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TRINITY COLLEGE

Alumni News

December, r 94 7


• THE TRUSTEES AT THE OCTOBER 25TH MEETING MOVED TO ADOPT THE FOLLOWING MINUTE CONCERNING

The Late Judge Joseph Buffington The Honorable Joseph Buffington, of the Class of 1875, served Trinity College with unparalleled devotion and with great distinction. He was elected an Alumnus Trustee in 1900 and reelected until 1918, when he was made a permanent member of the Board . His loyalty to Trinity was such that it is safe to say that he regarded none of his many honors or achievements more highly than he did his forty;seven years of service as a member of this Board. During the seventy;six years of his association with Trinity College, he played an important part in the great progress made by his Alma Mater. Having attended the College when it was located on Capitol Hill, he witnessed with deep satisfaction the move to the present campus and the construction of fifteen buildings thereon. He saw the growth of the student body from eighty;one to eight hundred and eighty;four students, and aided in increasing the endowed resources of the College from somewhat less than $400,000 to over $4,000,000. Judge Buffington has ever been a symbol representing the high achievement possible for a man trained in the liberal arts. The integrity, courage, sound judgment, devotion to high moral principle, loyalty, and persuasiveness which brought him at an early age to national prominence exemplified in one man the qualities which Trinity College attempts to induce in its students. The Judge will be sorely missed not only by his colleagues on this Board, but also by the hundreds of Trinity men who have been inspired by his example. To the members of his family, the Trustees of Trinity College feel moved to send this evidence of sympathy in our common loss.

T

COVER PICTURE jUDGE jOS E PH B U FFINGTON,

'75


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TRINITY COLLEGE ALUMNI NEWS PUBLI S HED BY THE AL U MNI ASSOCIATION OF TRINITY COLLEGE, HARTFORD, CONNECTIC U T EDITED BY jOHN A. MASON, '34 VoL. IX

DECEMBER

President's Message SINCE THE 125th Anniversary Development Program - which aims to provide Trinity with $1,500,000 for a new Field House, a new dormitory, added library facilities, and more endowment - is now well into its eleventh month, I think it is appropriate to provide you with a progress report. As of November 14, $1,070,000 has al~ ready been pledged by 3,680 persons. Our alumni, faculty, and trustees have contributed $409,000, citizens of Hartford - $196,000, students and their parents - $35,000, and friends outside Hartford - $430,000. While the total amount pledged to date is very gratifying and represents a fund raising achievement unparalleled in Trinity's long history, we still are far from our goal. Between now and July 1, 1948, when the Campaign ends, an additional $430,000 must be raised. It is obvious that this will be a most difficult assignment because the cream has already been skimmed. In the five months since Commencement time the total has been increased by only $115,000. Many of our most promising non~alumni prospects have already contributed generously. I am spend~ ing much of my time in attempting to solicit funds from foundations, corporations, and prospective large donors, but competition for aid from these sources is keen, and it is probable that no sizeable gifts can be expected from these groups. The campaign is going forward energetically with parents and the citizens of Hartford, but we cannot hope for miracles - especially since the Hartford Hos~ pita! is attempting to raise $3,000,000 here in the city. The conclusion is inescapable that Trinity must depend upon that group which has always been the main support of the College - our alumni - to give the Campaign the final push which will attain our goal. I was shocked recently to learn that only 1542 alumni, or 41 % of the total, have as yet contributed to the Development Program.

1947

No.1

My feeling of profound discouragement was mitigated somewhat when further inves tigation indicated that many of our alumni had not as yet been asked to subscribe, a!~ though the campaign was eleven months old. If those who have not yet contributed will respond as generously as those who already have, our campaign is certain to be successful. Our goal of $1,500,000 represents the minimum which is necessary at this time to keep Trinity in sound financial condition and to make possible certain necessary additions to our physical plant. This goal was established almost two years ago and does not take into consideration the rise in building costs which has occurred since that time. At today's prices it is obvious that $1,500,000 truly represents the minimum amount needed. Elsewhere in this issue there are pictures of the groundbreaking of the Field House, construction of which is underway and will be completed by September, 1948. Including architect's fees, grading and insurance, this building will cost about $430,000. Since it will be an expensive build~ ing to operate, an endowment of $150,000 must be set aside to maintain it. The total cost of the Field House, therefore, will be $580,000 without equipment. The pressure of an enrollment 68% above pre~war normal has made imperative the construction of a dormitory for 100 men before next September, at a total cost of $300,000. In view of our present circum~ stances, a new dormitory is needed even more urgently than the Field House. Unless accommodations are provided for 100 men by fall, the college will be required to restrict the admission of resident students to the point where it will have a permanently deleterious effect on the composition of our student body. Almost $400,000 of the $1,070,000 pledged to date cannot be used for field house or dormitory construction, since the donors have specified other uses - especially the Hamlin library addition. As a consequence no pledges have been received to date which


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were recommended by Trinity alumni. Three; quarters of the class admitted came from this group. These figures illustrate the im; portance of the alumni as admission agents. Part of this activity was organized. Wales At this stage of our campaign we are Dixon, '27, and Ron Kinney, ' 15, set up a asking for funds to build a dormitory and to committee in Philadelphia to pick out good equip the Field House. Having obtained these candidates for the class of 1951. Twenty;six necessities, pledges will be applied to the men were finally admitted from the Phila; delphia area, all of them recommended by library addition and to added endowment the committee. Late in March, Wales, and for general operating purposes. It is evident, Isabel Dixon gave a buffet supper at their therefore, that the remaining $430,000 needed home for all the boys in the Philadelphia to reach our campaign -goal is all important area who were applying for admission to if the greatest needs of the College are to Trinity. This gave Dean Clarke and Bert Holland a chance to talk with all the appli; be satisfied. The renewed support of all cants and to compare every boy with all alumni is necessary if the 125th Anniversary the other boys. But organized help from Development Program is to break through alumni was not limited to the Philadelphia area. Dr. Edwin Nugent, '28, head of the its present crucial phase. Rochester Alumni Association, interviewed a There will be no Alumni Fund Drive this number of applicants. Nort I ves, ' 16, head year, but all alumni who have already contri; of the Detroit Association, was very active. buted, especially those who have contributed Harvey Dann, '31, and Fred Tansill, '22, continued their fine work in New York, and and paid in full, are urged to increase their Ken Case, '13, worked very hard in Spring; contribution~ if at all possible. The many field. AI Birch, '25, sent in the names of many alumni who have not yet given to the cam; qualified young men, including the name of paign will be personally solicited wherever the boy who was later awarded the Boston possible by Committees under the leadership Alumni Scholarship. Laurie Scaife, '31, inter; viewed a number of the Pittsburgh applicants. of Bob Morris, '16, head of the Alumni Ray Montgomery, '25 brought more than Campaign, and by their Class Agents. fifteen boys up from New Haven and was However, you need not wait for a solicitation a tireless worker for the College. Finally, before making your contribution. Donations Nelson Shepard, '21, and Don Viering, '42, made before the end of the year can be continued their outstanding work in the Greater Hartford area. deducted when making up 1947 income tax Trinity can maintain its present high returns. Checks can be sent either "to Robert place among the colleges of the country S. Morris, 100 Pearl Street, Hartford 3, only if each Freshman Class can be selected Connecticut, or to Trinity College, Hartford from a large group of well;qualified applicants. 6, Connecticut. The size of a share is $150. The help of the alumni will become more Many alumni will want to give one or more, and more important as competition for good men increases. The first signs of this in; . but the College will be most grateful for creased competition were visible last year. smaller contributions from those who feel In 1948, while applications will still exceed that they cannot afford a share. Won't you by a large number the places available, it send in your pledge, today! Your Alma will be much easier for good men to enter Mater is "on the march" but it needs some the college of their first choice. It is in per; suading the top men to make Trinity their extra help if the step is to be kept lively. first choice that the alumni can help most. What qualities go to make up a good Trinity man? First of all, he should have a good mind. His record and work in high Admissions school or preparatory school should indicate THE PRESENT Freshman Class of 225 was that he can maintain the high scholastic picked from over 1500 applicants. The total requirements of Trinity College. number of applicants represented a new high Secondly, a good Trinity man should show for Trinity, but there was an even more evidences of leadership. Alumni can measure significant figure: over 900 of these applicants this capacity in two ways: participation in can be applied to the construction of a dor; mitory or to the equipment of the Field House (removable basketball floor, netting, etc., estimated to cost $34,500.)

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school activities and good influence on others. Participation in school activities includes not only athletics, but, also, glee club," debating, newspaper work, dramatics, church work, scouting and many other things. Above all, it is not the number of activities but the quality of the work in those activities that is important. The ability to bring out the good qualities in other people is a certain proof of leadership. The boy should have a sense of respon~ sibility. Does he have the determination to make something of his life? Has he a definite purpose in coming to college? He should have high personal standards. Trinity is looking for boys of integrity who have the moral courage to stand up for what they believe to be right. Does he try to help others? Is he a loyal friend? Is he a boy of warm sym~ pathies?

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character and give specific examples to support the alumnus' judgment of the boy. Letters from teachers and family friends are also helpful. This year plans have been made to keep alumni completely informed of the decisions on applicants recommended by them. We started this practice last year and will be able to expand it even further in 1948. Next year Trinity plans to admit a Fresh~ man Class of 200. Alumni are urged to send in their recommendations as soon as possible, so that each boy can be given careful consid~ eration. With the active help of all alumni Trinity will be assured of another fine Fresh~ man Class.

Alumni, then, should look for three quali~ ties in boys they wish to interest in coming to Trinity: a good mind, leadership; and character.

Recent Gifts and Bequests

Here are the answers to a few questions frequently asked both by alumni and appli~ cants: 1. How does a boy apply for admission? He writes to the Secretary of Admissions, Trinity College, Hartford 6, Conn., and asks for an application blank. He will be sent at the same time a catalogue and a trahscript form. The application blank should be filled out and sent in as soon as possible. The transcript form should be filled out by the boy's principal or headmaster and sent to the Secretary of Admissions after the first semester marks are available for the boy's senior year in school.

THE CoLLEGE has recently received the following gifts and bequests: A gift of $3,000 from Charles T. Easterby, ' 16, of Philadelphia in appreciation of scholar~ ship aid received by him when a student at Trinity. The scholarship is given in memory of Mr. Easterby's father, Alfred]. Easterby, and will be known as the Easter by Scholar~ ship Fund. A gift of $5,000 from the Estate of Thomas Fisher, a graduate of Lafayett:: College. The bequest is to be known as the Thomas Fisher Scholarship Fund, and the income is to be used for a scholarship, giving particular con~ sideration to an applicant froru the Diocese of Harrisburg or Bethlehem, Pennsylval)ia.

2. How many scholarships are available for Freshmen? There are about forty scholar~ ships available for Freshmen. They range in amount from $100 to $1,000. Application blanks may be secured from the Secretary of Admissions. Scholarships are usually awarded in May, so that boys will know well in advance what help they can count on. Scholarships are of course awarded not only on the basis of merit but also on the basis of need. 3. In writing a letter of recommendation what points should an alumnus stress? The best Jetter of recommendation will take up the three qualities of mind, leadership and

A legacy of books and a sum of money, $1,840, from the estate of Otis S. Hill of Washington, D.C. He was not a Trinity alumnus, but a close friend of the late Pro~ fessor Babbitt. The Otis S. Hill Library Fund has been established and the income is to be used for the purchase of Greek and Latin books for the Library. Have you subscriqed to the Tripod, the undergraduate newspaper, yet? Hear all the college news told in an interesting manner. For the next thirteen issues, beginning in February, the price is only $2. Send your mailing address together with a check for $2 to the Trinity Tripod.


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Ed Faber, '48, President of College Body; John R. Reitemeyer, '21 , Vice-President of the Alumni Association ; A. Northey Jones, ' 17, Chairman of the !25th Anniversary Development Program; President Funston ; Ray Oosting, Director of Athletics

(Courtesy - Hartford Courant)

Ground Breaking WHEN President Funston took office he immediately set out to fulfill the hopes of Dr. Luther and Dr. Ogilby who had long talked of Trinity's need for better athletic facilities. On October 25 ground was broken for the new Memorial Field House! The Alumni have enthusiastically contributed and will be glad to know it will be completed and ready for use by next September. We all know what this new building will mean to Trinity because Alumni Hall has long ago outlived its usefulness. No longer will we have to go down town for our "home" basketball games, and now Ray Oosting and Dan Jessee will have ample space for varsity practice in bad weather. The Field House and attached Sports Annex will join Trowbridge Memorial on the east. The cost of the structure will be about $465,000 including interior equipment

of a portable basketball floor and baseball netting of fireproof cotton. The building will con, tain a tenth of a mile dirt track which will be eight feet wide. Inside the track will be an area large enough for a regulation baseball infield. There will be a removable wooden floor, 85 by 110 feet which will serve as a basketball court or as two practice courts. The seating capacity will be for 2000 persons at sports events, and this can be expanded to 3000 for public meetings. In the annex connecting the Field House and Trowbridge will be offices for the physical education department, a laundry, 400 lockers, shower rooms, a coaches' locker room, rubbing room, and a large sports room for boxing and the showing of movies. Other trustees who took part in the cere, monies were ] udge Philip ]. McCook, '95; George C. Capen, ' 10; Bern Budd, '08; Robert B. O'Connor, '16 ; Owen Morgan, '06; Lyman B. Brainard, '30; and Charles G. Woodward, '98.

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BRONZE TABLET 125th Anniversary Development Prog ram ALUMNI AND FRIENDS WHO HAVE SUBSCRIBED TO ONE OR MORE SHARES SINCE JUNE 24, 1947.

e

Abbey, Raymond C. Addis, Emmett (in memory of) Applegate, Rev. Oct.avius Bach, Matthew G. Baker, Charles H., Jr. Baker Trust, George F . Baldwin, Berry 0. Baridon, Felix E. Bates, Robert P. (in memory of) Bell, Stanley L. Bentley, William P. Blanchard, M. L. Bliss, Miss Grace E. Bond, Raymond A. Bryant & Chapman R. G. Miller & Sons Buhl, Lawrence D. Burns, Howard R. Burt, Richard W. Castagno, Dr. Rowe R. Convey, Thomas W., Jr. Cutler, Robert Hon. Davis, Dr. James E . Easterby, Charles T. Electrical Supplies, Inc. Farrow, Walter M. Penn, Philip C. (in memory of) Ferguson, Miss Eleanor First National Stores, Inc. Flynn, Joseph D. Gildersleeve, A. Lloyd Gilman, George H., Jr. Gooden, Rt. Rev. Robert B. Guertin, Alfred W. Haas Rug Co., Inc. Hart, W. Van Buren, Jr. Hartford Buick Company Hartford Courant Company Hartford Fire Department Hartford Police Department Hemenway, Charles C. Herrick, Paul F. Hicks, Lewis W. Holden, ] ames H. Hubbard, John W. Hudson, ] ames M. Hyde, William S. Isenberg, Henry L. Jackson, William W. Jewett, Dr. David B.

'10 '99 '87 '10 ' 16 '28 '14 '93 '27 '02 ' 16 '12 '25 '29 '37 '32 '43 '16 ' 11 '26 '34 '14 '02 '22 '45

' 12

'01 '02 '34 '00

Johnson, Frank L. Junker, Rev. Curtis W. V. Kohn Brothers Tobacco Co., Inc. Laub, George A. Lawlor, Dr. Peter P. Leschke, August H. Littell, Elton G. Lovell, John C . . Malkin, Richard E. Matthews, Rt. Rev. Paul" McCornick, William S. McElroy, William F. Medusa Alumni Association Meloy, Richard C. Miller, David Mitchell, Rev. James A. Moak, C. B. Moore, Rev. James A. G . Morris Joseloff Foundation, Inc. Myers, Thomas Bernard Naylor, Dr. Louis H. Needham, Clarence E . Nelson, Godfrey Nicholson, V. L. Niese, Alfred M . Nugent, Dr. Edwin J. Off, Cliftord Peiss, Reuben Pinney, Howard A. Poor, Walter E . Pressey, William B. Rudd, Harold H . '"• Sabat, Albert A. Sherman, Rev. Arthur M. Slate, Herbert N. Smith, E. Talbot Stafford , Alfred J . J ., Jr. Stark, Dudley S. Tenney, George P. Thayer, Robert W. Tiger, Elmer S. Trachtenberg, Alexander Tracy, John G. Van Loon, James C., Sr. Wentworth, Gilbert R. Westhal, Arthur E. L. (in mem~ ory of) Westinghouse Electric Corp. White, Rev. Howard R . Zaccaria, Michael Zakolski, Francis C.

'35 '15 '10 '99 '49 '46 ' 18 '34 '10 '32 '26 ' 15 ' 14 '08 ' 11

'23 '28 '07 '33 '87 '15 '01 '39 '38 '40 '13 '43 ' 17 '23 '33 '16 ' 11 '33 '08 ' 19 '02 '42 '43


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and after graduating, studied at the New York State Library School in Albany. In 1912 he accepted the position of Assistant Librarian at Amherst College, and in 1917 assumed the public librarianship at Lynn, Massachusetts. There he reorganized the Lynn Public Library and developed its branches, until his call to Providence as Assistant Librarian in 1922.

Clarence Sherman,' 11 LAST August 15th Clarence E. Sherman, '11, completed twenty-five years with the Providence Public Library. Since 1930, he has been the Librarian and has done such a splendid job in establishing branch libraries thoughout the city and improving the personnel standards by the organization of a Library Training Class that last fall the voters overwhelmingly approved a $1,300,000 bond issue for a Central Library addition. Trinity men in College with Mr. Sherman will recall that as an undergraduate, he was a member of the Freshmen-Junior Banquet Committee, the Glee Club, and the Tablet Board. He managed the Baseball Team, and was on the Junior Prom Committee. His classmates elected him President in their Sophomore year, at which time he was active on the Hop and Smoker Committees. And in his Senior year he was President of the Senate, the Senior Honorary Society and was Class Day President. His fraternity is Delta Kappa Epsilon. At Trinity, he gave up the idea of entering electrical engineering, and explored further his youthful thoughts of becoming a librarian. As a student assistant in the college library, he became deeply interested in the profession,

The July 1947 issue of " A Reader's Guide to Books" was prepared by the library trustees and staff without the knowledge or consent of Mr. Sherman. With his permission we are happy to reprint parts of it: "Twenty-five years ago - on August 15, 1922 - Clarence E. Sherman, then Librarian of the Lynn Public Library, began his work as Assistant Librarian of the Providence Public Library. Until February 7, 1930 - when he was made Librarian upon the retirement of William E . Foster - Mr. Sherman had the rare privilege of working with and sharing the vision, scholarship and administrative ideals of Mr. Foster who " . . . created this library . . . founded its traditions . . . and gave it world wide influence." "The achievements of Mr. Sherman's administration include the establishment of a much-needed Business Branch, a Library Training Class, and a modern system of Branch Library Buildings. In the expansion of Reader's Advisory, Vocational Counseling and Veterans' services, wide use of radio and other forms of publicity, including the setting up of a broad Library public relations program, this Library has been a leader. "So original and sound was Mr. Sherman's Stack Storage plan for storing less-used books, that it has been widecy copied throughout the country, as have his Neighborhood Advisory Committee and Friends of the Library ideas. He somehow finds time to contribute to professional journals, and has set a new standard for effective and attractive annual report writing. "Mr. Sherman's community contacts, based upon his interest in our citizens, are wide and varied. In addition to his many speaking engagements he has worked with Rotary, Boy Scouts, Chamber of Commerce, Labor Schools, is Chairman of the Rhode Island State Apprenticeship Council, a past president and board member of the Y.M.C.A., member of the corporation of the Rhode Island Hospital, director of the Citizens Savings Bank and a Trustee of the Rhode Island School of Design.

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"In 1941 Mr. Sherman was awarded an honorary Master of Arts degree by Trinity College in Hartford (his Alma Mater), and in 1947 was elected a Fellow of that College. "How successfully Mr. Sherman absorbed, carried on, and added to the traditions established by Mr. Foster, is revealed by the relative position of our Library today. It is now the second largest public library in New England, has more than 500,000 books on its shelves with a circulation of just under a million books a year, enjoys a national reputation, and is widely known for such special collections as the Updike Printing and the Nickerson Architectural. "In November 1946 some 43,000 citizens of Providence voted "Yes" on the $1,300,000 Bond Issue which will make possible the long-planned, desperately-needed Central Library addition. This achievement represents the high-water mark for Mr. Sherman's twenty-five years of devoted service to the people of Providence. "The word Enlightenment signifies the mission of this Library, and the goal of its Librarian.''

The Jesters

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ORGANIZED in 1914 as the College dramatic organization the JESTERS have always been known on campus as one of the more spirited clubs. This year that spirit took the group through a successful season of summer stock. "Dear Ruth" which opened in October at the Avery Memorial was followed on December 5 and 6 by the "Masque of Kings" by Maxwell Anderson also at the Avery. Everyone agreed that the October play was a smash hit for the dramatic group and that repertory had been fine training for those involved. Eight plays in ten weeks had done much for the JESTERS. In the past the organization has followed the tradition of dramatic experience through intelligent entertainment with little difficulty. This year they feel confident that it is possible to present four plays and maintain the same high standards. "Dear Ruth" had previously been produced with the same cast at The PITCHFORK PLAYHOUSE in Sharon, Connecticut. The playhouse located in a hundred-year-old carriage house was probably the last oldfashioned barn-storming theatre along the straw hat trail. The story behind the playhouse was one of almost unbounded enthusiasm, determination, and down-to-earth hard work. It was, indeed, a story of youth, for only the youthful fire of the group responsible

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Lyn1an B. Brainerd, '30 LAST month Mr. Brainerd was elected President of the Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection & Insurance Company. He has been a Trustee of the College since 1937, and was elected Secretary of the Board in June 1946, replacing Mr. Charles G. Woodward, '98.

for this unique venture could surmount the headaches and hurdles encountered in such an enterprise. Traffic between Hartford and Sharon was heavy this past summer, because people who clustered around the gay arc light, under the bold white title, "Pitchfol'J<. Playhouse," super-imposed over the faint ghost of the word "stables," realized the expectation and excitement which they experienced sounded a fresh note in summer entertainment. James Thurber paid tribute to the small group. After attending their production of his play, "The Male Animal," he climbed the dimly lighted stairs to the actors " dressing room" located in a one-time hay loft. Said Mr. Thurber: "A thing I would not have done for Elliott Nugent." As the name of the PITCHFORK PLAYHOUSE spread, the reputation of its director, Don Craig, '48 grew. During the ten-week season he produced eight plays and each one received an enthusiastic audience. Not only did he direct and offer technical advice, but he carried major


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roles at the same time. Both the faculty and JESTERS were quick to realize that they had in their midst a man with great ability. In announcing Mr. Craig's appointment Professor J. Bard McNulty, faculty advisor, said that only once before in the history of the college has the student dramatic group reached the present high level of organization and dramatic ability.

Sir Alfred Speaks at Virginia SIR ALFRED ZIMMERN spoke in behalf of Oxford and representatives of Universities throughout the world at the inauguration of Dr. Darden as President of the University of Virginia on October I. He pointed out the inability of the rest of mankind to under; stand the American people. " Life in this favored land has developed habits and attitudes that are strange to the over;seas peoples and at a first contact often surprise and puzzle them. And today the problem of European;American relations is rendered more difficult by the physical fatigue and nervous exhaustion which afflict the Euro; pean peoples," Sir Alfred said. The founder of the Geneva School of International Studies forecast that within the next few months, Americans would see "apparent ingratitude" and "symptoms of active irritation" from the peoples of Europe whom the Marshall plan is seeking to help. But he urged American patience until Europe recovers " health, happiness, and faith in life." Referring to a letter written by the founder of the University of Virginia, Thomas Jeffer; son, to Charles Sigourney, a founder of Trinity, and urging a "Spirit of cordial fraternity" among the nation's colleges, Sir Alfred called for an extension of Jefferson's idea of friendship and cooperation on an international level. With civilization now "poised in the balances," he suggested that universities can make a significant contribution in form; ing and fostering contacts between the peoples of the world which would be "a natural illu; mination, leaving behind an afterglow of permanent and radiating understanding." " Peace is, before all things, order in the soul," he said. "The Universities have a major part to play in the creation and maintenance of such an order."

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C 路 Ch omm unity est THE CoLLEGE again this year played a major part in the Greater Hartford Community Chest Campaign. This type of community participation is of great benefit to the student body as well as the city. Bill Peelle, '44, Captain of the Trinity team of 120 students, was high captain in his division, and the fourth highest in the whole city. His team raised $4,550, or 120% of quota, from the Trinity students and the surrounding neighborhood. One of the four general report meetings for the entire campaign featured Trinity Night at which the Band and the Pipes entertained. Among our alumni John Butler, '33, held the job of Vice;Chairman of the Individual Subscribers Section. Bert Holland, '34, headed up one of the ten divisions and brought his section into second place for the final report, having raised 106% of quota. The top division, incidentally, was headed by Mrs. Louisa Pinney, wife of Sidney Pinney, ' 18, and Chuck Kingston, '34, commanded another division which went over its quota.

Lectures THE L ECTURE CoMMITTEE has arranged for another interesting season of public lectures in the Chemistry Auditorium. Alexander F. Kerensky, President of the Russian provi; sional government in 1917, visited the campus on October 22 and 23, when he met with classes in Contemporary Civilization and Government and delivered a public lecture on "Russia and the United States." Sir Alfred Zimmern, visiting professor of International Relations, will present thirteen lectures on world affairs. He delivered the first of the series on November 13 and the other scheduled dates are December 4 and 18, January 8 and 22, February 5 and 19, March 4 and 18, April 1, 15 and 29, and May 13. It is Sir Alfred's intention to interpret current world affairs in the light of funda; mental principles embodied in the United Nations Charter, and Trinity is indeed fortunate to have such a well qualified expert to lead the discussion. Other lecturers on the fall schedule are Norman Cousins, editor of the Saturday Re; view of Literature, and Dr. Homer Thompson of the Advanced Institute of Princeton who was director of the Athenian Agora excava; tions.


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Judge Buffington juDGE joSEPH BuFFINGTON, one of Trinity's most loyal alumni died on October 21 at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in his ninety; third year. A member of the class of 1875 and trustee since 1900 the Judge had for over seventy;five years been unswerving in his devotion to his Alma Mater. Funeral services were held October 23rd at Trinity Cathedral, Pittsburgh, with Dean N. R. High Moor and the Rev. Lauriston L. Scaife, '31, officiating. Surviving are a sister, Hannah Buffington, a son, Joseph, Jr., Trinity 1918, and two grandchildren.

Joseph Buffington was born at Kittanning, Pennsylvania, on September 5, 1855, the son of Ephraim Buffington and Margaret Cham; hers Orr. Preparing for college at the Lambeth School, Kittanning, he entered Trinity in 1871 with the class of 1875. In college he was editor of the Tablet and played on the baseball team. He won the Silver Medal his Junior year for the English oration. He graduated in 1875 with a Bachelor of Arts degree, and received election to Phi Beta Kappa. At his commencement he delivered the class address. His fraternity affiliation was the Beta Beta Chapter of Psi Upsilon. He "read" law for several years and was admitted to the bar in 1878. Joining his brother, Orr Buffington, Trinity 1879, Mr. Buffington formed a law office in his boyhood home. President Benjamin Harrison appointed him United States Judge to the Federal Court in Western Pennsylvania in 1892, and Presi; dent Theodore Roosevelt named him to the Third Circuit Court of Appeals in 1906. At his retirement in 1938 his 46 years of service on the Federal Bench earned him the distinction of having served longer than any judge in the history of United States courts. As a Federal judge, Mr. Buffington ren; dered a number of decisions affecting large industries. In 1931 he held that the Radio Corporation of America, the General Electric Company, the Westinghouse Manufacturing Company, the American Telephone and Telegraph Company and subsidiaries had attained a monopoly over the sale of radio tubes and were in violation of the anti; trust act. In 1937 he participated in a decision curbing the power of the National Labor Relations Board to compel employers to deal with collective;bargaining agents designated by it to handle disputes with employees. The court ruled that an employer could make a

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satisfactory settlement of labor differences with a committee of his employees without the aid of a recognized union. In 1938 Judge Buffington issued an order restraining 'the · N. L. R. B. from enforcing its order to the Republic Steel Corporation to re;employ immediately 5,000 workers who engaged in the Little Steel strike in the summer of 1937. Mr. Buffington also was well known for his work in aiding aliens to become citizens and as an advocate of prohibition. His advice to sixty men and women who had just become naturalized citizens in 1933 was " to stay away from saloons. " He was the only surviving member of the original Carnegie Hero Fund Commission, appointed by Andrew Carnegie in 1904, and also the last living delegate to the Republican convention of 1880 which nominated James A. Garfield for the Presidency. Judge Buffington had been awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws from Trinity in 1890, and also from Lafayette College, University of Pittsburgh, Princeton, Washington and jefferson College, Grove City College, Pennsylvania Military College, and Dickinson College. Mount St. Mary's College honored him with a Doctor of Civil Laws degree. He was a chevalier in the Order of the Golden Crown (Italy) and a member of the Order of the White Lion (Czecho; Slovakia). In February, 1936, Judge Buffington pub; lished " The Soul of George Washington." This represented more than ten years of research by the author, and was undertaken in reply to the slanders and vilifications of Washington found in many publications. He also published a paper, Magna Carta: Its Overlooked Spiritual Side. Judge Buffington was activ~ion the Episco; pal Church and a member of the Church of the Ascension in Pittsburg. He had been a vestryman of Holy Trinity Church, Philadel; phia. For years he was an ardent worker for the Salvation Army, and had been presi; dent of the Kingsley House Association in Pittsburgh. He was also president of the Henry Clay Frick Commission. On January 29, 1885, the Judge married Miss Mary Alice Simonton of Emmittsburg, Pennsylvania. They had two sons: William, who died in infancy, and Joseph, Jr., Trinity 1918. Mrs. Buffington died in 1919. Five years later he married Mrs. Margaret Fairfax Clendenin of New Castle, Pennsylvania, who died in 1929. On January 1, 1931, he married Mrs. Mary Fullerton Jones of Phila; delphia. She died in 1933.


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SONS OF ALUMNI IN THE ENTERING CLASS Front Row : Leone! L . Mitchell, son of Rev. Leone! E. E. Mitchell, '20; james T . Barber, son of William P. Barber, Jr., ' 13 ; President Funston ; Stephen P . Pressey, son of Rev. Herbert E . P . Pressey, '19; Arnold B. johnson, son of Charles B. johnson, '92. Middle Row: Alexander E. Simpson, grandson of Col. William H. Eaton, '99; William M . L'Heureux, son of Alfred J . L'Heureux, ' 13 ; Rollin M . Ransom, Jr., son of Rollin M. Ransom, '2 I ; Frederick B. Hinkel, son of Frederick C. Hinkel, Jr., '06; Charles K. Easterby, son of Cha rles T . Easterby, 'I6; joseph M . Groves, son of Rev. joseph Groves, ' 10. Back Row : Michael L. Daly, jr., son of Michael L. Daly, '24; Frank P . Bloodgood, III, son of Frank P . Bloodgood, Jr. , '27; Trubee G. Racioppi, son of Rev. joseph A. Racioppi, ' I7. Missing from the picture were john J . Carey, Jr. , son of john J. Carey, '22; Robert R. Farrell, son of Carlton Farrell, '26; Roger B. Ladd, Jr., son of Roger B. Ladd, ' I7 ; Richard D. Sherman, son of Cla rence E. Sherman, 'I I ; and Robert L. Woolam, son of john D . Woolam, '26.

Placement REGISTRATION of seniors with the College Placement Bureau reveals that 21 seniors will complete their degree requirements in February and approximately 182 in June. The February group had preliminary interviews with the Placement office early in November, and the June interviews ran from November 17 to December 10. Representatives from various companies have started coming to the campus, but the

majority of these recruiters will visit the College from February on. At present, about 40 percent of the seniors have indicated intentions of continuing their studies in graduate schools. However, this figure will probably be decreased at the end of the year due to the change of plans and the continued crowded conditions of graduate schools. Alumni who are in positions to be cognizant of openings in their various fields are urged to contact the Placement Bureau for the possible placement of Trinity men.


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13

Frank Eblen offfor a good gain against Williams (Courtesy - Hartford Courant)

Football

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APART from the single loss to Wesleyan at the end of the football season, it cannot be denied that this year's record including six straight wins is one of the most brilliant in our history. While the outcome of the Wes~ leyan game was a great disappointment, the overall record is an impressive string of triumphs. Starting off with a decisive 33~ 12 vengeance on the Bates team that humbled Trinity 25~0 last year, Dan Jessee's juggernaut rumbled irresistibly along the high road of fame knocking off opponents so methodically that long before the season ended, the 1947 team had established itself as one of the finest small college contenders in the country. The key to the Blue and Gold offense was a double~threat "T" formation. The constant danger created by Whitey Kunkiewicz's deadly passing ability kept opposing elevens

back on their heels, and our hard~driving Corcoran, Heintz, Eblen, Boland, and Carroll were able to pile up consistent ground gains. Trinity amassed a total of 189 scoring points for the year as against a meager 46 tallied by opponents. In the second game, ends Noonan, Osborn, Pope, and Pitkin spelled the '""teliable back~ field yardage winners as they collected Kunkiewicz's passes for a flurry of advances resulting in a 31~ 7 win over Middlebury. With Captain Roger Bestor anchoring the center of the line, the front wall proved effective and aggressive even though it was lighter than last year's outfit. Tackles Holmgren and Ponsalle, and guards Kola~ kowsl<i, Baltronis, and McDonnell withstood attacks solidly and in offensive operations opened up plenty of holes. The third game, in which Trinity beat Hobart 25~7, revealed a smooth integration of passing and running attacks which marked the Hilltoppers as a fully mature unit. ball~carriers


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Sports

Bob Boland away for a gain against Wesleyan

In the next three games there was never a serious question about Trinity's superiority. In spite of injuries that slowed down Barrows, Baltronis, and Eblen, the team stayed at peak efficiency as it conquered Williams 33~0, Worcester 34~7, and Norwich 33~0. The strength supplied by a fine string of reserves will carry over to provide next year's team with a running start. The record set by this year's team, however, will be a tough mark for future Trinity footballers to shoot at. The last game of the season, in which Wesleyan thwarted our hopes for an unde~ feated season before 9000 fans by coming out on top 13~0, was unique in that the losing Trinity team outgained the winners tremendously. The home team netted 219 yards and 21 first downs, while Wesleyan advanced 87 yards and made only 10 first downs. Incidentally Trin never punted all afternoon, nor was the team penalized. The year's statistics bring Dan ] essee's total of wins to 57, as against 27 losses and 3 ties in his 13 years of coaching at Trinity. Without a doubt, this year marked a new level of excellence for the Blue and Gold, and the prospect for continued superiority is bright. At graduation we will lose John Fink, a fine end who this year never repeated his pre~war brilliant pass~receiving performances because of a bad hand ; tackle Bill Powell; Bob Boland, one of the season's outstanding blocking and running backs; and Captain Roger Bestor. "Rog" has been one of the finest centers to wear a Trin uniform, and his sparkling play and leadership will long be remembered ..

FRESHMAN FOOTBALL The team defeated Springfield Freshman and Cheshire Academy while losing to the Wesleyan yearlings and Hopkins School. Under the direction of Joe Beidler, '42, several players showed good progress by the season's end . Pickett and Ludorf in the backfield should help Dan in a year or two. SOCCER The team showed steady improvement as the season progressed and won over Worcester Tech and Mass. State while losing hard fought matches to M .I.T., Yale, Amherst, and Wesleyan. Captain Morrel, Geiger, and Nelson played a steady game throughout the season. Goodyear and Dunn battled on even terms for the goal guard position. 1 The Freshman lost their four games but all of them were extremenly close. Nelson and Clifford showed much promise for future teams. CROSS COUNTRY The team did not score any victories, but Captain Eddie Lemieux, college two mile record holder, scored three firsts and finished seventh in the New England Intercollegiates .. The freshman should strengthen the varsity next year for they lost to Amherst by only one point, tied Wesleyan, and defeated East Hartford and Choate. VARSITY BASKETBALL away M.I.T. Dec. 10 home Williams Dec. 13 Mass. U. away Dec. 16 home Bates Dec. 18 home Bowdoin Jan. 9 home Amherst Jan. 13 home Worcester Tech. Jan . IS away Holy Cross Feb. 7 away Wesleyan Feb. 10 away Middlebury Feb. 14 home Coast Guard Feb. 19 away Amherst Feb. 25 away Tufts Feb. 27 home Mar. 2 Wesleftan away Hami ton Mar. 5 away Union Mar. 6 home Yale Mar. 10 Home games at State Armory Dec. Dec. Dec. Jan. Jan. jan. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Mar. Mar. Mar.

13 16 18 9 10 15 7 10 17 19 25 2 6 10

Jan. 10 Feb. 7 Feb. 13 Feb. 14

FRESHMAN BASKETBALL Abbey Mass. U. Hillyer College Hopkins Yale Worcester Tech . Westminister Wesleyan j . V. St. Thomas Monson Morse College Wesleyan Kingswood Cheshire

home away home home away home home away home home away home away home

VARSITY SWIMMING M.I.T. Boston University Bowdoin Worcester Tech.

away home home away


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TRINITY Feb. 18 Feb. 27 Feb. 28 Mar. 4 j a n. j an. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Mar.

9 14 II 18 21 25 4

COLLEGE

Amherst Union Preparatory Schools Wesleyan

home home home home

FRESHMAN SWIMMING Pawling Yale Deerfield Mt. Hermon Canterbury Hopkins Wesleyan

away away home home away home home

Fraternity Membership AXP A.M> ~KE

~<I> ~qr

'Yy ~N

Brothers 36 30 28 31 26 31 37

Freshmen Pledges 20 13 16 11 11 19 31

Upperclass Pledges 6 1 3 4 2 7 3

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15

Around the College Governor james L. McConaughy, Hon. '26, Bishop Wa lter H . Gray, Hon. '4 1, and Mayor Edward N. Allen participated in the opening Convocation exercises September 24 . . . The campus radio station WRTC has resumed its broadcasting from new studios in the basement of Woodward Dormitory . . . The Trinity College Flying Club has become a member of the Northeastern College Flying Club. There are 55 active members . . . The Phi Kappa Chapter of Alpha Delta Phi will hold the !16th International Convention on campus next June 24-27. The last Alpha Delt convention held at Trinity was in 1900 . .. Chaplain O'Grady is giving a series of lectures on " Christian Marriage" under the auspices of the Canterbury Club . .. The Band under the direction of Ken Wynne, Jr., '48, has performed most creditably at the home football games . . . The Glee Club plans several winter and spring concerts . . . Last summer's enrollment for the ten week term totaled 682. There were 250 Trinity veterans ; undergraduates from Amherst, Kenyon and Wesleyan; and nearly 400 H a rtford area residents in attendance . . . On November 7 Mrs. Laura Schatz m arked twenty-five years of loyal service in the Library . . . The new freshman baseball field has been completed. It is north of Trowbridge Memorial and east of the tennis courts . . .

NECROLOGY Name joseph Buffington William Pressey Lloyd G. Reynolds Edmund K. Sterling Walter A. Mitchell james M. Walker Francis E. Waterman Stanley Wimbish

Class 1875 1890 1898 1899 1901 1901 1901 1907

Oct. Aug. Sept. Aug. July June Aug. June

Date 21, 1947 27, 1947 24, 1947 29, 1947 29, 1947 1, 1947 10, 1947 17, 1938

Name Ralph R. Wolfe Guy C. Heater Uldric Thompson, Jr. J. G. Neafie Mitchell james G. Harbord (Hon.) William H. Fischer Philip C. Fenn

Class 1908 1913 1914 1916 1924 1925 1926

Aug. Aug. Aug. June Aug. July July

Date 10, 1947 26, 1947 19, 1947 26, 1944 20, 1947 11, 1947 11, 1947

Kiley Playground

Tuttle Memorial

THE KILEY PLAYGROUND was established by Henry L. Shattuck and given to the City of Boston for the benefit of the people of the neighborhood. It is located on Albion, Compton and Village Streets in the large tene~ent house area lying between Tremont Street and Shawmut Avenue. Roger C. Kiley was a member of the class of 1944. Enlisting in the United States Army on August 8, 1942, he was assigned to active duty in the Air Forces on February 10, 1943. He went through basic training in Mississippi and Virginia, and died at the Walter Reed Hospital on October 23, 1943. The Playground was formally presented to the City of Boston on October 30 by Mr. Shattuck. Mayor John B. Hynes accepted it in behalf of the city and Governor Robert F. Bradford spoke for the State.

ON SEPTEMBER 28 the towrf' â&#x20AC;˘of Windsor, Connecticut dedicated a bronze tablet in the Public Library in memory of Rue! Crompton Tuttle. Mr. Tuttle, a member of the Class of 1889, was well known for his paintings. The description on the plaque reads: Artist and Architect, was born in Windsor in 1866 and resided for many years in the house which is now the rectpry of Grace Episcopal Church. He studied in this country and abroad and achieved renown for his watercolors and murals. Through his foresight and generosity this building was remodeled and enlarged following his death in 1940. His benefaction to the Public Library of his native town is gratefully acknowledged.


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Faculty Changes DEAN CLARKE has been appointed coordinator of student activities. NORTON COE has resigned as instructor of English at Trinity to become headmaster of the Williston junior School, Easthampton, Mass. FRANCIS J. DEIGNAN has been appointed instructor in psychology. He is a graduate of Clark University in Worcester, Mass., and also received his Master of Arts degree there. During the war he served three years with Army psychological units, and after his discharge in January 1946 has been a vocational appraiser for the Veterans Administration at Clark. He is a member of Sigma Xi; the National Vocational Guidance Association ; and the American Psychological Association. DANIEL B. RISDON has returned to the faculty as instructor in English after three years of service in the Army and a year of advanced study at Yale. SOLON W. STONE has been appointed instructor in Geology. He is a graduate of Allegheny College in 1938, and received his Master of Arts degree from Syracuse University in 1940. He engaged in geochemical prospecting until his enlistment in the Navy in I 942. After serving 21 months in the Pacific, Mr. Stone has been studying for his doctorate at Harvard. He is a member of Sigma Xi, and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. ROBERT M. VOGEL has been appointed assista nt professor of English. He is a graduate of Wabash College in 1935, and received his Master's degree from the University of Michigan in 1940. As a naval lieutenant he served as navigator on the destroyer Hobson and participated in the invasions of Normandy, Southern France and Okinawa. He was awarded the Bronze Star for his handling of the Hobson when she was hit and damaged by a Kamikaze suicide plane off Okinawa. This past summer he completed his requirements for his doctorate at Columbia. He is a specialist in speech correction and public speaking. JOHN H . WHITTEMORE has been appointed instructor in Romance Languages. He graduated from Harvard in 1941 and served in the Navy for four years. His sea duty took him to Hollandia, Truk, and Okinawa. Following his service separation in 1945, Mr. Whittemore taught French and Spanish for a year at Taft School and then enrolled at Columbia University Teachers College from which he recently received his Master's degree.

Faculty News PROFESSOR ALLEN participated in the College English Association Meeting on October 18 at Northeastern University, Boston. PROFESSOR BISSONNETTE has been appointed a commissioner to represent the United States at the First World Congress on Animal Reproduction and Artificial Insemination in Milan, Italy, next June. PROFESSOR BUELL represented the College at the inauguration of james E. Smith as President of Willimantic State Teachers College on November 23. PROFESSOR BURGER was elected Director of the Mt. Desert Island Biological Laboratory on August 14. The laboratory is well known for its work on the physiology of the kidney, tissue culture, and cancer research. The recent Bar Harbor fire did not damage the property.

ALUMNI

NEWS

PROFESSOR CANDELET represented Colby College at the 100th anniversary celebration ofthe Sheffield Scientific School at Yale on October 17. PROFESSOR DADOURIAN has written an " Introduction to Analytic Geometry and Calculus" and is preparing a book entitled "How to Study - How to Solve." J. BRUCE MUNRO has been appointed head coach of the New England Soccer squad for the Northern Intercollegiate Olympic Tryouts on November 23 at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. PROFESSOR NOTOPOULOS has written "The Creation of the Tribe Hadrianis" in the 1947 volume of the Transactions of the American Philological Association . CHAPLAIN O'GRADY was the principal speaker at the Intercollegiate Episcopal Council at Camp DeWolfe. New York, October 24-26. The conference was attended by eight colleges in the New York area having Canterbury Clubs. PROFESSOR RAY has designed a bolt head maze and a memory drum which will be used to determine a student's speed in learning and remembering. PROFESSOR SHAW has written an article on Dr. Seligman of Columbia for the Professors Association Maga zine. The Military Engineer published his "Italian Campaign of 1515, Marignano." Dr. Shaw has written recent book reviews for the Princeton Alumni Weekly, American Historical Review, The Churchman, The Commonweal, and the Hartford Courant. PROFESSOR THOMPSON reviewed Men of Erie, A Story of Human Effort by Edward Hungerford in the July New York Historical Society Quarterly. PROFESSORS TOWLE, CANDELET, TUCKER and CHANCES of the Economics Department attended the Connecticut Valley Economics Association meeting at Amherst, Mass., on October 17. HOWARD' KRAMER, former instructor of History who left in 1943 to serve with the Red Cross, is at Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.

Alumni Notes HON. 1931 GOODWIN B. BEACH has been elected chairman of the Hartford Housing Authority. HON. 1936 CHARLES B. COOK was presented with the Jewish War Veterans Citizens Award on November 29. The citation reads in part - "whose life and deeds exemplify the unifying principles of American interfaith relationship." . . . The RT. REV. HENRY K . SHERRILL, Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, received the Medal for Merit from Secretary of War Patterson on june 26. His citation reads "for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the United Nations during the recent war. " HON. 1942 The REV. GEORGE G. MONKS has been appointed Canon of Washington Cathedral. He assumed his new duties on October 1 .. . EUGENE E. WILSON has been appointed Hartford Chairman of the 1947 campaign of United Service to China. 1877 WILLIAM G. MATHER celebrated his 90th birthday on September 22 with a small dinner for his family and friends.


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1895 PHILIP J. McCOOK writes he took a most interesting vacation trip to the West Coast, Alaska, and return by Vancouver, Victoria and Glacier National Park. 1896 JOHN F. FORWARD married Mrs. Henry Samuel Cole on August 12 in Binghamton, New York. They will live in Clearwater, Florida, this winter .. . The REV. GEORGE B . GILBERT directed the 37th annual Old Home Day Service at Emmanuel Church, Killingworth, Conn., on August 17. He is completing his fiftieth year in the ministry. 1898 FREDERICK A. BALCH was a recent visitor on campus. - - 1902 - DR. EDMUND S. MERRIAM has joined the faculty of the Marietta College School of Petroleum on a part-time basis. He will teach courses in engineering materials and gas production .. . The REV. WILLIAM H. WHEELER represented Trinity at the inauguration of Dr. Harvey Liston as President of Johnson C. Smith University on October 20. - - 1903 The REV. EDMUND C . THOMAS has resigned from St. James Church, Hartford. He became the rector on February I, 1912, and the new church was built in 1926 under his direction at 75 Zion Street. 1906 - The REV. DWIGHT W. GRAHAM has resigned as rector of St. Thomas Church, Bath, N. Y., after 18 years of active service. 1910 - HORACE R. BASSFORD is chief actuary of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Life Magazine recently published his picture in an article about the company. - - 1911 - wALTER E. BATTERSON has been nominated by Governor McConaughy to the Federal Rent Advisory Board in the Hartford area . .. JAMES B. PORTE US has been elected to the board and named president of the Sterling Engine Co., Buffalo, N . Y. - - 1913 - THOMAS G. BROWN has been appointed to the Mayor's Committee for the Commemoration of the Golden Jubilee of New York City. 1914 - The REV. HORACE FORT was. a recent VISitor on campus. From 1935 through 1945 he was pastor of St. Mary's Church, Bedford, England. This city in the midlands housed many of the evacuated children during the blitz. Before going to Bedford the Rev. Mr. Fort had been closely connected with the Church Tutorial Classes Association - an educational movement for the laity - both at Canberwell, London, and at Brighton. His parish at Brighton was Holy Trinity, and there he formed classes for the parish in Bible subjects. Their popularity spread around the countryside so that students from all over England attended. The Rev. Mr. Fort intends to return to England via Sweden where his wife is living. 1915 - The REV. SAMUEL H. EDSALL represented Trinity at the inauguration of Dr. Katherine G. Blyley as president of Keuka College on October 4 . . . HOWARD R. HILL announces the marriage of his daughter, Nancy Jean, to William B. Hopkins, Jr., on July 11.

ALUMNI

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17

1916 JUDGE VICTOR F. DE NEZZO has been reelected Hartford Police Court Judge . . . ROBERT S. MORRIS' daughter, Barbara, was married to JOHN L. JOPSON, '50, on June 14. The groom spent four years in Army Air Corps. - - 1917 - WARREN M. CREAMER has been promoted to director of engineering construction of the Connecticut State Highway Department. He has been with the department since 1922 and was senior highway engineer. 1919 PAUL H. ALLING has been named Ambassador to the new nation, Pakistan. He was been an adviser to the American UN delegation and also Minister to Syria .. . CLARENCE D. TUSKA has been appointed Director of the Patent Department of the Radio Corporation of America with headquarters at Princeton, N . J. 1920 SIDNEY H. WHIPPLE has been elected to a two year term as Director of the Hartford Rotary Club. 1921 JOHN R. REITEMEYER, JR., has been elected president and publisher of the Hartford Courant. Formerly the executive vice-president, he succeeds the late Maurice S. Sherman, who died June 27. 1922 EDWARD C. ANDERSEN has completed twentyfive years of service with the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Co. He is superintendent of agencies. 1923 LLOYD E. SMITH, of Racine, Wisconsin, is the father of a son, Leighton Lloyd, born on August 2. - - .1924 WILLIAM S. HAWLEY is with the California Bank in Los Angeles. 1925 ROBERT HEALEY has been elected president of the Men 's Club of St. Mark 's Church, West Hartford . . . KENNETH D. SMITH has published a book, "Baseball's H all of Fame." It is a complete story of the game's shrine at Cooperstown, N. Y., from Abner Doubleday to Carl Hubbell. - - 1927 - JOSEPH J . LUTIN represented tne College at the inauguration of Dr. Charles S. Johnson as President of Fisk University, on November 7. 1928 - CHRISTIAN GASSER has accepted a position as professor of Economics at the University of St-Gall, St-Gall, Switzerland. He was with the Geneva Life Insurance Co. Recently he was elected a director of the Institute of Foreign Trade and Market Research and expects his duties will bring him to the United States in 1949. 1929 DR. KARL F. KOENIG, associate professor of German at Colgate, plans to publish "Michael Kohlhaas" in 1948. He is co-author of another book also in preparation - A New Definitive History of German Civilization . This work will be the first of its kind to appear in the English language. 1930 LEWIS H. BABBITT is curator of zoology at the Natural History Museum, Worcester, Mass. He and


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his wife travel over the Eastern Seaboard collecting snakes and reptiles . . . DR. LOUIS F. COROSO married Miss Rita Catherine McGrail of New Britain, Conn., on October 18. - - 1931 - HOWARD D. DOOLITTLE addressed the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Connecticut Section, on October 14 at Stamford. His topic was "Advances in Power Tube Design for Electric Heating Applications." He is with the Machlett Radiation Laboratories, Stamford. -1932THOMAS BURGESS, JR., has been promoted to auditor of the Mutual Life Insurance Co . . . . G. KEITH FUNSTON has been elected a director of General Foods Corporation. He has been appointed to the Connecticut Highway Safety Commission by Governor McConaughy. He represented the College at the 250th anniversary celebration of Trinity Church, New York ; the inauguration of President Darden at the University of Virginia on October I. and at the Centennial Convocation of Yale's Sheffield Scientific School on October 17 . .. THOMAS R . STUMPP married joan Kennedy Wessmann on August 30 at Port Washington, Long Island .. . JAMES TOBIN was a recent campus visitor. He has returned to his position at the New York Public Library. On September 26 he became the father of a daughter, Elizabeth Claire. They are living in West Englewood, N. ]. 1933JOHN D . FOTHERGILL married Miss Janet E . Harris of West Hartford on August 16. 1934 HAROLD R. BAYLEY is Connecticut cargo sales representative for Willis Air Service, Inc., based at Teterboro, N. ] . . . . ROBERT E. SCHMOLZE is in charge of Civil Information and Education for the entire island of Kyushu, japan. He is with the Kyushu Military Government Region Headquarters of the U.S. Army. 1935 DR. MILTON C. FLEISH has been elected a fellow of the American Board of Pediatrics. He is practicing in Hartford . . . ROBERT ] . LAU was the general chairman for the second annual ball of the American Veterans Committee in Trenton, N. ] . ... ROY HANNA is teaching English at St. Peter's School, Peekskill, N . Y . . . . EDWARD BOEGER is with the Viking Chemical Co., Central Islip, Long Island, N . Y. 1936 The REV. SYDNEY E. GRANT has accepted the rectorship of Calvary Church, Bayonne, N. ] . He assumed his new duties on October I . . . JOHN G. HANNA is a member of the Simmons College faculty in Boston, where he teaches courses in the Modern Continental, British, and American Novel . . . ARTHUR V. JENSEN has been promoted to Associate Professor in Anatomy at the University of North Carolina . . . JAMES R . MILLER reports the birth of a daughter on September 23 . .. JACK WILLIAMS married Miss Mary Martin of Pampa, Texas, on November 25. They will live in Washington. 1937 EDWARD COLTON is the father of a daughter, Judith Elaine, on August I . . . ROBERT GAGNON is with the California Texas Oil Co. He was stationed in India for a year and a half. On his vacation he took a hunting trip in the Himalayas at 12,000 feet. He saw the SS. Trinity Victory in Calcutta . . .

ALUMNI

NEWS

LT.-COL. JOSEPH A. L. GRECO, U. S. Air Corps has been transferred from the University of New Hampshire to the newly installed Military Dept. at Williams College where he is in charge . . . LT. PAUL C . LAUS is with the 24th Corps, G-2 section, Seoul, Korea .. . WILLIAM R. O'BRYON announces the birth of a daughter, Barbara Ann, born June 9 . .. A. BRUCE ONDERDONK became the father of a son, Andrew Bruce, on July 5. He is teaching surveying at Trinity this year . . . DR. SIDNEY L. CRAMER has opened an office for the practice of radiology in Hartford. 1938 - MORAY ARMSTRONG became the father of a son, Robert Reed, on October 20 . . . JOHN D . LOCKE has been appointed general manager of the Havana Division of Chicago and Southern Airlines. He will live in Havana . . . HERBERT VINICK became the father of a son, Charles William on May 21 . . . THOMAS A. WHAPLES has opened an office for the practice of architecture in Richmond, Virginia . . . DR. PAUL H. BARBOUR, JR., became the father of a son, jeffrey Hart, on October 15. 1939 STEPHEN R. BARTLETT is a resident in surgery at the Veterans Administration Hospital, Richmond, Va .... PHILLIPS HAWKINS married Mrs. Dorothy Wagner on July 15 in Berlin, Germany. He is chief of AMG's decarletization section . . . EDWARD L. SMITH married Miss Mary F. O'Hare of East Hartford on October 4. JOHN F. BUTLER, '33, was best man . . . FRANCIS A. STOCKWELL, JR., has been transferred to Houston, Texas, as chief underwriter for the Southern Marine Department of Automobile Insurance Co . . . . WILLIAM H. YATES married Miss Shirley Carlton of East Hartford on September 13. He is with the Aetna Insurance Co. in New Bedford, Mass. -1940GUSTAVE ANDRIAN represented Trinity at the inauguration of Dr. Edward C. Fuller as President of Bard College on October 11 . . . PAUL J . BILKA has been studying Internal Medicine at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn .. .. JOHN H. CAREY is general agent for the Loyal Protective Life Insurance Co. with offices in West Hartford .. . The REV. WAYNE L. JOHNSON was married to Miss Marie Bonnell of Brookings, South Dakota, on June 30. He is priest in charge of St. Paul's Church there . . . JAMES S. NEILL, JR ., is engaged to Miss Elizabeth Kendrick of Pryor, Oklahoma, and New York City . .. JOHN R . RANDALL has received his M.B.A. from the New York University Graduate School of Business, and is working with E. R. Squibb and Sons, Brooklyn . . . HERBERT SLATE is in Guam as Project Engineer for the Guam Engineers District. His wife is with him, and they have a three room cottage with all conveniences ... LESTER TIBBALS, JR., has been appointed to the faculty of the Princeton Country Day School . . . C. DUNCAN YETMAN is teaching at Monson Academy, Monson, Mass. 1941 ROBERT E. BROATCH, JR., married Miss Katherine L. Biebel of Bridgeport, Conn., on September 20 . . . DR. HERBERT I. CHAUSER has been separated from the Navy ... RICHARD W. INSLEY is at the Harvard Business School . . . KENNETH J. KELLY married Miss Mary V. Finley of Hartford on October II. He is with Pratt and Whitney, East Hartford . . . LAWRENCE B. MARSHALL received his M .A. from Columbia in June and is teaching history at the Portland Junior College, Portland,

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TRINITY

COLLEGE

Maine . . . WILLIAM G. OLIVER, JR., is studying at the American Institute of Foreign Trade. He finished his course at Trinity this summer after four years in the Army . .. REV. WILLIAM B. VAN WYCK, Lime Rock, Conn., announces the birth of a son, Robert Brewster, on May 22. - - 1942 JOHN R. BARBER became the father of a daughter, janine Ruth, on May 22 . . . ROBERT A. BODKIN married Miss Cornelia E. Watson of Maplewood, N. ]., on September 6. He is in the advertising business in New York . . . FRANK BRAZEL was. married to Miss Nancy E. Kennedy of Hartford on October 4. He is with the Hartford Fire Insurance Co. . . . JOSEPH] . BONSIGNORE announces the birth of a son, Mark Joseph, born on May 30 . . . HENRY G. HALE is with the Aetna Casualty Insurance Co., Hartford . .. FRANC D. LADNER has left the Waldoboro Press, Waldoboro, Maine, and is in the advertising business in Boston. He is living in West Newton . . . ALAN MILLER married Miss Phebe W. Clark of New York on September 19 . .. HENRY G. ROTHAUSER reports the birth of a son, Charles Henry, on july 22 . . . The REV. ROBERT SCHUMANN is Rector of Holy Trinity Church, South River, New jersey . . . WILLIAM F. SCULLY, JR., is engaged to Miss Rose Rice of Hartford . . . The REV. M. HOWARD ST. CYR is Vicar at Trinity Church, Fallon, Nevada . . . He reports the birth of a daughter, Bari, on April 14 . .. JOHN WEISMAN is engaged to Miss Dorothy C. Hesch of Valley Stream, N. Y . . . . ROBERT C. WHITSETT married Miss Aithine Frances Crandon of Riverdale-on-Hudson, N. Y., on September 10. He will continue his graduate studies at Columbia and also teach at Horace Mann School . . . DR. JON M. WILSON was graduated from N. Y. Medical College on] une 11 and is interning at the Emergency Hospital, Washington, D. C . He married Dr. Laura Virginia Van Dyke of Spotswood, N. ]., on October 4 . .. DR. THOMAS B. WOOD is practicing dentistry in Park Ridge, New jersey. 1943 COURTLAND DALY is teaching Biology at Cranford High School, Cranford, N . ] . . .. ROBERT W. GUNSHANAN was awarded his degree in July. For four years Naval duty has kept him away from Hartford at Commencement . .. JOHN HOBBS became the father of a daughter, Sarah Rodney, on September 19 . . . CHARLES L. JONES, JR., is teaching English at the Salisbury School. He plans to organize a "Pipes" group there . . . FRANCIS M. RACKEMANN, JR., is studying art in Boston this winter . . . WILLIAM J . TRIBELHORN is engaged to Miss Rhea Clicquennoi of Rochester, N. Y. . . . ROBERT M. WELTON married Miss Barbara Wilcox of Wethersfield, Conn., on October 18. He is a field assistant of the Travelers Insurance Co., in Richmond, Va . . . . RICHARD WEISENFLUH has been transferred to the Philadelphia office of the Connecticut General Life Insurance Co .... CARL H . WILLIAMS married Miss Elizabeth Baldwin on June 14, at Marion, Mass .. .. EDWARD S. MORRISON is engaged to Miss Dorothy Chedzoy of Scunthorpe, England. 1944 MURRA YR. FEARING, JR., expects to be another year as surgical technician at the 385th Station Hospital in Nurenburg, Germany . . . SHERWOOD H. GOSLEE, JR., married Miss Natalie L. Slawson of Manchester, Conn., on September 20 . . . PAUL GROEBLI, JR., is teaching at Trinity School .. . RICHARD E. HASKELL married Miss Marilyn Wilbur of Stillwater, New York, on October 11.

ALUMNI

NEWS

19

ALBERT HASKELL, '37 was best man . . . H . THOMAS JARRETT married Miss Amy Z. Thompson of jackson Heights, N. Y., on july 3. They will live in Glens Falls, N. Y . . . . EDMOND C. KELLY reports the birth of a son, Edmond, Jr., on May 18 . .. JOHN MACKINTOSH became the father of a daughter, Diana May, on September 14 . . . NATHANIEL R . H. MOOR became a father of a daughter, Margaret, on October 8 . . . BERNARD MULLINS is with Station WKNB, New Britain ... THEODORE A. MUSCO has been appointed a field representative of the Guardian Life Insurance Co ... . WILLIAM R. PEELLE became the father of a son, William R., Jr., on August 8 .. . SPIRO PETERSON has received his Masters degree in English from the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. He plans to continue graduate work . . . The REV. WILLIAM B. SPOFFORD, JR., wanted to take his family from Washington to Detroit by air. He asked a ticket agent if children under two years could fly free. "Yes," replied the ticket seller. "Well, I have four of them," said Mr. Spofford and he explained that three of the children are triplets, Mark, Andrew and Stephen, born last January and the fourth, Timothy, is exactly four years old. It was finally agreed that the four boys could travel for a half-fare. 1945 CLEMENT DOWD married Miss Eleanor L. Williams of Greenwich, Conn., on June 29. He is with Battern, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc., in New York . . . WILLIAM GRAVES is with G. Fox's, Hartford .. . WARREN F . McCONIHE received his A.B. degree at Harvard in August and has entered the Havard Business School . .. JOHNS. MEYER was married to Miss Muriel S. Haskell of Wellesley, Mass., on June 20 . . . JAMES]. RHEINBERGER has received his Masters degree from Harvard in History . . . FRANK TIETZE has been doing research work at the Marine Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass. He has received a fellowship for study at the Hygienic Institute, Washington, D. C., this fall . .. WALTER B. WILDMAN has graduated from the New York University College of Medicine and is serving his interneship at the Christ Hospital, Cincinnati. - - 1946 JOHN W. DORCHESTER is teaching at Poquonock Ridge School, Groton, Conn ... . RICHARD C. FAY married Miss Marguerite Kathryn Griffin of Hartford on June 14. He is attending Massachusetts Institute of Technology .. . JOHN ]. FERRANTE, JR., plans to continue his study of opera at fu~ Fontainbleau Opera School, Fontainbleau, France . .. LEWIS P. JOHNSON has been appointed special agent by the Aetna Insurance Group for the New jersey territory . . . MICHAEL R. MAGARIAN married Miss Rosine Djeuahirdjiatl of Beyrouth, Lebanon, on August 12 . . . GEORGE G. TWITCHELL is engaged to Miss Anne Barton of West Hartford. He is attending M.I.T. 1947 FREDERICK C . ELLIS is engaged to Miss Doris L. Sheller of Plainfield, N.J . . . . WILLIAM C. FAY married Miss Mary Lee O' Brien of Hartford on September 12 .. . ROBERT B. JENNINGS married Miss Shirley E. Narvesen on August 30 in the College Chapel .. . DONALD E. JONES married Miss Marion L. Plasche of Ridgefield Park, N . ]., on September 6 . .. "HENRY M . LOZIER married Miss Elizabeth B. Thompson on July 1. They are living in Simsbury, Conn .. . . EDMUND C. PLATT married Miss Lysbeth Ann Walker of Shaker Heights, Ohio, on September 15 .. . EMIL V. POLCE married Miss Harriet E. Roussos of Hartford on October 27


20

TRINITY

COLLEGE

. . . FREDERICK P. SCHULZE married Miss Lillian ;A. Brown of West Hartford, on June 28 .. . JOSEPH R. STIRLACCI is engaged to Miss Grace Ciampi of Springfield, Mass . . . . WILLIAM I. THOMSEN, JR., married Miss Joan W. Cannon of Hartford on june 21 in the College Chapel . . . WILLIAM WELLING married Miss Harriet V. Brewer of Hartford on September 13 . . . JOHN S. WILSON reports the birth of a son, john Spry, Jr., on July 4. The following is a partial list of where the class is working or doing graduate study : JOEL BENGSTON - Instructor in Physics, Worcester Tech. ; KARL W. BRADLEY - j. L. Hudson Co., Detroit, Mich. ; ARTHUR E. FAY - So. New England Telephone Co., Hartford, Conn.; CHARLES J. FECTO, JR. - Sperry & Barnes Co., New Haven; WILLIAM D. FLYNN - Bethlehem Steel Co. , Bethlehem, Pa. ; LEWIS L. FRIEDLAND - Tax Examiner, State of Conn. ; EDWARD M . FRIEDLANDER - Plasticoid Corp., Hazard ville, Conn . ; RICHARD J. GODLEWSKI - Atlantic & Pacific Co., Springfield, Mass.; THOMAS C . GRIMES - Aetna Casualty & Surety Co., Hartford, Conn. ; RAYMOND G. HALSTED, JR., JOHN W. MURPHY and JAMES D. WICKENDEN - Aetna Life Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn.; HOWARD S. HANE, JR. Teaching, Hoosac School, Hoosick, N. Y.; HAROLD L. HAYES - General Electric Co., Bridgeport, Conn. ; ROBERT B. JENNINGS - james Lees & Sons, Bridgeport, Pa. ; JOHN D . JOHNSON - Trinity College, Chern. Lab. Ass 't;. EDMOND C. KELLY Crocker Mills, Fitchburg, Mass.; LeROY KENT, JR. - Teaching and Athletic Director, Gilbert High School, Winsted, Conn .; GEORGE E . LINARDOS Planning to visit Balkan countries for next year; HENRY M. LOZIER - So. New England Telephone Co., New Haven, Conn .; GILBERT J . MARTINO Aetna Life Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn. ; ANDREW W. MILLIGAN, JR. - Hartford Accident & Indemnity Co., Hartford, Conn. ; WILLIAM R. PIERRE General Chemical Co. , New York; KARL A. REICHE, JR. - Pratt& Whitney Aircraft, East Hartford, Conn. ; RICHARD H . SCEERY - Comptometer Division of Felt & Tarrant Mfg. Co. ; DONALD R. SPONCEY Teaching History, Watkinson School, Hartford, Conn. ; JOSEPH N. STIRLACCI - Westinghouse Electric Mfg. Co., East Springfield, Mass.;JOHN F . TYLER Aetna Fire Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn.; CHARLES W. WALKER, JR. - Teaching Chemistry and Mathematics, Watkinson School, Hartford, Conn.; WILLIAM WELLING - Travelers Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn. ; JOHNS. WILSON - Smith, Barney Co., Chicago, Ill. GRADUATE SCHOOL ALBERT j. AHERN, JR. - Northwestern University ; FRANK H. BORDEN, JR . - Univ. of Pennsylvania Law School; HARRY BRAND - Columbia International School; ALFRED S. DUBINSKY Columbia University (Business); THOMAS F . EGAN __: Hartford College of~aw; SHERMAN A. FLAKS -

ALUMNI

NEWS

N.Y. University Dental School; ROBERT W. FREDRICKSON - N. Y. Medical College; RUSSELL B. HOLMES - Johns Hopkins, Languages; EDWARD J . HOTEZ - Columbia University, Industrial Management; WARREN A. HUNT - R. P. 1.; MERRITT JOHNQUEST - Univ. of Pittsburg - Merchandising; DONALD E. JONES - Columbia University, English; GEORGE R. LAEDLEIN - Philadelphia Divinity School; BARNEY LAPP and FREDERICK D. NEUSNER - Yale Law School; GEORGE A. MANSFIELD - R. P. 1.; WILLARD I. MARR N. Y. U. Business School; ALFRED H . MARZI University of Chicago; FREDERICK U . POPE Berkeley Seminary; GLENN W. PRESTON - Yale, Physics ; JULIUS F . RANSOM, JR. - Hartford Law School ; HUGH P. REED, JR. - University of New Mexico (English) ; ROBERT M. ROSENBERG Northwestern, Chemistry; WILLIAM I. THOMSEN, JR. - R . P . I. ; GEORGE C. WICKES - Columbia University, Mathematics; CHARLES WITHINGTON - University of Rochester, Geology; EDMOND WOODWARD - Hartford College of Law; JOHN F. WRIGHT - University of Chicago, Industrial Relations. 路 The men listed below finished their degree requirements in August: EUGENE C. BAKER - Teaching, Thomas School, Tucson, Arizona; ROBERT S. CROSS - General Electric Co., New York; HAMILTON GRANT Aetna Casualty & Surety Co., Hartford, Conn. ; RICHARD P. HORAN Phoenix Mutual Life Ins. Co., Hartford, Conn.; HARRY D. HULTINE James Lees & Sons Co., Bridgeport, Pa.; CHARLES JOHNSON - j. L. Hudson Co., Detroit, Michigan; TREVOR LEWIS-JONES - Gibbs & Cox, Inc., New York (Marine Engineer firm); ARTHUR LORENSEN - Export company in New York City ; ROBERT MIXTER - W . R . Grace Co., in New York City ; HAROLD MONOSON - Brewer & Co., Worcester, Mass.; JOSEPH F . MURTAUGH, JR. - Conn. General Life Ins. Co., Hartford, Conn.; GEORGE H . M. ROUNTREE, JR. - Travelers Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn . GRADUATE SCHOOL WILLIAM E . BLANCHFIELD and LEON PODROVE Hartford College of Law; STEPHEN BONIFAZI - Returning to Trinity for Master's in Chemistry ; GLENN GATELY - Georgetown Law School ; JOSEPH K. GIONFRIDDO - Georgetown Medical School ; JOHN J. GODFREY - Syracuse University, Industrial Managl!l11ent ; HENRY E. MILFORD - New York Medical School; JOHN PEABODY - Columbia Law School; THORNTON ROBY - Wesleyan; LEO ROSEN - Hartford Law School ; DAVID L. SCHROEDER - University of Colorado, Math. and Physics; WILLIAM A. STUDWELL - Yale Divinity School; ROBERT TOLAND, II I - Harvard University, Business S: hool ; VERNON E. THOMAS and LOUIS R . ZIEGRA, JR . - New York Medical School.

Dec1947  
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