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ENERGY ISSUE

05 Toward Tomorrow 08 Planting the Seed 010 Powerful Network


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PUBLISHERS Sandra Watson Steven G. Zylstra

EDITOR

Don Rodriguez

EXECUTIVE EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

05 TOWARD TOMORROW

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Susan E. Marie

ART DIRECTOR

Utilities look to alternative pathways on road to meet growing energy demand

Erin Loukili Lucky You! Creative

www.luckyyoucreative.com

DESIGNER

Jaclyn Threadgill

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kerry Bennett Monique Clement Tal Kelem Jessica Swarner Steve Yozwiak

E-MAIL techconnect@aztechcouncil.org

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For queries or customer service call 602-343-8324 TechConnect is published by the Arizona Technology Council, 2800 N. Central Ave. #1530, Phoenix, AZ 85004.

Entire contents copyright 2019, Arizona Technology Council. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Products named in these page pages are trade names or trademarks of their respective companies. Publication of TechConnect is supported by the Arizona Commerce Authority.

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PLANTING THE SEED Solar farm is key to Apple’s pioneering use of renewables

POWERFUL NETWORK Arizona Energy Consortium becomes uniting force for the industry

ARIZONA COMMERCE AUTHORITY

No roadblocks as electric vehicles race toward victory

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Also Inside

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014 Message from the Governor 015 The University of Arizona 016 Arizona State University 018 Northern Arizona University 020 TGen SPRING 2019 TECH CONNECT

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Publisher’s Letter

A Cleaner Powerhouse ven for long-time Arizonans, when you talk about the future of energy, the conversation almost automatically turns to Palo Verde Generating Station. While Palo Verde’s output is nothing less than impressive — enough power to serve more than 4 million people annually — it’s not the only show in town when it comes to meeting our needs. The future is really about alternatives. More specifically, that means renewable energy. And that’s not just me talking. Results of a recent survey of state voters conducted for the non-partisan Arizona PIRG Education Fund serving consumers and the public interest asked how much of a priority should it be for Arizona to grow and use renewable energy resources such as solar and wind. A total of 86 percent of the respondents considered it to be important. Further, the voters were asked about the importance of the state generating energy from readily abundant homegrown sources instead of importing them from neighboring states. This time, 89 percent considered it important. The voters even saw the added value of alternatives beyond convenience in their own lives. Seventy percent agreed with the view that increasing use of clean and renewable energy sources will create jobs and encourage economic development here. And when asked if there are benefits by even increasing the number of electric vehicles on our roads, 62 percent responded “yes.” Fortunately, renewable energy and its uses aren’t something for some day. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, renewable energy accounted for approximately 13 percent of the state’s net electricity generation in 2017. In that same year, Arizona was behind only California in solar generation for the United States. Observers know reaching this point

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STEVEN G. ZYLSTRA

didn’t happen overnight. Some might even think it seemed we were a little late to the party. The first commercial solar photovoltaic (PV) array in the state didn’t go into service until 1997. But by 2014, one of the nation’s largest solar PV facilities — 290 megawatts — was ready in Yuma. In 2017, solar energy accounted for about 6 percent of our state’s net electricity generation. Arizona ranks third in the nation in installed solar generating capacity behind California and North Carolina. And there should easily be more on the horizon when it comes to our tapping into the power of the sun. Arizona’s solar energy potential is second only to Nevada’s among the states. But the legacy of renewables isn’t just built on solar. The U.S. Energy Information Administration notes that almost half of the state’s total renewable net generation and more than half of the state’s utility-scale renewable net generation originate in hydroelectric power. Two dams on the Colorado River — Glen Canyon and Hoover — are among our largest power plants in the state. Even though it accounts for less than 1 percent of the net electricity generation, wind is still making a mark. Its story here started 10 years ago when the first commercial-scale wind farm came online. More potential for wind power lies along and just north of the Mogollon Rim. I’m just scratching the surface with this snapshot on renewable energy’s place in our state. As you’ll see in this issue of TechConnect, there are more than enough options for energy in Arizona to keep the lights on for years to come. STEVEN G. ZYLSTRA is president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council and Arizona Technology Council Foundation..


Close+up: Focusing on Significant Topics Affecting Technology

TOWARD TOMORROW Utilities looking ahead at non-traditional ways to deal with energy needs

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or Arizona’s utilities industry, meeting an ever-increasing demand for power is an ongoing challenge. But the major players already have made some headway to meet the need while factoring renewable energy into their game plans today and tomorrow.

ARIZONA PUBLIC SERVICE To decide where it is headed, Arizona Public Service (APS) went through a three-year stakeholder process to develop its 2017 Integrated Resource Plan mapping out how the utility expected to meet its customers’ projected energy needs for the 15 years to follow. For APS, solar will continue to be a focus when it comes to clean energy. It expects the state’s energy needs to be 50 percent higher by 2025. To respond, the utility expects increased use of solar energy along with energy efficiency to meet nearly half of the anticipated new energy growth.  Since 2011, customers have been benefitting from the clean energy produced by multiple grid-scale solar plants that APS operates under its AZ Sun program. The nine plants are in locales across the state, including Gila Bend,

APS buys all of the power created by Solana, the first U.S. solar plant with thermal energy storage that allows electricity to be produced at night.

Buckeye, Chino Valley, Hyder Valley, Yuma and Glendale, giving APS access to plants generating more than 437.2 megawatts. The site likely getting the most attention is the Solana Generating Station, a 280-megawatt parabolic trough solar plant just outside Gila Bend. It’s the world’s largest solar plant of its kind featuring thermal energy storage, meaning it captures power of the sun, stores it and continues to deliver it to customers for up to six hours after sunset. Although owned by Atlantica Yield & Liberty Interactive Corp., APS purchases all of the power generated. APS predicts a significant increase in private rooftop solar capacity and support from energy efficiency programs. A few years ago, the company counted more than 1 million installed solar panels in its portfolio, which collectively generated more than 1 gigawatt (551 megawatts of rooftop solar installations and 499 megawatts of utility-scale solar). But the utility is not just banking on the sun being up to meet its needs. Batteries also fit into the future as the Integrated Resource Plan calls for adding up to 500 megawatts of energy storage over the next 15 years. The batteries SPRING 2019 TECH CONNECT

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Close+up A battery storage system is at the heart of SRP and NextEra Energy Resources' Pinal Central Solar Energy Center.

will bring more clean energy to APS customers when it is redistributed at peak customer usage times later in the day. Three grid-scale batteries already operate plus a 50-megawatt battery is being created in partnership with First Solar for use in 2021. Plans call for more to come as APS recently wrapped up a process to select companies that will equip solar plants it uses with a total of up to approximately 106 megawatts of battery storage. As it does with its rooftop solar installation program, APS also is turning to residential partners for battery use. Its Storage Rewards program offers customers in targeted areas with a residential battery storage option using an APS-owned battery system. In exchange for a bill credit, the company manages use of the battery as the company studies the impact of using battery storage as an energy source during high demand periods.

SALT RIVER PROJECT For Salt River Project (SRP), its Sustainable Portfolio has the goal of meeting 20 percent of the utility’s retail energy requirements through sustainable resources by 2020. Considering the company reached the 17.25 percent mark when its fiscal year 2018 ended, SRP is on track to reach the new mark. Like APS, solar is just one of the renewable energy sources for SRP. It’s no surprise that SRP continues its tradition of using hydroelectric dating back more than a century when a byproduct of its new water-delivery system from the new Theodore Roosevelt Dam was power. But the mix is even more diverse with geothermal and wind and biomass as sources. Also, not all sources are necessarily homegrown. One

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example is SRP purchases geothermal energy generated at the Cove Fort Geothermal Project in Beaver County, Utah. Private energy resources like rooftop solar also fit into SRP’s plan to deliver a smarter grid into the future. The utility paid more than $150 million in solar incentives to approximately 20,000 customers from August 2004 through April 2018 Batteries also figure into SRP’s plans. In a partnership with NextEra Energy Resources, the utility opened the Pinal Central Solar Energy Center (PCSEC), Arizona’s largest utility-scale solar energy center paired with a battery storage system. The 20-megawatt solar photovoltaic generation facility comprised of 258,000 solar panels on land east of Casa Grande can generate enough solar energy to power 5,000 homes and store excess in a 10-megawatt lithium-ion battery system. In another project, SRP has partnered with AES and Fluence to create a long-lasting, reliable energy storage solution for central Arizona’s power grid, as well as the company’s electric customers. Construction of the 10-megawatt facility — the first stand-alone battery


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storage system of this type in Arizona — began in May. Based in Chandler, it will be charged by an SRP distribution station. Also in May, SRP launched a program to support the installation and use of battery storage systems for its residential customers. The Battery Storage Incentive Program provides up to $1,800 for customers who purchase and install qualifying lithium ion battery technologies. The program was made available to a limited number of residential electric customers on a first-come, first-served basis during a 36-month period.

TUCSON ELECTRIC POWER Tucson Electric Power (TEP) already gets 13 percent of its power from renewable resources, with enough wind and solar energy to power more than 115,000 homes. For utility-scale solar, the utility gets more than 250 megawatts from a combination of plants that it owns as well as power that it purchases. It also taps into more than 200 megawatts from residential and commercial rooftop solar systems. For wind power, TEP draws from the Red Horse Wind and Macho Springs sites. Red Horse is a 30-megawatt wind farm west of Willcox that includes 15 wind turbines on 220 acres. The project is owned by a subsidiary of Torch Renewables Energy. The Macho Springs facility is on approximately 1,900 acres northeast of Deming, N.M., and includes 28 turbines mounted on 264-foot-tall towers. Expect more use of renewable energy to come as TEP plans to double its wind and solar capacity with three new systems that are expected to be completed by 2021. They include a 100-megawatt solar array paired with a 30-megawatt battery storage system, as well

as a 100-megawatt wind system and one that will be rated at 150 megawatts. By 2030, TEP plans to have three times as much wind and solar energy as it does now. That’s enough to power almost every home in the Tucson area! Under the utility’s 30 by 30 Plan, 30 percent renewable power will be delivered to customers by 2030—nearly twice the level required by the state in 2025.

CENTRAL ARIZONA PROJECT The Central Arizona Project (CAP) is known as the largest source of renewable water in Arizona. What may not be evident is its being the biggest electricity user in the state. More than 2.8 billion kilowatt hours of energy are needed each year to deliver more than 500 billion gallons of Colorado River water to 80 percent of the state’s population. That’s largely because water is pumped 336 miles essentially uphill between Lake Havasu and the end of the system south of Tucson. Just like any responsible company today, there are considerations by CAP of controlling costs while seeking ways to reduce its carbon footprint. That’s especially true as closure of the coal-fired Navajo Generating Station near Page, a key source of power for CAP, appears imminent. An alternative energy source for the water supplier was revealed recently with news of a 20-year agreement with AZ Solar 1 to sell it power for just 2.5 cents per kilowatt-hour—one of the lowest-cost contracts of its kind—from a planned 30-megawatt solar plant. The facility will be owned, operated and built somewhere along the canal route by Origis Energy USA, with the first electricity delivery expected by the end of 2020. SPRING 2019 TECH CONNECT

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POWERFUL NETWORK

Christopher Davey EnviroMission

Michelle De Blasi Fennemore Craig

Arizona Energy Consortium keeps the industry well-connected

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ot only is there strength in numbers but there also is power. The latter is especially true when it comes the Arizona Energy Consortium (AEC). Established in 2011 as a committee of the Arizona Technology Council, the AEC became a standalone nonprofit in 2015 that has grown to a membership base of individuals and organizations totaling more than 500. With Michelle De Blasi of Fennemore Craig and Christopher Davey of EnviroMission serving as co-executive directors, the organization counts among its successes the Arizona Energy Roadmap released in 2013 and the inaugural Southwest Energy Conference held in September. TechConnect asked De Blasi and Davey to discuss AEC’s journey, the group’s impact and what’s in it for them.

For those unfamiliar with the consortium, how is its impact greater than what the individual members can do on their own?

Davey: What we’ve been successful in doing over the last 5 to 7 years is just bringing together or creating a forum where people can come together and exchange ideas, exchange business opportunities, lessons learned, as well as pitfalls that are out there and identify some of those so we can educate the relevant folks to make it easier to do business. I think that’s further reinforced by the diversity we now have in the membership base. Is the consortium just for members within Arizona or is it also open to people outside Arizona?

De Blasi: It’s definitely open to people outside of Arizona. From the conference last fall and the recognition that both we and the state were exposed to, we’ve gotten a lot more interest from out of state. We’ve had some folks from mostly the regional

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states but even those from back wast join us. Davey: I think the conference had people from about 30 different states that were represented. We’re definitely receiving a broader attention. What was the significance to both the consortium and the state by hosting the conference here?

De Blasi: I think it makes Arizona important as a place where a lot of businesses have wanted to locate. But we can’t do that without talking to our neighbors and coordinating with them. So, I think for the Energy Consortium itself it was really important in spreading the word about what we’ve been doing all this time. There really isn’t an organization out there that’s able to do what we’ve been doing. And I think for the state, obviously it was important enough to get the governor’s attention. We had the governor (Doug Ducey) as our keynote, we had regulators from out of state, as well as utilities in-state and out-of-state, developers, lawyers from all over the country, and other affected stakeholders. We had the (exeutive director) of the Western Governors Association (James Ogsbury) from Denver come. So, I think it really helped put the state in the middle of that conversation. Davey: Having it be put on by an industry group that again isn’t just a solar advocacy group or really just a branch of the utilities (was important). It’s truly a business consortium that is all forms of energy, not just one particular. We’re being seen as a regional cooperative since we first issued the the roadmap. We were a mutual player to provide a forum for all stakeholders to come together and have their thoughts be considered. Do you think that reponse really emphasizes we’ve now reached the point in time where


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it’s not just about the utilities? Does a conference like that emphasize that?

De Blasi: Absolutely it does. We had a very broad array of different types of stakeholders: everyone from developers to utilities to independent power producers to regulators. We had some community organizations there. All sides of the industry were covered there and I think it made for a really meaningful conversation. And that’s folks on all sides of the power industry as well — renewable and traditional and that sort of thing. How does the momentum of the conference continue? Is there a plan for another one?

De Blasi: We have gotten feedback from folks who have started discussions from the conference that are continuing. And so that’s great to hear as well. I don’t know if they’ll particularly get projects out of it but they’re definitely moving forward in that coordination. The details will be coming (about a second conference). It’ll be about same September/October timeframe. Davey: We’ll have information on the website in midyear. Besides the conference, what do you count among the successes over the past few years for the consortium?

De Blasi: I think having started with the Tech Council — which was a great opportunity to have that starting point as we worked with (President and CEO) Steve (Zysltra) to start it — we always knew that we would ultimately become our own nonprofit but I think we’ve been able to grow up as an organization. There was so much interest at the beginning that we were trying to just figure out how we could be the most helpful. We were pulled in a lot of directions I think at the beginning. Now we’ve really come to realize after speaking to many of our members that our greatest asset is the fact that as we are a business consortium and that our ultimate goal in everything we do is bringing people together to do more business together. Davey: As Michelle said earlier, it’s now not all about utilities. That’s an accurate statement. However, they are an integral part of the market and the market doesn’t exist in a secure, reliable,

cost-effective manner without them. So, they continue to need to be part of the conversation. At the end of the day, we’re all here to ensure we can turn the lights on in a cost-effective manner but we’re also all here to do business. So how can the region as a whole do business in the most effective manner? That’s not by putting up boundaries between the various states. Our groups are connected into Mexico, our groups are connected across other nations, our groups are connected to our east and to our west and to our north as well. So, you can’t ignore that. And there are impacts both positive and negative if you don’t have the conversations immediately or the onset. You risk having unintended consequences. Are there any other upcoming projects?

De Blasi: As Chris mentioned, the roadmap came out in 2012. I can’t believe it’s been that long! But we’ve been working over the last 6 to 8 months to update it and getting folks’ input. Hopefully, this quarter we’ll be issuing an updated version. Why are you both involved in the consortium?

De Blasi: When we started it, it really was because there wasn’t anything like it. And even times when I thought we might pass it off — and I don’t mean that in a negative way — to another organization to take this over and grow it or what have you. I’m not sure that’s possible because you really have to be fully entrenched in the industry as Chris and I both are in our day jobs, and understand the direction of where the conversation needs to go. Davey: It really has been a standalone organization that we got involved with for the betterment of the industry. And it probably was an altruistic goal at the beginning and that was sufficient to keep us motivated but then as you see us evolve as an organization, see the membership change and evolve, see the demands and interests of members change and come in line almost with what we were saying six or seven years ago. It reinforces why we’re still here. We are providing a service. From that perspective, it is rewarding. It’s rewarding to see people cut deals and hear about it or read about it, and I know how that happened or I know where they met. SPRING 2019 TECH CONNECT

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Close+up

PLANTING THE SEED Apple unveils its crowning achievement for renewable energy in Mesa Gov. Doug Ducey tours Apple’s Data & Global Command Center with company executives during its opening.

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WRITING BY >< JESSICA SWARNER

hen Apple made plans to convert an empty Mesa building into its $2 billion Arizona Data & Global Command Center, the technology giant knew it wanted the building to run on 100 percent renewable energy just like the rest of its facilities. And what better way to do so than build a giant solar farm? The makers of the iPhone partnered with the Salt River Project and other Arizona groups in 2014 to find space for the project. The team found a spot in Florence to build the 282-acre, 50-megawatt Bonnybrooke solar farm that became operational in December 2016. Apple made an agreement with SRP that year to sell the utility 50 megawatts of energy produced at Bonnybrooke. The approximately 144,000 solar panels in the array produce more than 147 million kilowatt-hours of energy per year, according to Apple. The 25-year agreement helps the utility reduce its carbon footprint and supports renewable energy development in the state, according to the utility. SRP purchases the solar power at a wholesale rate, meaning it doesn’t affect its 1 million customers’ bills, and Apple retains the environmental credits from the project. Apple considers renewable energy an important value to its business. The company announced in April 2018 that all its global facilities were running on 100 percent renewable energy, including retail stores, offices and data centers. “We’re committed to leaving the world better than we found it. After years of hard work,

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we’re proud to have reached this significant milestone,” CEO Tim Cook said at the time. “We’re going to keep pushing the boundaries of what is possible with the materials in our products, the way we recycle them, our facilities and our work with suppliers to establish new creative and forward-looking sources of renewable energy because we know the future depends on it.” The Bonnybrooke solar field produces more than enough energy needed to power Apple’s Mesa center. In fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 2017, the building was supported by 45 million kilowatt-hours of renewable energy—the same amount used by 3,640 Arizona homes. The 1.3 million-square-foot building was first owned but never used by First Solar. It was then bought by Apple and occupied by a glass supplier that filed for bankruptcy in 2014. After talks with the city officials, Apple decided to bring its data center to Mesa. “All of Apple’s iCloud operations—music, health, everything else that touches most of our lives literally all the time—is going through this building, and Apple talked about how pleased they are with the quality of the workforce they were able to find here,” Mesa Mayor John Giles told Covering Mesa when the center officially opened in August 2018. “They’ve invested so heavily, both in terms of the significance, the strategic value of this building, and the financial commitment to this building is really very flattering for Mesa and for the whole state of Arizona.” As of August, Apple had 1,100 employees in Arizona and supported 30,000 jobs in the state, according to Mesa officials.


Southwest Solar Technology of Tempe and Ben Gurion University of Israel have developed the Dish concentrated photovoltaic system. PHOTO BY Herb Hayden, Southwest Solar Technology

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ARIZONA AND ISRAEL Collaborations and funding take ideas to next level

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WRITING BY >< TAL KELEM

unding the development of innovative technologies is always a challenge. The risk is high, the development process outcome is not assured and, in many cases, the integration of a complementary technology that may be owned by another company is the elusive missing link. While Arizona and Israeli companies are realistic in understanding the obstacles that can stymie joint development efforts, they also share a keen appreciation of the synergistic benefits of strategic collaboration. Actually, there are quite a few successful joint technological partnerships between Israeli and Arizona companies in a variety of fields, including renewable energy where the tourism adage “you don’t have to shovel sunshine” could be applicable to both locations. Seven of these joint projects were funded by the U.S.-Israel Binational Industrial Research and Development (BIRD) Foundation, which was established to facilitate and stimulate mutually beneficial technological cooperation between U.S. and Israeli companies. The stimulation comes in the form of strategic matchmaking between compatible companies in both countries, and a $1 million conditional research and development grant per joint project in fields that cover the full spectrum of technology industries. The joint BIRD projects between Israeli and Arizona companies have come from various industries, from Agtech and life sciences to homeland security. Most recently, BIRD has supported two collaborative projects in the solar energy sector, where both Arizona and Israel have converging interests and, with days of uninterrupted sunshine, a geographical advantage. The project between Southwest Solar Technology (SST) of Tempe and Ben Gurion University of the Negev involved the development and testing of an SST Dish concentrated

photovoltaic (CPV) system and succeeded in producing a commercial product that already has achieved initial sales. “BIRD funding helped us begin a development of Solar Dish CPV technology in cooperation with an Israeli university that is a leader in solar R&D,” says Herb Hayden, SST’s president and chief technology officer. The BIRD project provided testing of pre-commercial dish units in the Arizona company’s facilities and at the Ben Gurion National Solar Energy Center in southern Israel. The result of this bilateral merging of the minds was the development of alternative CPV applications of the solar dish and a possible solution for energy storage, the holy grail of full renewable energy penetration. “We are working on solar thermal applications of the dish,” says Hayden, and “have developed a concept to use solar heat with thermal storage to drive a turbine for potentially 24-hour power.” A second clean energy-related venture being developed by Tucson-based Global Solar Energy and Haogenplast in Kibbutz Haogen combines lightweight flexible solar panel technology with PVC cover sheets to create an innovative sealed cover system for large-scale water reservoirs. By moving the generation of power closer to the point of use, this BIRD project aims to reduce load on the grid and transmission losses, and improve the robustness of the existing infrastructure. Arizona companies have many opportunities to develop their own advanced technologies while taking advantage of Israel’s local talent and vibrant technological ecosystem. The BIRD Foundation can assist by working with companies to identify potential strategic partners and facilitate introductions. For more information, please contact Tal Kelem at tal@birdf.com or visit www.birdf.com. TAL KELEM is director of business development for the BIRD Foundation.

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Arizona Commerce Authority

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Phoenix is site of the new Arizona Research & Development Center of Nikola Motor Company, maker of the Nikola One semi-truck.

Electric vehicles find the fast lane to success in Arizona >> BY SANDRA WATSON

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ince the beginning of the 21st century, Arizonans have experienced rapid changes in their transportation landscape. State highways like the Loop 202 and Loop 303 have established connections between the East Valley and West Valley in the Phoenix metro area. A decade ago, the Valley Metro light rail debuted, and today the system spans 26 miles. Arizona continues to make investments in the future Interstate11 corridor, laying the foundation for a critical connection between the two largest cities in the West— Phoenix and Las Vegas—that currently are not linked by an interstate. In the past few years, the innovations have been fast and furious. Ride-sharing apps and automated vehicle companies have joined the state’s economy, providing increased transportation options for Arizonans. Arizona also has strategically positioned itself as the capital of the next big innovative disruption in the transportation market: electric vehicles. More and more exciting

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companies are making tremendous investments in Arizona’s economy that benefit communities across the state. Yes, Arizona has become a leader in transportation technology and innovation, in large part due to a careful and thoughtful emphasis on job-friendly policies championed by Gov. Doug Ducey and leaders at every level of government. By developing a talented workforce while ensuring forward-thinking companies can operate in an environment free from overly burdensome regulation, Arizona has emerged as a hotbed for entrepreneurs and technology companies looking to build the products of the future and address global challenges. Arizona has demonstrated in recent years that our value proposition resonates strongly with modern businesses searching for a location to test, scale and succeed. We’ve put an emphasis on recruiting these innovative companies looking to make long-term investments, and we are beginning to see outstanding results. Lucid Motors is one such Arizona success


story. The automotive company aims to build a luxury vehicle for the next generation of Americans who want a world-class automobile to include an electric engine. Touted as the “most promising” of the new EV startup companies by Charged magazine, Lucid’s forward-thinking designs have already electrified the auto world and attracted the attention of private and public sector leaders from across the world. Lucid Motors explored 60 locations in 13 states as the potential site for its plant designed to create more than 2,000 jobs and $700 million in capital investment. Thanks to the groundwork laid by Gov. Ducey, the Arizona Commerce Authority and our partners, Lucid Motors selected Arizona on the basis of our innovation-first mindset, strategic geographic location and excellent relationship with our neighboring country of Mexico. “Lucid Motors is building the luxury automobile of the future, and we have an opportunity to become the global leader in automotive technology,” said Peter Rawlinson, the company’s chief technology officer. “We are confident Arizona is the ideal location to advance our innovations and will continue to provide an excellent platform for our success.” Electric vehicles aren’t just limited to the sedan-sized cars, however. When most people think of semi-trucks that haul goods and products across interstate highways, noisy, diesel-fueled vehicles come to mind. Nikola Motor Company is looking to change that vision and introduce a new option for businesses that need to move their goods across the country: semi-truck vehicles that run on hydrogen-electric technology. Nikola began looking for a new design and manufacturing headquarters facility specifically for these electric vehicles at the beginning of 2017.

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Arizona Commerce Authority

After a yearlong search that included nine states and 30 different site locations, one state stood out from the rest. “Arizona has the workforce to support our growth and a governor that was an entrepreneur himself. They understood what 2,000 jobs would mean to their cities and state,” said Trevor Milton, Nikola’s CEO and founder. Arizona’s well-developed talent pipeline, pro-business environment, low cost of living and access to major international markets also were mentioned by Milton as key factors in Nikola’s decision to bring more than $1 billion in capital investment to the region by 2024. And the electric vehicle companies choosing to set up shop in Arizona aren’t just limited to those that drive on our roads and highways. Eviation, an Israeli startup whose mission is to build the industry’s first all-electric aircraft, recently chose Prescott for its U.S. headquarters. After debuting the Alice Commuter—the company’s zero-emission regional commuter aircraft—at the Paris Air Show in 2017, Eviation was ready to find a U.S. location. Arizona ultimately offered the ideal environment for the company to scale and succeed. Thanks to Prescott’s proximity to Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Eviation also will have access to some of the most talented engineers being trained anywhere in the world. As technology gives rise to the next generation of transportation options, Arizona is well-prepared to act as a launching pad for innovative companies. As a result, electric vehicle companies will continue to park their operations in the state and shape the future of mobility—whether on land or in the air. SANDRA WATSON is president & CEO of the Arizona Commerce Authority and co-publisher of TechConnect.

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Message from the Governor

Plugging into a new way to power our travel

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n 1985, I packed my things into a Datsun B-210 and made the drive from my hometown of Toledo, Ohio, all the way to Tempe. As a young college student, there was nothing like the excitement of hitting the open road to start a new adventure. A lot has changed since then. Americans are still hitting the road to pursue their dreams but the cars they’re driving have evolved. As innovation and technology advances, affordable electric vehicles that are safe and clean will play an increasing part in our nation’s transportation future. And many of them will be made right here in Arizona. Arizona has earned a reputation as one of the best places to test, launch and scale new ideas. We’ve seen this in our business environment that attracts high-wage technology and manufacturing jobs from companies on the cutting edge of major industries. Dronemanufacturer and operator Airobotics chose Scottsdale for its global headquarters. TuSimple is making automated semi-trucks in Tucson. At Fab 42 in Chandler, Intel continues to produce semiconductors from one of the most advanced factories in the world. Like these other industries, the electric vehicle market is rapidly expanding and Arizona is leading the charge. Earlier this year, Nikola Motor Company chose Coolidge—one of 30 sites across the country being considered—to open the manufacturing plant for its hydrogen-electric semi-trucks. This investment will bring more than 2,000 jobs for Arizonans and $1 billion in capital investment, providing an economic jolt to Pinal County and our entire state. Just a half-hour away from Nikola’s plant

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GOV. DOUG DUCEY

will be a new manufacturing operation for Lucid Motors. Lucid chose Casa Grande after exploring more than 60 sites in the United States. Our state’s commitment to business-friendly policies, streamlined regulations and a well-developed pipeline of engineering talent were all cited by Lucid as reasons to bring more than 2,000 jobs and $700 million in capital investment to Arizona. With more high-tech jobs and positions coming here, we want to make sure Arizonans are prepared to fill them. That’s why our budget invests in meeting workforce needs across the state. In Pinal County, Arizona is partnering with the Arizona Commerce Authority, the City of Casa Grande and Central Arizona College to create a training center that will equip current and future residents in the region with advanced manufacturing skills that these motor companies and the growing industrial sector need. Our support for electric vehicles goes beyond simply building them here. Arizona recently joined an interstate Electric Vehicle Corridor agreement that promotes best practices among participating states to facilitate and expand the usage of electric vehicles. It’s Arizonans’ entrepreneurial spirit, creativity and leadership in innovation that leads to success. We’re looking forward to seeing the continued success of electric vehicles.


Tech Park advances the next generation of solar energy innovation with the unique testing and demonstration capabilities of the Solar Zone.

UPDATE THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

SOLAR ZONE

No place like it under the Arizona sun WRITING BY >< TECH PARKS ARIZONA

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ower generation and distribution are critical parts of our society. However, society has realized that we need to move away from fossil fuel power plants and into using clean energy to generate electricity. That is why The University of Arizona Tech Park developed the Solar Zone. The Solar Zone creates an integrated, multi-dimensional research center that fosters all elements of solar energy development including generation and distribution, research and development, assembly and manufacturing, product development, testing and evaluation, workforce development, and public education and demonstration. To successfully compete with coal and oilbased energy and become a larger part of the overall energy mix, solar energy must become more efficient, consistent and less costly. Just four years from its inception, Tech Parks Arizona celebrated the completion of Phase One of the Solar Zone at the UA Tech Park. The Solar Zone, a public-private partnership between the university and Tucson Electric Power, is one of the largest multi-technology solar testing and demonstration sites in the world. Representing the first milestone in the program, 10 companies and organizations are participating in Phase One, testing and demonstrating a variety of solar technologies and systems. The site is designed to generate 25 megawatts of power, which is nearly twice the daily electrical consumption of the Tech Park and enough to power the homes of more than 4,600 TEP residential customers for a year. Each

Solar Zone tenant has a 20-year agreement with TEP whereby the utility uses all solar power generated by the Solar Zone — which is fed directly into the grid — to expand its renewable energy resources in Southern Arizona. The sun shines at “optimal radiance” approximately 85 percent of the year in Tucson, allowing solar technologies to be tested effectively and thoroughly year-round. The Solar Zone provides researchers with invaluable data and the ability to evaluate various technologies as they perform side by side. Testing under identical operating conditions allows developers to determine when systems are most efficient and economical. University researchers are testing everything from solar power forecasting to the environmental impact of solar energy installations. Phase Two of the Solar Zone includes expanding research and development activities to focus on energy storage, grid optimization and micro grids, distributed solar systems, and integrated and embedded solar materials. As part of Phase Two, the UA Tech Park opened an additional 29 acres of land for testing and demonstration projects. Energy storage is a primary focus. The primary advantage of a storage system in the context of a large utility is often in its ability to very rapidly change power output levels, much faster than the proportional governor response rate of any conventional generation system. First generation solar energy storage projects can balance out fast-changing demands on the grid-level systems (i.e., weather-related events). The first project of Phase Two is an innovative energy storage systems. E.ON developed a 10-megwatt lithium titanate oxide (LTO) storage facility and accompanying 2-megawatt solar array on contract for Tucson Electric Power. Tech Parks Arizona continues to strive to achieve all of the above, creating a bridge between academia and industry through green technology innovations. The ability for many technologies to be tested and evaluated at the Solar Zone has allowed participating companies to access, modify, and improve the efficiency and potential impact of renewable energy. SPRING 2019 TECH CONNECT

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STAR POWER Researcher innovates solar energy technology in space WRITING BY >< MONIQUE CLEMENT

The thinness of a 20-micron-thick silicon solar cell prototype for space fabricated by Regher Solar enables extreme flexibility. PHOTO COURTESY OF Stanislau Herasimenka

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y 2050 we’re going to have global broadband Internet satellite networks, in-orbit manufacturing, space tourism, asteroid mining, and lunar and Mars bases. More than a gigawatt of solar energy — the equivalent of 3.125 million photovoltaic panels — will be needed to power those activities. However, because solar technology is currently the most expensive component on satellites, engineers and scientists are looking for ways to make solar energy in space affordable — and to keep solar power systems from degrading so quickly in the extremely harsh environment of space. Stanislau “Stas” Herasimenka, an Arizona State University postdoctoral researcher, thinks he has the solution to provide cost-effective and efficient next-generation solar power for space applications. Silicon heterojunction technology uses a low-temperature method to deposit layers of amorphous silicon with a high concentration of atomic hydrogen onto a crystalline silicon wafer. This method creates a solar cell that’s more efficient at converting sunlight into electricity than conventional solar cells, which are manufactured using standard high-temperature methods. Pioneered in the 1990s, silicon heterojunction technology is not new but it’s not widely used in the commercial solar energy industry. Still, it holds great promise for the future of solar energy. In conventional solar cells, the current manufacturing efficiency is up to 21.5 percent.

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Herasimenka believes silicon heterojunction solar cell technology can be manufactured to attain as much as 24 percent efficiency without increasing the cost of production. While that would seem to be a small step, it’s actually the next giant leap the solar power industry is looking to achieve. Seeing this as an opportunity to apply his graduate studies research, Herasimenka founded solar cell technology startup Regher Solar with solar industry expert Michael Reginevich. Stuart Bowden, an associate research professor of electrical and energy engineering in the ASU Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, praised Herasimenka’s work both as a doctoral student and a postdoctoral scholar to create commercial-grade silicon heterojunction solar technology. “When I came to ASU in 2009, Stas was our first student to complete an experimental thesis, and his passion for solar was critical to kick-start the lab,” says Bowden, Herasimenka’s doctoral research advisor. “He did extensive theoretical modeling work but he was also the one who pushed on making his research commercial. Stas has really embraced the entrepreneurial spirit at ASU and it’s great he has the support to take his lab work out into the world.” Space: The solar frontier It’s extremely complicated for a novel solar technology to enter the market. The current cost of a commercial solar panel is about 30 cents per watt. At this point in its development, silicon heterojunction solar cell technology is too expensive for the terrestrial market but may be very attractive to aerospace companies. The current leading technology of solar energy in space is in the form of tandem solar cells, which are more efficient than terrestrial solar cells (28 to 32 percent efficiency), but they cost orders of magnitude more at $100 to $500 per watt.


UPDATE ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

In comparison, Regher Solar’s silicon heterojunction technology is a great deal at $1 per watt cost even with the loss of about 7 percent efficiency. Not only is the price right, Herasimenka and his Regher Solar team have ideas in mind to make solar cells that are more resistant to the harsh environment of space that theoretically could also increase the cells’ end-of-life efficiency. Their research caught the attention of Albuquerque, New Mexico-based SolAero Technologies and the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant program, which seeks to fund technology to implement a space transport that could shuttle spacecraft from low Earth orbit to higher orbits. The area through which the transporter would operate is also where radiation is most damaging to solar cells. Thin is in To address the unique challenges of providing reliable solar energy in space, Herasimenka is testing a hypothesis that Regher Solar can make silicon heterojunction solar cells extremely thin, which adds the benefit of radiation resistance. Simulations conducted by Alex Fedoseyev — Regher Solar’s chief scientist for a previous NASA SBIR grant-funded project on which the ASU team was a subcontractor — show that when a silicon solar cell is very thin, high-energy protons can go through the solar cell without damaging it. “In some conditions, it may be practically transparent to high-energy particles,” Herasimenka says. “Besides, in a thin cell, electrons generated by light don’t have to travel as far to be extracted and even if space radiation creates a defect in a solar cell, electrons will have much less chance to recombine through this defect, thus increasing end-of-life efficiency of a solar cell.” While typical solar cells are 160 to 180 micrometers thick, Herasimenka and Regher Solar are targeting 50-micrometer or even 10-micrometer solar cells. Manufacturing thin, easily breakable solar

cells requires special equipment that makes production more expensive than 30 cents per watt but this isn’t a problem for aerospace companies that now pay 500 times more for a solar cell. Another feature of Regher Solar’s technology is its very low weight. Because every ounce increases the cost of a space launch, solar cells up to 15 times thinner would reduce space solar energy costs even more. As part of the SBIR grant project, Regher Solar will work with SolAero Technologies to test solar cells of different thicknesses to find the optimum balance of thinness and durability against radiation. If Regher Solar can pull it off, the company will be well on its way to helping the space economy meet its power needs. A quest to impact the solar industry Herasimenka came to ASU as a doctoral student when Bowden and Christiana Honsberg — now a professor of electrical engineering — joined ASU from the University of Delaware as ASU was beginning to launch its major solar energy initiative in 2009. In 2011, the Quantum Energy and Sustainable Solar Technologies (QESST) center was established, with Honsberg as its director, to address the “terawatt challenge” and develop advanced clean energy technologies to help raise the living standards of people around the globe living in energy poverty. It is a collaborative consortium of eight universities, more than 100 students and 30 faculty working with industry to find energy solutions. “One out of five people in the world live in the dark due to the high cost of electricity,” Honsberg says. “QESST is focused on reducing solar costs while simultaneously improving its efficiency to the benefit of over 1 billion people living in the dark. Regher Solar is one of eight QESST spin-out companies making an impact in the market and we’re proud to have helped catalyze its formation.” MONIQUE CLEMENT is a communications specialist with the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University.

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UPDATE NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIVERSITY Ryan Behunin has been working on a project to cut data center energy consumption.

EYE ON INNOVATION Multi-discipline approach used to solve energy-related issues WRITING BY >< KERRY BENNETT

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orthern Arizona University researchers are working across many different disciplines to tackle a range of energy-related issues using innovative technological approaches, including ecoinformatics to map carbon emissions and laser physics to cut energy consumption. Quantifying the global carbon cycle An expert in ecological and environmental informatics, NAU professor Kevin Gurney’s research focuses on carbon cycle science, climate science and climate science policy. Several of his large-scale projects involve simulating the global carbon cycle by quantifying fossil fuel CO2—all the way from single

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buildings to the global scale; the relationships between U.S. energy demand/supply and climate change; the linkages between terrestrial carbon exchange and climate variability; and the impacts of deforestation on climate. Data inventory a valuable tool The Vulcan Project, funded by NASA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), employs ecoinformatics to quantify North American fossil fuel carbon dioxide (FFCO2) emissions at space and time scales much finer than has been achieved in the past. The technology developed by Gurney and his team helps scientists and others better understand and manage the energy-related emissions of this most important greenhouse gas, critical to improving scientific understanding of the carbon cycle and as a result, climate policy. “The detail and scope of the Vulcan FFCO2 inventory has made it a valuable tool for scientists, industry, policymakers, and the public at large,” said Gurney.


UPDATE NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIVERSITY

First released in 2002, a new version of Vulcan is scheduled for release in mid-2019, improving input data and methods used as well as extending the estimation time period to 2010-15. Among the improvements are the addition of more detailed data on buildings and vehicular traffic. Dealing with climate change The Hestia Project™ builds on Vulcan, but provides even more detail, quantifying all FFCO2 emissions in individual cities down to the scale of buildings, streets and factories. With cities accounting for roughly 70 percent of FFCO2 emissions, the Hestia Project targets those locations where climate policy is most effective. “Hestia is revolutionizing how urban areas approach and interact with the climate change problem,” said Gurney, “by giving stakeholders an unprecedented opportunity to design and implement carbon management strategies; verify emissions reductions; strengthen and support basic research in climate prediction and carbon cycle science; and allow the public, decision makers, scientists and industry access to detailed space-time information on fossil/industrial energy consumption and CO2 emissions.” “Cities have had little information with which to make decisions about reducing greenhouse gas emissions—and you can’t reduce what you can’t measure,” added Gurney. “With Hestia, we can provide cities with a complete, three-dimensional picture of where, when and how carbon dioxide emissions are occurring.” Cutting data center energy consumption NAU assistant professor Ryan Behunin explores fundamental questions regarding the interaction of light, sound, and matter—from quantum friction to laser noise, with Brillouin physics as his primary focus. Behunin recently joined a major new study funded by the DOE’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy. The multimillion dollar, three-year project, “FRESCO: FREquency Stabilized Coherent Optical Low-Energy WDM DC Interconnects,” is a collaboration between

the University of California, Santa Barbara, Yale, Stanford, NAU and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). As data centers expand to handle the exponential growth of global data traffic, the amount of energy they consume is increasing at an alarming rate. Behunin will contribute his expertise in nonlinear dynamic laser modeling and physics to the project as the team develops the FRESCO transceiver, which will leverage recent advances in fundamental laser physics to enable terabit, coherent optical (light-based) data transmission inside data centers using an ultra-pure, ultra-stable laser signal. This low-power, low-cost solution will be able to overcome power and bandwidth scaling limitations of current technologies. Tech based on advanced laser physics The outcome of the project will be an integrated photonic package capable of connecting to 100 terabit-per-second networking switches over coherent optical short-reach data center fiber links. Using transformative technologies based on advanced laser physics, the project team believes FRESCO will disrupt the way data centers, data center interconnects and terabit Ethernet switches are engineered. “FRESCO is a drastically different approach to coherent links than those being employed today,” said Behunin, “and if successful, has the potential to change the way data center links are built.” The new solution is expected to significantly reduce global data center energy consumption— currently estimated at 10 percent of the world’s electricity production, and predicted to rise to 20 percent by 2025 if existing technologies are still in place. The project plan includes commercializing the technology developed in partnership with several industry partners, including Microsoft Optical Research, Barefoot Networks and Morton Photonics. KERRY BENNETT is Northern Arizona University’s Research

Communications Officer. Connect at nau.edu.

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UPDATE TGEN

STRONGER TOGETHER

Partners use holistic approach to connect human health and the environment WRITING BY >< STEVE YOZWIAK

Dr. David Engelthaler

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Gen North, the Pathogen and Microbiome Division of the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), has partnered with the nonprofit NARBHA Institute to advance human health through the new TGen One Health Collaborative, an initiative that recognizes the interdependence of people, animals and plants in both the human-built and natural environments. TGen is an affiliate of City of Hope. Microbial pathogens — the bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites that can make you sick and even kill you — often know no particular biological boundaries. Understanding that all living systems share the microbial universe, the TGen One Health Collaborative, funded through the NARBHA Institute, leverages the expertise of TGen North scientists to address today’s health challenges in a holistic manner. These challenges include tracking the cause and source of disease outbreaks, antibiotic resistance, hospital-acquired infections, microbial evolution, pathogen dispersal, and emerging infections. Examples of research areas that would be covered by the TGen One Health Collaborative: antimicrobial resistance, emerging infectious diseases, tracking Valley Fever, and outbreaks of the potentially deadly West Nile Virus. “Our One Health initiative seeks to understand the larger health problems of our time through a comprehensive approach to studying human health, both in clinical medicine and public health; in relationship to the environment,

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including water systems, agriculture and natural ecosystems; and in concert with animals, be they pets, farm and ranch livestock, or wildlife,” said Dr. David Engelthaler, director of TGen North and the TGen One Health Collaborative. Engelthaler also is a former state epidemiologist for the Arizona Department of Health Services. The NARBHA Institute — formerly known as the Northern Arizona Regional Behavioral Health Authority — has been a major community force in Northern Arizona for more than a half-century. It changed its name in 2015 to reflect its expanded mission of promoting human health and wellness, and addressing chronic disease, hunger, homelessness, housing, workforce development, and sustainable economic development. “The NARBHA Institute is thrilled to be working with TGen on this important initiative. We know that health is not just about the human condition but rather a complex set of interactions between us and the world around us. The One Health Collaborative is an innovative strategy to be more holistic in our understanding of the health ecosystem,” said Mary Jo Gregory, NARBHA Institute president and chief executive officer. TGen and the NARBHA Institute will coordinate the One Health Collaborative, which will include clinicians, public health officials, veterinarians, wildlife managers, environmental scientists and academic researchers. STEVE YOZWIAK is the senior science writer for the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). Connect at www.tgen.org.


NEW MEMBERS AdviNOW Medical revolutionizes patient-provider interaction, enables cost containment of healthcare costs, and expands primary and acute care coverage. www.advinow.com Aerovation offers services in aeronautical engineering, aircraft development, aerospace structures and systems testing, aerospace propulsion systems testing, aircraft modifications, and mission system integration. aerovationinc.com Airobotics addresses the unique needs of the world’s most complex industrial environments, having developed a platform that is fully automated, industrial grade, on-demand and multipurpose. www.airoboticsdrones.com AIS Industries offers a metal fabrication and laser cutting facility. www.aisindustries.com Alagen is a comprehensive cybersecurity services partner that is 100 percent security-focused, open-minded to all technology solutions, and broadly experienced. alagen.com Ampcera is a U.S.-based innovator and global leader in the development and commercialization of solid electrolyte materials, which are used in highperformance lithium batteries and their upstream. www.ampcera.com Anchor Wave provides web design, digital marketing, website maintenance and hosting, SEO, and review management. www.anchorwave.com Atop Technologies is a leading designer and manufacturer of industrial networking and pick-to-light systems. www.atoponline.com Bank of Arizona is a full-service commercial bank offering nationally competitive financial products delivered by talented employees who are local decision makers deeply committed to the communities they serve. www.bankofarizona.com

Brad Johns Consulting provides experienced data storage industry consulting to help computer storage companies and end-users with their marketing and business strategy needs. bradjohnsconsulting.com Breezing tracks your metabolism over time and helps you create a diet and exercise plan that’s right for you. For the first time, accurate metabolic information is at your fingertips. www.breezing.co Certification Partners develop vendorneutral IT and web technology education and high- stake certification program. Its educational materials help schools and training providers meet desired delivery goals. www.ciwcertified.com City of Goodyear sits at the intersection of profound growth and striking natural beauty where companies are connected, educated talent is abundant and possibilities are endless. developgoodyearaz.com ClarityTel is a hosted VoIP provider that specializes in telephone service, SIP trunks, and call center solutions. www.claritytel.com Cloudburst Solutions pays meticulous attention to detail through deep learning of businesses’ intricacies. Its unsurpassed follow-through sets it apart from competitors in security and compliance, carrier services, UCaaS and CCaaS, and cloud compute and colocation solutions. www.cloudburstsolutions.net CoScientific is a science-based manufacturing consulting firm that helps manufacturers develop solutions with expertise in starting up new products and production equipment. coscientific.com Crawford Mechanical Services is an HVAC, electrical and plumbing contractor specializing in commercial/ industrial mission critical and comfort cooling services, repairs, preventative maintenance, installation and construction. www.cmsaz.com

Delta Development Team provides research, development and manufacture of custom refrigeration systems. www.deltadevteam.com DivInd offers an innovative, flexible approach to improve upon liquid process technology and deliver solutions necessary to specific applications. Its experienced staff comes from the semiconductor field. www.divindtech.com Douglas Reid & Associates is an organizational development group that specializes in creativity and innovation, collaboration, and change leadership. Dynamic Manufacturing & Engineering was established to put its manufacturing expertise to work in an innovative way. The company specializes in the fabrication of machined components with extremely short lead times. www.dmeaz.com Evocative is a provider of e-mail, web hosting and data center services, dedicated servers, virtual servers, and professional Linux server management. It offers colocation space from single servers to large cage space. www.evocative.com FirstDigital Telecom – Tucson is a leading fiber-based carrier providing a full suite of business services including local voice, long distance, Internet, VOIP and managed services. www.firstdigital.com Gentap’s manufacturing and sales of a multi-focal product line finds and solves consumer challenges with affordable and quality products for liquid transfer and cooling capabilities. www.gentap.com Grupo Red USA has supplied custom software solutions for more than 1,000 projects with outstanding clients. Other services include staff augmentation and social media marketing. gruporedusa.com

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NEW MEMBERS HATech provides development and operations consulting and automation to clients across the nation. It helps customers get their features into their own customers hands! hatech.io InfoArmor develops industry-leading solutions for employee identity protection and advanced threat intelligence to help organizations protect their most valuable assets. www.InfoArmor.com InterOptics is a new optical metrology instrumentation company offering value-engineered, high-precision interferometric equipment to manufacturers and users of precision surfaces. www.inter-optics.com LeeShanok Network Solutions is committed to providing leading information technologies with expertise, efficiency and excellence. www.leeshanok.com MAD Greens offers fresh, delicious and healthy employee food — from leafy greens and hearty wraps to delicious desserts — at a reasonable price that it will deliver straight to your office. www.madgreens.com mrktstreet creates a connection between agents and their prospects that extends beyond the transaction, and invites lenders’ customers to use the digital connection to securely send their data. mrktstreet.com National Technical Systems is a testing, inspection and certification company that provides engineering services and supply chain management solutions for the aerospace, defense, automotive and many other industries. www.nts.com New Discovery provides business optimization/sales development services in product marketing, product management and sales development through its innovation and collaboration network of aerospace experts. newdiscovery.com

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To join the Arizona Technology Council, a member-supported group that represents the interests of the state’s technology community, go the www.aztechcouncil.org.

NorCon Technologies utilizes critical enabling material technologies, advanced manufacturing techniques, computer-aided simulations and design, and optimal device integration, resulting in transformative products. www.norcontech.com NOW CFO Phoenix is a premier provider of outsourced accounting and consulting for CFO, controller and staff accounting services — part-time, interim or projectbased — to companies in all industries. www.nowcfo.com Predictive Solutions Engineering designs, installs and maintains sensitive facilities by employing the latest in electronic, physical and cyber security technologies. www.predictive-se.com ProKarma is an IT solutions company that helps businesses re-engineer themselves through powerful digital platforms, customer engagement and emerging technologies. prokarma.com R4 Ventures has patented disruptive technology to replace mechanical refrigeration systems by using the earth’s natural water cycle in multistage evaporative cooling systems (MECS)real time data center cooling systems (RTDCCS). www.naturalcycleenergy.com Rocky Mountain Instrument Company is a leader in the production of highquality precision optics. Its world-class optical fabrication techniques can meet even the most challenging custom requirements. www.rmico.com ServiceGuru’s kiosk captures customer feedback at the point of interaction, making it simple to collect valuable and actionable feedback about your staff and business. www.serviceguru.com Sky Republic provides a smarter blockchain for the digital enterprise. www.skyrepublic.com

Software Management Consultants is an IT staffing and solutions leader in the many business communities and industries it serves. www.smci.com Sondhi Solutions is an information technology (IT) consulting and staff augmentation firm that specializes in focusing on what its clients need. sondhisolutions.com Stratus.hr provides payroll services, human resources consulting, employee benefits, risk management, workers’ compensation, 401(k) and a cloud-based employee management system. stratus.hr Sumo Logic is a secure, cloudnative, machine data analytics service that delivers real-time, continuous intelligence from structured, semistructured and unstructured data across the application. www.sumologic.com SurchX is a FinTech company that enables merchants to pass their merchant processing fees on to their customers while keeping them in compliance with U.S. laws governing surcharging. surchx.com UA Venture Capital is a venture capital fund dedicated to the commercialization of University of Arizona science. www.uaventurecapital.com Verdigris is establishing a bank for those who lack equal and affordable access to the financial system, including the financially underserved (unbanked and underbanked) and excluded (de-risked and high compliance, including FinTech). www.verdigriscapital.com


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VISIONARYSPONSORS SPONSORS VISIONARY VISIONARY SPONSORS VISIONARY SPONSORS SPONSORS VISIONARY SPONSORS VISIONARY SPONSORS VISIONARY VISIONARY VISIONARY VISIONARY SPONSORS SPONSORS SPONSORS VISIONARY SPONSORS VISIONARY VISIONARY VISIONARY SPONSORS SPONSORS SPONSORS VISIONARY SPONSORS VISIONARY SPONSORS VISIONARY SPONSORS ISIONARY SPONSORS VISIONARY SPONSORS VISIONARY VISIONARY SPONSORS SPONSORS VISIONARY SPONSORS VISIONARY SPONSORS VISIONARY VISIONARY SPONSORS SPONSORS VISIONA R YSPONSORS SPONSORS VISIONARY VISIONARY SPONSORS SPONSORS VISIONARY VISIONARY VISIONARY SPONSORS SPONSORS IONARY SPONSORS ONARY SPONSORS

AllianceVISIONARY Bank | APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor | Cyrus One | EY | GuardVant | Indecomm Global Services VISIONARY SPONSORS VISIONA R Y SPONSORS SPONSORS

VISIONARY SPONSORS VISIONARY SPONSORS VISIONARY SPONSORS D Digital Solutions |APS Alliance Bank | APS | Arizona | |Audio Canoe Marketing Alliance Bank |Solutions APS | Blue Marketing |APS cStor | Cyrus One |Collaboratory EY | GuardVant Indecomm Global Services VISIONARY SPONSORS Alliance Bank |Solutions | Blue Canoe Marketing |APS cStor | Cyrus One ||Eye| EY |Eye| GuardVant | Marketing Indecomm Global Services VISIONARY VISIONARY SPONSORS SPONSORS VISIONARY SPONSORS A &AVISIONA D&Digital |Canoe Alliance Bank |Alliance | Arizona Collaboratory |One Audio BlueBlue Canoe Alliance Bank |APS APS |Blue Blue Canoe Marketing |APS cStor |Cyrus Cyrus One |EY EY |GuardVant GuardVant |Indecomm Indecomm Global Services Alliance Alliance Bank Bank | | APS | | Blue Canoe Canoe Marketing Marketing | cStor | cStor | | Cyrus One | | EY | GuardVant | | Indecomm Global Global Services Services SIONARY SPONSORS A & D Digital | Bank | | Arizona Collaboratory | Audio Eye| Blue Canoe Marketing R Y SPONSORS Alliance Bank | APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor | Cyrus One | EY | GuardVant | Indecomm Global Services VISIONARY SPONSORS InfusionSoft JDA | MDSL | MSS | Pima Community College | Resound | Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc A & D Digital Solutions | Alliance Bank | | Arizona Collaboratory | Audio Eye| Blue Canoe Marketing Alliance Bank | APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor | Cyrus One | EY | GuardVant | Idea Farm Alliance Bank | APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor | Cyrus One | EY | GuardVant | Indecomm Global Services A & A & D D Digital Digital Solutions Solutions | Alliance | Alliance Bank Bank | APS | APS | Arizona | Arizona Collaboratory Collaboratory | Audio | Audio Eye| Eye| Blue Blue Canoe Canoe Marketing Marketing Alliance Bank | APS | Blue Canoe Marketing cStor | Cyrus One | EY | GuardVant | Indecomm Global Services Clements Agency | cStor | Commercial Real Estate Group of Tucson | CyrusOne | EY | GuardVant iance Bank | APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor | Cyrus One | EY | GuardVant | Indecomm Global Services A & D Digital Solutions | Alliance Bank | APS | Arizona Collaboratory | Audio Eye| Blue Canoe Marketing Alliance Bank | APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor Cyrus One EY | GuardVant | Indecomm Global Services Alliance Alliance Bank Bank | APS | APS Blue Blue Canoe Canoe Marketing Marketing | cStor | cStor | Cyrus | Cyrus One One | EY | | EY GuardVant | GuardVant | Indecomm | Indecomm Global Global Services Services InfusionSoft | JDA | MDSL | MSS | Pima Community College | Resound | Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc A & D Digital Solutions | Alliance Bank | APS Arizona Collaboratory | Audio Eye| Blue Canoe Marketing VISIONA R Y SPONSORS A|&Alliance &D D Digital Solutions | Alliance Bank | APS | | Arizona Collaboratory | Audio Eye| Blue Canoe Marketing Clements Agency | cStor | Commercial Real Estate Group of Tucson | CyrusOne | EY | GuardVant VISIONARY SPONSORS InfusionSoft | JDA | MDSL | MSS | Pima Community College | Resound | Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc &Digital D Digital Solutions | Alliance Bank | APS | Arizona Collaboratory | Audio Eye| Blue Canoe Marketing A Digital Solutions | Alliance Bank | APS | Arizona Collaboratory | Audio Eye| Blue Canoe Marketing A & A D & Digital D Digital Solutions Solutions | Alliance | Alliance Bank Bank | APS APS | Arizona | Arizona Collaboratory Collaboratory | Audio | Audio Eye| Eye| Blue Blue Canoe Canoe Marketing Marketing Alliance Bank | APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor Cyrus One | EY | GuardVant | Indecomm Global Services ce Bank APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor | Cyrus One | EY GuardVant | Indecomm Global Services Bank | APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor | Cyrus One | EY GuardVant | Indecomm Global Services Alliance Bank | APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor | Cyrus One | EY | GuardVant Idea Farm Alliance Bank | APS | AudioEye | Blue Canoe Marketing BrightGuest | cStor | Cyrus One | EY | GuardVant VISIONARY SPONSORS Clements |cStor cStor |Commercial Commercial Real Estate Group of Tucson |CyrusOne CyrusOne |EY EY |GuardVant GuardVant VISIONA R YSPONSORS SPONSORS InfusionSoft |JDA JDA |MDSL MDSL |Involta MSS |APS Pima Community College Resound Solugenix |Sun Sun Cooridor Inc VISIONARY InfusionSoft InfusionSoft ||Agency |Blue JDA | |Canoe |cStor MDSL ||Marketing MSS ||Commercial MSS |Bank Pima | JDA Pima Community Community College College || |Resound |GuardVant Resound | ||Solugenix |Resound Solugenix |Solugenix |Cooridor Sun Cooridor Cooridor Inc Inc Alliance Bank | APS Blue | cStor | Cyrus One | EY | | Idea Farm A & D Digital Solutions | Alliance Bank | | Arizona Collaboratory | Audio Eye| Blue Canoe Marketing A & D Digital Solutions | Alliance APS | Arizona Collaboratory Audio Eye| Blue Canoe Marketing Indecomm Global Services| InfusionSoft | | MDSL | Pima Community College | | Solutions | Alliance Bank | APS | Arizona Collaboratory | Audio Eye| Blue Canoe Marketing Alliance Bank | APS Canoe Marketing | cStor | Cyrus One | EY | GuardVant | Idea Farm University of Advancing Technology | University of Arizona Tech Parks Clements Agency | Real Estate Group of Tucson | CyrusOne | EY | GuardVant Indecomm Global Services | Infusionsoft | LeaseWeb | MSS | Okta | Pima Community College | Simpleview InfusionSoft | JDA | MDSL | MSS | Pima Community College | Resound | Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc Clements Clements Agency Agency | cStor | Commercial Real Real Estate Estate Group Group of of Tucson Tucson | CyrusOne | | EY | | GuardVant | VISIONARY SPONSORS Alliance Bank | APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor | Cyrus One EY | GuardVant | Idea Farm InfusionSoft | JDA | MDSL | MSS | Pima Community College | Resound | Solugenix | Sun Inc VISIONARY SPONSORS Clements Agency | cStor | Commercial Real Estate Group of Tucson | CyrusOne | EY | GuardVant InfusionSoft | JDA | MDSL | MSS | Pima Community College | Resound | Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc University of Advancing Technology | University of Arizona Tech Parks Indecomm Global Services | Infusionsoft | LeaseWeb | MSS | Okta | Pima Community College | Simpleview Clements Agency | cStor | Commercial Real Estate Group of Tucson | CyrusOne | EY | GuardVant InfusionSoft | JDA | MDSL | MSS | Pima Community College | Resound | Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc InfusionSoft InfusionSoft | JDA | JDA | MDSL | MDSL | MSS | MSS | Pima | Pima Community Community College College | Resound | Resound | Solugenix | Solugenix | Sun | Sun Cooridor Cooridor Inc Inc Clements Agency | cStor | Commercial Real Estate Group of Tucson | CyrusOne | EY | GuardVant Alliance Alliance Bank Bank | APS APS | Blue | Blue Canoe Canoe Marketing Marketing | cStor | cStor | Cyrus Cyrus One One | EY | | EY GuardVant | GuardVant | Idea | Idea Farm Farm | Indecomm Global Services VISIONARY SPONSORS Alliance Bank | APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor | Cyrus One EY | GuardVant Idea Farm InfusionSoft | JDA MDSL | MSS | Pima Community College Resound | Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc VISIONARY SPONSORS Agency | University cStor |Symantec Commercial Real Estate Group of Tucson |World CyrusOne |Nuanced |View GuardVant Clements Agency cStor cStor ||MSS Commercial Commercial Real Real Estate Estate Group Group of Tucson of Tucson || |CyrusOne CyrusOne ||Tech CyrusOne ||GuardVant ||College EY GuardVant GuardVant ce Bank |Clements APS |Clements Blue Marketing ||Advancing cStor Cyrus One EY | Pima GuardVant Idea Farm VISIONA R|Canoe Y Indecomm Global Services| Involta |Advisors JDA |Arizona MDSL Pima Community College ||EY Resound ||Solugenix Global Services Involta JDA |MDSL Keap leaseweb |GuardVant MDSL |View MSS |Parks of Technology ||of Arizona ||Technology Indecomm Global Services |Infusionsoft Infusionsoft |LeaseWeb LeaseWeb |MSS MSS |Okta Okta ||Pima Community |Simpleview Simpleview Clements cStor ||||||MDSL Commercial Real Estate Group Tucson |Pima EY |Media InfusionSoft |Indecomm JDA MDSL |Infusionsoft Community College ||University |Community Sun InfusionSoft |University JDA | Marketing Pima Community |of Resound |Parks Sun Cooridor Sun Cooridor Inc| University of Advancing Technology of Tech Parks Enterprises Solugenix Sun Cooridor Inc. ||InfusionSoft |||Real Trailblazer |University Tech Park |Solugenix ViaWest |EY World Indecomm Global Services| InfusionSoft Involta ||APS JDA |University College ||EY Resound ||GuardVant Solugenix fusionSoft |Agency |Cooridor MDSL |Agency MSS |MSS Pima Community College |Solugenix Solugenix Sun Inc Clements Agency ||SPONSORS cStor Commercial Estate Group |of |Cooridor Clements Agency Commercial Real Estate Group Tucson CyrusOne EY GuardVant University of Technology Arizona Tech Parks Alliance Bank ||Services APS Blue Canoe cStor Cyrus One |of EY |||Arizona Indecomm Global Services Indecomm Global Services| ||Technology Involta | JDA |Arizona MDSL |Tucson Pima Community College |View Resound |Inc Solugenix Indecomm Global Services |InfusionSoft Infusionsoft |University |Resound MSS |of Okta Community College University of Advancing Technology |Resound University of Tech Indecomm Indecomm Global Global Services |Infusionsoft ||Pima ||LeaseWeb LeaseWeb |LeaseWeb MSS Okta |of Pima |||Pima Community Community College |Simpleview |Simpleview of Advancing ||College Arizona Tech Parks ments Agency |Global cStor Commercial Tucson ||CyrusOne CyrusOne |Cooridor EY |Inc GuardVant Indecomm Global Services| InfusionSoft ||Estate Involta ||Group JDA MDSL ||of Pima Community College || College Resound || Simpleview Solugenix University of Advancing Technology ||of University of Arizona Tech Parks Indecomm Global Services ||Advancing Infusionsoft ||Advisors LeaseWeb |||UA MSS ||of Okta ||Community Pima Community College ||Marketing Simpleview Solugenix |JDA Sun Inc. | cStor Symantec || Real Trailblazer ||||University UA Tech Park ViaWest |Parks World ASolugenix &|Involta D Digital Solutions | Alliance Bank | | Collaboratory | Audio Eye| Blue Canoe University of Advancing Technology | of Arizona Tech Parks VISIONARY Alliance Bank |SPONSORS APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor | Cyrus One | EY | GuardVant | Indecomm Global Services Indecomm Global Services | Infusionsoft LeaseWeb | MSS | Okta | Pima Community College | Simpleview University of Advancing | University Arizona Tech Indecomm Services | | MSS | Okta | Pima Community College | InfusionSoft Indecomm Global | Services| JDA | leaseweb InfusionSoft | MDSL Involta | Pima | Community JDA | MDSL College | Pima | Community Resound | Solugenix College | Resound | Solugenix Indecomm Global Services| InfusionSoft Involta JDA MDSL Pima Community College Resound Solugenix University of Advancing Technology University Arizona Tech Parks University University of Advancing of Advancing Technology Technology | University University of Arizona of Arizona Tech Tech Parks Parks Indecomm Global Services | Infusionsoft | LeaseWeb | MSS Okta | Pima College | Simpleview Indecomm Indecomm Global Global Services Services | Infusionsoft Infusionsoft | LeaseWeb LeaseWeb | MSS MSS | Okta Okta | Pima Pima Community Community College College | Simpleview Simpleview Sun Cooridor Inc| University of Advancing Technology | University of Arizona Tech Parks | World View Enterprises A & D Digital Solutions | Alliance Bank | APS | Arizona Collaboratory | Audio Eye| Blue Canoe Marketing Pima Community College | Resound | Sandler Training | Solugenix | Sun Corridor Inc Alliance Bank | APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor | Cyrus One | EY | GuardVant | Indecomm Global Services |Sun Sun Cooridor Inc. |Symantec Symantec |Trailblazer Trailblazer Advisors |UA UA Tech Park |ViaWest ViaWest |World World View omm Global Services| InfusionSoft |Marketing Involta JDA |University MDSL |One Pima Community College ||ViaWest Resound |||World Solugenix University of Advancing Technology | University of Arizona Tech Parks comm Global Services | Infusionsoft | LeaseWeb | MSS | Okta | Pima Community College | Simpleview University of Advancing Technology | University of Arizona Tech Parks University of Advancing Technology | University of Arizona Tech Parks Indecomm Global Services | Infusionsoft | LeaseWeb | MSS Okta | Pima Community College | Simpleview Sun Cooridor Inc| University of Advancing Technology | University of Arizona Tech Parks | World View Enterprises Indecomm Global Services | Infusionsoft | LeaseWeb | MSS | Okta | Pima Community College Simpleview Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc. | Symantec | Trailblazer Advisors | UA Tech Park ViaWest | View Sun Cooridor Inc| University of Advancing Technology | University of Arizona Tech Parks | World View Enterprises A & D Digital Solutions | Alliance Bank | APS | Arizona Collaboratory | Audio Eye| Blue Canoe Marketing Alliance Bank | APS | Blue Canoe | cStor Cyrus | EY | GuardVant | Indecomm Global Services Solugenix Solugenix | Sun | Cooridor Cooridor Inc. Inc. | Symantec | | Trailblazer | Advisors Advisors | UA | Tech Tech Park Park | | | World View View InfusionSoft | JDA | MDSL | MSS | Pima Community College | Resound | Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc Sun Cooridor Inc| University of Advancing Technology | University of Arizona Tech Parks World View Enterprises Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc. | Symantec | Trailblazer Advisors | UA Tech Park | ViaWest | World View Alliance Alliance Bank Bank | | APS APS | Blue | Blue Canoe Canoe Marketing Marketing | cStor | cStor | Cyrus | Cyrus One One | EY | | EY GuardVant | GuardVant | Idea | Idea Farm Farm | Indecomm Global Services University of Advancing Technology | of Arizona Tech Parks mmSun Global Services | Infusionsoft | LeaseWeb | MSS | Okta | Pima Community College | Simpleview Clements Agency | cStor | Commercial Real Estate Group of Tucson | CyrusOne | EY GuardVant Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc. | Symantec | Trailblazer Advisors | UA Tech Park | ViaWest | World View Ackmann & Dickenson | APS Arizona Collaboratory | Blue Canoe Marketing | CyrusOne | A & D Digital Solutions | Alliance Bank | APS | Arizona Collaboratory | Audio Eye| Blue Canoe Marketing Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc. | Symantec | Trailblazer Advisors | UA Tech Park | ViaWest | World View InfusionSoft | JDA | MDSL | MSS | Pima Community College | Resound | Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc Cooridor Cooridor Inc Inc| | University University of of Advancing Advancing Technology Technology | University | University of Arizona of Arizona Tech Tech Parks Parks | World | World View View Enterprises Enterprises Sun Cooridor Inc| University of Advancing Technology | University of Arizona Tech Parks | World View Enterprises Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc. | Symantec | Trailblazer Advisors | UA Tech Park | ViaWest | World View Solugenix Solugenix | Sun | Sun Cooridor Cooridor Inc. Inc. | Symantec | Symantec | Trailblazer | Trailblazer Advisors Advisors | UA | UA Tech Tech Park Park | ViaWest | ViaWest | World | World View View Clements Agency | cStor | Commercial Real Estate Group of Tucson | CyrusOne | EY | GuardVant University of Advancing Technology | University of Arizona Tech Parks | World View Enterprises InfusionSoft | JDA | MDSL | MSS | Pima Community College | Resound | Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc. | Symantec | Trailblazer Advisors | UA Tech Park | ViaWest | World View Alliance Bank | APS | Blue Canoe Marketing | cStor | Cyrus One | EY | GuardVant | Idea Farm Solugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc. | Symantec | Trailblazer Advisors | UA Tech Park | ViaWest | World View ooridor Inc| University of Advancing Technology | University of Arizona Tech Parks | World View Enterprises Clements Agency | cStor | Commercial Real Estate Group of Tucson | CyrusOne | EY | GuardVant olugenix | Sun Cooridor Inc. | Symantec | Trailblazer Advisors | UA Tech Park | ViaWest | World View InfusionSoft |Inc. JDAServices| MDSL ||InfusionSoft MSS |Global Pima Community College Resound |AZTECHCONNECT.COM Solugenix |MSS Sun Cooridor Inc InfusionSoft Indecomm Global | Involta JDA | leaseweb | MDSL |Services Involta | Pima |Community JDA |University MDSL College |of Pima |Community Resound | Solugenix College |Pima Resound | Solugenix Advancing Technology |www.aztechcouncil.org University of Arizona Tech Parks Indecomm Global Services |of Infusionsoft | LeaseWeb || MSS ||AZTECHCONNECT.COM Okta || Pima Community College | Simpleview AZTECHCONNECT.COM Clements Agency ||University cStor Commercial Real Estate Group Tucson CyrusOne |023 EY | GuardVant 023 023 EY | GuardVant | Indecomm | Infusionsoft LeaseWeb | | Community College enix | Sun Cooridor | Symantec | Trailblazer Advisors | UA Tech Park | ViaWest | World View AZTECHCONNECT.COM 023 University of Advancing Technology | of Arizona Tech Parks AZTECHCONNECT.COM Indecomm Global Services | Infusionsoft | LeaseWeb | MSS | Okta | Pima Community College | Simpleview For For more more information information on sponsorship, on sponsorship, visit www.aztechcouncil.org/sponsorship visit 023 For more information on sponsorship, visit www.aztechcouncil.org Indecomm Global Services| InfusionSoft |visit Involta |visit JDA MDSL | Pima Community College |AZTECHCONNECT.COM Resound | Solugenix University Advancing Technology |University University of Arizona Tech Parks Indecomm Global Services |of Infusionsoft | www.aztechcouncil.org/sponsorship LeaseWeb | MSS | Arizona Okta || Pima Community Simpleview For For more more information information on sponsorship, on sponsorship, www.aztechcouncil.org Sun Cooridor Cooridor Inc Inc| |Sun University University of of Advancing Advancing Technology of of Tech Tech Parks Parks | World |College World View View Enterprises Solugenix |solugenix Cooridor Inc. | Symantec | Trailblazer Advisors UA Tech Park | ViaWest ||Enterprises World View University Advancing Technology |||University of Arizona Tech 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