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Vero Heritage Inc. is finalist for historic preservation grant and needs your vote Local News Theatre Guild’s Genie Awards recognize talents, efforts of casts and crews Arts | Entertainment

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Rip currents, heat pose danger Water is deepest concern for Commissioner Solari News

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 Lifeguards urge caution this summerNews

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Local News

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presence locally as it expands its business nationally and internationally,” said company president Mark Feurer. “Our office, along with county staff, have been working with company representatives the past several months,” Caseltine said. “This is a perfect example of how our business retention and expansion efforts can benefit the county and its residents.” The recent success of the jobs grant program is another example of how the county has worked to improve on an image it had once developed of not being business friendly and more interested in maintaining the status quo than expanding its economic base.

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initiative to change it and make it much more user friendly. As a result we have seen a number of local companies and new companies that we have recruited use the program.” The latest company to take advantage of the program was Communications International, Inc., a telecommunications firm providing technology and management services, which announced plans this month to add 12 new positions at its Vero Beach headquarters, at an average annual wage of $55,000. “Communications International has enjoyed growing its business in Indian River County for over 35 years and looks forward to continue growing its

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After undergoing a facelift a few years ago the moribund Jobs Grant Program has started to work for Indian River County. The program provides cash payments to companies that either expand or locate their businesses in the county and create a minimum of five jobs that pay at least 75 percent of the county average annual wage of $34,730. Over the last two years the program is expected to have generated 291 current or future jobs for a $1.6 million payout. The companies that have participated thus far are SpectorSoft, OcuCue, eMindful, INEOS/

New Planet BioEnergy, AlgaGen, NetBoss Technologies and Communications International. Due to the economic downturn some of these companies have not met all their hiring targets. However, much of the hiring is done in phases and the employers can still make up for a missed target with more hiring in a different phase of the program. “The jobs grant program has been in existence for a number of years,” said Helene Caseltine, the Chamber’s Economic Development Director. “It wasn’t as user friendly as it is now. There was a lot of if this, then that and a lot of caveats, so it really didn’t get much use. Commissioner Peter O’Bryan took the

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BY IAN LOVE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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County jobs program proving a boon to business


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LOCAL NEWS

COUNTY JOBS FROM PAGE 3

“Economist Bill Fruth recently told community leaders of the importance of not only attracting new businesses, but to make sure that you support existing businesses,” OBryan said. “I believe that this shows the county is committed to supporting local businesses and helping them grow in a business friendly environment. So whether it’s a new business re-locating, or an existing business looking to expand, Indian River County stands ready to help make your business a success.” Caseltine said that before the O’Bryan changes to simplify the requirements and streamline the payments, almost no businesses even bothered to sign up for the grant. “There was a whole list of options and it just became very burdensome for a company to apply and to meet the criteria and parameters of the program.” she said. “That is why most companies didn’t apply, because it

was so burdensome to walk through.” The money is paid out of the county’s general fund and is an actual check written back to the company. For jobs that pay 75 percent of the county’s average $34,730 annual wage, the company will receive payment of $3,000 per employee. For matching the average salary the company receives $5,000 per employee and for salaries over 150 percent the county pays $7,000 per employee. The payments are stretched out over a three-year period. There has been criticism in some quarters that the county should not be paying for companies to hire employees. Peter Robinson, who is on the Board of Directors of the Indian River County Chamber of Commerce, says that is simply being short-sighted. “My great grandfather opened a paper plant in North Carolina in 1907,” he said. “When he did he asked for an abeyance for real estate taxes for 20 years. That plant is still open and

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2010-2011 JOB GRANT APPROVALS NEW JOBS ANTICIPATED/CREATED

AMOUNT

INEOS/New Planet

55

$310,000

AlgaGen (expansion)

10

$36,000

NetBoss Technologies

57

$363,000

Communications Int’l (expansion)

12

$68,000

134

$777,000

COMPANY

TOTAL

Source: Indian River County Chamber of Commerce

employs 1,200 people. In the long run it has paid back that tax break by ten fold. Overall it will help us reduce the residential taxes if we can build up a broad base from business taxes.” The program is also centered on targeted industries to build the county’s economic base. Among those industries are clean energy; life sciences; information technology; aviation/ aerospace; emerging technologies; financial/professional services; arts, entertainment, Recreation; and manufacturing/warehouse/distribution. Indian River budget director Jason Brown said the county is just beginning to start to cut checks to the new wave of companies that have qualified for the program. “The grants are approved (by the County Commission) up front based on a certain number of jobs, but then they must document that those jobs were filled and approved,” Brown said. Companies must file quarterly unemployment insurance reports that the county uses to verify that the anticipated hiring has taken place and at the wage the company specified on its application. Caseltine said that is an important feature of the program -- the fact it is performance based. The companies must prove the jobs have been filled at the promised wages before any money changes hand from the county to private industry. “The money is paid out over a period of time and is phased in as the company does the hiring,” she said. “The county looks at it by phase and each phase of their hiring gets paid

out over three years.” She also mentioned that the jobs program serves as a matching grant the county would likely have to pay anyways for a state program that offers the same benefits. “Our program actually mirrors a program the state has called the “Qualified Target Industry Tax Refund Program,” she said. “The state program typically requires a 20 percent match from local government. Our program can be used as that local match.” Stuart Woodward, President of OcuCue, an Internet based technology company involved with visual analytics, said his company has not filled all the positions it had anticipated when applying for the grant due to the economic slowdown. “If you don’t hit your numbers you can’t take all the money off the table,” he said. “We will receive some payments under the program.” Nonetheless, he says it is a nice incentive for start-up businesses. “It is an attractive boost to a company in the early stage of its development,” he said. “I think it is also good that it is available to companies that are here and want to grow and to companies thinking about moving here.” And it is just that type of businessfriendly relationship that the Jobs Grant Program helps to engender. “Businesses can go anywhere they like,” Peter Robinson said. “Part of what the program does is keep us competitive and it does not cost a lot of money. It helps us get the message out that we appreciate their business and we want them here.”


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Bob Solari knows ‘River’ is our middle name

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STAFF PHOTOS

Indian River County Commission Chairman Bob Solari.

BY MICHAEL CROOK VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Bob Solari will tell you bluntly that he just can’t be an expert on every issue that faces the people of Indian River County. In his office at the County Administration Building, the chairman of the County Commission wonders if he can put his hand on an organization chart to demonstrate his point. Of course he can; in a small library of identical loose-leaf binders, he spins his chair and finds the right one. And he shows a chart of 53 parts. “Fifty-three,” he says emphatically. “There is no possible way I can be an expert on all these areas.” He’s chosen water – all things water, from your kitchen tap to the sewer plants to the Indian River Lagoon and even the ocean strand – for his most intensive study, influence and stewardship.

In a mere hour with Vero Beach Newsweekly, Solari showed a farreaching and detailed grasp of the challenges we face in guarding our water supply, our beloved Indian River and the gorgeous beaches for which we are best known. “Water’s probably, that single topic, is the one I spend the most time on,” Solar said. “And it’s one of the reasons I wanted to get on the County Commission. Water is obviously a crucial resource not only for Indian River County but for everybody in the world. There are some incredibly interesting issues in that. My initial focus was the Indian River Lagoon.” INDIAN RIVER LAGOON What does Solari want? “I want the Lagoon cleaned up,” he said, simple and declarative. CONTINUES ON PAGE 6

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Vero Heritage Inc. needs votes in‘This Place Matters’challenge

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LOCAL NEWS

PROVIDED BY VERO HERITAGE

Sailors from the Naval Air Station came to dances at the center in wartime. VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The sum of $25,000 may not seem like much when you stack it up against 76 years of Vero Beach heritage. To the Heritage Center, though, it could mean new windows, electrical

and plumbing replacements, kitchen updates. In short, the kind of work any decades-old house might need. Fortunately, Vero Heritage, Inc. has been chosen as one of 100 finalists in the National Trust for Historic Pres-

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STAFF / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Vero Heritage Center in historic downtown Vero Beach. ervation’s 2011 “This Place Matters Community Challenge.” Should Vero Heritage Inc., which operates and cares for the Heritage Center, receive the highest number of votes from individual supporters, it would receive a first-place $25,000 cash prize to be used to fund maintenance and upkeep of the Heritage Center and the Indian River Citrus Museum. Built in 1935 as the original Community Building, the Heritage Center is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a vital link to the history of our community. It continues to be a center of activity for the community, hosting lots of public and private events including weddings, meetings and dances as well as the Hibiscus Festival and other public events. The original Community Building, now the Heritage Center in Pocahontas Park, was first begun in 1925. The park was deeded to the city in 1921 by the Indian River Farms Corp., which developed the downtown and outlying areas.  The park had a small zoo, a circular wading pool and playground equipment for children.  The park was an important part of the early downtown, an area where everyone came to meet. By 1934 the town’s growth made a meeting place for tourists and local clubs a necessity. The design became a reality in 1935 and with the aid of

federal funds the Community Building was completed in April of that year. World War II brought a Naval Air Station to Vero Beach and service personnel needed a place to meet. The north wing was added in 1943 to provide a lounge and service center for the base. Today that wing is the Indian River Citrus Museum. It’s open Tuesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. To 4 p.m., showcasing art and artifacts from the industry so closely identified with Indian River County since its first homesteads were planted. In 1991, when officials starting talking about demolishing the building, Vero Heritage, Inc. was formed to restore and maintain this historic structure for community use.  It was renovated and put back into use in 1992 and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993. Voting started June 1 and concludes on June 30. Votes can be cast by going to www.preservationnation.org/take-action/this-placematters/community-challenge/.  You can also vote via the Vero Heritage webpage at www.veroheritage.org or on Facebook at Vero Heritage, Inc. Vero Heritage operates through memberships, fundraising, building rentals and grants.  For more information, please call 772-770-2263 or e-mail at veroheritage@bellsouth.net.


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LOCAL NEWS

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Here’s how to spot them: • Change in water color from surrounding water (either murkier from sediments, seaweed, and flotsam, or darker because of the depth of the underwater channel where the rip flows) • Gap in the breaking waves, where the rip is forcing its way seaward through the surf zone • Agitated (choppy) surface that extends beyond the breaker zone.

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The most prolific predator stalking the shoals along Indian River County beaches has no teeth, no fins, no venom, and wears a clever disguise: water. “Rip currents are what’s killing us,” said Rory Hanna, a lifeguard and emergency medical technician with Indian River County Ocean Rescue, stationed last week at Golden Sands Beach Park. The Indian River County Recreation Department, and its counterpart in the city of Vero Beach, provide trained, certified water safety personnel at certain city and county beaches. “Just last week I pulled an 8-yearold kid out of a rip current right over there,” he said, gesturing northward where, from the lifeguard tower, a rip current was still in place, sucking sea water away from the beach, roiling the sand and giving it a distinct brownish color in contrast to the small waves and calm blue water around it. “Lots of people out there just don’t get it,” Hanna said. “It should be a state law that you learn how to swim.” The last known fatal shark attack in Vero Beach started with a rip current and a little boy near the pier at Jaycee Beach in 1999. The boy was sucked into a rip current and pulled into deeper water where, tragically, a tiger shark killed him. “We think the shark went for him because he was panicking, thrashing,” Hanna said. Local beaches aren’t notorious for shark sightings or attacks – not like New Smyrna Beach, for example – though April was an active month as the ancient eating machines followed schools of baitfish. Lifeguards will order everyone out of the water for 30 minutes after spotting a shark. There’s another silent killer stalking

the Atlantic beaches of Indian River County from Sebastian Inlet to the southern county line: The sun. Heat exhaustion, dehydration, even heart attacks have been documented on the barrier island, all due to overexposure to the summer sun and scorching heat, lifeguards said. If you think about it, the beach is more like a desert than a playground. If we lived on the edge of the Mojave Desert, would we consider putting on a swimsuit and taking a big towel to lay in the sun for four to six hours, surrounded by cacti? No shade, no fresh water? That’d be crazy. Yet thousands of denizens of airconditioned homes and offices – and northern climates – come to the beach and do just that, lulled into complacency by so much water. Their skin burns, their respiratory systems are taxed, and sometimes their hearts fail. “Drink lots of fluids, put on lots of sunscreen and swim near a lifeguard,” advised John Frazier, county Ocean Rescue’s head captain. But by far, rip currents are the most consistent problem faced by area beach-goers. Rip currents are powerful currents of water moving away from shore, capable of sweeping even the strongest swimmers out to sea and are often called “killer currents” for a good reason. Although estimates vary, rip currents are responsible for approximately 150 deaths every year and probably thousands worldwide.

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BY MICHAEL CROOK VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Silent predators stalk Indian River County beachgoers

STAFF / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

• Floating objects moving steadily seaward • Temperature of water--water in the rip may be colder than surrounding water. Rip current speeds vary. Average speeds are 1-2 feet per second, but they have been measured as fast as 8 feet per second—faster than an Olympic swimmer. Rip currents can be very narrow or more than 50 yards wide. Sometimes rip currents end just beyond the line of breaking waves; however, they may continue to pull hundreds of yards offshore. Rip currents do not pull people under the water— they pull people away from shore.

Safety tips • Know how to swim.

• Never swim alone. • For maximum safety, swim near a lifeguard. • Obey all instructions and orders from lifeguards. • Be cautious at all times. • If in doubt, don’t go out!

For more information about rip currents: • Before you leave for the beach, check the latest National Weather Service forecast for local beach conditions. Many offices issue a Surf Zone Forecast. • When you arrive at the beach, ask on-duty lifeguards about rip currents and any other hazards that may be present. • More information about rip currents can be found at www. ripcurrents.com.


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Community Forum Families use Community Foundation to manage charity gifts BY BECKY ALLEN INDIAN RIVER COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

It was the cocktail chatter heard round the world last year. Twelve of the nation’s leading billionaires invited to dinner by Warren Buffett and Bill and Melinda Gates. The question: will each of their guests sign The Giving Pledge? Devised by Buffett and Gates, The Giving Pledge is an effort to invite America’s wealthiest individuals and families to commit to giving the majority of their wealth to philanthropy. They started with 40 billionaires and as of April, the number has grown to 69. “At its core, the Giving Pledge is about asking wealthy families to have important conversations about their wealth and how it will be used,” said Warren Buffett. Good advice for everyone, not just the wealthy. Philanthropy is an American tradition, rooted in our individual freedom to support the causes we care about most deeply and passionately. However, you don’t have to be a billionaire, or even a millionaire, to experience the joy of giving. Not long after the infamous dinner party, a New York foundation took out a full page ad in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal asking the

question, “Why let the billionaires have all the fun?” Anyone with the desire to make our community stronger, to impact societal problems or to leave a legacy after can accomplish their goals BECKY ALLEN through the Indian River Community Foundation. While the mega-rich are signing The Giving Pledge, locally 43 individuals and families are using donor advised funds at the Indian River Community Foundation to support their favorite charitable causes at their own pace. In many ways, a donor advised fund is like a private foundation, but without the IRS regulations, requirements and expense. The Indian River Community Foundation is an established 501c3 public charity, so all contributions are fully tax deductible at the time of the gift. Once established, the donor may make charitable contributions from the fund with no annual requirement and anonymously if they choose. Recently, eight local philanthropists who utilize the Indian River Community Foundation joined together to

“Doing good by doing right.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island.

fund a competitive grant process for local programs that address the root causes of time-sensitive community issues. Although each contributor is an established philanthropist in their own right, they all expressed a desire for stronger reporting on the impact of their philanthropy. One philanthropist, who previously used a family foundation, said the comprehensive grant reports provided by the Community Foundation staff gave him an effective tool to measure the value of his charitable investment. For those looking beyond immediate charitable giving, earlier this year, the Indian River Community Foundation launched the Alma Lee Loy Legacy Society, named after one of the community’s most cherished leaders. The society is made up of people, like Ms. Loy, who are relying on the Community Foundation to execute their charitable wishes after their death, no matter how specific or general those wishes may be. There are now more than 770 community foundations throughout the United States, which administer approximately $31 billion dollars in charitable funds. The Indian River Community Foundation is proud to be among this stellar group of nonprofit organi-

zations, representing one of the fastestgrowing forms of philanthropy in the United States. So if your last name is Buffet or Gates, please sign The Giving Pledge… our world needs more philanthropists like you. For everyone else, consider the Indian River Community Foundation, where The Giving Pledge is welcome but not necessary to reap the joy of philanthropic giving. Becky Allen is the Chairman of the Indian River Community Foundation and a former banking executive. She may be contacted through the Indian River Community Foundation by calling (772) 492-1407.

LETTERS WELCOME Vero Beach Newsweekly invites you to send Letters to the Editor on topics of interest pertaining to Indian River County. Letters should be 250-300 words and may be edited for length. We encourage an open dialogue, but reserve the right to refuse publication of letters that do not meet our editorial standards. E-mails may be sent to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com or by regular mail to Letter to the Editor, Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. 1, Vero Beach, FL 32960.

Mark Schumann Publisher 978-2246 mark.schumann@scripps.com

Martine Fecteau Account Executive 696-2004 martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com

Michael Crook Managing Editor 978-2238 michael.crook@scripps.com

Carrie Scent Graphic Designer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Ian Love Lead Writer 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com

Marsha Damerow Graphic Designer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Highway 1, Vero Beach, Florida, 32960 To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004, or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233.


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COMMUNITY FORUM

day, I will gaze up at the puffy, welcoming clouds overhead, and marvel at their infinite patterns and colors. And early evening commutes home on my bicycle often allow me to study the sky at sunset, as the whole Florida landscape is wrapped in wild hues of pink, orange and red. Yes, I know, we do not have a lot of varied or dramatic or soaring landscape here in Florida. But we sure do have skies…glorious skies which fill the eyes with magic. If you are not regularly looking up, and paying attention to the skies, you are missing one of the unique joys of living in this part of the world.

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experienced since moving here. Yes, we may not have a lot of mountains and rolling hills to titillate and please our eyes, but we sure have wonderful skies around these parts, made rich and fascinating by the ever-changeable clouds that are usually in motion overhead. One of my everyday mindfulness practices -- since moving here -- is pausing outdoors several times during the day and just study the changeable skies.  Early in the morning, I love watching the sun rise out of the Atlantic (usually hot red, interspersed with dark clouds) as I nurse my first cup of coffee.  Often during the mid-

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“Mount Trashmore,” which soars a towering 143 feet above sea level! While some might find this local lack of geographic elevation regrettable and boring, I have come to ap- REVERAND preciate that this SCOTT ALEXANDER flatness highlights the wonderful and varied skies and clouds we have here in the Sunshine State. I have never seen more beautiful skies – including remarkable sunrises -- and sunsets than I have

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As a relative newcomer to Florida – I moved here from Washington last August -- one of the things that has struck me as a newcomer is how profoundly flat the landscape is! In fact, when I did a Google search about points of elevation here in Florida, I discovered that the highest point in the entire state is a state park place called Britton Hill up in the Panhandle, which achieves an elevation of 345 feet above sea level. Down here in Southern Florida it seems that the highest point is a landfill site in southern Dade County, affectionately called by the locals

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REV. SCOTT W. ALEXANDER

Here we go again: ready, fire, aim MARK SCHUMANN VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Wanting a break from the monotonous view of the Interstate, a lone traveler chose as an alternate route, a country road that wound through beautiful farm country. About twenty miles after leaving the main highway, he noticed a sign that read, “Country Store Dead Ahead.” Thirsty for coffee and low on gas, he stopped. Pulling into the parking lot, he noticed that on each fence post in front of the store was a small sign, and on each sign was painted a target, and in the center of each target was a bullet hole. Near the store stood a dilapidated barn, its old, rotting wood bare except for several dozen bright red circles, each about six inches in diameter, and each with a bullet hole in the center. “Someone around here is a pretty good shot,” the traveler said as he stepped into the store. The man standing behind the counter identified himself as the marksman. “Yes sir, that’s my shooting,” the clerk said proudly. “How do you get a bull’s-eye every time you shoot,” the traveler asked?

Smiling ever so slightly, the clerk leaned forward and said, almost in a whisper, “It’s easy. First I shoot, and then I draw the target.” I was remembering this story as Vero Beach’s water and sewer director presented his report projecting that the city can reasonably expect to operate more profitably with a smaller customer base. This may be a convenient target to draw, if one first concludes that the city’s priority should be to maintain its utility franchises. And this might be a tempting argument to make if one’s job depends on preserving the city’s ownership of a utility that has for decades subsidized the city’s operating budget, but is now only be able to do so by charging artificially high rates. At the same time, some activists seem dead set on getting the city out of the water and sewer businesses, and are impatient to see the city accept the county’s initial offer. In their minds all competing arguments melt before the searing heat of their fiery logic. They, too, are shooting first and then drawing their target. Richard Winger’s presentation at

last week’s marathon city council meeting raised a number of questions the council would do well to consider carefully before they agree to accept the county’s offer of simply assuming the city’s debt, and paying the cost to connect the city’s system to the county’s system. Winger, vice chairman of the Vero Beach City Council’s Finance Committee, carefully and methodically laid out a compelling rationale for slowing down the process long enough to more fully consider the value of the city’s water and sewer system. In Winger’s view, the county’s initial offer is “a very bad deal.” Clearly there is a growing consensus the city would be wise to sell its electric utility to FPL, so long as FPL does not insist on acquiring the assets at a fire-sale price. Such a consensus to sell the city’s water and sewer system does not yet exist. As a preface to “The Big Short,” Michael Lewis offers this quote from Leo Tolstoy: “The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the sim-

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Our flat terrain accentuates soaring skies

plest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of a doubt, what is laid before him.” If consensus is to be built, if reason is to prevail, it is time to stop shooting down arguments before they have at least been given due consideration. It is time to engage in less advocacy and more inquiry. Everyone involved in the debate, elected officials, activists, staff, and consultants, would do well to remember that the human mind is much like a parachute, in that it works best when it is open.

THOUGHT TO CONSIDER “Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance.” George Bernard Shaw


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r:=KDO== Developer turning U.S. 1 corridor into entertainment hot spot BY IAN LOVE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Michael Rechter’s vision is starting to take shape to turn the Majestic and Indian River plazas into the entertainment place to be in Vero Beach. Rechter has been hard at work on the U.S. 1 properties he purchased for a total of $18 million after the 2005 hurricanes all but left the once valuable real estate an unattractive, lifeless collection of businesses. He has just completed the first phase of his plans, turning the Majestic Movie Theatre into an upscale attraction with offerings from new Hollywood releases to video performances from New York City’s Metropolitan Opera and plays from The National Theatre in Washington, D.C. He has also turned the Vero Bowl into a state-of-the art bowling center with a $2.5 million upgrade he undertook himself when he could not get the previous owner to do what Rechter considered the right thing. The Vero Bowl renovation earned Rechter a front page spread in the trade magazine International Bowling Industry. The story by Robin Breuner starts out: “Vero Bowl is a Cinderella story. The rundown, neglected, diamond-in-the-rough bowling center meets Prince Charming and is magically transformed.” The bowling center has become Rechter’s vision of an entertainment center that attracts leagues and families, but also appeals to a wider crowd with a bustling sports bar and restaurant quality food that you would never find in the bowling alleys you frequented as a child. Rechter will cap his Vero Bowl

STAFF PHOTO

The future home of Izzyban, an Asian fusion restaurant that developer Michael Rechter says will be “like nothing Vero has ever seen.” renovation with the opening soon of a video arcade connected with the bowling alley that will attract young and old alike. “It is going to be gorgeous,” Rechter said. “It will have all the state of the art games, but it will also have things like skeeball. It will appeal to kids of all ages.” With much of phase one of his development plan complete with the very successful launches of the bowling alley and theatre, Rechter is turning his attention to the development of the side-by-side properties as the date night entertainment hot spot in Indian River County. “What I see is a place that is welllit and secure at night and safe and has different options for people to choose from so you can take your wife out or your children and there are a variety of things to do that are quality destinations,” he said. “If you have the horizon of a year or

two, someone will be able to turn into that parking lot, park their car and do many different things, whether it be to play pool, go see a movie, go bowling, have a cocktail, or have a nice dinner with a choice of multiple locations. That to me is the beginning of a great entertainment destination for Vero Beach.” Work is underway for an upscale billiards club expected to open by the third quarter and Rechter said he has held initial talks for bringing in a family-fun indoor inflatable party play center. What really has Rechter excited at the moment is the planned opening by Labor Day of the Asian fusion restaurant Izziban in a strip just to the south of the bowling alley. Chef Diane Lee owns another Izziban in Orlando which former Orlando Sentinel food critic Scott Joseph has called his favorite sushi restaurant in central Florida. “I am so pumped up about this

place,” Rechter said. “It is going to be a state of the art sushi bar, like nothing Vero has ever seen. There will be a very trendy interior with a very modern floor plan. There will be a section for booths and between them will be these panels and there will be water flowing and LED lights. It creates a very cool, modern feel.” Owner-Chef Diane Lee said the Vero Beach location came to her in a dream. Her brother lives in Sebastian and was helping her scout places to open another Izziban in Indian River County. She awoke from a dream one night and had a vision of a place next to a movie theatre and told her brother to go find it. As he was more familiar with Sebastian he was unable to locate the spot until a few weeks later when he happened by the Majestic Theatre and saw the work being done on the Plaza. Rechter had been plan-


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ning for a restaurant in that spot and said once Diane Lee visited the location it was the easiest lease he has ever negotiated. Izziban will feature an extensive Sake list and a unique menu of Asian inspired dishes mixed with other types of cuisine. They will also offer a tabletop barbecue menu where customers order their meat and other dishes and cook the food themselves. “It is a very social thing, people can share whatever meat or vegetable they want,” said Izziban general manager Daniel Moon. “The server will show them how if they have never done it before.” For Rechter, attracting such a high-quality tenant is vindication of his vision and another step in his ultimate plan. He so firmly believed his plan, he was ready to take on the restaurant himself if he couldn’t find the right tenant. “I said to myself this location is getting better, it is by itself not great, but then we started getting success with the Majestic and the Vero Bowl,” he said. “Since I was doing all the work myself anyways, I had it all set to go regardless if a tenant stepped into the picture or not. I didn’t realize acquiring a tenant would happen just as I was starting to pound my first nail. “In terms of timing, Game Zone is set to open mid-June. Izziban we expect to open no later than Labor Day and the billiard club will be right behind that, so by October 1st this whole corner will be rocking.” Rechter is also working on plans to spruce up the Indian River Plaza, also known as the K-Mart Center. He is considering a mix of tenants that will include upper-end and casual restaurants. “We intend to raze the old Denny’s and replace it with a new building. It will be broken into four spaces facing U.S. 1 and four facing inward,” he said. “I am talking with a concept called Jimmy John’s, a gourmet sub place, they have about 3,000 locations. Chipotle Mexican

PHOTO BY M. JAMES NORTHEN

Vero Bowl has recently undergone a $2.5 million facelift into a state-of-the-art facility.

Grill is looking to come to Vero and that corner would be perfect for them. We are just in talks, nothing is signed yet. We also haven’t gotten

a yea or nay yet from P.F. Chang’s, they have a casual dining concept called Pei Way. “In the next three or four years,

you will see all this. You will see great restaurants, upscale, downscale casual dining, a full range of dining options.”

Casual seafood restaurant to open at former Stax location VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

A July 15 opening is planned for the Fishack, a casual seafood restaurant at 1931 Old Dixie Highway, which most recently was the home of Stax. The business is owned by Ethan Weiss, who along with his father, Mitchell, will operate the restaurant. The Weiss family also owns Pizzooddle’s, which will continue under the direction of Jo Ann Weiss and chil-

dren Alex and Alissa. Work is still underway at the Fishack adding a nautical décor to the premises with a strong emphasis on casual. Jo Ann Weiss said the place will have a “beachy,” tiki bar feel to it. The menu will feature fried fish platters, fish tacos, fish sandwiches, New England fried clams, lobster and lobster salads.

When it is fully operational, the Fishack will be open seven days a week for lunch and dinner and will host a Sunday brunch as well. For those looking for late night entertainment there will be offerings of beach and reggae music. “It will be the kind of place where people can come and hang out,” Jo Anne Weiss said. “This will be the casual spot to eat seafood.”


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Active Life

Keeping that resolution to keep going to the gym STAFF PHOTO

Varying your exercise routine can help in maintaining your commitment to the gym once the motivation begins to wear off. SIOBHAN FITZPATRICK FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

This past January, Margaret Reynolds made her New Year’s resolution a goal that many of us share -- to get in shape. At 47, Reynolds wanted to do more cardiovascular and weight training exercises to build her upper body and arms. But unlike many of us, Reynolds actually kept her resolution. “I always keep my goals,” said Reynolds, who has been a regular the last eight years at the mainland gym, the Jungle Club. Since we all know the importance of a healthy lifestyle, why do so many of us end up not keeping our New Year’s resolutions to stay fit? “The main reason people give up is either they don’t get results fast enough to stay motivated or they do something wrong and hurt themselves, “ said Phil Raschko, a personal

trainer at the Jungle Club. The best way to stick to your New Year’s resolution is to hire a personal trainer because they’re “more likely to help you get results fast enough and will keep you motivated – safely,” said Raschko. Yet there are those people, like Margaret Reynolds who works out on her own, and has kept her New Year’s quest to get in shape. On a typical day, Reynolds does approximately 50 minutes of cardio on an elliptical exercise machine and then about a half hour of work focusing on her abdominal, waist, legs and upper body using mats and free weights. Reynolds, a sales rep for a wholesale gift company, must maintain erratic work hours and says she joined the Jungle Club because of its flexible schedule. “Other gyms close earlier,” she said. “At the Jungle Club I can come any-

time. And the gym is always nice and clean, including the locker room, which is very important to me.” Reynolds’ work schedule requires that she travel and because she is sticking to her get-in-shape resolution, she has developed the mindset that she is missing out when she can’t make it to the gym. “When I’m on location and cannot work out, I am miserable. I feel a zillion times better when I workout,” she said. As is the case with Reynolds, exercise is extremely important to Kathleen McLaughlin, who moved to Vero Beach in November. At the recommendation of her sister, who has lived in Vero for over 40 years, McLaughlin joined Longevity Fitness Club and Spa. McLaughlin was a caretaker for her ailing mother in New Jersey who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease.

When McLaughlin’s mother passed away, she decided to take a leap of faith and move to Vero and look for a new house, job, and gym. She too used New Year’s to help focus on her desire to get in better shape. ”My goal was to try and become healthy and lose weight now. So far, I’ve lost 31 pounds,” said the 65-year– old McLaughlin. McLaughlin, who arrived in Vero Beach eight months ago, loves her newly adopted home. She has already found a new house and job (as a health assistant) and has also become a colossal fan of Longevity and its coaches. “One instructor, Maria, taught me that I should not workout my entire body all at once,” she said. “Instead, she recommends that I work on my upper body one day, and lower body the next to give my muscles a rest. This has made working out so much more enjoyable, and more effective.”


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Ellen Deschatres, a self-employed artist, is another fitness enthusiast. She moved to the area from St. Louis nearly a year ago. At the suggestion of a friend, she joined the Jungle Club to accommodate her goal of staying in shape. “When I visited the Jungle Club I felt it had everything I had wanted, including a full range of activities, classes, resistance-weight machines and free weights,” Deschatres said. She has recently become a faithful follower of the Jungle Club’s aquatics program, which is spearheaded by a relatively new instructor, Greg Sarbak. “Greg is not only a phenomenal instructor but a coach in the most profound sense of word,” she said. “He can have six different people in the pool and from the time you go from one end of the pool to the other he would have discovered six different things for these six different people that need to be corrected. “People don’t think of swimming as a big workout, but it’s challenging. I was a spinner for years and even it taught it, but aquatics gives workout a that I wouldn’t have gotten from spinning.” Having the flexibility to choose from aquatic classes to Zumba to the StairMaster is precisely the kind of diversity that makes the Jungle Club so great, says Katie Smith, General Manager of the Jungle Club. “It’s important to change your routine up a bit to get variety and keep it interesting,” Smith said, noting that exercise is not merely for the body, but for keeping a positive state of mind. Deschatres agrees that staying positive is an important factor in getting in shaping and sticking to those promises we make to ourselves to live a healthier lifestyle. “Mentally and physically. I think exercise brings all those physiological benefits that we are aware of,” she said. “It’s a personal thing for each one of us. For me, it’s physiological, emotional and takes the edge off of everything. It relieves stress, and sets me right away for the rest of the day. The myth that as you get older that you have to take it easy, well that is bunk.”

Jungle Club trainer Dede Snipes works with Lisa Smith.

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Indian River Galley MT’S Chop House is best‘special occasion’restaurant NICK THOMAS

On June 3, the evening before my daughter graduated from Vero High, I took her on a “date” to MT’s Chop House on Vero’s South NICK THOMAS Beach. Good choice. MT’s, to my mind, is the best “Special Occasion” restaurant in town. It has all the elements of a “fancy” American restaurant – an attractive young hostess greets you at the door and, menus in hand, shows you to your table, through a dimly lit, quiet dining room done up in leather and wood and hues of tobacco brown. Then you’re seated in a private booth with upholstered, highbacked benches and a high side wall, the table dressed with crisp linen and sparkling stemware. Being the silly people we are, Grace and I enjoyed opening the menus to find that they are self-illuminating. Before we even began to read, and before our server arrived, we played around with the menus – open, close, open, close; wear it like a hat; compete to see who could open their menu the least and still have it light up. By the time our server showed and I ordered a Manhattan (rye whiskey, sweet vermouth, bitters), my standard fancy-restaurant cocktail, we were settled in and having fun, talking about our upcoming summer trip to, well, Manhattan. Turning to the menu, we cooked up our plan. Knowing dad would order steak, Grace settled on the Colossal Diver Scallops, with “Comfort

Sides” of Sautéed Forest Mushrooms and Roasted Garlic Whipped Potato. Not exactly a combination a chef might come up with, but the girl likes what she likes. For my part, I figured if I was going to eat a steak, I might as well go for the gold -- the 22-ounce Prime Cowboy Bone-In Ribeye, with sides of Mac and Four Cheeses with Truffle Oil and Grilled Asparagus with Béarnaise sauce (cleverly reasoning I could use some of the sauce on my steak). Regarding my date’s meal, her scallops were large and flawless, lightly seared on the outside and the perfect warm opalescent on the inside. Tender in the extreme, they were made that much better by the orange/ginger buerre blanc. Her sides were just fine as well, with the mushrooms sautéed down to a correct meaty texture, and the whipped potatoes warm and smooth. While I doubt any of the mushrooms had ever seen a “forest,” I don’t mind a bit of puffery if I don’t feel I’m being purposefully misled. As for my meal, the asparagus was very nice -- lightly grilled, perhaps even pre-blanched to achieve a perfect texture to my taste. The Béarnaise was authentic, eggy, yummy. The Mac and Cheese, however, was served at near room temperature, and while I could see what they were going for, it didn’t really hit the mark. As a pasta purist, I don’t really consider “penne” to be the best choice for this application. It’s too firm to meld into a dish that, ideally, has a unified casserole texture. Finally, my Cowboy Ribeye. Served on a warmed white rectangular plate, it was a vision of perfection – an even char, an ideal medium pink inside, and perfumed with wood

smoke made all the more appealing by the fact that you could not otherwise smell the smoke in the restaurant. My only gripe is that, at $52, the steak itself wasn’t all I was hoping for. It wasn’t dry aged, so it didn’t have that unctuous, concentrated, almost-round-the-bend flavor of the very best steaks. And even considering that it was wet aged, I didn’t get that “Prime” vibe off of it. It wasn’t as “marbled” as I might have hoped for; and after all, that’s why you order

a rib steak. You want that delicious fat. So as long as you understand going in that MT’s Chop House is not a “steak house” in the manner of Peter Lugar’s of New York, The Capital Grille in DC, or Bern’s in Tampa, every time you visit will be a special occasion. Nick Thomas is a lawyer and certified family mediator. Reach him at nthomaslaw@comcast.net.

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Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – June 2-June 8 Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

470 Arrowhead Trail Indian Trails 11/12/2010 $725,000 6/3/2011 $650,000 Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

4605 Sunset Drive Bethel Isle 1/28/2011 $675,000 6/8/2011 $575,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Alex MacWilliam, Inc.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

945 Riomar Drive Riomar 4/22/2011 $620,000 6/2/2011 $565,000 Cliff Norris Real Estate Cliff Norris Real Estate

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

3325 110th Place Wabasso Estates 7/12/2010 $349,500 6/3/2011 $325,000 Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

525 Flamevine Lane River Oaks Estates 11/5/2010 $250,000 6/3/2011 $215,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

1155 Reef Road #C7 Windward Condo 12/1/2010 $199,000 6/8/2011 $175,000 The Moorings Realty Sales Co. Billero & Billero Properties

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

3275 74th Street Copeland’s Landing 4/5/2011 $250,000 6/2/2011 $230,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Real Living Realty Unlimited

Mainland Real Estate Sales – June 2-June 8 Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker: Address 511 Calamondin Way SW

Subdivision Citrus Springs Village

4025 Chardonnay Place SW The Vineyard 6/3/2011 $280,000 6/3/2011 $280,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. List Date 2/14/2011

List Price $209,900

Sell Date 6/6/2011

Sell Price $204,900

Listing Broker Laurel Agency, Inc.

Selling Broker Laurel Agency

Reach the island and beyond Advertise your business to every home on the barrier island, and to communities such as Vero Isles, River Wind, Oak Harbor, Grand Harbor, and the Vero Beach Country Club.

The Vero Beach Newsweekly gives you the barrier island and more.

To learn more, call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233.


SOLARI FROM PAGE 5

Then he explained. “To me, the best way to clean it up in addition to the other measures (already in place) is to have substantial reservoirs to the west. And so you take that, a large portion of that 96 million gallons a day (that pour into the Lagoon from three major canals trisecting the

county) and instead you put them into large reservoirs to the west and maybe you have one or two algal mats, scrubbers and a series of ponds, With the reservoirs, now you have a source of surficial water for drinking that is clean...and you’ve done a number of different things, like clean up nitrogen and phosphorus” that rain and irrigation wash out of citrus groves and

off of lawns and into the lagoon. “I’d like to see us clean up the Lagoon the way the old timers remember,” Solari said. “So it’s clean but also make sure that any future generations have water. But I would like us to use less and less from the (underground) aquifer over time and at least get to the point where we don’t take any more water from the aquifer than we do today, so that future generations will have a

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Prior to joining IRMC in early 2011, Dr. Glotzer was a partner in a multispecialty group in Jamestown, NY, where he held the position of Chief of Surgery at WCA Hospital and Westfield Memorial Hospital. Dr. Glotzer also served as WCA Hospital’s Cancer Liaison Physician for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer. After completing his general surgery residency at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, Dr. Glotzer went on to complete a fellowship in colon and rectal surgery at Saint Vincent’s Hospital in Erie, Pa. Dr. Glotzer specializes in the following areas: • Breast surgery • Colonoscopy and polypectomy for colorectal disease • Gastrointestinal surgery (stomach, small bowel, colon and rectal surgery) • Melanoma, pancreas, endocrine, thyroid surgery • Minimally invasive hernia repair, gallbladder and colon surgery Now accepting new patients. Call 772.563.4741 to schedule an appointment.

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surficial source to draw on. This is the right thing to do.” He reminds us that, “The Indian River Lagoon is an Estuary of National Significance. It’s hugely important to our community. It’s a tremendous economic driver but it’s an imperiled body of water. Before I was elected, the County was already doing some things to help the Lagoon, but I believe we have to do more.” Here is what’s happening: Nutrients from fertilizer – mostly nitrogen and phosphorus – in water flowing off of our land into the lagoon are feeding algae, which clouds the water, cutting off sunlight to seagrasses. Without seagrass, the Lagoon loses its fertility as a nursery for marine life. “At this point I don’t think any of us know what the natural Lagoon looks like,” Solari said.

CONSERVATIVE CONSERVATIONIST Compare Solari’s concern about the water to your average “environmentalist,” and it looks quite similar. But make no mistake about this Republican’s politics. “I’m a small-government person, but I fully believe that that’s an appropriate area for government to concern itself with. We need to be taking the lead in rectifying the things that have been done. Basically when we settled Florida we made a lot of mistakes. “And I don’t blame anybody for making mistakes, they did it, they settled Florida, but now we’ve got to face those mistakes and rectify them.” “I consider myself a longtime not only conservative but conservationist. I mean, that’s just part of our life. We’ve composted every year since I lived in my house. That doesn’t solve everything but it helps. Recycling, I think that’s a great thing. “I barely have to empty my trash. I’ve got those two bins and my trash can is empty. I have no problem if I don’t have to put out the trash every two weeks. I’ve been basically frugal, so I use things, our culture of our house is not so disposable as many are. The things I like most are the things I’ve had 40 or 50 years.” “Again I think conservatives understand the value of what we have. It’s our approach sometimes. Like for instance, we’re trying to work with the St. Johns River Water Management District to not have a coercive water restriction ordinance and I understand what they want because they think it’s the easy way to meet their goals. I think they ought to leave how to meet the goals to local governments. What I said is that we want to conserve just like you do. Just give us the goals and let us work out the metrics … Let us figure out how to beat those goals, which we


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The County Commission has proposed taking over the Vero Beach water-sewer system in exchange for paying off the $24 million debt the city owes. He is impatient, as a 23-year resident of Painted Bunting Lane on the barrier island, within the Vero Beach city limits. The county has plenty of capacity, having built huge water-sewer projects during the economic boom years with impact fees collected from developers. The City Council has agreed to consider the transaction.

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“I saw this as nothing but an opportunity for the county as a whole,” Solari said. “But to have a real dialogue has been impossible. Nobody’s challenged anything we’ve said, although they’ve badmouthed us from time to time they don’t badmouth us based on the information, they just badmouth us because they don’t like the idea. “Ask yourself a question. From 2000 to 2010 why did the population of Vero Beach drop 10 percent? Why? You talk to Realtors and they say a lot of people don’t want to live in the city of Vero Beach because of the high electric and water and sewer rates. It’s a huge economic development problem. The city is in a downward spiral.”

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will. A coercive ordinance has the effect of undermining our democracy.” He’s critical of water management district blanket “solutions” to local problems without local citizen participation. “This community as a whole has a real deep appreciation for that part of nature that we have here and will work hard to protect it,” Solari said. “So let us work hard and … I appreciate all the information and support they give us but let us work out how best to use it in our community. The bigger thing is if you keep on telling people what to do, it undermines their autonomy and you undermine our ability to function as a dynamic democracy and that to me is more important than any single issue on any given day. “If you have all your citizens stop thinking, what happens? Democracy dies, so as far as I’m concerned America is dead, and I’ve taken an oath to uphold the Constitution, so that’s probably in my mind where a conservationist differs from an environmentalist.” “Environmentalist I find is probably one of those who believe environmentalism is a religion. I’ve been in meetings where they say, We need to do this but they have no science to back it up.”

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THE BEACHES Turning to the most recent controversy involving our beaches – a renourishment project plagued by delays and cost overruns, partly due to the County Commission’s decision to go with a sand mine instead of offshore dredging – Solari said it wasn’t entirely a mistake. “To some degree it did work out, but not to the degree we thought. Did we realize the whole savings we expected? No. Will we rethink it going forward? I’m not sure we’re going to be doing another of that type of sand renourishment project in the future. Different types of PEP (artificial reefs) are getting some positive reviews and we’ll be looking at those. “Having a protected beach not only protects the property base but it brings in the tourists, it brings in a huge amount of development. I don’t know at this time what the best way going forward is. I do know that we’re going to have to explore more than just beach renourishment. I don’t have the answer. There’s a lot of things I don’t know.” That last statement leads County Commission Chairman Bob Solari to laugh.

Solari at home with his beloved wife, Jackie.

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Hundreds join Kiwanis ‘Take a Kid Fishing’ event

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PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Dakota Wheeler and Tyrec Davis get some fishing pole tips from Youth Guidance mentor Ted Hrynyk.

Over 250 people signed up for the Kiwanis event

BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Almost 300 kids signed up for the Kiwanis’ 19th annual “Take a Kid Fishing” free event held on June 11th under the Barber Bridge on the causeway pier. The event offers children the chance to spend the day fishing and bonding with parents and mentors in a wholesome and fun activity. Lou Aprile, current Kiwanis president, said that unbelievably some of these kids have never even seen the water before let alone hold a fishing pole. He said last year one of the kids had never been to the river before and was so excited he tried to jump over the railing to get their fish. Luckily an adult was near enough to explain that

the fish were supposed to come out of the water up to the angler, not the other way around. Chester Clem and Jeff Meyer, former Kiwanis leaders have participated in the event for years and said “it was just a program that needed to be undertaken.” They volunteer to do everything from registering the children to cutting bait and releasing the hook from the fish after being caught. All the volunteers had some kind of touching story of the kids that keeps them coming back to help each year. Youth Guidance has signed on to bring their organization’s children to the event and you could see many YG mentors on the pier showing the kids how to cast, tug their lines and if lucky enough, bring up a fish or two

followed up by cheers all around. After the fish get logged in by the Kiwanis volunteers, they are released back into the river (although some enterprising parents and mentors cut them up for bait if they were beyond swimming away status.) Awards and prizes were given afterwards at a big cookout held in MacArthur park for smallest fish, largest, most fish and even ugliest fish. Aprile said the largest fish was actually a 21-inch hammerhead shark which was, of course, not handled by the children but won the lucky fisherman a new fishing pole and tackle box. The winning ugliest fish was a Rock Fish but one little girl caught a Puffer Fish which all the kids were fascinated by as it puffed up and de-

flated over and over. Over 100 poles were donated to be used free of charge along with bait and tackle from local businesses including Vero’s Tackle, Coastal Automotive, Wabasso Tackle and Professional Outfitters. Aprile praised the generosity of all involved including the volunteers who worked on the event. The Kiwanis Club has a mission of serving children as does Youth Guidance and this event was just one of the many programs they offer. If you wish to get your children involved or would like to volunteer to help children, contact the Treasure Coast Kiwanis Club at www.VeroKiwanis. com or Youth Guidance by calling 772-770-5040 or www.ircyouth.com.


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SOCIAL | LIFESTYLE

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Carter Braun caught one of the very first fishes of the day. Kiwanis volunteers cutting bait are Tom Maher, Rob Robinson Jr, Michael Cairns, Chester Clem and Jim Wolfe

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s?;=uoD;O?;TKDGOD; Glitz, glamour and glory at the Genie Awards BY CHRISTINA TASCON

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The Vero Beach Theatre Guild has been in existence for 53 years. Originally they were located at the site of the Riverside Theatre but eventually the community theatre group moved into a former chapel into downtown Vero Beach. Performing well-known productions, the Guild has built up a large and loyal following of members, and their staff and volunteers are as devout as the previous tenants of the building. On June 11 at the Elks Lodge, the Guild hosted their annual Genie Awards, their equivalent of a sparkling night at the Tony Awards. In keeping with the musical theme of last season’s biggest box office hits, the directors of the Genie Awards came out with a hysterical version of their most popular hits from Fiddler on the Roof and Annie as a warm-up to the evening’s festivities. After an elegant cocktail reception, the stage filled with members of the cast of Fiddler to spoof If I Were a Rich Man with their highly entertaining version of “If I Won a Genie” and then donned bright red curly wigs and bald-headed masks to perform “Genie” to the tune of “Annie.” It was an entertaining performance directed by Mark Wygonik leading off a night to honor the best and brightest stars of their 2011 season. Space does not allow for the over 40 categories, but some of the highlights included three awards to Scott Freshly, who won for Best Male Vocalist; Outstanding Musical Contribution and Outstanding Leading Actor in a Musical. Kara Henson was recognized as Best Lead in a Musical; Supporting Actress in a Comedy and as the Female Newcomer. Rebecca Carswell

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

The Pre-Show Annie Singers: Dana Rogers, Patty Carreau, Vallery Thaw, Gerry King and Glenna Sherman

Carolyn Toohey with Paul & Carol Amaru

“Leading Ladies” Genie winners: Gerry King, Neal Stannard, Rebecca Carswell, Kara Henson, Johnny Banek & Jason Avery and Jason Avery both won for Best Leads in a Comedy. Debbie Kepler and Nicole Hall were honored for backstage contributions and Kem Johnson for Best Newcomer and Best Juvenile performer as Abby Nudelman won for Best Female Rookie and Evan Cisneros for Best Male Rookie. Supporting, Secondary & Character Awards for various categories were Neal Stannard, Deborah Chastain, Larry Strauss, Gerry King, James Anthony Davis, John Toohey, Martha Kelly, Robin Volsky, Gary

Sayles, Johnny Banek, Vallery Thaw and Paul Amaru. Clara McCarthy was honored as Outstanding Director; the Backstage Genie and the “Show Must Go On Award” she shared with Ed Dessureau. Both McCarthy and Dessureau suffered severe medical situations, yet each of them came immediately to the theatre afterward so the “show could go on.” Another highlight went to Sarah Morley with the Lifetime Achievement Award. Sara Dessureau was presented a

President’s Award to a standing ovation for her service to the Guild by John Toohey who was also recognized for his years of service “above and beyond.” Sara thanked everyone from the set designers to the volunteers and praised the 85 actors who she said were “all stars in our eyes” and thanked them for all their hours of service. If you would like to know more about the theatre’s schedule please call 562-8300 or visit www.VeroBeachTheatreGuild.com.


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Cast of Fiddler on the Roof

Micheal Naffziger, Clara McCarthy, Colleen Brennan and Ed Dessureau

Joe DelOrifice, Larry Thompson, Kevin Hogan and Laird Goulding

Mark Wygonik, Dana Rogers and VBTG President Sara Dessureau


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kOHAKDM kTDP= Visiting Nurse Association gives more than hospice care BY SIOBHAN FITZPATRICK VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

When George Rooney’s wife, Linda, was in her final stage of mouth and lung cancer, the couple made the difficult, but ultimately right decision to spend her last few weeks at the Visiting Nurse Association’s Hospice of Indian River County. “She liked the room and the grounds,” Rooney said. “The staff made sure she was clean, fed and free from pain.” Located off of 37th Street, near the Indian River Medical Center, the VNA Hospice -- the only such provider in Indian River County -- is a beautiful facility with 12 elegant guest rooms that could be featured in House Beautiful magazine. The average patient usually has less than six months to live if the illness were allowed run its regular course. With that in mind, the hospice’s staff does everything it can to make those final days or months as peaceful as possible, providing nursing services, medication, social services and counseling. In

short, “anything to help make them more comfortable,” said Joyce Baldrica, VNA’s President and CEO. Aside for caring for the terminally ill, the non-profit hospice provides rooms for the chronically ill, allowing caregivers a respite from those often consuming responsibilities. “We offer this five-day option because it can be really taxing caring for a loved one, especially a spouse,” says Baldrica. “We also find many caretakers’ health goes downhill when caring for a spouse.” Another service the VNA offers is in-home care. This program provides essentially the same services as at its 12-room facility – often free of charge. Both hospice programs are free for most people, with Medicare providing 100 percent coverage (traditional Medicare, not the HMO) and most private insurances covering some costs as well. The VNA also offers bereavement services free of charge. Staff will keep in touch with survivors of family members for 14 months after the death through

STAFF PHOTO

Nurse Susan Strader, left, speaks with VNA CEO Joyce Baldrica in a VNA mobile unit.

letters, phone calls and will also provide bereavement support groups throughout community. “We want people to know that they’re not in it alone,” says Tracey Kendrick, VNA’s Communications Manager. George Rooney took advantage of this service after his wife died. “Before I went back to full-time employment, I went to the bereavement groups meetings on Wednesday afternoons. Kim Carpenter was the counselor and an excellent one. Talking with people who went through a similar experience has helped me a lot,” he said. Another bereavement service VNA provides is its Camp Chrysalis for children ages 7-12, which it hosts twice a year at McKee Botanical Garden. “We want to add some fun and give children the chance to see that they are not the only one who has experienced this loss,” Kendrick said. While the hospice and its different programs is a big part of what VNA does, it is really just one arm of the non-profit. Another major branch is VNA’s home-health patient program, which cares for approximately 600 patients in their homes and another 115 in area hospitals. These patients are typically home-bound or have difficulty leaving the house (or hospital) and receive in-home physician visits. The home-health patient program also provides nurses, occupational therapists, social workers and home health aides for clients. In addition, the program offers skilled services like a dietician for a short period of time - usually a month to 40 days. VNA also offers a private duty non-medical service that helps close to 100 clients in their homes. The services provided could be anything from acting as a companion to someone who’s home-bound or helping them take a shower and get dressed, to grocery shopping. The VNA receives 70 percent of its money from federal (Medicare) and state (Medicaid) programs. With regard to Medicare, Baldrica advises people to choose the traditional “Medicare Part A” program as opposed to the “Medicare HMO” because the latter has stricter requirements about what doctor you can see. “What is happening is more seniors are choosing the HMO because it helps with prescription coverage, but they do not realize there are co-pays and deductibles,” says Baldrica. Medicare Part A Traditional also offers prescription coverage, but people have to pay extra for it.


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HELPING HANDS

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The VNA has 12 elegant rooms for patients and their families.

help provide for the many services. One of these volunteers is George Rooney, who lends his computer skills to the VNA Communications Department. “I made new organization charts, reports in MS Access for blood sugar and blood screenings,” Rooney said. “I also did my share of envelope stuffing.”

Rooney readily offers his skills free of charge to VNA because of how well they treated his wife. “The staff always kept me informed of her condition and (let me help) the nurses with cleaning and changing feeding bottles. I could not have asked for a better staff,” he said.

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N E W S W E E K L Y

After Medicaid and Medicare, VNA seeks reimbursement from insurance companies including Aetna, United, and Blue Cross, but Baldrica says there is “not a lot (of money) in this area.” VNA also has a foundation that raises a $1.5 million per year for patients who don’t have enough money for VNA services, but who also do not qualify for help from the county. VNA’s thrift store on Miracle Mile, Hidden Treasures, also helps offset some of those costs. But like all health care organizations, VNA’s financial future remains uncertain as President Obama moves forward with his plant to provide health care to most Americans. “I’m not sure what Obama’s health care is going to do, but if everyone has health insurance, they will take (money) from providers,” Baldrica said. “Already, our (federal) reimbursement was decreased $100,000.” Baldrica says budget worries are a constant in her line of work. “I’ve been in healthcare for over twenty years and there’s always cuts so we just need to focus on the patients and work with the money we’re allocated,” she said. Baldrica also notes one of VNA’s secret weapons to curb costs is the formidable 370 volunteers that


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BUSINESS

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ning for a restaurant in that spot and said once Diane Lee visited the location it was the easiest lease he has ever negotiated. Izziban will feature an extensive Sake list and a unique menu of Asian inspired dishes mixed with other types of cuisine. They will also offer a tabletop barbecue menu where customers order their meat and other dishes and cook the food themselves. “It is a very social thing, people can share whatever meat or vegetable they want,” said Izziban general manager Daniel Moon. “The server will show them how if they have never done it before.” For Rechter, attracting such a high-quality tenant is vindication of his vision and another step in his ultimate plan. He so firmly believed his plan, he was ready to take on the restaurant himself if he couldn’t find the right tenant. “I said to myself this location is getting better, it is by itself not great, but then we started getting success with the Majestic and the Vero Bowl,” he said. “Since I was doing all the work myself anyways, I had it all set to go regardless if a tenant stepped into the picture or not. I didn’t realize acquiring a tenant would happen just as I was starting to pound my first nail. “In terms of timing, Game Zone is set to open mid-June. Izziban we expect to open no later than Labor Day and the billiard club will be right behind that, so by October 1st this whole corner will be rocking.” Rechter is also working on plans to spruce up the Indian River Plaza, also known as the K-Mart Center. He is considering a mix of tenants that will include upper-end and casual restaurants. “We intend to raze the old Denny’s and replace it with a new building. It will be broken into four spaces facing U.S. 1 and four facing inward,” he said. “I am talking with a concept called Jimmy John’s, a gourmet sub place, they have about 3,000 locations. Chipotle Mexican

PHOTO BY M. JAMES NORTHEN

Vero Bowl has recently undergone a $2.5 million facelift into a state-of-the-art facility.

Grill is looking to come to Vero and that corner would be perfect for them. We are just in talks, nothing is signed yet. We also haven’t gotten

a yea or nay yet from P.F. Chang’s, they have a casual dining concept called Pei Way. “In the next three or four years,

you will see all this. You will see great restaurants, upscale, downscale casual dining, a full range of dining options.”

Casual seafood restaurant to open at former Stax location VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

A July 15 opening is planned for the Fishack, a casual seafood restaurant at 1931 Old Dixie Highway, which most recently was the home of Stax. The business is owned by Ethan Weiss, who along with his father, Mitchell, will operate the restaurant. The Weiss family also owns Pizoodle’s, which will continue under the direction of Jo Ann Weiss and chil-

dren Alex and Alissa. Work is still underway at the Fishack adding a nautical décor to the premises with a strong emphasis on casual. Jo Ann Weiss said the place will have a “beachy,” tiki bar feel to it. The menu will feature fried fish platters, fish tacos, fish sandwiches, New England fried clams, lobster and lobster salads.

When it is fully operational, the Fishack will be open seven days a week for lunch and dinner and will host a Sunday brunch as well. For those looking for late night entertainment there will be offerings of beach and reggae music. “It will be the kind of place where people can come and hang out,” Jo Anne Weiss said. “This will be the casual spot to eat seafood.”


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Keeping that resolution to keep going to the gym STAFF PHOTO

Varying your exercise routine can help in maintaining your commitment to the gym once the motivation begins to wear off. SIOBHAN FITZPATRICK FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

This past January, Margaret Reynolds made her New Year’s resolution with the goal that many of us share -- to get in shape. At 47 Reynolds wanted to do more cardiovascular and weight training exercises to build her upper body and arms. But unlike many of us, Reynolds actually kept her resolution. “I always keep my goals,” said Reynolds, who has been a regular the last eight years at the mainland gym, the Jungle Club. But why do so many people not keep their New Year’s resolution to stay fit? “The main reason people give up is either they don’t get results fast enough to stay motivated or they do something wrong and hurt themselves,” said Phil Raschko, a personal trainer at the Jungle club. The best way to stick to your New Year’s resolution is to hire a personal trainer because they’re “more likely to help you get results fast enough and will keep you motivated –- safely,” said Raschko. Yet there are those few people, like Margaret Reynolds who works out on her own, and has kept her New Year’s quest to get in shape. On a typical day, Reynolds does approximately 50 minutes of cardio on an elliptical exercise machine and then about a half hour of work focusing on her abdominal, waist, legs and upper body using mats and free weights.

Reynolds, a sales rep for a wholesale gift company, has erratic work hours and joined the Jungle Club because of its flexible schedule. “Other gyms close earlier,” she said. “At the Jungle Club I can come anytime. And the gym is always nice and clean, including the locker room, which is very important to me.” Reynolds’ work schedule requires that she travel and because she is sticking to her get-in-shape resolution, she feels she is missing out when she can’t make it to the gym. “When I’m on location and cannot workout, I am miserable. I feel a zillion times better when I workout,” she said. Like Reynolds, exercise is extremely important to Kathleen McLaughlin, who moved to Vero Beach in November. At the recommendation of her sister, who has lived in Vero for over 40 years, McLaughlin joined Longevity Fitness Club and Spa. McLaughlin was a caretaker for her ailing mother in New Jersey, who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease. When McLaughlin’s mother passed away, she decided to take a leap of faith and move to Vero and look for a new house, job, and gym. She too used New Year’s to help focus on her desire to get in better shape. ”My goal was to try and become healthy and lose weight now. So far, I’ve lost 31 pounds,” said the 65year–old McLaughlin. McLaughlin, who moved to the area eight months

ago, is not only a huge fan of Vero, her new house and job (as a health assistant), she is also colossal fan of Longevity and its coaches. “One instructor, Maria, taught me that I should not workout my entire body all at once,” she said. “Instead, she recommends that I work on my upper body one day, and lower body the next to give my muscles a rest. This has made working out so much more enjoyable, and more effective.” Having the flexibility to choose from aquatic classes to Zumba to the StairMaster is precisely the kind of diversity that makes the Jungle Club so great, says Katie Smith, General Manager of the Jungle Club. “It’s important to change your routine up a bit to get variety and keep it interesting,” she said, noting that exercise is not merely for the body, but for keeping a positive state of mind. Ellen Deschatres, a self-employed artist, moved to the area from St. Louis nearly a year ago. She agrees that staying positive is an important factor in getting in shape and sticking to those promises we make to ourselves to living a healthier lifestyle. “Mentally and physically. I think exercise brings all those physiological benefits that we are aware of,” she said. “It’s a personal thing for each one of us. For me, it’s physiological, emotional and takes the edge off of everything. The myth that as you get older that you have to take it easy, well that is bunk,” said Deschatres.


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by the fact that you could not otherwise smell the smoke in the restaurant. My only gripe is that, at $52, the steak itself wasn’t all I was hoping for. It wasn’t dry aged, so it didn’t have that unctuous, concentrated, almost-round-the-bend flavor of the very best steaks. And even considering that it was wet aged, I didn’t get that “Prime” vibe off of it. It wasn’t as “marbled” as I might have hoped for; and after all, that’s why you order

a rib steak. You want that delicious fat. So as long as you understand going in that MT’s Chop House is not a “steak house” in the manner of Peter Lugar’s of New York, The Capital Grille in DC, or Bern’s in Tampa, every time you visit will be a special occasion. Nick Thomas is a lawyer and certified family mediator. Reach him at nthomaslaw@comcast.net.

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and Roasted Garlic Whipped Potato. Not exactly a combination a chef might come up with, but the girl likes what she likes. For my part, I figured if I was going to eat a steak, I might as well go for the gold -- the 22-ounce Prime Cowboy Bone-In Ribeye, with sides of Mac and Four Cheeses with Truffle Oil and Grilled Asparagus with Béarnaise sauce (cleverly reasoning I could use some of the sauce on my steak). Regarding my date’s meal, her scallops were large and flawless, lightly seared on the outside and the perfect warm opalescent on the inside. Tender in the extreme, they were made that much better by the orange/ginger buerre blanc. Her sides were just fine as well, with the mushrooms sautéed down to a correct meaty texture, and the whipped potatoes warm and smooth. While I doubt any of the mushrooms had ever seen a “forest,” I don’t mind a bit of puffery if I don’t feel I’m being purposefully misled. As for my meal, the asparagus was very nice -- lightly grilled, perhaps even pre-blanched to achieve a perfect texture to my taste. The Béarnaise was authentic, eggy, yummy. The Mac and Cheese, however, was served at near room temperature, and while I could see what they were going for, it didn’t really hit the mark. As a pasta purist, I don’t really consider “penne” to be the best choice for this application. It’s too firm to meld into a dish that, ideally, has a unified casserole texture. Finally, my Cowboy Ribeye. Served on a warmed white rectangular plate, it was a vision of perfection – an even char, an ideal medium pink inside, and perfumed with wood smoke made all the more appealing

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On June 3, the evening before my daughter graduated from Vero High, I took her on a “date” to MT’s Chop House on Vero’s South NICK THOMAS Beach. Good choice. MT’s, to my mind, is the best “Special Occasion” restaurant in town. It has all the elements of a “fancy” American restaurant – an attractive young hostess greets you at the door and, menus in hand, shows you to your table, through a dimly lit, quiet dining room done up in leather and wood and hues of tobacco brown. Then you’re seated in a private booth with upholstered, high-backed benches and a high side wall, the table dressed with crisp linen and sparkling stemware. Being the silly people we are, Grace and I enjoyed opening the menus to find that they are self-illuminating. Before we even began to read, and before our server arrived, we played around with the menus – open, close, open, close; wear it like a hat; compete to see who could open their menu the least and still have it light up. By the time our server showed and I ordered a Manhattan (rye whiskey, sweet vermouth, bitters), my standard fancy-restaurant cocktail, we were settled in and having fun, talking about our upcoming summer trip to, well, Manhattan. Turning to the menu, we cooked up our plan. Knowing dad would order steak, Grace settled on the Colossal Diver Scallops, with “Comfort Sides” of Sautéed Forest Mushrooms

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NICK THOMAS

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MT’S Chop House is best ‘special occasion’ restaurant


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Community Calendar

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SUNDAY, JUNE 19

MONDAY, JUNE 20

TUESDAY, JUNE 21

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22

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SATURDAY, JUNE 18

To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

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FRIDAY, JUNE 17

or linmacd@gmail.com. June 18: Republican BBQ, Vero Beach Heritage Center, picnic catered by Bono’s, speaker US Senate Candidate Adam Hasner. 4:307:30pm 2140 14th Ave, cost is kids $10/adults $25, 772-538-6832, reservations - leahfacto@yahoo.com June 18: An Evening at the Ballet, 7pm, VBHS Performing Arts Center, Excerpts from Sleeping Beauty, Giselle and original choreography to Gershwin’s three piano preludes. Professional dancers Barry and Amy Trammell as well as students from the Vero Classical Ballet. 1707 16th Street, $8 students/seniors, $12 adults www. veroclassicalballet.com June 18: Vero Beach Book Center event at 11a.m.: “Donuts with Dad” Father’s Day Celebration with Miss Julie and special guest author and illustrator

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9684 www.verodance.org June 17 & 18: Riverside Theatre’s Comedy Zone, up-and-coming comedians at 7:30 & 9:30pm, 3250 Riverside Park Drive, Tickets $15. www. riversidetheatre.com June 18: The Seventh Annual Water Lily Celebration at McKee Botanical Garden. McKee Botanical Garden, 350 US1. Event special hours: 8:30-2pm. Park will stay open until 5pm. Summer admission is $7 adults, $6 seniors, $4 children 3-12 and free to members and children under three. 772-794-0601 or visit www.mckeegarden.org. June 18: The Democratic Women’s Club of Indian River County will hold a potluck luncheon 11:30am at the IRC Main Library. The featured guest speaker will be Rev. Denny Hart of the Indian River NAACP. Contact Linda MacDonald at 772-234-3473

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If you’d like to see one of your photographs published in Vero Beach Newsweekly, please send them to us at verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com. Photos need to be at least 200 dpi and in jpeg format.

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THURSDAY, JUNE 16

STAFF / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Ethan Long presenting “My Dad, My Hero” in the Children’s Store. Stories and Refreshments too. 772-569-2050 www.VeroBeachBookCenter.com June 18: Paddle St. Sebastian River 9:30am-2:30pm. Dale Wimbrow Park, 11805 Roseland Rd., Florida Outdoor Center event. $45 for adults and $5 for children and includes the paddle tour and lunch. 772-202-0220 www.floutdoor.com June 19: Father’s Day Brunch - Antique Car Show and Brunch at the Elk’s Club 1350 26th St. 10am-2pm, $10, Reservations suggested: 772-562-8450 June 20: Vero Beach Book Center, David Baldacci presents “One Summer” 7pm David Baldacci will hold a short talk, followed by some Q&A and finish with autographing his book. Books must be purchased at the VBBC. 772-569-2050 www.VeroBeachBookCenter.com June 24: Captain Sig Hillstrand and his brothers from the “Deadliest Catch” television show will be appearing at the King Center. 6pm picnic followed by talks by the brothers about life on the boat and being on the show of one of the nation’s captivating new “reality series” at 8pm. Tickets: $29.50 321-242-2219 or www.kingcenter.com June 24: Senator Bob Graham presents “Keys to the Kingdom.” Vero Beach Book Center, 1pm. Books must be purchased at the VBBC. 772-5692050 www.VeroBeachBookCenter.com June 25: Summer Cruise and Picnic to benefit Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute. 10am-1pm, River cruise with lunch on Intracoastal island. $25. 772-242-2559

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Every Saturday: Oceanside Business Association’s Farmer’s Market from 8am-noon. Located in the parking lot just south of Humiston Park on Ocean Drive. Fresh vegetables, juice, herbs, bakery goods and music and hot food items. www.VeroBeachOBA.com, 772-532-2455 Every Sunday: Sunday Market from 9am-2pm in historic downtown Vero Beach at the corner of 14th Avenue & 21st Street. To register as a vendor or for more information, contact Eric Hessler by email: eric@ mainstreetverobeach.org or call the Main Street office at 772-480-8353 Through July 14: Indian River County Courthouse Vero Beach Art Club Member Exhibition, 2000 16th St., Vero Beach Monday-Friday 9am-5pm. Through Sept 25: The Vero Beach Museum of Art presents “What’s the Story?” Visitors are invited to guess the meanings of a selection of artwork picked to pique the viewer’s curiosity and to encourage them to look more closely at the subject matter. (Admission to general exhibitions and education wing exhibitions is free for this exhibit. Donations are welcome.) 772-231-0707. June 13-Aug. 5: Summer Art Camp at the Vero Beach Museum of Art. In the studios of the Museum Art School. Children ages 4-6. 65 morning and afternoon classes in eight week-long sessions. For more information, call Ellyn Giordano at (772) 231-0707, x116 or e-mail: egiordano@verobeachmuseum.org. June 16: USA Dance, West Coast Swing will be holding a dance at 7pm at the Heritage Center. Adults and students with ID $8-$10. 772-770-


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Obituaries Arthur Bowes Arthur S. Bowes Jr., 79, died May 28, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in Chicago, and lived in Vero Beach for 25 years. Survivors include his wife of 58 years, Barbara Bowes of Vero Beach; daughter, Karen Pugh of Cumming, Ga. Arrangements were by Aycock Funeral Home, Fort Pierce. A guestbook is available at aycock-hillcrest.com. Harry Evans Harry Gunn Evans, 94, died June 5, 2011, at the VNA Hospice House of Vero Beach. He was born in Whitwell, Tenn., and moved to Vero Beach 30 years ago, coming from Franklin Lakes, N.J. Survivors include his wife of 66 years, Doris Evans of Vero Beach; daughter, Jan Bott of Pikeville, Tenn.; son, Barry Evans of Charleston, W.Va. He was preceded in death by a son, William Pope Evans. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice House, 1111 36th St., Vero Beach 32960. Arrangements are by Seawinds Funeral Home and Crematory in Sebastian. A guestbook is available at seawindsfh.com. Benjamin Caci Benjamin S. Caci, 71, died May 27, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. He was born in Everett, Mass., and lived in Vero Beach for 16 years, coming from North Andover, Mass. He attended Tabernacle Ministries of Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 37 years, Shelley; and daughter, Sweetie of Vero Beach. Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of your choice. Arrangements are by All County Crematory in Stuart. Lottie Mosley Lottie Beatrice Mosley, 85, died June 5, 2011, at the Atlantic Healthcare Center in Vero Beach. She was born in Dora, Ala., and lived in Vero Beach for nine years, coming from

Princeton. She was a member of the Nazarene Church in Princeton. Survivors include her son, Charles H. Mosley of Vero Beach. She was preceded in death by her husband, Harry L. Mosley; and a son, Roger D. Mosley. Memorial contributions may be made to the Vero Beach First Church of the Nazarene, 1280 27th Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960. Cox-Gifford-Seawinds Funeral Home. A guestbook is available at coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Arthur W. Nimmer Jr. Arthur W. Nimmer, Jr., 96, died on June 2, 2011, at the VA Medical Center of West Palm Beach. He was born in Chicago and lived in Vero Beach for 25 years, coming from LaPorte, Ind. He was a member of Lutheran Church of the Redeemer in Vero Beach, the Vero Beach Bridge Club and American Legion Post 39, Vero Beach. Survivors include his daughter-in-law, June Nimmer of Vernon Hills, Ill. Memorial contributions may be made to the Lutheran Church of the Redeemer, 900 27th Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960. Arrangements are by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory in Vero Beach. A guest book is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com. Pauline Hoege Pauline E. Hoege, 94, died June 7, 2011 at Indian River Estates in Vero Beach. She was born in Philadelphia and lived in Vero Beach for two years, coming from Southampton, Pa., and Southampton, N.J. Survivors include several cousins. She was preceded in death by her husband, William Hoege. Arrangements are by Aycock Funeral Home in Fort Pierce. A guestbook is available at www.aycock-hillcrest. com. Joseph Altieri Dr. Joseph John Altieri, 54, died June 6, 2011, at his home. He was born in Mount Vernon, N.Y., and practiced in Vero Beach for 25 years, coming

from Yonkers, N.Y. Survivors include his daughters, Robyn of Arvada, Colo., Diana of Tampa and Nicole of Vero Beach; wife, Gina of Vero Beach; brothers, Eugene of Panama and Frank of Fort Myers; and mother, Frances Louise Altieri of Vero Beach. He was preceded in death by his father, Sylvestro Altieri. Memorial contributions may be made to SafeSpace, PO Box 4075, Fort Pierce, FL 32948. Arrangements are by Thomas S. Lowther Funeral Home & Crematory in Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Eleanor Chew Eleanor Marion Chew, 87, died June 6, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. She was born in Cumberland County, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach for 22 years coming from Bridgeton, N.J. She was a member of Grace Lutheran Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include her sons, Leonard Springfield of Bridgeton and Mark Doty and Raymond Chew, both of Vero Beach; daughter, Suzanne Erianne of Vero Beach; brother, Fred Stites of Dover, Del. Memorial contributions may be made to Grace Lutheran Church, 1150 41st Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960. Arrangements are by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory in Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com. Leah Krail Leah Willem Krail, 83, died June 6, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. She was born in New Orleans and lived in Vero Beach for 16 years, coming from her birthplace. Survivors include her husband of 30 years, John R. Krail of Vero Beach; daughter, Karen Renfrow of Alvin, Texas; brother, Harold Willem Jr. of New Orleans; twin sister, Lois Magnon of Fairhope, Ala. She was preceded in death by her first husband, Pat Dennis; and sons, Steve and Mike Dennis. Me-

morial contributions may be made to the Association for Retarded Citizens, 1365 16th Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960. Arrangements are by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory in Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Rodolfo C. Diaz Rodolfo C. Diaz, 85, of Vero Beach, FL died Thursday, June 9, 2011 at the VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach, FL. Mr. Diaz was born July 27, 1925, in Havana, Cuba, moving to New York in 1948. In 1978, he moved to Miami, FL., and has been a resident of Vero Beach, FL. for seven years. He was a member of the Treasure Coast Assembly of God in Vero Beach, FL. His survivors include his wife of 63 years, Maximina A. Diaz of Vero Beach, FL.; sons, Rodolfo Diaz, Jr. of Vero Beach, FL., Patrick Diaz of Miami, FL.; daughter, Haydee S. Mahannah of Vero Beach, FL. The Family has requested Memorial Contributions to VNA Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL. Arrangements are under the direction of Cox-Gifford-Seawinds Funeral Home and Crematory, Vero Beach, Florida. Condolences may be sent through www. coxgiffordseawinds.com. Joseph Anthony Pope Joseph Anthony Pope, 82, of Vero Beach, FL. died Tuesday, June 7, 2011 at Royal Palm Healthcare & Rehabilitation Center in Vero Beach, FL. Mr. Pope was born January 21, 1929 in Elizabeth, NJ. He was of the Catholic faith. He was been a resident of Vero Beach, FL., since 2002, moving from Cranford, NJ. Survivors include his daughters, Joan Pope of Vero Beach, FL., Terry Pope of Pawleys Island, SC., Ronnie Bowles of Califon, NJ.; sons, Chris Pope of Golden, CO., and Joseph Pope Jr. Of Thousand Oaks, CA. He is preceded in death by his wife, Joan Pope. Memorial contributions may be to the VNA Hospice Foundation, 1110


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Richard Snyder Richard Andrews Snyder, 87, died June 10, 2011, at Consulate Health Care Center, Vero Beach He was born in Syracuse, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 22 years, coming from Long Green, Md. He was a member of First

cluding being the first Orange County State Committeewoman for the State Republican Party. Joseph Dearborn Robinson IV, 67, died on May 1, 2011. He graduatated from Dartmouth College and received his MBA from the University of Chicago, where he studied under Milton Friedman. Robbie returned home to Winter Park to work for the family company, and served as President of Laurel Homes Inc. During the 40 years that Robbie worked and lived in Winter Park, he was involved with many local civic activities. Affectionately known as Robbie, he was honored at his service by Orlando mayor Buddy Dyer declaring it Robbie Robinson Day in the City of Orlando. Among the family he is survived by is brother Peter and his wife Debb of Vero Beach.

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Frederick Edmunds Frederick R. Edmunds, 85, died June 5, 2011, at his home. He was was born in Rochester, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach as a full-time resident since 2006, coming from Gettysburg, Pa. He was of the Presbyterian faith. Survivors include his daughters, Stephanie Adams of Atlanta, Linda Friedrich of Fort Pierce, and Emme Edmunds of Ithaca, N.Y.; sons, Dr. Geoffrey Edmunds of Albany, Dr. Frederick Edmunds of Victor, N.Y., and Thomas Edmunds of Schoharie, N.Y. He was preceded in death by wife of 58 years, Nancy I. Edmunds. Memorial contributions may be made to the Great Conewago Presbyterian Church, 174 Red Bridge Road, Gettysburg, PA 17325; oesrescuenetwork.org/supportus.html. Arrangements are by Cox-GiffordSeawinds Funeral Home & Crematory, Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Laura Gamble Thomson Robinson Joseph Dearborn Robinson IV Two important members of the Laurel Corporations, which through its subsidiary the Laurel Agency built a number of housing developments in Indian River County, passed away

recently. Laura Gamble Thomson Robinson, 95, was the matriarch of the family business which concentrates on land acquisition and development, construction and general real estate operations in central Florida and the Treasure Coast. She died on June 3, 2011 at The Mayflower in Winter Park, Florida. Mrs. Robinson’s husband, Joseph Dearborn Robinson III, named his company Laurel Homes in her honor and built and developed thousands of homes throughout Orange, Seminole, Osceola, Brevard, Polk, Duval, Pasco, Saint Lucie and Indian River counties. The firm has developed over 50 communities in these areas and many carry the “Laurel” name. She was active in many civic and political endeavors in central Florida in-

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Susanne Doyle Susanne J. Doyle, 86, died June 6, 2011, at her home. She was born in St. Johns, Mich., and lived in Vero Beach for 25 years, coming from Dallas and Saginaw, Mich. Survivors include her husband of 62 years, Harold D. Doyle of Vero Beach; sons, Michael S. Doyle of Sarasota, James M. Doyle of Escondido, Calif., and Douglas H. Doyle of Wilson, Wyo.; daughters, Christine Doyle Eagle of Charlotte, N.C., and Susanne K. Doyle of Fort Collins, Colo. Arrangements are by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at strunkfuneralhome.com.

Presbyterian Church of Vero Beach, where he formerly served as head usher. Survivors include his wife of 57 years, Pattie Thomas Snyder of Vero Beach; son, Thomas Andrews Snyder of Vero Beach; and sister, Polly Snyder Talbot of Fort Myers. Memorial contributions may be made to First Presbyterian Church, 520 Royal Palm Blvd., Vero Beach, FL 32960. Arrangements are by Cox-Gifford Seawinds Funeral Home and Crematory in Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at seawindsfh.com.

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35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. Arrangements are under the direction of Cox-Gifford-Seawinds Funeral Home and Crematory, Vero Beach, Florida. Condolences may be sent through www.coxgiffordseawinds.com

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OBITUARIES


Vero Beach NEWSWEEKLY 1801 U.S. 1 Vero Beach, FL 32960

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Vero Beach News Weekly  

Vero Beach News Weekly Issue 11

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