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WHAT’S INSIDE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2015

features

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Villa Alamandra – a waterfront wonder ............. 12 Cool Sunglasses ........................... 16 Dream chaser Olivia Graveley ... 18 7 Frozen Drinks to Try THIS SUMMER ...................... 22 Tiki Hut comes home .................... 24 Flyboarding –Provo’s newest extreme watersport ..... 34 Summer Stylin’ .............................. 40 Storytelling –the oral tradition of the TCI ..................... 44

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regulars

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From the editor .............................. 8 Island Flavours Recipe ................ 20 Happenings .................................... 50 Social Scene .................................. 56 Events Calendar ........................... 62

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Cover photo: Flyboard instructor Alex Cox demonstrates his superb skills at Walkin Marina, Leeward, Providenciales


From the

Publisher Coral Visions Ltd.

New adventures

Editor Kandi Hariraj

It’s hard to think of trying something new and not have a moment of doubt. But jumping in with both feet is sometimes the best way and that’s exactly what we did with this magazine. In getting to where we are now compares closely to learning to flyboard – we had to get in the water and take a few unexpected dips before finding our balance. But now that we have, we’re super excited and ready to fly. I am immensely pleased to present our seventh edition, largest to date and evolving into exactly what we intend it to be. Within the pages of this new bimonthly magazine are fresh, fun features and highlights of a small sample of what this ‘Beautiful by Nature’ island paradise has to offer. It’s intended to present a true essence of our islands for residents and tourists alike – showcasing culture, lifestyle, food, people, things to do and so much more. This issue has a few interesting features of new things to try, enduring things to love and the regular things you have come to expect and look forward to. Watch out for our features on flyboarding - TCI’s newest extreme sport, plus Lady Livi – a newly discovered hip-hop/rap artiste with big dreams, a luxury villa with a magnificent waterfront view, a list of delightful frozen drinks to try and some snazzy sunglasses you’re sure to love. Also, in our Social Scene and Happenings section, we give you a peek of some exciting events and things that have happened this summer, a tasty recipe to try from Tiki Hut, a funny native tale from past generations and more. So read on, enjoy and dare to try something new. I look forward to sharing with you my new discoveries, keeping you entertained and in-the-know of all the things this beautiful island has to offer. Cheers!

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Graphic Design Cord Garrido-Lowe Contributing Writer David Bowen Contributing Photographers Darwin Martinez Kandi Hariraj Cord Garrido-Lowe Agile LeVin Digital Handprint TCI Island Guide Magazine Providenciales, Turks and Caicos Islands, BWI Tel: 649-347-4092 info@TCIIslandGuide.com www.TCIIslandGuide.com

TCI Island Guide magazine Is produced by

DESIGN • PRINT • PUBLISH

The magazine is published bimonthly and distributed across the islands. Every effort is made to ensure accuracy in compilation of published content. However, no liability is accepted for typographies, omissions or inaccuracies. Reproduction of editorial matter or graphic material in any manner without permission is prohibited.

If you would like to advertise, suggest events or content, please contact info@tciislandguide.com or 347-9047.


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LUXURY LIVING

V illa Alamandra a waterfront wonder

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Villa Alamandra is managed by Property Manager Dinesh Rampersaud of Island Escapes TCI Telephone: 649-941-4006. Website: www.islandescapestci.com The property is currently for sale for US$4.5M through Sotheby’s Turks and Caicos.

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trolling up the entrance, across the 100 ft. long cedar bridge surrounded by a lush tropical garden dotted with bunches of colourful bougainvillea, induced a sense of tranquillity and delight. But the view beyond the entryway, framed by massive Japanese gates, was instantly arresting and nothing short of spectacular. A glimpse of familiar turquoise water appears between two pavilions and as you walk on it reveals the most magnificent picture-perfect postcard scene. An impressive infinity edge pool centres the sight which extends to an uninterrupted panoramic pleasure of the Caribbean sun and sea. A quick glance around Villa Alamandra and you’ll notice how sensationally stylish and well-built it is. The luxurious property, located in the gated community of Silly Creek Estates, Chalk Sound, boasts a fusion of Balinese design and Caribbean open plan living with three separate pavilions sitting on almost two acres of living space. Inside the three pod style pavilions, the ambience is bright and airy thanks to the soaring vaulted ceilings and massive Spanish cedar doors and windows which are strategically positioned to take advantage of the steady sea breeze. The short term rental villa contains four large bedrooms with ensuite full baths – with two master suites featuring private patios and showing off ocean front views. The main suite sits independently in one pavilion, three guest bedrooms are contained in another and the main pavilion comprises the great room, kitchen,


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LUXURY LIVING and games room. The entertainment centre is fully outfitted with a flat screen TV, DVD player, IPod/MP3 docking station, and high quality interior/exterior sound system. Other guest amenities include wireless internet service, phone, poolside built-in grill with stone cooking surface and large laundry room a washer and dryer.

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his vacation home is great for the multi-family or multi-couple getaway, cleverly fusing the layout of a contemporary open plan lifestyle while still retaining the ability to offer cozy and private spaces for everyone. A winding stone path leads down to a private dock. A secluded patio on the opposite end offers another tucked away corner –

both with a similarly stunning view. Villa Alamandra is also great for entertaining – fully equipped with modern amenities for convenience and comfort, indoor-outdoor seating for up to 35 people, an entertainment area, a huge living room, and a full customized Kochman-Reidt gourmet kitchen with granite countertops and stainless steel appliances. Just a half mile away is one of the most charming beaches in the TCI, Taylor Bay, and within 15 minutes of driving are more gorgeous beaches, restaurants, supermarkets, pharmacy, banks, gyms and resorts. Super location, stunning architectural details, stylish interior and picture-perfect views are just some of the things that make Villa Alamandra one of TCIs most remarkable rental property.

Super location, stunning architectural details, stylish interior and picture-perfect views are just some of the things that make Villa Alamandra one of TCIs most remarkable rental property

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Dream Chaser

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BY KANDI HARIRAJ

he journey to becoming a famous female rapper in the male-dominated industry is probably just as challenging as pursuing an international career in football. Getting there is the stuff dreams are made of. But for as long as Olivia Graveley can remember, that’s all she’s ever wanted. In the football arena she’s a member of the TCI women’s national football team, the youth development officer for the Turks and Caicos Islands Football Association (TCIFA), ambassador of the recently launched TCIFA ‘Live Your Goals’ campaign and a favourite coach of many youngsters. But in the music world she’s known as Lady Livi. The passionate 24-year-old recently made a significant stride in pursuing her musical dreams when she caught the attention of some heavyweights in the international music industry while participating in a Caribbean-wide talent showcase - Island Music, Model and Talent Showcase (MMTS) - held in The Bahamas in July. After placing first in the Island MMTS 2015 female Singer/Solo category and third place in the Songwriter category, Olivia is ready to reveal her talent to the world and is excited about chasing her dream of becoming an internationally recognised artiste. Here is what the local hip-hop/rap singer said in a chat with TCI Island Guide Magazine.

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I put myself out of the box in uncomfortable situations where I can learn and grow. Tell us about your participation in the MTTS I competed against about 30 people here on island in the musical category and was chosen. When I got there I had to compete with over 100 people in my category. I won and also got to meet many professionals in the industry as well as attend different seminars that, as an artiste, helped me to improve and grow in the industry.

other career.

What did you expect to gain from the competition? First of all, everyone was so talented. I didn’t think I would win. I just wanted to be noticed and maybe spread my CDs around and basically go to the seminars.

How would you describe your music? As an artiste I like conscious music, making sure there is a deep message. I do have two mixed tapes out, but I wouldn’t say that any of them represent Lady Livi. It’s just that the label I was representing at the time required me to put out two tapes. When it comes to my art and what I do, I don’t call myself a rapper but a musician because I also like writing my own songs and it’ll always be something deep, something poetic, something positive and something that encourages.

But instead? I got the attention of a lot of important people like record producers Klaus D and Bryan-Michael Cox which I’m particularly happy about. I had so many callbacks from producers, agents and record labels lining up to speak with me after my first performance. A couple of international magazines also approached me for interviews. What do you think they saw in you? Most of them said they liked my ‘raw talent and authenticity’. When did you start rapping and how did it become a part of your life? I’ve had a passion for hip hop and rap since a very early age. I remember spending hours in the mirror when I was a little girl, mimicking Left Eye and MC Lyte’s flow and dance moves. My brother would take me to his school to perform rap battles and I won them all. Everyone was shocked - not ‘cause I was 12, not ‘cause I could rap, but because I was female. He also secretly bought me Dr. Dre and Eminem CDs because mom wouldn’t let us listen to explicit lyrics. But I knew rap would become a part of my life. When did you think it could turn into a career? I’ve always had a desire for music but my passion for turning it into a career didn’t begin until I moved to Jamaica and met some musicians that did this for a living. It made me realise that you could make a living off your talent, it just takes work and dedication like any

What has been your biggest challenge? The mentality of people here towards music, art and sports is that you’re not gonna make it. We don’t have much local support. They think that my hunger is crazy or my dreams are too big.

Who or what inspires you? My inspiration comes from general life experiences. I put myself out of the box in uncomfortable situations where I can learn and grow. As for my idols in the industry, a lot of my flow and inspiration comes from Left Eye, Lauryn Hill, Eve, Erykah Badu and MC Lyte. Now that you’ve caught the attention of big time producers, what are your plans? I’ll be working very closely with Grammy award winning record producer, Bryan-Michael Cox. He’s the guy who produced for Usher and Mariah Carey and a bunch of other artists. I’m so excited to work with him. I have a new project coming out called ‘Me thus far’. It’s an EP with about five or six songs and it’s based on my true story. I am still working with my other producer from Jamaica, SOS Dynamikz, who produced about 85% of my music. What are you looking forward to the most? Tours from companies like iStandard who are known for organising city to city and international tours are in the process of organising a 10 city tour where I will open for rappers like Rick Ross and other well-known artistes. I also have a collaboration with fellow MMTS winner Judah Tha Lion. ISLAND GUIDE SEPTEMBER/oCTOBER 2015 19


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Beat the summer heat

Frozen drinks D

to try

o you have that one go-to drink that you love? If so, we’re here to help you think outside the glass and try something new. The soaring temps sent us searching for extra icy drinks and we’ve found just what you need to cool off, as well as widen your horizons on what you should give a shot. Diverse, yet delicious, these frozen flavours found around Providenciales, are so worth putting on your list of drinks to try.

Flip Flop

Get it at Las Brisas in Chalk Sound Precisely poured for our pleasure, this colourful creation by bartender Jamesly is as flavourful as it looks. The amazing sea-side view plus the combination of mango, strawberry, sour mix, triple sec, light rum and blue curacao makes this drink doubly delicious. 22 ISLAND GUIDE SEPTEMBER/oCTOBER 2015

By Kandi Hariraj

The Green Flash

Get it at Seven, Seven Stars Resort in Grace Bay Stop by and have mixologist Nicolò Fiamarelli whip you up his latest creation - The Green Flash. This refreshing cocktail is made with white rum, honeydew, cucumber, mint, lime juice and sugar. We loved this tasty thirst quencher as much as Nicolò’s impressive technique.

Frozen Fishhook

Get it at Biere et Boules, Grace Bay Club in Grace Bay This perfectly pink vodka based drink includes lime juice, strawberries and bartender Garth’s special secret ingredients. He won’t tell what’s in it but will indulge us by preparing it any way we like – blended, shaken or stirred.


Banana & Mango Daiquiri

Lava Flow

Banana puree, mango puree, vodka and peach schnapps make up this delightful frozen frost. And paired with the perfect view overlooking the beautiful Grace Bay beach, you’ll not only be pleasing your palate at this beach side restaurant.

This frozen concoction created by Kalooki’s bartender James, aka 007, gives a twist to the Miami Vice, exploding with island flavours. It contains a blend of strawberry, piña colada and mango, plus a dash of local rums including Bambara Black, Gold and Silver, and Coconut Rum.

Turquoise Colada

Fruit Flavoured Margaritas

Alluding to the delightful turquoise waters of the TCI, this tasty indulgence includes Bambarra Coconut and Silver, pineapple, Coco Lopez and Curacao. After one sip you’ll probably be ordering another – it’s that good.

Cool off with your choice of fruit flavoured margarita at this busy beach side bar. Their signature frozen drinks include strawberry, mango, passion fruit and lime margaritas. Go ahead, you’re sure to love one of these tequila teasers.

Get it at the Deck, Seven Stars Resort in Grace Bay

Get it at Pelican Bay, Royal West Indies Resort in Grace Bay

Get it at Kalooki’s in Blue Hills

Get it at Bugaloo’s in Five Cays

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Tiki Hut comes home

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wenty-three years after Tiki Hut was first established in Turtle Cove as a neighbourhood bar and restaurant, it has returned to the exact spot where it all began. While it now boasts a restyled layout, additional seating, an updated menu and vibrant new decor, it retains the unique charm and family-style atmosphere that it has become renowned for. “Tiki Hut is all grown up and ready for the next era,” said Doug Camozzi, co-founder and owner of the popular island eatery. It was in 1992 that Doug, a third generation restauranteur from Colorado, and his first wife Stephanie decided to invest in the venture. They had lived in Providenciales for two years and Doug had enjoyed running both the Conch Bar and the Banana Boat - but he was looking for a new challenge. As luck would have it, the opportunity to buy ‘DJ’s Tiki Bar’ at boutique hotel Turtle Cove Inn presented itself and he and Stephanie jumped at the

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The stunning open air waterfront restaurant and bar with breath-taking views across the marina, is a welcome spot for tourists and locals alike.

chance to revamp the business. Its location on Turtle Cove Marina was ideal as the area was at the time the “heart and soul” of Providenciales, Doug said, adding “it felt like the right place to be.” They renamed it ‘Tiki Hut’ and Doug, who took the reins as chef, created a simple, reasonably priced menu that instantly attracted hordes of regulars. He explained that in the early 1990s there were very few restaurants in Providenciales, and there was a gap in the market for his American influenced island cuisine. His specialty was Colorado certified Angus beef, and over the years the menu expanded to include lobster, crab, fresh fish, pizzas and more. The restaurant became increasingly popular as Doug and Stephanie, who worked as hostess, came up with new ideas to attract customers.

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They created the Wednesday staple ‘Chicken or Ribs Night’, which remains one of the most popular weekly events on the island. Eleven successful years after founding the restaurant the couple lost the lease on the property and decided to move the establishment to a spot further up the marina. On the final night, scores of loyal customers grabbed their chairs and walked the short distance with them to the new venue. There, music instantly began to play, drinks were served and Tiki Hut continued to live on. While all efforts were made to retain the appeal of the original eatery, it became a larger restaurant with a different feel and it missed its home, Doug said. Meanwhile the original venue went through several changes of hands, spending time as Aqua, the F Spot


and F Lounge, but continued to be referred to as ‘the old Tiki Hut’.

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n 2015 Stephanie, who had been running the restaurant for several years, decided to move on, and Doug came up with the idea to take it home. “These are my roots,” Doug said, “I wanted to bring back something I created years ago but in a new and exciting atmosphere.” The original location was available and it was a dream come true to take it back home. Closing night mirrored that of 12 years earlier as customers grabbed their chairs, carrying them back to the original venue where the party continued. While he remains busy with several other business ventures, Doug said that his passion for Tiki Hut and what it represents is unrivalled. “Stephanie and I created something amazing. When we came to Provo, there were only 13 restaurant licences; now there are 139 and growing. “Tiki Hut remains one of only a couple left of the original 13 so the history is huge. “I attribute this to Stephanie as we both worked so hard to make this work through all these years, through all the new restaurants, through all the ups and down of the financial sector, through old timers moving on and leaving legendary stories behind, through hurricanes and relocations, the Tiki Hut lives on.” The stunning open air waterfront restaurant and bar with breath-taking views across the marina, is a welcome spot for tourists and locals alike. Its unique history is displayed throughout the brightly coloured building in photographs, aged signs and mementos of by-gone years. New features include a fireball lounge, a bistro with high top tables, a beer garden and a bamboo room – with a volley ball court and cabana bar on the way. Friendly staff attentively wait for orders which they deliver with a smile saved just for family – as every single customer becomes. ISLAND GUIDE SEPTEMBER/oCTOBER 2015 27


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Flyboard I

f you’ve noticed people popping in and out of the water at Walkin Marina like dolphins, doing flips and acrobatic tricks, you’re not mistaken. It’s just the newest water sport to hit the island called Flyboarding. Only developed about three years ago, this sport has stirred up some serious excitement among water sports enthusiasts and even the average adventure seeker. Although a seemingly dangerous sport, the activity does cause an adrenaline rush but is apparently far less scary than it looks and doesn’t require any special skill to get started. “Once you can walk, you can fly,” said FREE business co-owner Kilo Walkin, who introduced the sport to the island this summer. FREE owners Eugene Walkin and Kilo Walkin became fascinated with the idea since it premiered in 2012 and couldn’t get enough of the videos on the internet. They thought that TCI’s year round tropical climate and amazing blue waters would make a perfect location for the new sport. Although called a Flyboard, the clever invention actually consists of not only a board, but a pair of rather sturdy boots attached to a board that is connected by a long hose to a high powered jet ski. Of course there is a bit more whiz and accessories to it but the Flyboard is basically powered by

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A free feeling like no other


ding BY KANDI HARIRAJ

Provo’s newe

st extreme wa

ter sport

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And after you’ve got the hang of it the fun factor is fabulous. They’ll send you to incredible heights where you can start to manoeuvre and even attempt some acrobatics the water craft’s underwater propulsion, shooting water through the hose, thrusting the rider out the water and into the air allowing them to hover and ‘fly’ about or dive headfirst through the surf. FREE is equipped to launch riders up to a vertigoinducing 55ft, which - if you manage to reach it - can feel much higher.

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e warned though, Kilo said that once you get the hang of it, it can become addictive – as he’s noticed from many repeat customers. “It’s pretty easy to learn too,” he said, and once you’ve got a feel of it you’ll want to start manoeuvring and trying tricks. To get started, all you have to do is be able to stand, get over any fear and you’ll be ready to Flyboard, he reassures. While the sport seems to incorporate aspects of an

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array of activities including water skiing, snowboarding, wake boarding and acrobatic diving, these activities require a substantial amount of time and skill to master. However, balancing on a Flyboard is very intuitive and will most likely be accomplished on your first flight, Kilo explained. In the beginning, an instructor spends some time teaching you the basics and what to expect. Once in the water, the jet ski controller will only take you a few feet above the water until you’ve become comfortable and have gained some confidence. When you’ve found your balance, you can start to advance, depending on your comfort level and progression. And after you’ve got the hang of it the fun factor is fabulous. They’ll send you to incredible heights where you can start to manoeuvre and even attempt some acrobatics. “Once you learn to balance you truly get to experience the feeling of being free,” Kilo said. The hydro flight water sport, invented by Franky Zapata, has gained such global recognition and adoring fans that there is even a World Cup Flyboard competition held every year since 2012. With its growing popularity and progressive dexterity it’s quite apparent that this new water sport will continue to upsurge as participants push the boundaries of speed, height and innovation with new aquatic antics. Currently, FREE accepts participants from 4ft tall and up to 350lbs. Being athletic or having strong swimming skills are not even required. So if you’re in for a thrill, head up to Walkin Marina in Leeward and give it a try; it’s only a matter of time before you start flying free.


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BY DAVID BOWEN

The Oral Tradition of the Turks and Caicos Islands

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torytelling, like in many cultures, was a way of passing on traditions and customs from one generation to another. Each story carries morals, life principles, or life lessons. Throughout our history, story time was an integral part of the communal life of the people and the families of the settlements. The tales were always narrated; they were not written down. As they were told and retold, each storyteller would add this and take away that, but the essence, moral and storyline remained the same. Due to the TCI being annexed to Jamaica from 1873 until 1962, we share the folk stories of a clever, shrewd and crafty spider named Ananci. We also share the Brer Bookie and Brer Rabbie stories with our cultural cousins in The Bahamas. The ‘Brer' is an abbreviation for the word ‘brother’. These animal characters had the human characteristics of speech and manner. Ananci was a spider and Brer Bookie and Brer Rabbie were a goat and a rabbit. The stories came with the African slaves during

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the slave trade and eventually many of the references to Africa were dropped and local social characteristics and cultural aspects of the Caribbean islands were added as these stories were retold. The majority of the tales had an opening phrase that the storyteller recited before delving into the story. There are many such openings in the various Caribbean countries. However, the most commonly used introduction in the TCI goes something like this: “Once upon a time was a very good time, the monkey chew tobacco and spit white lime." The story would often end with: "Pig in the pen, my story end." Once the storyteller had uttered the preliminary words, you knew it was time to hear an exciting story. Telling fables was one way of passing on social values to children. Some make them think, some were comical, even scary - but they all entertained, just as stories and characters still do in the form of cartoons and animation today. Ananci is my favorite character so I'd like to share an Ananci story. Keep in mind that it’s always difficult to convey the true essence of the story when it’s written since the storyteller brings the characters to life with gestures, inflections of their voices, use of local dialect and the expressions on their


faces. So as you read this story, envision a wise elderly island native sitting on an old handmade stool, under a cool shady tree with a number of children and adults of all ages seated around.

Ananci and the Wisdom of the World

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nanci wanted to be the wisest one in all the world so he spent a whole year gathering every piece of wisdom he could find. On the morning of the last day of the year, he had finally gathered all the wisdom of the world and he stuffed it into the spiralling cavity of a large queen conch shell. He felt that by having all the wisdom hidden away, it would guarantee he would be the wisest and smartest on earth. By noon that day he realised he had a problem. He couldn't very well carry the conch shell everywhere. He became anxious and suspicious. Would someone try to steal the conch shell full of wisdom? He had so many suspicions and the more suspicious he felt, the more insecure he became. By evening he decided to hide the shell somewhere safe from thieves. He saw a tall Lignum Vitae tree and decided to hide the shell in the very top branches. Ananci was a good climber so he put the conch shell in a crocus sack, hung it around his neck in front of him and started

to climb. But right away he found it difficult to climb. He made several attempts, but every time the crocus sack containing the shell got in the way. Ananci became angry and frustrated and started yelling and cussing the tree. All the noise brought out Ananci’s ten children who stood by and watched from a distance. They only came closer when Ananci was tired and less likely to grab and lick one of them in frustration. Each child made a suggestion but Ananci only yelled at them to go away. Finally, the youngest suggested to Ananci to tie the crocus sack behind him the way some of the women in the settlement would carry their children on their backs when they went to work in the field. Ananci thought about it a bit then he tried his son’s suggestion. As quick as you could bat one eye, he was at the top of the tree. As soon as he got there he realised that the conch shell did not contain all the wisdom because some of it was left in the head of his youngest son. In his haste to climb down to get it, he forgot to secure the crocus sack and it fell from the top of the tree. The conch shell smashed on the ground and all the wisdom in it scattered to the four corners of the earth. Pig in the pen, my story end. Moral: "He who wants everything, every time, will lose everything anytime."

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SOCIAL SEEN

‘Race for the Conch’

ECO Sea-Swim

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erfect sunny blue skies, fresh coconut water, open water swim races, conch medals and trophies – those were just some of the highlights from the 6th annual ‘Race for the Conch’ ECO Sea-Swim event on July 4 in front of Ricky’s Flamingo Café. Participation in the three main races as well as the kids races exceeded expectation, with swimmers from the TCI, US, Canada, Barbados,

Photos: Digital Handprint, Agile LeVin, Marius Vultur

Watersports

Weekend

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Trinidad and Brazil. The event also garnered the support of Olympic gold medalist (1984 Los Angeles) Rowdy Gaines and world class open water marathon swimmer Yuko Matsuzaki who swam non-competitively. Organised by Ben Stubenberg and Chloe Zimmermann, the charity swim race raised money for Provo Children’s Home, TCI Swim Federation, and Reef Fund.


SOCIAL SEEN

Windvibes

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he 9th annual Windvibes watersports tournament on July 5 at Long Bay beach was a grand success. Amateur competitions in kiteboarding, kayaking, stand up paddling, swimming, and windsurfing kept the crowd of men, women and children entertained throughout the picture perfect day. The Windvibes Charity Challenge, which is a team relay event, recurred for a 2nd year with

team ‘Do It Centre’ taking home the winning trophy and collecting $10,332 for donation to their charity of choice – The Turks & Caicos National Trust. The event was organized by TCI’s own star kiteboarder Hope Levin and hosted by professional windsurfers Brian Talma of Barbados and Kevin Pritchard of Hawaii who travelled to the island to host the event.

Photos: Agile LeVin

Watersports

Weekend

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SOCIAL SEEN

WE Carnival

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rovidenciales experienced its first carnival with a three day lineup of activities during July 31 to August 3. Celebrations kicked off with ‘Junkyard Jouvert’ featuring soca artist Denise Belfon on Friday. Saturday accommodated a float parade from the

National Stadium to the downtown ballpark which included three floats representing Providenciales, Salt Cay and Grand Turk. Another concert at the park ended the night while events concluded on Monday with a family friendly beach party at the Bight Park.

Photos: WE Carnival, Prime DJs, Darwin Martinez

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SOCIAL SEEN

Caribbean House

Evolution

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his summer is sizzling with music and celebration and easily the grandest beach party of the year. Caribbean House Music Evolution, hosted by promoter John Tsavalas aka Johnny Legand, featured three international and two local DJs who rocked the TCI with four superb events over the weekend of July 24 -26. DJs included DJ Danny Stern from Miami, DJ B’ugo from Montreal, DJ Peter Andrews from London and local DJs – DJ Dayoh and DJ Dallas Rhodes. Opening the weekend festivities was a DJ workshop at the Regent Palms for teenagers ages 15 -18 who got a chance

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to mix, scratch and learn the basics of DJ equipment from the professionals. The partying got started on Friday night with a high energy ‘Revolution’ celebration at the Sand Bar. On Saturday, a combined party and charity fundraiser at Somewhere Café raised $12,000 for the Cancer Society. The final ‘Liberation’ party on Sunday welcomed 41 boats with over 350 people for a day of great music and fun in the sun at Little Water Cay. Right photo  John descends from a parasail to join in the excitement

Photos: Caribbean House Evolution


SOCIAL SEEN

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Events

Guide

September 12

September/October

SPECIAL DATES

Wrightfully Fit presents: Miss Teen Turks and Caicos Lifestyle and Fitness Competition at Long Bay Beach

September 25 National Youth Day - Public Holiday October is National Heritage Month October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

September 24

Miss Teen Turks and Caicos Motorcade from Stubbs Diamond Plaza to Fish Fry at The Bight Park. Starts 6pm.

October 12 National Heritage Day - Public Holiday

September 26

October 31

2nd annual Miss Teen TCI Pageant at Brayton Hall. Red Carpet 7pm. Coronation 8pm

Halloween

October 3

National Cancer Society Breast Cancer Awareness Walkaton from Graceway Gourmet at 5:45 am. Contact 232-8177

October 10

In the Pink Fundraiser at the Regent Palms

October 11

Corporate Charity Challenge at Provo Golf Club

October 17

National Cancer Society all-island Walkaton in North Caicos, South Caicos and Middle Caicos. Contact 232-8177

October 24

23rd Annual Ryder Cup at Provo Golf Club

October 25

6th Annual Chrysalis Fitness 5/10K Fun Run for the Salvation Army. 6:30 am

October 31

National Cancer Society Breast Cancer Awareness Luncheon at Beaches Resort at 1 pm. Contact 232-8177

WEEKLY EVENTS WEDNEDAYS Reggae Soca Sunset Cruise with Catch the Wave. Call 941-3047

THURSDAYS Island Fish Fry at The Bight Park. 5:30 - 9:30pm

Chicken and Rib night at Tiki Hut. Call 941-5341

FRIDAYS Steak Night at Tiki Hut. Call 941-5341 Steak and Shake at Big Als. Call 941-3797 Food and Live Music at Bugaloo’s Conch Crawl. Call 941-3863

SATURDAYS

SUNDAYS

Food and Live Music at Bugaloo’s Conch Crawl. Call 941-3863

Beach BBQ & Bonfire on Grace Bay Beach at Seven Stars Resort. Call 339-3777

BBQ and live band at Kalooki’s. Call 332-3388

Food and Live Music at Bugaloo’s Conch Crawl. Call 941-3863

Send your upcoming events to info@tciislandguide.com or call us on 649-347-9047 to have it listed here. 62 ISLAND GUIDE SEPTEMBER/oCTOBER 2015


ISLAND GUIDE SEPTEMBER/oCTOBER 2015 63


TCI Island Guide Magazine - September/October 2015  

A fun filled and trendy bi-monthly magazine highlighting TCI lifestyle and showcasing all the best things to enjoy in this beautiful island...

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