian River County’s economic development director. “These 52 new jobs, pay-

ing an average wage of approximately $35,000 per year – greater than the county’s average wage of $33,947 -- will pump an additional $2 million in paychecks into our local economy.” Caseltine said that due to the unique nature of its product, with several patents pending, the company requested confidentiality to avoid tipping off competitors. Nylacarb Corp. has been in business locally since 1987 on the 1700 block of 98th Avenue and currently has about 30 employees. Over the last three years the Board of County Commissioners has approved approximately $2.3 million in grants to companies expanding or relocating in Indian River County.

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Fulfilling a family tradition to serve

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The McMullen for Sheriff Website (www.mcmullenforsheriff.com) notes that McMullen, a native of Deland, is a third generation law enforcement professional. McMullen said his family came to Florida from Georgia about 180 years ago as pioneers and became

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Experienced, dedicated and qualified

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With a combined family history of a century in professional law enforcement service, it may be that Bill McMullen is carrying a gene for public safety. The Indian River County Sheriff ’s Office lieutenant, who is seeking to replace incumbent Sheriff Deryl Loar, will challenge his boss in a Republican primary election on August 14 that is expected to essentially conclude the race. McMullen, 49, a patrol commander who previously served as director of the county’s Division of Corrections from 2001 to 2009, has served with the county Sheriff ’s Office since 1983. He is set to leave his post on June 8 upon officially qualifying as a candidate. Florida’s “Resign to Run” law requires deputies to step down if they enter a race with an incumbent sheriff. When former Sheriff Roy Raymond decided to retire after two

ing career record or I’m going to be elected as your new sheriff and continue to serve with all the experience, background and training that I have. “My genuine concern for our community is why I’m running for sheriff,” McMullen said.

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BY BARBARA YORESH VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Chester Clem and former County Commissioner Sandra Bowden. He said there has never before been a sheriff ’s candidate that has been so strongly and publicly backed by his peers, many of whom have made donations to his campaign. “(Former Sheriff ) Roy Raymond said it’s historic – this number of Sheriff ’s Office employees supporting me. It has never happened before,” McMullen said. He is looking forward to the campaign once the official qualifying period is over. “As of June 8, one of two things is going to happen: I’m going to retire having served our community for 30 years with an outstand-

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PHOTO SUPPLIED

Bill McMullen

terms, Loar and McMullen faced off in a four-way 2008 race for sheriff that also included Ed Glaser and Kent Campbell. Raymond endorsed Loar and McMullen and donated to the campaign of each. Loar -- who raised a whopping $209,787 campaign war chest in that race -- won the sheriff ’s post with 6,795 votes out of 17,989 cast with McMullen finishing second with 4,575 votes tallied. This time, Raymond is backing McMullen who also has the support of County Commissioner Joe Flescher and retired Sebastian Police Chief Randy White. McMullen was initially reluctant to speak publicly while still working as an employee of the Sheriff ’s Office. He subsequently agreed to meet on a day off from duties with Vero Beach Newsweekly to discuss why he wants to head the 500-person agency which includes law enforcement, corrections and court services divisions. “During this campaign I’m looking forward to the opportunity to be more outspoken,” McMullen said. “We have a fabulous county and it got there through compromise – through listening and consulting to reach an agreement that is good for everyone. And public safety is the cornerstone of our lifestyle.” McMullen has been running an active, grassroots campaign which has had strong support and encouragement from many deputies and other Sheriff ’s Office personnel as well as from county residents. Among his prominent supporters are county historian Ruth Stanbridge; Indian River Shores Mayor Thomas Cadden; Attorney

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Sheriff ’s Lieutenant Bill McMullen seeks top law enforcement post


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prominent residents of Pinellas County. The north-south McMullen Booth Road in the Clearwater area is named for a McMullen forbearer. During a 34-year law enforcement career, McMullen’s grandfather served as police chief in Clearwater and with the Pinellas County Sheriff ’s Office. McMullen’s father served for 33 years as a Florida prison superintendent and was honored in 1986 for his contributions to law enforcement by having a building named for him at what is now Indian River State College. “We moved around a lot when my dad was in corrections. I’ve lived here (Indian River County) longer than anywhere and this is home,” McMullen said. “I care about the people who live, work and visit here.” McMullen began his own law enforcement career in 1982 and has served his entire tenure with the Indian River County Sheriff ’s Office where has risen through its ranks. He became a lieutenant by the age of 24. A graduate of the Southern Police Academy at the University of Louisville, McMullen earned a

Loar’s 20 years of service with the Florida Highway Patrol. McMullen, who is a father and married to a teacher, politely, though firmly, declined to speak specifically about his married life – past or present. “My family is more important than anything in life and I don’t want to subject anybody I love to that exposure,” he said. “You’ll never see me pictured with my wife or just my own kids.” He then related an instance of a chance meeting in another part of the state with former jail inmates five years after their incarceration. Though McMullen didn’t recognize them, they addressed him by name. PHOTO SUPPLIED The anecdote illustrated what McBill McMullen works the dunk tank at a recent charity event. He resigned from Mullen sees as the need for law enthe Sheriff ’s Office this week to run for sheriff. He squares off against incumbent forcement personnel to keep their Deryl Loar in the Republican primary August 14. families’ identifications as anonymous as possible for safety reasons. Bachelor of Arts degree from Bar- “But we need a change. We need McMullen sloughed off Loar’s true leadership in our organiza- claims on his campaign website ry University in Miami. His duties have included re- tion in these challenging finan- (www.LoarforSheriff2012.com) sponsibility for administration, cial times and I’m going to restore that the jail was “filthy” under Mcmanagement and operations of proactive law enforcement in our Mullen’s direction. the Sheriff ’s Office’s corrections community. “He can say anything he wants “I’m not a politician; I’m a life- about corrections because he has division, a 200-member unit with an annual budget of more than time public servant,” McMul- zero experience with corrections,” len said. “Deryl is one of the best McMullen said. $15.3 million. “I’ve been in management for 25 politicians I’ve ever seen. But this McMullen said the number of years. My experience and diver- (Sheriff ’s post) is not about traffic inmates incarcerated in the counsity is very broad,” McMullen said. and safety,” he said in reference to ty’s jail on any given day is “150

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“There are not enough deputies to cover the 11 districts of the county,” McMullen said. He noted there are approximately 540 square miles of unincorporated area which are covered in the 11 patrol zones of varying geographic size. “The patrol zones have not been analyzed since 1996 and since then the (Indian River) mall was built and the complexion of the community has changed,” McMullen said. “You need an even, consistent law enforcement presence to impact crime. Our presence deters crime.” McMullen states that the first priority and foundation of the Sheriff ’s Office is public safety for individuals, businesses and organizations. “We have to provide routine services to our community on a consistent basis and I’m the most experienced and have the broadest range of experience in our Sheriff ’s Office to provide the services we need to move forward into the next decade. “I don’t believe in ‘tax and spend.’ Right now our staff runs from call to call to call and that’s not doing proactive work,” McMullen said. Fostering career planning and ongoing education for staff is also high on McMullen’s list. “There is no career plan for deputies here,” he said. His management style, whether dealing with Sheriff ’s Office staff or the public, is that of being “fair, firm and consistent with every person you deal with,” he said. McMullen said he wants to im-

and kick back to enjoy the fruits of his long law enforcement career, he decided to press on to try to effect change within the agency. “I have to keep fighting for what’s right. It’s 100 years in my blood,” McMullen said. “I’ve given my entire adult life in service to the community which has been very good to me and for which I am very appreciative.”

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McMullen claims patrol zones inadequately staffed

prove the Sheriff ’s Office case clearance rate. “Clearance rates are important and the Sheriff ’s Office’s clearance rate is low among all the jurisdictions in the county. Clearance rates are important because if we don’t catch them, they offend again,” he said. While McMullen could take a retirement with substantial benefits

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$37,273,845 proposed budget “a campaign budget” in which the Sheriff ’s Office open positions are left unfunded, thereby realizing a “savings.”

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less per day than when Roy Raymond was sheriff and you have to ask yourself where are those offenders now and what are they doing?” McMullen added that when he was director of corrections from 2001 to 2009, “the corrections staff voted not to unionize.” Since that time, McMullen said, “Our employees have joined a union for a reason: his (Loar’s) management style. It has forced unionization of the Sheriff ’s Office – something which didn’t happen under two prior sheriffs. “Deputies were upset about the difficulties they have fulfilling their oath of office and their ability to provide safety for the public and themselves,” McMullen said. “Our neighborhoods aren’t protected while we’re sleeping.” According to McMullen, the Sheriff ’s Office handles about 150,000 calls for service annually. “The huge majority of those calls don’t result in an arrest or traffic citation but rather in assistance in one form or another,” McMullen said. Loar references Florida Department of Law Enforcement crime reports as an indicator that overall crime in the county was down by 6.1 percent in 2011 although overall crime increased 4.7 percent in 2010. Although he did not elaborate, McMullen does not favor Loar’s instituting 10-hour shifts for the patrol division versus the former 12-hour shifts they worked under former Sheriffs Raymond and Gary Wheeler. Loar said the change was a necessary cost-cutting measure due to budgetary constraints. Loar’s proposed reduced budget for the upcoming fiscal year has already won kudos from County Administrator Joe Baird. However, McMullen termed the


Appreciating the opportunities of education School board chairman Jeff Pegler aims to teach ‘children how to think and engage in the world’

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attorney, a father and lege to work with (Superintend- he said. “I was not particularly a husband of a special ent) Dr. (Fran) Adams. She is an athletic or popular. I was a book 24( 64 exceptional leader. I have a great worm and enjoyed studying and INDIAN RIVER 05&:,5#:+$1 education teacher.” He won that Novem- relationship with her, and we reading. As a teenager, those qualCOUNTY -- In 2010, 74-5.% ities were perceived as weaknessber election with 50.75 make a good team.” Jeff Pelger, an attor"'!448/ percent of the vote. Since his legal career began as an es. I try to tell my kids to embrace ney and Tampa native who had moved to *$,/-1$ 93) His platform was to assistant state attorney in Pinellas those characteristics that make heighten communica- County, Pegler wanted to have his them different, they are the keys Vero Beach to join the tion between the pub- School Board tenure serve as a to future success. law firm of Samuel A. lic and School Board. vehicle with which to ensure that Block, P. A., decided “I started my career as a prosecuBeing elected to the juvenile delinquency not become tor in the juvenile crime division to run for the Indian School Board requires a problem in Indian River County. of the State Attorney’s office and River School Board. a commitment to be Another motivating factor was I recognize how important it is to In his “Ask the Canavailable in many di- the issue of bullying. As a victim make certain that our schools not didate” responses in verse locations for a himself, he wanted to ensure that allow any student to fall through the Press Journal he plethora of events. The no other student suffered as he the cracks.” described his motivacompensation is set by once had. tion was to “ensure that His experience with the Indian law at $29,000 although he “My experiences were not much River County School Board has the focus of our schools will and other board members have different than those of many kids,” allowed him to set policy “across be in teaching our children how to think and engage in the world.” voluntarily reduced their salaries The decision to work in a posi- in this austere economic climate. “My wife and I are very fortunate tion on the Indian River School Board came from a passion about that we have careers which enable education learned from his moth- us to provide for our family,” he said. “We made the personal deer and father. “My parents sacrificed a great cision that we wanted to donate deal so that I could attend Cor- a part of my school board salary nell and the University of Florida back to the community. Again, we College of Law, and they instilled are in a very unique situation. I in me a deep appreciation of the view my role on the school board opportunities education can pro- as an opportunity to set policy and work with the superintendent vide,” he said. It is a lesson he campaigned on to accomplish the goals we have and has worked to instill since be- set for the school district. Other ing selected by his fellow board members of the school board are incredibly active, serve on numermembers to serve as chairman. “First, I truly believe that a ous committees and dedicate trestrong public education system is mendous amount of time to the the foundation of our community job. They are an incredible group and our nation,” he said. “The only of individuals.” In speaking about his experiway that our children will succeed in the world is if we provide them ence on the School Board, he with the tools that they need to said, “I am truly blessed to work meet the challenges ahead. Sec- with Mrs. (Carol) Johnson, Mrs. ond, I thought that I would bring (Karen) Disney-Brombach, Ms. a perspective to the School Board (Claudia Jimenez, and Mr. (Matt) FILE PHOTO that would complement the group McCain. We work extremely well Jeff Pegler listens intently at a recent school board meeting. He credits his and make it more effective. I am an together. It has also been a privi- mother and father for instilling in him a passion for education. VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY


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that he is willing to do all that is necessary to secure a bright future not only for his own family, but also for all the children of Indian River County. “I intend to pursue a career in education,” he said. “The limitless opportunities to affect the lives of children and people of all ages literally compelled me to change my career path.”

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vitalize and strengthen education, it is important to cultivate leaders who have diverse experiences that can advance education into the 21st century.” A strong motivating factor for ensuring a quality school system in Indian River County are the Pegler children Ian, age 3, and Blake, age l. They are the apple of their father’s eye and the reason

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lom the only synagogue in Indian River County. The entire Pegler family now is a part of this unique group of individuals who are engaged in continual study about their ancestry. “My grandparents, Marilyn and Irving Weissman, actually founded a Jewish nursing home in Pineallas County (Menorah Manor), and my father is the president of our synagogue in Tampa.” he said. “The values instilled in me by my parents and grandparents have enabled me to continue to be active in the community as my inlaws have been.” In keeping with the family traditions, Pegler has in the past been a volunteer in a diverse variety of philanthropic areas including the Gifford Youth Activity Center, March of Dimes, Sun-Up Center, and Early Learning Coalition of Indian River, Martin and St. Lucie counties. Pegler acknowledged that both he and his wife believe that “public education is fascinating because it truly enables children from across the spectrum to learn and succeed. It changes lives and I am fortunate to be a part of it.” The year 2012 has been one of change for this energetic attorney, he has left the law practice and accepted a position with the Osceola school district. “I left the practice of law in order to become an administrator (Director of Purchasing and Contracts) in the Osceola school district.” he said. “It has been a phenomenal experience and I am more certain than ever that I have found my path in life. I have also seen what effective leaders like Fran Adams and Terry Andrews, the superintendent in Osceola County, can accomplish. “I have a different background than many traditional educators, but I believe that in order to re-

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the board -- curriculum, construction, enrollment, employment, legal and finance issues are just a few of the topics that we must address. The school district is the largest employer in Indian River County, and with responsibility for over 17,000 students which generates an enormous number of topics to address.” He has set some lofty goals for the School Board, including improving the reading skills of students with a benchmark of having 9 out of 10 third graders proficient at the third-grade level. “Dr. Adams has made this a priority and the Learning Alliance has been an invaluable partner in working toward this goal,” he said. Working with the Learning Alliance and Education Foundation is the kind of collaborative venture that Pegler believes is vital. “They are excellent examples of how public-private partnerships can positively impact a school district,” he said. “Hillsborough County may have Bill and Melinda Gates, but the programs that Indian River County has implemented have advanced our school district immeasurably. We would not have the curriculum to achieve a 90 percent literacy goal without the Learning Alliance. We would not have received a $100,000 grant for technology from Impact 100 without the Education Foundation.” With his marriage to Jennifer Block Pegler, Jeff Pegler became a part of a family in Indian River County with strong ties to the community. His wife has had over 10 years of experience as a teacher. She was at Dodgertown Elementary a decade and moved on a year ago to be an ESE (special education) teacher at Thompson Lifelong Learning Center. Jennifer’s father, who was the son of a rabbi, became one of the founders of Temple Beth Sha-


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Seeking to protect the Indian River County brand County Commission candidate Nick Thomas running on a platform of ‘Preserve and Progress’ LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Despite the sluggish economy and the agricultural woes facing citrus farmers, Nick Thomas has faith that Indian River County will bounce back. Thomas, 50, a securities attorney and mediator with an office on Ocean Drive, is a republican candidate for the District 5 seat on the Board of County Commissioners. Personable, articulate and intimately acquainted with the area, this is Thomas’ first real dance with politics. He faces incumbent Bob Solari, among others, in the primary election this August. “Vero Beach/Indian River

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County is a brand. A valuable brand,” said Thomas, who returned to his hometown in 2005 to raise his children and enjoy the lifestyle he knew growing up. And according to Thomas, it’s the ocean, along with plenty of sunshine, boating, fishing and golf that makes our brand so special. “If we preserve the brand… I have faith that when the economy turns around, we’ll be positioned to grow in a way that will benefit all of our citizens,” he said. But Thomas does not agree with some of the budgetary decisions made by the County Commission, including cutting back on recreation, in particular lifeguards who ensure the safety of area beaches. “That does not preserve the value of our brand,” said Thomas. “It’s penny wise and pound foolish.” Thomas’ campaign slogan is Preserve and Progress. He’s been considering running for public office for years. Thomas grew up in Vero in a big house on the corner of SR 60 and 58th Avenue, where Walgreen’s now sits. He attended St. Helen’s Catholic School and Vero Beach High School, where in 1980 he was senior class president. The first in his family to earn a college degree, Thomas received a Bachelor of Art in English from the University of Florida and a law degree from Florida State University. He started his law career at the Securities and Exchange Commission in Washington D.C. “My sister, Beth Falls, was nipping at my heels,” said Thomas about his sibling, who has a doctorate degree in nutrition and now lives in St. Lucie Village. His brother, Jim Thomas, a

PHOTO SUPPLIED

Nick Thomas

painter, lives in Sebastian. Another brother, Tony Thomas, is involved with the tennis program at Quail Valley in Vero Beach. An accomplished musician – he plays guitar in the Johnny B. Witt band, named after a past Vero Beach High School principal with several former classmates. He is also an avid fisherman and cook and owns a home on the river in Silver Shores. His daughter, Grace, 19, is now a sophomore at William and Mary University, where she runs cross country for the Division 1 school. His son, Elliot, 12, attends Gifford Middle School and plays Little League baseball. “I considered running for city council, but the kids were still too young,” said Thomas, who thinks government should be run more like a business. A self-described centrist, Thomas said that bringing jobs to the county is a priority, but he does

not believe jobs should be bought with taxpayer money. “We want people who want to be here,” he said, pointing out that there is room for improvement to make the county more business friendly, but “it’s a slippery slope when you start bribing businesses (with tax incentives) to bring a bunch of jobs. Everyone else is doing the same thing. It’s a game you can’t win.” Instead, Thomas said “we need to get off the back of the little guy,” and focus on attracting mediumsized businesses by hammering home the benefits of no state income tax, reasonable property taxes and affordable utility rates. He wants to encourage growth, but growth that is progressive. “Not just growth for growth’s sake,” said Thomas, claiming there are many more new jobs created in the current economic slump than have been publicized. “I call it invisible growth, the home offices and small businesses operating from a non-traditional platform,” said Thomas, who wants to “celebrate these microbusinesses.” For example, a successful eBay vendor can support a family, pay taxes and stimulate the economy without significantly impacting roads or resources. And, Thomas reminds people, one of the area’s biggest businesses is retirees. “You don’t attract retirees by cutting lifeguards,” he said. “We don’t want to be the cheapest government in the state. We have to protect our brand.” For more information about Nick Thomas’ campaign, visit his website at www.votenickthomas.com.


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VERO BEACH -- With a dazzling combination of beauty and brains, barrier island resident Juli Goldstein, a veterinarian at Harbor Branch VERO BEACH -- Through the magic of Disney as well as the talent of Oceanographic Institute, was crowned Ms. Florida U.S. Continental local young thespians, Riverside Children’s Theatre will present “Winnie last week in West Palm Beach. the Pooh Kids!,” based on the beloved classic A.A. Milne tales of Winnie Goldstein, 34, represented the Treasure Coast in competing against CONTINUES ON PAGE 14 40 other women for one of three state titles. She will compete for the national title in August 2013. +/&$# ! -,&!/.)" ! (*)%'*"# This is not Goldstein’s first tiara. In 1994, at the age of 13, she was the

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Disney’s “Winnie the Pooh Kids” at Riverside Children’s Theatre

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reigning Miss Martin County. And in 2009, she won Ms. Florida United States. “The pageants are a way for me to raise awareness about marine animals and money for the Stryder Cancer Foundation,” said Goldstein, who established the nonprofit to help pet owners with medical costs after her golden retriever, Stryder, died of cancer. Goldstein is also the chief clinician for Harbor Branch’s marine mammal and research conservation program. She was featured as a character in the movie, “Dolphin Tale,” after assisting in the rescue and rehabilitation of a dolphin from the Indian River Lagoon. In addition, Goldstein is an avid marathon runner, commonly competing in two marathons per weekend. She uses that venue as another platform to further her causes. In October, Goldstein spent seven days running 250 kilometers in a marathon through the jungle of Brazil promoting the Stryder Foundation. The event was featured on ABC’s “Nightline” in March. “Now, I’m developing a pet loss bereavement group through the foundation,” said the tireless advocate, who is a member of Junior League, and works with the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation, the Wyland Foundation and the Hibiscus Children’s Center. A graduate of Auburn University’s undergraduate school and College of Veterinary Medicine, Goldstein’s most recent pageant win was based on five one-on-one interviews with the judges, athletic wear and evening gown. “I had more blisters on my feet from wearing shoes in the pageant PHOTO BY CHRISTIE GONZALEZ than I have ever gotten from running,” said Goldstein. “Pageantry is one Juli Goldstein receives congratulations after being named Ms. Florida U.S. tough sport.” Continental. For more information, visit www.strydercancerfoundation.org.


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and his friends at the Anne Morton Theatre beginning Friday, June 8. A cast of 40 will debut a fully-staged production which features classic Winnie the Pooh characters and songs from the 2011 Disney animated hit film. According to Linda Downey, education director for RCT, this special show has been in the works for months. “We auditioned in March and we’re one of the first theatres in the country to be performing it. We’re excited to do it and it’s a compilation of the 2011 Winnie the Pooh movie’s music,” Downey said. Like Riverside Theatre which has gained national attention for its excellence as a regional producing theatre, RCT has won similar kudos among theatrical entities and was picked to perform this show by the youth division of Music Theatre International. Disney’s “Winnie the Pooh Kids!” is set at the Hundred Acre Wood where Winnie will once again search for honey. Sponsored by The Crockett Group Insurance, the show features music and lyrics by Richard M. Sherman; Robert B. Sherman; Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez as well as music adaptations, arrangements and additional music and lyrics by Will Van Dyke. The book and additional lyrics are by Cheryl Davis. “Winnie the Pooh Kids!” performs June 8, 9, 10, 15, 16 and 17 at 1:30 p.m. at the Anne Morton Theatre located at 3280 Riverside Park Drive in Vero Beach. The show is recommended for ages 4 and older. Tickets are $12 for adults and $6 for children. For more information or to purchase tickets call the box office at (772) 231-6990.

Education Foundation names new officers for 2012-2013 INDIAN RIVER COUNTY --The board of directors of the Education Foundation has selected its new officers for the upcoming 2012-2013 school year. Patricia Donovan, retired educator of the School District of Indian River County, will serve as president of the organization. She is supported by the executive committee: Past President Adrian Smith; President-

Elect Patrice Stowe; Secretary Jennifer A. Taylor; Treasurer Brian Elwell; Stewardship Chair Lee Moore, and Program Liaison Debbie Biedenharn. Members-at-Large include: Johnny C. Benjamin M.D.;Greg Brown; Gail Kinney; Steve Higgins; Wanda Lincoln; Jose Prieto;Joanne Quaile; J. Mack Singleton; Darren Sylvia, and Jennifer Malone Watson. Founded in 1991 by Marion Block, Alma Lee Loy and Dan Richardson, the Education Foundation of Indian River County is a charitable, non-profit organization dedicated to enriching educational opportunities for children enrolled in public, private, parochial and home schools throughout Indian River County. For more information or to make a charitable donation visit: www. edfoundationirc.org , email: director@edfoundationirc.org, mail: P.O. Box 7046, Vero Beach, FL 32961, or call: (772) 564-0034.

Hoyt C. Murphy merges with Coldwell Banker Paradise Ed Schlitt Realtors INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- Coldwell Banker Paradise Ed Schlitt Realtors and Hoyt C. Murphy Realtors have merged operations. The companies will be known by two names: Coldwell Banker Paradise Ed Schlitt Realtors (www.FLColdwellBanker.com ) with offices located in Vero Beach, North Hutchinson Island, Sebastian and Melbourne; and Coldwell Banker Paradise Hoyt Murphy Realtors with offices located in Fort Pierce, Hutchinson Island, Ocean Village and Port St. Lucie. The merger brings together two of Florida’s Space and Treasure Coast’s leading real estate brokerages and will focus on real estate sales, rentals and property management. “We are enthusiastic about building on both company’s long-lasting traditions while focusing on our common goals of excellent personalized service to our customers,” said Steven Schlitt. “We are fortunate to acquire the talent that Hoyt C. Murphy Realtors has proved during their 63 years in business. Linda Schlitt Gonzalez added, “Both domestic and international buyers are looking to relocate to an uncongested tropical area with wonderful beaches and great breezes. Through Coldwell Banker’s global reach, the use of cutting-edge technology and extensive advertising, we have captured the bulk of the market share in our entire geographical area.”

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Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233

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in the only weekly newspaper serving the island and the mainland call...

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VERO BEACH -- The nominating period for National Philanthropy Day recognizing philanthropic leaders in the community ends June 11. Organizations have until the end of July to complete the nomination process. Mentors are available to assist in completing the applications. A new category is being added this year to recognize outstanding youth age 18 and under. Returning categories are Outstanding Individual Philanthropist; Outstanding Corporate Philanthropist; Volunteer Fundraiser of the Year, and Unsung Hero. Organizations do not have to be a member of AFP to nominate an individual or company.

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VERO BEACH -- The Alzheimer & Parkinson Association of Indian River County will hold its ninth Walk to Remember on Saturday, Nov. 10, at Riverside Park. Family, friends, business associates and organizations are invited to create a team to raise awareness and support for the nonprofit organization’s role of supporting those whose lives have been challenged by disorders affecting memory and movement. “This is the Alzheimer & Parkinson Association’s largest fund raising event of the year,” said Chairperson Linda Wells. “We are so appreciative of the sponsors, teams and individuals that raise much needed funding to support the unique programs that are provided right here in our community.” Sponsorship packets and team and individual registrations are available via email at WTRadmin@alzpark.org or call the Alzheimer & Parkinson Association office at (772) 563-0505. Visit www.alzpark.org for additional information.

VERO BEACH - The Salvation Army of Indian River County has received an $18,780 grant from the Indian River Community Foundation for its program to provide routine car maintenance to those in need. This program allows clients to have their vehicles made safe with new tires, brakes and correcting other safety issues including car seats and seatbelt repair for children and other passengers. The aim of the program is to help clients who have a job and need reliable transportation to maintain employment. It also aids families with children to get them to school, daycare or summer camp safely. Kerry Bartlett, executive director of the Indian River Community Foundation, said her board of directors appreciated the opportunity to offer additional funding to The Salvation Army’s unique program. “Although the economy is slowly recovering, there is no denying that good hard working people are still struggling to make ends meet and an unexpected auto repair bill can send a family over the edge,” Bartlett said. “This program strategically targets people in jeopardy of losing employment opportunities due to unreliable transportation, which not only benefits the family, but the entire community.” For more information visit www.ircommunityfoundation.com. To learn more about The Salvation Army of IRC and The Ride Safe Program call (772) 978-0265 or visit Facebook.com/pages/The-Salvation-Army-of-Indian-River-Co-Fla.

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Walk to Remember slated for November 10

Salvation Army receives grant from Indian River Community Foundation

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VERO BEACH -- The new Vero Beach headquarters for CenterState Bank are expected to be open for business starting June 18. The 14,000-square-foot building, located at 855 21st Street, will feature two floors with the bank occupying the first floor and the second floor currently available for lease. In addition to adding safe deposit box service, customers will have four drive-through lanes, a drive-up ATM and lobby coffee bar. “We made an effort to focus on a local contractor in Summit Construction, who utilized local sub-contractors for the construction of the new building,” said Chris Bieber, Vice President of Commercial Lending. CenterState Bank, an independent Florida-based bank, is rated four stars, by BauerFinancial, an independent bank rating and research firm in Coral Gables. The bank will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday.

Hosted by The Association of Fundraising Professionals Indian River Chapter, the National Philanthropy Day celebration and awards ceremony will be held on Nov. 13 at Riverside Theatre. For more information about each category or to submit a name, contact NPD Nominating Committee Chair Kerry Bartlett at (772) 492-1407 or via email at kerry@ircommunityfoundation.com. Online forms and more information may also be found at: afpindianriver.afpnet.org.

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Community Forum

Lessons learned at 15.5 miles per hour

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On Tuesday, May 22, I completed my 30-day, 3,300-mile, 115 mile-a-day Ride to Beat Hunger with a gala homecoming party held at Waldo’s Restaurant. Hundreds of cheering wellwishers – and local riders, Mark Schumann and Bill Penney, who rode the last four days with me – were there to celebrate that I was able to accomplish this physical and mental feat and our success in raising over $52,000 to address both local and global hunger. Perhaps more important than the large amount of funds raised for the two worthy hunger agencies selected (Harvest Food and Outreach Center, the local recipients, and Stop Hunger Now, the international recipient) was that we succeeded raising awareness in our community about hunger as a pressing and persistent human issue. I am so grateful for the many committed people from our Treasure Coast community who worked for months with me to make the Ride to Beat Hunger such a success. Many people have asked me what

I learned on my arduous and physically demanding journey, and I have answered by sharing three simple insights which I gained that strike me as important for any REVEREND SCOTT ALEXANDER human journey.

Sit up and pay attention

their way through their lives, not focusing their senses on the world that they so miraculously have before them. For all 30 days of my ride, I made an intentional effort to notice – truly notice -- the rich American landscapes I passed through, and the simple, gracefilled moments I shared with the other riders. We would all do well to sit up and pay attention in the amazing, simple lives which are ours.

fellow riders as we all pitched in to help fit the flat and get back on the road. The larger truth is that all of us have regular “flats” in our lives – inconveniences, complications and challenges when life does not go the way we want it to. In such moments, knowing how to “go with the flow,” and calmly deal with the problem or inconvenience at hand, helps us to positively get our lives back on track, and keep our blood pressure low.

It is so important when you are on a long bike ride, often “in the saddle” for eight to 10 hours a day – to simply sit up and pay attention. Not only is this important for your safety (so you can avoid rough spots in the road, inattentive drivers, or charging dogs) it is also important for your spiritual and emotional well-being. Sitting up and paying attention – which is being purposefully mindful of your surroundings, emotions and relationships – is important whether you are on a crosscountry bike trip, or just living your ordinary day-to-day life here on the Treasure Coast. So many people seem to be sleep-walking

Appreciate the flats On any long bike ride, flat tires are inevitable. As a group of 12 riders, we had well over 100 of them as we crossed America. What I learned on this trip is that whenever a flat tire occurred in the group I was riding with, I faced a spiritual and emotional choice that would determine how pleasant that part of the day would be for me. I could both bemoan and resent the interruption to our ride or I could appreciate the unexpected interruption as an opportunity to take a breather, look around at my surroundings, and enjoy camaraderie with my

Stop complaining and be grateful

Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

“Doing well by doing good.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

Ian Love, Managing Editor 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com Mike Bielecki, Sports Editor 321-6105 mbwordsmith@gmail.com Christina Tascon, Writer/Photographer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Carrie Scent Graphic Designer Marsha Damerow Graphic Designer Lisa Rymer Contributor Milt Thomas Contributor

Scott Alexander Contributor Michael Birnholz Contributor Barbara Yoresh Contributor Martine Fecteau Account Executive

To contact one of our contributing writers please call 772-978-2251 or send an email to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 (martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com) or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233 (Mark.Schumann@scripps.com)

On any long bicycle ride – and I have done three of them over the last decade -- there are always plenty of things to complain or gripe about. On this long ride across America I made a conscious effort not to complain and express gratitude whenever possible. Not only did this spiritual practice of not complaining and being grateful make the trip more enjoyable for me -as my heart was not burdened with negativity -- it also made the trip more enjoyable for my companions who didn’t have their moods darkened by my complaints. It may seem too simple to be true, but I believe that a satisfying and positive life – no matter where your journey takes you -begins with a grateful heart. Rev. Scott W. Alexander is the minister of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach, and has been a minister, author, and educator for almost 40 years. He is an avid cyclist and outdoor enthusiast who loves living in Vero Beach.


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Herb Whittall Vero Beach

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ter is in code and is only the total amount of electricity used over short periods of time. This information is of no use to anyone except you and the utility. It will not tell anyone anything about your coming and going or what you are doing at any given moment. Your privacy is much more compromised by using your cell phone in public or posting things on Facebook! Source: California Council on Science and Technology, January, 2011.

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR to better understand how much to adjust your lifestyle to reduce What can smart is needed and where, as your electric bill. meters do for you? electricity well as notifying the utility when There have been several fallacies electric service is interrupted. published about smart meters. To the Editor: The smart meters do send raThere has been a lot of misinfor- When such an interruption ocmation circulated about the smart curs they will be able to send the dio signals with data to the utilmeters that utilities are installing right equipment to correct the ity. However, the signals are sent around the country. The trans- cause much quicker, thus improv- in batches and the radio signal is only on about 1 percent of the mission and distribution system ing the utility’s overall reliability. Also the data from the smart time. Also the strength of this in this country is getting old and meter will be sent in code to the signal at 10 feet is less than 1 perneeds upgrading. To try and improve their service utility. The utility will set up that cent as strong as the radio signal and system reliability, the coun- information in such a way that sent by your cell phone when it is try’s utilities have adopted the you can, with a password, access at your ear *. So the fear of this concept of the smart grid. Smart your electric usage. By doing this signal causing health problems is meters are a part of the smart grid. you will be able to look at how you groundless. Smart meters allow the utility are using electricity and allow you The data sent by the smart me-

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elections, where half the 500 or so seats went to Muslim Brotherhood or other religious candidates. The Salafis make no bones about wanting to create a religious state like Saudi Arabia. But the MBs staked out a more moderate position. I interviewed the regional MB leader, Mohson Radhi. While he did not deny he would like to see a more religious orientation, the people were looking for jobs and justice, both lacking under Mubarak. “If we can’t improve their daily lives, we will be voted out of office in four years.” This all may sound familiar – jobs-economy, more religion-less religion, liberal-conservative. Whatever the outcome, it is the first step toward democracy, a concept as foreign to Egyptians today as it was to King John’s subjects in 1215. Milt Thomas is a Vero Beach resident and an experienced freelance writer/author with a 20-year background in the music industry. He currently writes biographies, blogs, lectures, travels extensively and is an active member of the National Press Club.

under dictator Hosni Mubarak. Most of the 30odd original candidates represented liberal, secular parties or were independents, some radical left, some MILT THOMAS radical right. It was a truly democratic selection. The problem though, is that under Mubarak, no opposition was allowed, so all these candidates were running for office the first time. Each had their constituents, but Morsi and Shafik were destined to come out on top. Why? The only two cohesive political forces in Egypt over the past 60 years have been the military and the Muslim Brotherhood (MB). Although the Brotherhood was only granted limited political exposure, they made up for it by providing social services (food, shelter, clothing) to Egypt’s poor. While Egypt is a mostly secular country, its people are religious. Religion is the one aspect of their lives where they feel free. Naturally, when faced with a broad selec-

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tion of little known presidential contenders, the MB, and its more radical allies, the Salafis, were the most popular. Second most popular, Shafik, a high ranking official under the dictator Mubarak. So why would anyone vote for him? The answer is, because he is not from the Muslim Brotherhood. To half of the Egyptian electorate, the devil they know is better than the devil they don’t know. Modern Egyptians enjoy an American-like lifestyle. They like western culture, the clothing, music and entertainment, Facebook, You Tube, etc. It’s almost like freedom. They also have 50 percent unemployment among college graduates, the best and brightest of Egyptian youth, who have emigrated to western countries for that freedom. What half the Egyptians fear is an Islamic state, where those freedoms would be taken away, women would lose the rights and positions they have held even under Mubarak. I was in Egypt last November, a week before the parliamentary

By Milt Thomas Since there are two presidential elections in the news these days, I thought it might be interesting to compare them. We all know about the one in November, but we should also probably know more about the one in Egypt, June 16-17. The U.S. presidential election has occurred every four years for more than 200 years of our existence. The Egyptian election is the country’s first – ever. Pharaohs were never democratically elected (in other words, elected by the Egyptian public). Every leader since the last pharaoh (Cleopatra) has either been selected by the conquerors of Egypt, or for the past 60 years, by the Egyptian military. Naturally, since democracy is not much further along in Egypt than it was in England when the Magna Carta was written, this election offers some interesting choices. After an initial vote with 30 or so candidates, two emerged as opponents in the run-off, Mohamed Morsi, chairman of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party, and Ahmed Shafik, a former prime minister

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Parallels between elections in the U.S. and Egypt


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Youth Guidance Luau marks end of season

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Elke Brockway, George Fetterolf, Gabbi Richter, Franck Baudach and Regina Rohde enjoy the sunset. BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Goodbye winter, hello summertime. The Youth Guidance Tropical Night Luau at Quail Valley allowed guests to toast the end of season when much of the charitable fundraising takes place. That doesn’t mean the work will end, but the feeling at this bash was one of letting the stress melt away and enjoying a celebration of jobs well done. Most non-profit volunteers and many of the area’s biggest service oriented individuals donned grass skirts, flowered leis and clinked cocktails for a fun night which everyone looks forward to all year. “It’s the year round people who come out,” said Youth Guidance director Barbara Schlitt Ford. “The

ticket prices are reasonable, it’s a fun time and the crowd is a blend of many people who do the hands-on work of helping in the community.” The festive party was again held at Quail Valley which put out an incredible buffet of Hawaiian themed foods located inside and outside overlooking the beautiful Indian River Lagoon sunset. “We think Quail Valley is the perfect backdrop for the event” Schlitt Ford said. Chef Jose Faria said the club was happy to support the childrenrelated fundraiser. “It’s always an honor to support any event to make sure the kids are taken care of,” he said. Almost four hundred tickets were sold and organizers hoped to raise $60,000 for Youth Guidance.

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Mayor Pilar Turner dances with husband Al Turner and Jane & Lorne Coyle


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Butch Casano, Barbara Schlitt Ford and Beth Casano

Laurel Wook Lenker, Bob & Debbie Bedell and Bob & Mikki Pfeiffer

Sheriff Deryl Loar, Jennifer Loar, Donna Leemon and Eric Menger

Jay Hart with Jackie and Bob Solari

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Sandy Robinson, Mary & Paul Williamson, Al & Betty Sammartino and Robbie Robinson


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Bruce & Ana Andeerson, John & Brenda O’Connor and Karen & Russ O’Brien

Amanda Smith Pfennig and Brad Pfennig

Dr. Rob Callery and Cathie Callery

Joe & Jan Binney with Marllyn & Dale Justice

Kristen Frindell, Kim Cybulski, Bobbie Holt and Lisa Amaroso


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! Father’s Day Pajama Story Hour

6:30 pm, story time in Vero Beach Book Center’s Children’s Store with Miss Julie. 772-569-6650.

Winnie the Pooh Kids, Anne Morton Theatre, 1:30 & 2:30, $12/$6. 772-231-6990. JUNE 9 ! Blue Water Open

Benefits Sebastian Exchange Club, Capt. Butcher’s, 1730 Indian River Dr., Sebastian, fishing, captain’s party, $225/boat. bluewateropen.com. ! Vero Beach Book Center

Campfire Saturdays, Children’s Store with Miss Julie, stories, guitar sing-a-long, snacks and more. 772-569-6650. ! Israel Scouts Friendship Caravan

JUNE 16 ! Water Lily Celebration STAFF PHOTO

If you’d like to see one of your photographs published in Vero Beach Newsweekly, please send them to us at verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com. Photos need to be at least 200 dpi and in jpeg format. ! Democratic Women’s Club

Luncheon, 11:30 am, C. J. Cannon’s, $16, speaker Art Ciasca, Director of Development for SafeSpace. Reservations 772-2313906. ! Free strength and agility testing

With assessments for residents over 60, Leisure Square, 1705 16th St., 9 am-12 pm. Appointments, 772-321-6003. JUNE 10 ! Space Coast Symphony

Music, dance and international cultural performers, Emerson Center, 1590 27th Ave., 7 pm, $8$10. 772-569-4700.

Music from the 20s, 30s & 40s, Emerson Center, 2:30 pm, $20, spacecoastsymphony.org. 772252-7276.

! Hurricane Expo

! ”Lost in Detention”

Indian River Mall, 10 am-3 pm, lots of hurricane preparedness vendors and service exhibits, free. 772-770-9404. THURSDAY, JUNE 7

Social Justice Film Series, Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 1590 27th Ave., 7 pm, free. 772-7785880.

FRIDAY, JUNE 8

McKee Botanical Gardens, 350 US1, photographers and visitors welcome, 10 am-4 pm, $3.60-$6. 772-794-0601. ! Let’s Bowl for Health

JUNE 10 & 24 ! Theatre-Go-Round

Joey’s Bistro, “Dancing in the Streets,” musical revue from the 60s, 4 pm cocktails & dinner, show at 6 pm, $22.50-$45. Reservations, 772-252-9341. JUNE 13 ! County Commission

Candidate Forum for districts 3 & 5, Elks Club, 1350 26th St., 11:45 am, lunch provided for $15, public is invited. Glenn Heran, 473-7629. JUNE 14 ! Harry Potter Night

Mulligan’s Beach House, 5-8 pm, costumes welcome, benefits Frances Langford Center for Children. MulligansRestaurant.net. ! Stars & Stripes Forever Luncheon

Democratic Party of IRC, Speak-

Benefits Treasure Coast Community Health, 4:30-7:30 pm, Vero Bowl, $20 includes bowling, shoes & door prizes. 772-2578224 x152. JUNE 17 ! Father’s Day Celebration

Vero Beach Hotel & Spa, Heaton’s Reef, 3200 Ocean Dr., noon-4 pm, steel drummer, buffet, beer tasting, $20. 772-2315666. JUNE 22-23 ! Comedy Zone SUMMER NIGHTS!

Grilled food from Hale Groves and treats from Kilwin’s available. Mike Rivera and Trish Keating, 7:30 & 9:30 pm, $15 plus food, prices vary. 772-231-6990. To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 9

SUNDAY, JUNE 10

MONDAY, JUNE 11

TUESDAY, JUNE 12

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13

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Winds: SSW 9 mph Chance of Rain 40%

Winds: W 10 mph Chance of Rain 40%

Winds: E 11 mph Chance of Rain 30%

Winds: ESE 11 mph Chance of Rain 30%

Winds: ESE 10 mph Chance of Rain 30%

Winds: ESE 11 mph Chance of Rain 20%

Winds: SE 10 mph Chance of Rain 40%

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Grilled food from Hale Groves and treats from Kilwin’s available. Mike Armstrong and Ted Denson, 7:30 & 9:30 pm, $15 plus food, prices vary. 772-231-6990.

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JUNE 8-9 ! Comedy Zone SUMMER NIGHTS!

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Farmer’s Market, 8 am-noon. Ocean Dr. & Dahlia Ln. 772-5322455.

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Best Dog Contest, Schumann Hall Senior Center, 686 14th St., 1-2:30 pm, $25 registration per dog, free to public view. 772-4692062.

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JUNE 15 ! Hot Diggity Dog Day

EVERY SATURDAY ! Oceanside Business Association

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3-6 pm, downtown Vero, corner 14th Ave. & 21st St. 772-480-8353.

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er Edwin Enisco & music by Avenue D Boys, noon, $75. 772-2265267.

EVERY FRIDAY ! Farmer’s Market

JUNE 8-17 ! Riverside Children’s Theatre

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Glass exhibit turns the usual into the unusual BY BARBARA YORESH VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Indigo Icarus

PHOTOS SUPPLIED

VERO BEACH -- They’re not exactly in the same category as Mason glass jars, but artist Rick Beck has found a surprisingly wonderful and highly creative application for these otherwise mundane cast glass objects. Form, Color, Light: Cast Glass by Rick Beck will be on display in the Laura and Bill Buck Atrium of the Vero Beach Museum of Art on Saturday, June 23 and continues through October 14. The exhibit offers whimsically delightful and detailed sculptures in glass that colorfully mimic things like kitchen objects or tools but also human forms using unexpectedly deep-hued color and impressive size which convey a strong presence. Creating glass sculpture through the use of clay forms to create a silicone mold into which he melts recycled glass, Beck then fires the glass to 1,650 degrees Fahrenheit. It may then take literally weeks to cool to room temperature and final assemblage in what is considered to be an arduous and difficult process. Beck, a renowned glass sculptor based in Spruce Pine, N.C., has worked as a teaching assistant at Pilchuk Glass where iconic glass artist Dale Chihuly was associated as well as at the Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina where Beck has been an instructor and artist in residence. His forms may make reference to natural things such as vine and leaves or take on curvy Art Nouveau or geometric Art Decoinspired elements. Others are patterned after such every-day things as spoons or backscratchers. Jay Williams, the museum’s curator of collections and exhibitions shared delighted enthusiasm about Beck and the exhibit. “He’s very unusual. A lot of glass artists do hot blown glass

– like Dale Chihuly who does manipulating and stretching of hot glass. But cast glass is more unusual and Rick’s training is very broad although he centered on cast glass,” Williams said The degree of difficulty involved in creating such complex cast glass forms is remarkable, considering the medium’s unforgiving nature, according to one of Beck’s admiring art critics Mark Sloan. Williams notes “Becks work is not like anyone else’s. He plays with these forms with playful imagination and he crosses boundaries by obliterating the distinction between fine art and craft.” Beck is not as well-known as he should be, Williams said, despite being critically heralded and represented by what Williams termed “the premier glass gallery in Florida.” Though there is variety to the work Beck has created over the years, there is nonetheless what Williams termed an identity and an inanimate familial trait to Beck’s creations. Some art critics and historians see Beck’s work as being similar to that of the Pop Artists of the 1960s like Andy Warhol who based images on familiar advertising items like soup cans or other topical subjects. However, Beck’s skill at creating glass sculpture allowed him to transcend any easily definable “school” or category. “His glass sculpture is fine art with a capital F. It’s not trendy in the sense of here today, gone tomorrow like some art is,” Williams said. “They’re big with sculptural mass and presence.” For the past 20 years, Beck’s work as been featured six times in American Craft Magazine as well as in Glass Magazine. His cast glass sculptures have been exhibited at the Mint Museum of Art in Charlotte, N.C.; the Society of Arts and Crafts in Boston; the Kentucky Museum of Art and


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really good work,” Williams said. There is no admission charge to visit this exhibition. The Vero Beach Museum of Art is located at 3001 Riverside Park Drive in Vero Beach. The museum is closed on Mondays through Labor Day and open during the summer from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and from 1 to 4:30 p.m. on Sunday. For more information, call (772) 231-0707 or visit online at www. verobeachmuseum.org.

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Design; the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts; Loyola Museum of Art; the Racine Art Museum; the Glasmuseum in Denmark and in galleries throughout the United States. Williams noted that while Beck’s exhibit will be the only one on display during the museum’s renovations during the summer months, it is by no means a “fillin” or second-tier exhibit. “It’s our only blast over the summer but it’s strong work –

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Winged Figure

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Vero Beach Baseball Academy open for business

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PHOTOS BY MIKE BIELECKI

Hitting instructor Brian Cavanaugh shows off his flawless swing.

Pitching instructor Chris Thomas works with Michael Holland on his pitching motion.

BY MICHAEL BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- Baseball season is in full swing and the boys of summer are hard at play. To ensure a proper introduction to the national pastime, two local men have recently opened the Vero Beach Baseball Academy. The 5,000-square-foot, climate-controlled indoor facility is located at 510 2nd Street S.W. in Vero Beach. The labor of love is operated by owner/instructors Chris Thomas, a former pitcher with the Minnesota Twins and Los Angeles Dodgers organizations and Jack Cavanaugh, a former Division 1 baseball player and 16-year high school baseball coach. Cavanaugh came up with the idea for the Academy from a former minor league player who ran indoor baseball facilities in his native New Jersey. The high school coach and Thomas began looking for the right space for their complex about eight months ago.

“The place up in New Jersey was a small with one batting cage and one pitching lane and I started taking my kids there at a young age,” Cavanaugh said. “Chris and I began talking about the indoor baseball complex idea, as we both had an interest in it. We feel that there is a real need in this town for a facility where kids are going to get some good instruction and get them started on the right foot so they develop and have their mechanics down. That will help them reach their highest potential.” Additional instructors include Brian Cavanaugh, Ed Nicolace, Jason Wright and George Young -- all of whom have considerable collegiate and professional baseball experience. The facility has state-of-the-art equipment, featuring two Iron Mike hitting machines in 75’ x 14 foot lanes, an individualized pitching lane with portable mounds to facilitate little league and major league distances and conditioning and strength training equipment. Teaching aides also include

video analysis which is used to record and analyze the player’s hitting swing or pitching motion. “What we’re trying to do is let people know we’re here,” said Thomas. “We’ve had three or four teams rent the facility out and we have hourly rates for teams for either one cage or the whole facility. When it rains outside, the phones start ringing here. “One of the things about Indian River County is that there is a lack of baseball fields,” added Thomas. “There’s the field at Vero Beach and St. Ed’s High schools, but other than that there is no place for the (older) kids to play. You have to either drive south to Lawnwood or to Lakewood Park to rent fields if you want to play. I don’t think there is another facility in the area that can compete with this in terms of offering the kinds of services we have at Vero Beach Baseball Academy.” For more information call 772-567-0776 or visit www.verobba.com


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Cravings Ice cream, bakery, sandwiches and salads Patio seating, take out, mail order 3149 Ocean Drive, Vero Beach, FL 32963 Hours - 7 days, 6:30 a.m. – 10 p.m.

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plastic container and plastic cutlery -- was as classic as one would find in a fine dining establishment. Strips of ham and turkey were layered together with white and yellow cheeses. Sections of sweet red and green bell pepper and shredded carrots and a mound of bean sprouts atop simple greens completed this surprisingly satisfying salad. Deciding on a more healthy choice as well, the unexpected surprise was a beautiful fruit salad more befitting service on fine china than a take out container. The fruit salad was overflowing with plump, revived blueberries; delicate sections of sweet mandarin oranges, crisp green apple slices and highlighted by chunks of tangy feta cheese. To accompany our salads was a cup of homemade chili. The thick, chunky chili would have been better served hot, rather than lukewarm which was a bit of a disappointment. The third dinner companion selected an artichoke wrap with bits of chicken in a sauce that needed

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successful they soon branched out, opening more shops throughout Michigan. Years later when they visited Vero Beach, they fell in love with the area and Cravings of Vero Beach was born. Aside from their local business, Cravings has a thriving mailorder business, offering fresh baked gourmet cookies and other homemade treats via their website (www.cravingsbymail.com). The cookies come in several delicious varieties packed in custom cookie tins, some of which can be seen displayed in their Vero Beach shop, located at the busiest corner on the barrier island at 3149 Ocean Drive. At this time of day, Cravings was quickly winding down and with several hours yet till close, the staff of two managed to take care of all their duties. The same gentleman that took our order apparently prepared all three meals. When our food arrived, we were definitely hungry and the items chosen were generous in size. The chef salad -- minus its clear

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With not a lot of time, our schedule did not allow for table cloths and fine dining and since our destination was the beach, the choice of Cravings was obvious. We wanted to sit outside to take in the normally picturesque view of Ocean Drive, but unfortunately it was a rainy evening. Spotting one of the few coveted empty tables inside, we made a mad dash to the comfort of this tiny ice cream parlor, pastry and sandwich shop. Taking in the overly displayed counter, it took longer than expected to decide on our meals. Homemade signs, cards, menu boards and commercial displays covered practically every inch of available wall space. The collection advertised soup to nuts and everything in between. With a mind-boggling, myriad of menu choices, clearly this was going to be a tough decision. Scanning the endless possibilities from sweets to sandwiches, several healthy items caught our eye including some salads that sounded very familiar and some that did not. With the cooling rain, soup came to mind and when we asked about the soup of the day as advertised, we were told that chili was available in the evenings. Two of us chose the chili, along with two very colorful salads. The third person chose an artichoke wrap with chicken. In 1983, in the small resort town of Harbor Springs, Michigan, Mary Sue, Marty and Martin Walker opened up a small ice cream shop, aptly name Cravings. Aside from ice cream, the shop specialized in homemade cookies. The Walkers were so

some more flavor. This rather plain offering and a bag of chips could have been kicked up a notch. At a shop that specializes in dozens of fresh baked sweets and confections including an on-line mail order business, we were hoping the selections would be plentiful. As we surveyed the offerings of unusual ice cream flavors, something very different caught my eye: attached to the display case was a Popsicle with a super hero cape, advertising “Hero Pops.” While our meal at Cravings was better than average, a hero in the form of a Popsicle swooped in to save the day and make it a very good experience. Being a chocolate lover, I selected a chocolate, caramel and sea salt Popsicle. This perfect blend of sweet chocolate, rich caramel and balanced with flakes of sea salt was a gourmet Popsicle dream. Far from an ordinary ice cream on a stick, the Hero Pop delivered incredibly rich flavor. Aside from pure deliciousness, what sold me even more was the fact that Hero Pops are made right here in Vero Beach. These pops must be a well kept secret because I’ve not seen these delicious frozen treats offered anywhere else. Hopefully Cravings will keep them in stock. Finishing our meals we noticed the rain finally letting up and as we were leaving this tiny little shop of treats, even at this late hour we were not surprised to see a small line of younger people lining up at the counter, perhaps impatiently waiting to calm their cravings for a late night snack. I hope they tried the Hero Pops. Dinner for three with tax: $40.

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BY MARK JOSEPH VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Cravings more than satisfies your sweet tooth


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Charlie Messer Charlie Messer, 79, died May 17, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born

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Catherine L. 'Kay' McConnell Catherine L. "Kay" McConnell, 84, died May 17, 2012, at Consulate Healthcare of Vero Beach. She was born in Yonkers, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach, coming from Pawling, N.Y. She was a member of The Community Church of Vero Beach. She volunteered at the American Legion, Vero Beach. Survivors include her son, Douglas McConnell of Poughquag, N.Y.; five grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer's Foundation of America, 322 Eighth Ave., 7th Floor, New York, NY 10001. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

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Thomas P. Lever Thomas P. Lever, 69, died May 20, 2012, at his home. He was born in Astoria, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 18 years, coming from Riverhead, N.Y. He was a graduate of Our Lady of Mercy Regional School in Riverhead. He served in the Navy and was involved in the blockade of Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis. He served as a sheriff's deputy with the Suffolk County Sheriff's Department for 20 years before his retirement in 1994 as a lieutenant. He was a member of Our Savior Lutheran Church, Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 22 years, Barbara Lever of Vero Beach; sons, Eddie Lever of Vero Beach and Gregory Lever of California; daughter, Allissa Phillips of Riverhead; brother, Joseph Lever of Hampton Bays, N.Y.; and two grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society , 3375 20th St., Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

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John Robert Lamson John Robert Lamson, 91, died May 21, 2012, at the Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in Springfield Township, Ohio, and lived in Vero Beach for 10 years, coming from Daytona Beach. He was a veteran of World War II and served in the Navy as an electrician's mate first class. Survivors include his daughters, Debra Kappel of Vero Beach and Judy Hendrickson of Jacksonville; and three grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Murray R. Maxon Murray R. Maxon, 81, died May 22, 2012, at VNA/Hospice House in Vero Beach. He was born in Sackets Harbor, N.Y., and was a winter resident of Vero Beach for eight years, coming from his birthplace. He was the owner of Ontario Place Hotel in Sackets Harbor. Survivors include his wife of 61 years, Earleen Maxon of Vero Beach and Sackets Harbor; sons, Dr. Tomm Maxon of Watertown, N.Y., James Maxon of Atlanta, Dr. Jeffrey Maxon of Rochester, N.Y., John of Vero Beach and Dr. Mark Maxon of Fayetteville, N.Y.; daughter, Dr. Mary E. Maxon of San Francisco; 11 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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Beach and Indian River County, P.O. Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

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Robert Leslie Jones Robert Leslie Jones, 88, of Vero Beach, Florida, passed away on Friday, May 18, 2012, at Hubbard Hospice House West, South Charleston. He was formerly employed by Appalachian Power before moving to Cleveland; and he retired as an electrician for TRW of Cleveland, Ohio. He was an U. S. World War II Navy veteran. He is survived by his wife, Madge Preece Wilson Jones of South Charleston; son, Randal Jones of Port St. Lucie, Florida; daughter, Cheri (Jerry) Jones of Vero Beach; granddaughter, Sarah Wallace of Jacksonville, Florida; grandsons, Jake Jones of Orlando, Florida and Derek Jones of Jensen Beach, Florida; and stepsons, Steven Wilson of South Charleston and Charles (Donna) Wilson of Charleston. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests Howard L. "HoJo" Johnson donations to Hospice Care, 1606 Howard "HoJo" L. Johnson, 77, Kanawha Boulevard West, Chardied May 22, 2012, at Indian River leston, West Virginia 25312-2536. Medical Center, Vero Beach. He Brant Weems King was born in Jamestown, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for eight years, Brant Weems King, 65, died May coming from Greenacres. He re- 20, 2012, at Indian River Medical tired as the training director with Center, Vero Beach. He was born in Nozzle Nolan Pest Control after Jacksonville and lived in Vero Beach more than 30 years. He was a ser- for one year, coming from Nashville, geant in the National Guard. Sur- Tenn. Before retirement, he was emvivors include his wife of 32 years, ployed by Xerox, Zenith and InterPhyllis Marshall of Vero Beach; graph Computer, in their Nashville daughters, Leslie Johnson of South offices. He served in the Navy durHaven, Kan., and Karen Mercado ing the Vietnam War. He received of Jupiter; brothers, Kenneth R. his bachelor of arts in Business Johnson of Ruskin and Paul John- Administration, graduating cum son of Jamestown; three grand- laude, from Vanderbilt University children; and three great-grand- in Nashville. He was a member of children. Memorial contributions Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of may be made to Humane Soci- Vero Beach and Toastmasters, Vero ety of Vero Beach & Indian River Beach. Survivors include his wife, County, Attn: Connie Cotherman, Anne M. Trainor of Vero Beach; son, Asst. Development Director, P.O. Kevin Brant King of San Diego; and Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. sister, Melinda A. Lewis of Petaluma, A guestbook is available at www. Calif. Memorial contributions may be made to Humane Society of Vero coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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Janet Gayle Heinze Janet Gayle Heinze, 77, died May 18, 2012, at VNA Hospice House. She was born in Heron, Mo., and lived in Vero Beach since 1987, coming from Wisconsin. She owned and operated a family supermarket along with her husband, as well as a publishing company. She attended Our Savior Lutheran Church of Vero Beach. Survivors include her husband of 55 years, Vern of Vero Beach; daughter, Kathryn Marks of Palm Beach Gardens; sons, Mark Heinze and Mike Heinze, both of Vero Beach; and four grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice of Indian River County, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

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Obituaries


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OBITUARIES in Copperhill, Tenn., and lived in Vero Beach for 65 years, coming from his birthplace. Survivors include his sons, Charles Waters of Fort Pierce, Curtis Waters of Lantana and Josh Messer of Vero Beach; stepdaughters, Vonnie Dare of Vero Beach, Jennifer Lynn of Sebastian and Vickie Camacho of Panama City; sister, Yvonne Whalen of Vero Beach; former wife, Joyce A. Messer of Vero Beach; 16 grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to American Lung Association , Southeast Florida, 2701 N. Australian Ave., Suite 100, West Palm Beach, FL 33407. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Dorothy M. Sackrider Dorothy M. Sackrider, 93, died May 16, 2012, at Atlantic Healthcare Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Philadelphia and lived in Vero Beach for 30 years, coming from Albany, N.Y. She was a member of Christ by the Sea United Methodist Church, the Scottish Society, and the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Republican Association, all in Vero Beach. Survivors include her sons, Robert Gilson of Syracuse, N.Y., and David Gilson of Carlsbad, Calif.; five grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com. Peter Fordham Mitchell Peter Fordham Mitchell, 86, died May 23, 2012, at the VNA/ Hospice House in Vero Beach. He was born in Greenwich, Conn., and lived in Vero Beach for 22 years, coming from his birthplace. He served as a first lieutenant bombardier navigator in the Army Air Forces during the World War II. He was a former member, president and regional director

of the Lions Club of Greenwich, Conn., and a member of Innis Arden Country Club of Greenwich, Hawk's Nest Golf Club of Vero Beach and Vero Beach Country Club. Survivors include his wife, Nancy S. Mitchell of Vero Beach; son, William Arthur Mitchell of Greenwich; daughter, Maggie O'Donnell of Oak Park, Ill.; and five grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to American Diabetes Association , 1500 W. Cypress Creek Road, Suite 104, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

tions may be made to Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, 383 Main Ave., 5th Floor, Norwalk, CT 06851 or http://support. themmrf.org/go to/Gayle.Schuldt. A guestbook is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Ginny Simon Ginny Simon passed away peacefully at VNA Hospice House of Vero Beach on May 5, 2012. She is survived by: her beloved husband Hal Simon; daughters Dannielle Simon, Kathleen Leder Goelkel, and Karen Leder Wheeler; and brother Bruce Butterworth; as well as three grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and one great-great granddaughter. She had homes in Wilmington, Delaware; Griffin, Georgia; and Spring Hill, Florida before retiring to Indian River Estates in Vero Beach in 1999. She was as an active member of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach and the local genealogical society, as well as serving as a volunteer at the Indian River Estates Medical Center. In lieu flowers, donations may be made in her memory to either VNA Hospice House of Vero Beach or the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach.

Michael D. Ostrower Michael D. Ostrower, 64, died May 17, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 24 years, coming from Huntington, N.Y. He was a special-education teacher at Gifford Middle School for more than 15 years. Survivors include his wife of 25 years, Lisa Ostrower of Vero Beach; daughter, Megan Ostrower of Vero Beach, FL; son, Ben Ostrower of Vero Beach; and brother, Donald Ostrower of Ardsley, N.Y. Memorial contributions may be made to Humane Society of Vero Beach & Indian River Robert Lewis 'Bob' Sligh County, Attn: Connie Cotherman, Asst. Development Director, P.O. Robert Lewis "Bob" Sligh, 84, Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. died May 21, 2012. He was born A guestbook is available at www. in Grand Rapids, Mich., and was coxgiffordseawinds.com. a lifelong resident of Holland, Mich., and winter resident of Gayle A. Schuldt Vero Beach. . He retired as CEO Gayle A. Schuldt died May 21, of Sligh Furniture Co. Survivors 2012. She was born and raised include his wife of 60 years, Lois in North Royalton, Ohio, and Sligh; sons, Rob Sligh of High lived in Virginia for 38 years be- Point, N.C., and John Sligh of fore moving to Vero Beach. She Eden Prairie, Minn.; daughter, was a member of the Indian River Barb Sligh Donati of Louisburg, Model Sailing Club. Survivors in- N.C.; nine grandchildren; and four clude her husband, Kirt; daugh- great-grandchildren. Memorial ter, Bethany Chirico; and brother, contributions may be made to the Stan Skaza. Memorial contribu- Macatawa Bay Junior Association

(www.mbja.org) at 2157 South Shore Drive, Holland, MI 49423. or the American Water Ski Hall of Fame (www.waterskihalloffame. com). A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Tracy Smith Tracy Topper Smith, 50, died May 16, 2012, at Treasure Coast Hospice, Fort Pierce. She was born in Fort Pierce and lived there for two years, coming from Vero Beach. She worked as a travel agent. Survivors include her husband of nine years, Frank Smith; daughters, Mary Branscomb of Vero Beach, Jennifer Branscomb of Union, S.C., Sarah Loveland of Jensen Beach, Grace Simonson of Sebastian and Jessi Dickerson of Vero Beach; son, Ted Dickerson of Indiana; sister, Melanie MacPherson of Fort Pierce; and four grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Treasure Coast Hospice, 1201 S.E. Indian St., Stuart, FL 34997. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com. Jane Ann Thaggard Jane Ann Thaggard, 49, died May 20, 2012. She was born in Winchester, Ky., and lived in Vero Beach for two years, coming from Cape Canaveral. She worked for Bonded Floors of Vero Beach as a sales specialist for three years and had worked in the industry for 25 years. Survivors include her husband, Dave Thaggard of Vero Beach; sister, Nancy England of Palm Bay; brother, William England of Arcadia; and mother and father-in-law, Claudia and Bob Thaggard of Melbourne. Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Indian River County, 6230 77th St., Vero Beach, FL 32967. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.


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Commercial real estate showing signs of life LISA RYMER

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Commercial real estate broker Billy Moss says he is in serious negotiations for a new tenant to take over the old Patio restaurant.

ing on a bank foreclosure of a commercial property. Although he has helped broker the sales of multiple businesses over the past year, this is the first real estate transaction in which he has been involved. “The biggest problem is banks are reluctant to loan money on commercial property – and nothing on land unless it’s owner occupied,” said Zimmerman. He claims community banks in particular are under pressure by the federal government, which has established guidelines limiting how many commercial loans a community bank can extend. At issue is the depreciation of property values. In the past, “commercial real estate projects have been financed by banks with balloon payment notes due five, seven or 10 years out at most,” said Zimmerman. Those old balloon payments comprise 90 to 95 percent of a property’s former value. Nowadays, “the banks are only writing balloon type loans for 60 to 65 percent of a property’s new value,” he said. And, to make things even more difficult, they can downgrade a loan at any time. By way of example, Zimmerman described a residential develop-

ment in Sebastian that is over 10 years old. “The developer was never late or missed a payment, but the bank downgraded the loan because the developer used a local contractor to lay the infrastructure,” said Zimmerman, explaining the developer was then forced to come up with the additional cash. To provide some relief, Zimmerman said state Senator Bill Posey has been working to get legislation passed that will control overregulation of community banks. “We make money by extending loans,” said Bill Penney, president of Marine Bank and Trust, a community bank in Vero Beach, which differs from a national bank in that it can customize its loan criteria on an individual basis. The current federal guidelines require that investor income properties be owner occupied. Nonetheless, Penney said the bank’s loan volume is down “because demand is low.” From his perspective, however, such soft demand is a matter of investor confidence. “Not much is happening until the European crisis subsides and the presidential election is over,” said Penney.

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national restaurant chains have been looking at Vero Beach,” said Moss, citing top numbers for this size market coming out of the local Olive Garden and Outback restaurants presenting an opportunity for competition. But even more uncommon in recent years are the plans Moss is facilitating to build a new structure from the ground up where the Vatland Honda dealership is currently located. The plan for that venture is to house a combination of retail shops and restaurants. “Nationally, people are spending more retail dollars, the banks are loosening up and there’s job growth,” said Moss, pointing to signs of increasing consumer confidence. Working with investors, Moss said he has a vision of “extending the beach,” to include Miracle Mile and the downtown business district. “Buy and hold positions are popular,” said Moss, “and many property owners are now willing to negotiate.” Still, ”it’s a cash is king market,” said Karl Zimmerman, a commercial real estate agent with Treasure Coast Sotheby’s International Real Estate. Zimmerman is currently work-

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- A new tenant for The Patio and a national restaurant chain at Vatland Honda on U.S. 1 may be indications that commercial real estate in Vero Beach is finally beginning to come back around. Five years into the recession, residential real estate sales are up triple digits over last year, including new home sales on the barrier island and in select communities on the mainland. And after years of looking at vacant buildings, empty car lots and desolate swaths of land stripped of trees without a house in sight -the commercial real estate market seems to be showing some signs of life. “Things are finally starting to percolate,” said Billy Moss, a commercial Realtor at Commercial Real Estate, LLC, with offices in Vero Beach, Stuart, Melbourne and Boca Raton. Moss specializes in hospitality, “one of the hottest areas in commercial real estate,” he said, but he deals in all aspects of the business, which encompasses vacant land, office/retail/industrial space and multi-family residential property. “As we speak, I’m negotiating a deal with a new tenant for The Patio restaurant that will bring it back to its glory days,” said Moss, who has 35 years in the restaurant business in Chicago, Las Vegas and Los Angeles, where he worked with Wolfgang Puck. Although not at liberty to divulge the new tenant’s identity yet, Moss has been working closely with the Sexton and Tripson families to fill the 5,000 square foot landmark eatery. “For the past six to eight months,


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Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – May 24-May 30

Address 2165 Galleon Dr., #G8

Subdivision Windward Condo

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1985 Mooringline Dr. Moorings 1/24/12 $2,000,000 5/29/12 $1,800,000 The Moorings Realty Sales Co. Erika Ross Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Connie Cederholm

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

910 Cove Pointe Pl. River Club 2/22/12 $995,000 5/29/12 $907,000 Palm Coast Rlty Treasure Coast Peter Orrick Palm Coast Rlty Treasure Coast Peter Orrick

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

2175 Windward Way Southwinds 1/20/12 $575,000 5/29/12 $550,000 The Moorings Realty Sales Co. Terri McConnell The Moorings Realty Sales Co. Judy Hargarten

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

9013 Somerset Bay Ln. Somerset Bay Condo 3/12/12 $525,000 5/29/12 $445,000 BREC Properties Inc. George Nagy Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Daniel Luce

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

2700 Ocean Dr., #201 Gables of Vero Beach 1/2/12 $379,000 5/24/12 $330,000 Boca Executive Realty, LLC Cheryl Goff Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl Claudia Pascal

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

705 Conn Way Bethel by the Sea 4/30/12 $299,000 5/24/12 $295,000 Norris & Company Bob Faller Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl Kelly Stubbs

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1415 Winding Oaks Cir. W Sea Oaks 2/13/12 $219,000 5/30/12 $179,500 North Beach Realty, Inc. Polly Miller Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Debbie Cleveland

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1527 Coral Oak Ln. Coralstone Condo 1/10/12 $189,000 5/30/12 $174,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Bobbie Holt Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Sam Robbins

List Date 10/6/10

List Price $178,900

Sell Date 5/25/12

Sell Price $164,000

Listing Broker/Agent The Moorings Realty Sales Co./Judy Hargarten

Selling Broker/Agent The Moorings Realty Sales Co./Daina Bertrand

Mainland Real Estate Sales – May 24-May 30

Address 5720 Corsica Pl.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

4600 2nd St. Indian River Farms 3/23/10 $795,000 5/24/12 $650,000 Norris & Company Jane Schwiering Norris & Company Jane Schwiering

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

2485 66th Ave. SW Indian River Farms 3/18/11 $498,990 5/30/12 $467,500 Re/Max Classic Kelly Fischer Daley & Company Real Estate Sally Daley

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1213 Riverwind Cir. Riverwind 9/27/11 $369,500 5/25/12 $350,000 Norris & Company Cheryl Burge Weichert, REALTORS Hallmark-VB Maxine Hazen

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

13890 Ruffner Ln. River Trees 9/21/11 $299,000 5/30/12 $260,000 Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl Mike Thorpe Real Living Realty Unlimited Fred Reichert

Subdivision Isles at Waterway Village

List Date 2/18/12

List Price $237,000

Sell Date 5/25/12

Sell Price $225,000

Listing Broker/Agent Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Sam Robbins

Selling Broker/Agent Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB/Vance Brinkerhoff


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