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Vol 5 No 11 C o m p l i m e n t a r y i n - f l i g h t m a g a z i n e f o r 1 t i m e A i r l i n e w w w .1 t i m e . c o . z a 0861 345 345 • www.aboutime.co.za

raising the stakes

W i l d C o a s t • C ro s s i n g D e s e r t s • P i e t e r m a r i t z b u r g • B e e s Ke w G a rd e n s • Fr a n t i c Fe s t i v i t i e s • A m o r V i t t o n e • Ke n n e l s

1time.co.za


contents

on our 24

Cover “Why do you think the same six guys end up at the final table at the World Series of Poker every year? Are they the luckiest guys in Las Vegas? No, it’s because they’ve got skills” – Rounders (1998) Pic © iStockphoto.com 34

Vol 5 No 11

Features

46

Life on the Wild Coast is slow, which is precisely why it’s so seductive. It requires you to abandon your city trappings and adopt the relaxed ways of the place where rural South Africa and paradise meet.

24 Raising the Stakes Poker

28

Is the Honeymoon over?

34

Crossing Deserts

60

Frantic Festivities

106

Pet Vacation

The global bee crisis

Extreme ultra marathon

Getting ready for the festive season

Pet care over the holidays

Entertainment

10

28

Read more on page 34

Travel 34

Life in the Slow Lane The Wild Coast

46

Pietermartizburg

71

London Blooming

94

Not-so-sleepy

The Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew

Nelson Mandela Bay A great holiday destination

Motoring

53

Amor Vitonne

56

Navigating the Bush

76

How do you Smaak my language

Health

98

Whisky

80

Too much on your plate

124

Lighten Up

87

Future Proof your Child

‘n passivolle packet

How to find your way in the Bushveld The peculiarities of SA English Your drink of choice Summer decorating

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From The Showroom Floor

New Models, Peugeot, Kia

Talking about stress

Parenting for modern kids


contents

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76

116

Vol 5 No 11

90

The gardens are filled with trees and plants from across the globe, intriguing historic buildings – including a palace – makes for a delightful escape from the bustling city streets. Read more on page 71

Business & Tech 65

Airport Upgrade Cape Town International

90 The Quest for Clarity

HDTV

111

Mousing Around

115

Auctioneering’s Advance

Keeping Up With The Times

20

How About That

112

What’s happening in South Africa

News in short

Colouring-In Competition Fun for the little ones

Websites that will make you look twice

Property on auction

Regulars

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18

12

Editor’s Letter

14

Letters From Passengers

Laura Cooke

Your opinion counts

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120

On The Cutting Edge

Get it first

126

Flight Schedule 1time flight details

130 Touchdown News 1time news 134

Domestic Flight Menu

136

Zanzibar Flight Menu

What will it be?

A scrumptious selection

100


1time Airline Tel: +27 861 345 345

e d i t o r ’s l e t t e r

about adventure

Competition Winners from September 2008

The south African Bushveld by Lee Gutteridge Guther Fouche` SKYY Vodka Hamper Neil Samdass Guther Fouche` Yatish Daya Plasma Morph Dragon Teresa Fryer Matthew de Beer Marlene Van Heerden

Wandering through a local shopping centre during October, and seeing the shops already lined with Christmas crackers and tinsel, I began to feel an overwhelming sense of panic that the year was almost over. At the time, Christmas day was a good two months away, and I started thinking about why we let future worries impact so severely on our dayto-day lives? I, for one, have a tendency to bury myself under a host of future pressures long before the actual event/deadline is anywhere near. Not only does this compound my existing stress levels far beyond what they should be, but it is largely unnecessary. It is becoming increasingly obvious to me that it is crucial to our wellbeing that we take time out and enjoy the small, precious everyday moments of the present. In the course of pursuing careers, dealing with families and relationships, buying cars, houses and a plethora of other desirable items, it is all too easy to become so immersed in the attainment of future goals that we forget to savour the now. Whether taking a 15-minute rest from the office during a crisis, or going on a weekend break, we need to take time out before we burn out. For the ultimate time-out, one of my favourite “slow lane” destinations has for long been the stunning Wild Coast, with its temperate oceans, superb beaches and gentle rolling hills, this is the place to find a sense of calm. However, relaxing with no day-to-day stress is easy. The trick is finding a sense of balance throughout the year, even when pressure builds. In this edition we talk about planning ahead for the festive season to avoid overburdening yourself. We also discuss the modern malaise of “presenteeism” which sees employees forcing themselves to work when ill. They may be in the office, but aren’t fully engaging with their work and this growing trend can have similar negative impacts on businesses as absenteeism. So, take some time off, cash in on your unused leave and enjoy today rather than worry about tomorrow.

Editor: Laura Cooke laura@aboutime.co.za Assistant to THE Editor: Marinda Scharneck marinda@tcbpublishing.co.za Advertising Sales: Senior sales director: Pierre le Roux +27 84 525 2431 Andre Scharneck +27 72 739 8855 sales executives: Neal Kinnear +27 83 655 5780 Alan Kalukhov +27 82 679 5552 Charlotte Nutman +27 83 442 8641 Robyn Shillaw-Botha +27 82 795 5995 Patricia Kinnear +27 76 742 3523 Martin Taljaart +27 82 564 2066 Images: Racing the planet, Solange Hando, Laura Cooke, iStockphoto.com, Gallo/Getty Images, Nicky Furniss, Pietermaritzburg Tourism, Nelson Mandela Bay Tourism, Kerrin Cocks, Quickpic Design & Layout: Joanne Mc Laren Virtual Da Vinci Creative Room joanne@virtualdavinci.co.za Webmaster: Brett Rothmann webmaster@aboutime.co.za PRINTING: Business Print Centre, Pretoria Contributors to this Issue: Kathyryn Fourie, Bianca Capazorio, Nicky Furniss, Karen Nel, Solange Hando, Jolene Bailey, Jenna van Schoor, Bernie Hellberg, Bernard K Hellberg, Lindi van Rooyen, Eugene Goddard, Natalie Gillman, Lisa Witepski, Jane Barry

Laura

abouTime is published monthly by TCB Publishing on behalf of 1time Airline. Opinions expressed in the publication are not necessarily those of TCB Publishing, 1time Airline or any of their clients. Information has been included in good faith by the publisher and is believed to be correct at the time of going to print. No responsibility can be accepted for errors and omissions. No material (articles or photographs) in the publication may be reproduced, in whole or in part, without specific written permission from the Editor. Submissions of articles and photographs for publication are welcome, but the publisher, while exercising all reasonable care, cannot be held responsible for any loss or damage. Please ensure that all material is posted by registered mail to PO Box 11273, Hatfield, Pretoria, 0028.

SMS & WIN!

Copyright © 2008. All copyright for material appearing in this magazine belongs to TCB Publishing and/or the individual contributors. All rights reserved.

Living Yoga Guther Fouche` Denys Slabbert

One lucky reader stands a chance to win Sharper Edges. Simply SMS the word TIME, followed by the word EDGE to 35131. Cost per SMS is R3. Competition closes 30th November 2008. By entering this competition you consent to receiving electronic information pertaining to abouTime and/or 1time Airline.

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Publisher: TCB Publishing PO Box 11273, Hatfield, 0028 Tel: +27 861 THE MAG Fax: +27 88 012 346 2367 mail@tcbpublishing.co.za


passenger letters

about adventure

Dear 1time, I am a frequent flyer on your airline and have wanted to comment for a long time. From the moment I step into the airport in any city, I see your sign immediately. I do not have to walk up and down to find the check-in counter feeling lost. The signs are clearly visible, showing the destination of the various flights. The staff are always extremely pleasant and professional. The seats on the aeroplanes are comfortable and I never feel “squashed”, even when I am in a middle seat. The magazine is right up there with all the major publications. The articles are great and keep me entertained and the smaller size of the magazine is really user-friendly. To me, you are number 1 – all the time! C.A. Hawkins

Dear 1time, I have just come back from a trip to Cape Town and I have to tell you how impressed I am with 1time. Your prices were excellent, your service was spot on and everyone was really helpful and friendly. Your attention to detail is really impressive as are your carriers – which are spotless and spacious! I thoroughly enjoyed every part of my trip. Thank you for creating such a pleasant travelling experience. Thanks again, Jessica Comninos

Letter of the Month Dear 1time,

The writer of the Letter of the Month will receive one of two limited edition Ferrari Pens. Buy these and other gifts online from NetFlorist.

Some time ago, my pocketknife went missing and I assumed it had been stolen. I was quite upset as the knife held a lot of sentimental value. I recently flew down to Cape Town from Johannesburg. On going through the security check, my missing knife was detected at the bottom of my backpack. I did not want to lose it, so I went back to the 1time counter to ask for help. Without hesitation, the young lady at the counter found a substitute to sit in for her while she went in search of a box. With the addition of some scrap paper, and copious strapping tape, the check-in ladies boxed my precious knife and checked it in as additional luggage – and all this was done with cheery smiles from all the staff at the counter. The 1time staff were under no obligation to assist a passenger who had failed to thoroughly check his carry-on luggage. I would like to take this opportunity to thank them for service beyond the normal. I am a frequent flyer around the world and it is refreshing to be treated in such a friendly and courteous manner. 1time’s service in the air is excellent, their ground staff are equally so. 1time may be a no-frills airline but when it comes to all-round great service they stand out from the rest! Dennis Comninos

Visit www.netflorist.co.za Have a compliment or comment? Ask your flight attendant for a pen and paper and let us know what is on your mind. Alternatively, email cr@1time.co.za.

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keeping up

with the TIMES Table Mountain Blues Summit This year sees the mother city presenting seven of the country’s hottest blues and rock artists to entertain audiences at Bloemendal Wynhuis on 22nd November. The lineup includes Dan Patlansky, Boulevard Blues, Southern Gypsy Queen, Johnathan Martin and No Quarter, Dave Ferguson and The Lonesharks, Black Cat Bone and Paris Hillbilly and the Happy Endings. Presented by Boulevard Blues and sponsored by Combustion Technology, the Table Mountain Blues Summit is set to be a fantastic festival in a beautiful setting. Tickets are R160 and available from Computicket.

Whiskey Time Discover the mystery of whisky at the FNB Whisky Live Festival. Running from 5th to 7th November in Cape Town and 12th to 14th November in Johannesburg, the annual FNB Whisky Live Festival is set to be more thrilling than ever. This year sees the introduction of a number of innovations designed to demystify one of South Africa’s most popular drinks. The festival encourages responsible drinking and no persons under the age of 18 will be allowed into the Tasting Hall. Tickets are R150 and are available from Computicket. Go to www.whiskylivefestival.co.za for more.

Ficksburg

Cherry Festival

Head to the Free State this November to celebrate one of the oldest festivals in South Africa. First held in 1969, the Ficksburg Cherry Festival, running from the 20th to 22nd November now attracts up to 20,000 visitors. Set in picturesque surroundings, this in a chance to enjoy fresh cherries as well as tasty asparagus. Take a picnic basket, listen to music and watch out for the Miss Cherry Blossom and miss Cherry Pip competitions. For more information go to www.cherryfestival.co.za.

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how about that

Spoil yourself with Moya Moya is a fabulous range of therapeutic spa, body, hair and home products that make use of the medicinal properties of Fynbos and other indigenous botanicals. The products use a combination of Cape Chamomile, Buchu, Lanyana, Cape May, Zinziba, Cape Snowbush and Cape Geranium in the form of essential oils. This allows their therapeutic qualities to be rapidly absorbed through the skin and put to good effect in mind, body and soul. The rare Cape Chamomile is the showpiece of the range. This extraordinary oil turns a beautiful indigo blue when exposed to oxygen. Moya products are vegetable oil-based, have no added colourants or artificial fragrances, and are not tested on animals. Moya is available at selected Woolworth’s stores and spas. For more information visit www.moyasan.com or call +27 22 448 1746.

Keep it tidy with MyClip There are a variety of useful plastic cable covers on the market to keep your electronics cables neat and tidy. However, they are quite restrictive if ever you want to move your equipment. South African innovators have come up with a simple, but very clever little device – MyClip. Simply stick MyClip onto your desk, with the supplied adhesive pad, and link all your loose cables in one small gadget. It is easy to unclip in order to rearrange cables or move the clip to a different location. As an added bonus, they also include MyCellclip, designed for those people who are irritated by never finding their cellphone charger cable in the same location. Now you can stick your cable to your bedside table and never have to scramble for the end of your charger cable again. MyClip is available at Incredible Connection, Hi-Fi Corporation, Game and other stores nationwide, at a recommended price of R49.00. For the full range of Ergo-Tilt products visit www.ergo-tilt.com.

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how about that

New twins at the Zoo In a first for the National Zoological Gardens of South Africa in Pretoria, twin red-cheeked gibbons were born on 30th September 2008. Mom, Cheyenne, is 20 years old and has successfully reared four youngsters since 1997. Red-cheek gibbons generally only give birth to a single baby every two or three years. The babies are initially blonde in colour to match the colour of their mother’s coat. As they get older they turn from blonde to grey to black. This allows the father, who is black in colour to take over the care of the youngsters. Once the gibbon has reached sexual maturity at the age of seven years, the females turn blonde again and the males remain black. This is Cheyenne’s first set of twins and she is coping well with the demands of the two youngsters. She is being monitored 24 hours a day and is being given supplements and vitamins to protect her health so that she can feed the babies properly. For more information go to www.nzg.ac.za.

Break the mould with

GreaterGood SA

GreaterGood South Africa is urging South Africans to make this Christmas different by choosing gifts that will change lives. Make Christmas Matter is an annual call-to-action campaign offering a range of alternative Christmas gifts. Each festive season from November to January, Make Christmas Matter gives people the chance to discover the true joy of giving. Christmas “gifts” – like fruit trees for a community orchard or books for rural children – are available for people to buy quickly and securely online at makechristmasmatter.co.za. Personalised gift cards can be printed or sent by email to friends, family, colleagues or business associates explaining how the gift is helping to change lives in South Africa. Since it started in 2005, Make Christmas Matter has raised R1,477,710 for 17 development projects ranging from a child immunisation programme in the Northern Cape to a community environmental education drive on the East Rand. Go to www.makechristmasmatter.co.za or www.greatergoodsa. co.za or call + 27 21 794 0580 to find out more.

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Poker about poker

“Why do you think the same six guys end up at the final table at the World Series of Poker every year? Are they the luckiest guys in Las Vegas? No, it’s because they’ve got skills” – Rounders (1998) Story by Laura Cooke Pix © iStockphoto & Gallo/Getty Images

T

he question that seems to constantly circle this card game is whether it should be treated as gambling or as a game of skill? Poker obviously relies on a bit of good luck, but for the real professional this game takes a lot of skill, talent, a cool head and guts. Professional poker players are a far cry from the grey, desperate gamblers who spend their lives in front of the blinking lights of one-armed bandits. The professional poker circuit sees players

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competing for exorbitant amounts of cash. The final table of players in the 2008 World Series of Poker (WSOP) compete for a whopping $9,119,517. Out of the 6,884 who originally entered the WSOP, nine finalists will play at the final table, and although the “November Nine” are all guaranteed millionaires, the $9 million can only go to one. (The final is scheduled to take place on 9th November.) What makes it clear that poker is not just about luck, is that throughout history the same poker bigwigs

repeatedly walk away with the winnings. Johnny Chan is one of the legends of the professional poker world who, along with Phil Helmuth and Doyle Branson, has managed to win 10 World Series of Poker titles. He entered the world of poker at the age of 16, and soon dropped out of college and moved to Vegas to become a professional poker player. He is the last player to win two consecutive WSOP championship events in 1987 and 1988. Chan was almost on his way to a third, which would have been almost unheard of, when the young Phil


about poker

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about poker Jamie Gold of California poses with his mentor, poker legend Johnny Chan, after Gold won the World Series of Poker no-limit Texas Hold ‘em main event at the Rio Hotel & Casino on August 11, 2006 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Gold outlasted more than 8,700 other poker players to win the top prize of USD 12 million.

Helmuth toppled his throne to become the youngest person to ever win the event. All of these stars consistently win their games – adding more credence to the idea that fortune is only one of many components that makes up a good poker game. South Africa has their own surprise poker superstar who sprang onto the WSOP circuit in 2007 and finished third. Raymond Rahme was a complete wild card in the event and had only started playing poker via online sites a few years earlier. At the age of 62, he was the oldest competitor in the event and has been quoted as saying, “A lot of the youngsters are incredibly aggressive players, and very good. But sometimes your life experience comes out on top.” It was an enormous achievement to finish the WSOP at the winner’s table, especially for someone who had little experience in professional poker. Unlike many of the pros, he believes that the game

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has much more to do with luck than anything else. And lucky he was – he left the event with a tidy $3 million for his efforts. Poker has always been a popular pastime, but its popularity increased dramatically with the introduction of online poker as well as the invention of the hole-card camera. For the first time, poker was transformed into a real spectator sport with viewers now able to see player’s facedown cards. Prior to this, spectators had no way of knowing what players held and the game was far less engaging. Since this development, broadcasts of the major tournaments such as the WSOP and the World Poker Tour have attracted huge viewer volumes with poker professionals fast becoming celebrities. Where exactly this game originated is disputed and there is no clear trace to the root of poker. Many now think that a myriad of early card games all played some part. A modern theory even argues that the game has nothing

to do with early card games at all, and rather that the practice of betting is what links it to the past. In this view, poker developed during the 1700s and through the years slowly morphed into its present day forms. Today there are a number of variations that include draw, stud, straight and community – with Texas Hold’em and Omaha being the most well known in the last category. Whether the game is one of skill or luck is a question that is not likely to be resolved, and is largely irrelevant, as it doesn’t deter private and professional poker players from placing their bets. There are millions of online poker players across the world, thousands of poker tables in casinos everywhere, and this doesn’t even touch on the hundreds of poker games going on between friends on Saturday nights. But even the most fervent believers in the strength of their poker skills are hoping that fortune will shine on their hand. >


about bees

Story by Kathryn Fourie Pix © iStockphoto.com

honeymoon IS THE

over ?

What happens when bees disappear…

I

magine settling down to a nice afternoon tea, you order crumpets and they come with syrup instead of honey. Outrageous! You want honey and lemon Strepsils to soothe your throat, but it’s no longer available. No honey brittle, no honey shampoo, no honey in your rooibos, you can’t even lick a teaspoon of honey. It’s gone. And so are all the bees. If that’s not bad enough, half the food you used to eat can’t be produced because there are no bees to fertilise the plants. Seem unlikely? Guess again,

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because in North America, Canada, South America, Europe and Asia, bee health is at an all time low. Honey-producing beehives were sailed across the seas from Europe to the Americas hundreds of years ago, as they were not found in these unexplored regions of the world. In turn, a small number of European queen bees provided the entire gene pool for the bee communities of two rather massive continents. This in essence, was not smart genetic logic. Intensive structured

breeding and a low resistance to introduced diseases meant that a weak bee, completely inferior to its ancestors, came into being. European bees today are medicated and maintained by humans, which makes honey a far cry from the organic product that it is supposed to be. Moreover, the bees are unable to pollinate plants effectively, one of their most vital roles in first world food production. One may think that sitting happily on the southern tip of Africa this doesn’t really concern us. But according to Dr


about bees

Garth Cambray, the effects dial straight into the heart of small rural African farming. Garth is a founder of the Makana Meadery, established 8 years ago in the Eastern Cape. The meadery brews the alcoholic beverage of mead by fermenting honey. It is an age-old drink, which is popularly associated with medieval times, but was and still is brewed by indigenous peoples all over Africa. Cambray explains that “in the West, scientists say one out of every three mouthfuls of food was pollinated by a bee.” However the story is more complicated than that. Bees pollinate legumes (beans), which fix nitrogen and enrich the soil. With bees vanishing from the farming world, soya and other legumes are exceptionally difficult to produce and have been increasingly replaced by maize, which relies on fertiliser for successful growth. This has resulted in worldwide fertiliser prices skyrocketing under the increased supply pressure. As Cambray says, “Ironically, a shortage of bees in America has made the cost of non-bee pollinated crops in South Africa (SA) more expensive. In reality, for us in SA, less bees working in the world economy means every mouthful of food we eat will be either more expensive, or not there at all.” Fortunately for us, bee breeding has not been heavily managed in SA and the rest of Africa, and in most cases colonies are wild or semi-managed. The vast gene pool that these bees are derived

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from means that they are exceptionally hardy, and within a short period of time can build up a resistance to diseases that would have killed them before. It is this diversity which Dr Cambray believes could be utilised to help combat the problems experienced abroad. If African bees were farmed, with exceptional care taken to recognise and preserve the gene pool, they could be exported to the USA. There they would be installed in a hive and pollinate crops during the appropriate time of the year, and simply die off during winter. In this way job creation and economic enterprise amongst African farmers could be positively influenced, and perhaps fertiliser costs could drop down a notch. Bees are also the sole pollinators of a variety of crops such as sunflowers, rapeseed and canola, which are key crops in the production of biofuel. The loss of bees and their ability to pollinate these crops would stunt the development of biofuel technology, increasing our reliance on regular fuel. More demand for regular fuel means a higher price to be paid at the petrol pump. Again. Closer to home, bees provide us with our favourite Pooh Bear snack, and support a multi-million Rand industry. Beekeeping is one of the most ecologically sound farming techniques, as the bees do all of the harvesting work, causing no damage to the surrounding fauna and flora. As a form of economic empowerment, it can reach straight to

the grassroots level, where true economic development is so drastically needed. It is in this light that it is important to realise that we have a valuable and rare resource in SA that could aid in reducing the global food and fuel crisis. Taking care of this resource, and creating awareness around the opportunities that bees can provide in reducing poverty is imperative, lest we be left with syrup shampoo, marmite brittle and oil at $400 a barrel. For more information on Dr Garth Cambray and the Makana Meadery visit www.iqhilika.co.za and learn about the ancient grog of mead. >

Crops that are only fertilised by bees: Almonds, apples, avocados, blueberries, cranberries, cherries, kiwi fruit, macadamia nuts, asparagus, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, onions, legume seeds, pumpkins, squash, sunflowers, canola, rapeseed, safflower, soybean.

WIN: Two abouTime readers can each win a delicious hamper from Makana Meadery. SMS the word TIME, followed by the word HONEY to 35131. Cost per SMS is R3. Competition closes 30th November 2008. By entering this competition you consent to receiving electronic information pertaining to abouTime and/or 1time Airline.


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Life about travel

in the slow lane

Story by Bianca Capazorio, Pix Š iStockphoto.com & Laura Cooke

Life on the Wild Coast is slow, which is precisely why it’s so seductive. It requires you to abandon your city trappings and adopt the relaxed ways of the place where rural South Africa and paradise meet.

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S

tretching 270km, from the Great Kei River to the border between the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal, and encompassing the areas of Morgan Bay, Coffee Bay, Port Saint John’s and Qunu, the Wild Coast is home to scenery that firmly wedges itself in your memory. Driving along the potholed roads into the intensely rural region, you get the sense that time has stood still. It may feel like an untouched piece of paradise, but the area has its share of troubles – many of the locals are unemployed and desperately poor. Infrastructure is almost non-existent, and parts of the Wild Coast’s untouched beauty are under threat by major mining works. Perhaps it’s this stark contrast between the harshness of life and the splendour of the landscape that makes you appreciate the dramatic cliffs, wild waves, green hills and the quiet joy of cows wandering the beach, as an utterly unique experience. You would be forgiven for believing that in such a rural paradise, there may be little to keep the active traveller entertained. But, adrenaline junkies can pick their activities from a list including abseiling, cliff


about travel

jumping, surfing, sea kayaking, canoeing and rock climbing. Feared by sailors for its terrible storms and waves, the coastline has claimed many a ship. These wrecks, and their spoils, such as coins, crockery and the odd cannon, now inhabit the seabed. The life that has grown up around these relics makes for great snorkelling and diving. If you feel safer on land, sit back and watch hundreds of bird species or get up and take a hike. Popular trails include the stretch from Qora Mouth to Cintsa, and the five-day Port Saint John’s to Coffee Bay route. A shorter, three-hour walk from Coffee Bay to Hole in the Wall (a phenomenal rock formation created by centuries of pounding waves) is highly recommended. Alternatively, spend your time on horseback exploring the rolling green hills. Culture vultures will be pleased to know they are also catered for.

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The Wild Coast, and specifically, the village of Qunu, provided Nelson Mandela with some of his greatest memories, which he describes in The Long Walk to Freedom: “It was in the fields that I learned how to knock birds out of the sky with a slingshot, to gather wild honey and fruits and edible roots, to drink warm, sweet milk straight from the udder of a cow, to swim in the clear, cold streams, and to catch fish with twine and sharpened bits of wire.” Madiba Magic has caught on in the area, and the Nelson Mandela Museum, opened in 2000, allows tourists to catch it too. Exhibits in the main museum, near Mthatha, include gifts sent to Nelson Mandela from presidents, statesmen and ordinary citizens. The display features letters from children, jewelencrusted camel saddles and some of his awards and medals. There are two smaller, satellite museums at

Mvezo, Nelson Mandela’s birthplace and at Qunu, where he spent his youth. Tours of all three sites can be arranged. For a great cultural experience, spend some time at the Fair Trade accredited Bulungula Lodge, which is partly owned by the local community. Here you will learn about Xhosa customs and take part in traditional face painting, beer brewing and meal preparations, while colourful locals regale you with stories. Whatever it is you decide to do on the Wild Coast, you will feel yourself start to do it to the unhurried rhythm of the locals. And soon after you’re back to your mobile phones and flat screen tvs, you’ll begin to long for that slow, rural heartbeat. Go to www.wildcoast.co.za to find out more about accommodation, travel maps and other useful advice. >


Deserts

about adventure

Crossing

Story by Laura Cooke, Pix © iStockphoto.com & Racing the Planet

There are many ways to see the world. Take a Kontiki Tour around Europe, a cruise through the Caribbean. Or … run for six days continuously through the desert.

S

outh African Ryan Sandes chose the latter. A novice to the international world of extreme marathons, he won the six-day, 250-km Gobi March in June 2008. The Gobi March is only one of four gruelling desert footraces that make up the 4 Desert Series. The series is the height of extreme, and takes

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competitors across the largest and most forbidding deserts on Earth. The Gobi aside, it includes the Atacama in Chile, the Sahara in Egypt and Antarctica. Participants are not only in competition with one another, but have to deal with searing heat, intense wind, sand and icy cold. In all races, competitors carry their own food, clothing and equipment.

They are only provided with water and a place in a tent to sleep, however, they are supported by professional medical and operations teams should anything go wrong. With the Gobi win behind him, Sandes headed off to the Sahara to take part in the third stage of 4 Deserts. Also known as the “Race of No Return,” the Sahara Race


about adventure

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about adventure

Ryan Sandes crossing the finishing line of the Gobi, March 2008, in first place

(scheduled to start on 26th October) sees temperatures regularly reaching 45 degrees Celsius and has the added challenge of being very, very sandy. How does someone decide to get involved in extreme events such as the 4 Deserts? In the case of Sandes, it was mostly a desire to travel and see the world. During 2007, Sandes competed in a number of local endurance events, in which he did very well, but has only been running seriously for just over two years. He did some “googling,” and found the 4 Deserts website. “It was just something really different and looked interesting as well as a huge challenge. Originally I wanted to do the first race, the Atacama Crossing, as I have always wanted to see South America, but injured myself and had to wait for the Gobi.” In preparation for events of this magnitude, Sandes is involved in a rigorous training routine that starts months in advance. An average week for this quantity surveyor by day does

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not leave much time for socialising. For the Sahara in particular, Sandes trains in a special heat chamber twice a week to prepare his body for what he will face in the Sahara. In each 2-hour session, he runs from 18 – 27 km. Wednesdays sees Sandes out for a 2 – 3 hour trail run, Friday he goes to the gym and on Saturday and Sunday he heads out for healthy 4 – 11-hour trail runs. But no amount of training can totally prepare you for what you will face during the race. Sandes recalls a low moment on the Gobi, “On day five, which was an 80-km stage, I knew that the Chilean competitor (Juan Encina) was strong. I pushed very hard to keep up with him. When we got to the 60-km check point, the temperature was above 45 degrees. The air was shimmering from the heat. I leant against a pole and almost collapsed. For the next 10 km I really battled and thought I might not make it.” But make it he did, finishing first

against hardened ultra-endurance athletes such as “Ultramarathon Man” Dean Karnezes who was 27th in Time Magazine’s 100 most influential people poll. (Karnezes finished an ultramarathon just two days before the Gobi and suffered from fatigue during the event, yet still placed fourth.) Another South African racer, Paul Liebenberg and Karnezes are the only two remaining athletes who aim to complete all four races in one year. When asked what Sandes is most looking forward to in the Sahara Race he says, “I think meeting up with some of the competitors again. You build up strong friendships during these events.” Like the Gobi, the event takes the athletes through some of the most remote areas on Earth, pushing them both mentally and physically to levels beyond what most people experience in a lifetime. For more information go to www.4deserts.com. >


about travel

Story by Nicky Furniss Pix ©

‘Maritzburg Not-so-sleepy

Surrounded by hills on all sides and generally devoid of major goings-on “Sleepy Hollow” used to be the epithet that both

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visitors and residents alike associated with Pietermaritzburg. ut in recent years KwaZulu-Natal’s capital city, and the second largest in the province, is having something of a renaissance and, while it still retains a certain small town charm, it can now be called anything but sleepy. With its beautiful green surroundings, wholesome feel and

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a size that means its just small enough to get around easily without the evils of rush hour traffic, and just big enough to have most of life’s necessities (like an Exclusive Books and more than one cinema to choose from), Pietermaritzburg is regularly voted as one of South Africa’s best cities to live and raise a family in. Increasingly visitors too, recognising its fascinating history

and its convenient location perfectly poised between the Drakensberg and the coast, are beginning to realise just how much good old ‘Maritzburg has to offer. Although the city was originally founded in 1838 by Dutch-speaking Voortrekkers, and derives its name from two famous Voortrekker leaders (Piet Retief and Gert Maritz), it was taken over by the British only


about travel

five years later when it became the administrative seat of the Natal Colony. Today the city is renowned for its strong British Colonial architecture and wealth of red brick Victorian and Edwardian buildings. In fact, many consider Pietermaritzburg to be one of the best preserved Victorian cities in the world. One of the prime examples of this style of architecture is the beautiful City Hall. The current building dating from 1901, is renowned for its fine stained glass windows, domes and the fact that it is the largest red-brick building in the Southern Hemisphere. The main hall, a regular venue for concerts, houses an impressively large pipe organ, also of world-class size with an amazingly resonant sound that fills the entire building.

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Across the road the grand columns and imposing facades of the old Natal Parliament buildings and the old Supreme Court (now the Tatham Art Gallery) offer glimpses of the splendour of the colonial era. Around the city one can still spot Victorian architectural influences in the quaint pedestrian lanes that link the city’s main streets, roofs decorated with wrought-iron lace work and even the occasional hitching post, reminding visitors of a slower more romantic time when “horse power” was still of the four legged variety. For those less interested in architecture, ‘Maritzburg is also known as the “City of Flowers,” and for good reason. The city’s National Botanical Garden, established in 1872, is one of eight national gardens in the country

and is famous for its beautiful avenue of plane trees. With its lush location on the edge of a mist belt, the garden plays home to a huge variety of rare and endangered indigenous plants, interesting specimens from the Northern Hemisphere and over 150 species of birds, making it a popular picnic and walking spot for nature lovers and those just wanting to get away from it all. Fast becoming another favourite getaway spot is the beautiful Victorian-style garden at Rosehurst. This little red-brick building in the middle of town, once home to one of ‘Maritzburg’s most loved gardening personalities, Lorraine Kettley, has been lovingly restored and now offers visitors all sorts of temptations in the form of a Belgian chocolate


about travel

shop, antiques, jewellery, beads, rare books and vintage clothing. The Café at Rosehurst is the perfect place to savour a cappuccino and a light lunch before exploring Rosehurst’s main attraction, its diminutive but enchanting Victorian garden, that on lazy summer afternoons drips heavy with the sweet smells of old fashioned roses and moonflowers. In November, homeowners across ‘Maritzburg and the surrounding Midlands (including Rosehurst) open their gardens to the public, giving visitors a glance at some of the most spectacular gardens in the country and making the Open Gardens event one of the most popular on the ‘Maritzburg social calendar. Another popular event for garden fundies is the Sunday

Tribune Garden and Leisure Show in October, which attracts over 25,000 visitors every year and is now the largest three-day show of its kind in the country. ‘Maritzburg also serves as a convenient starting point from which to explore the surrounding Natal Midlands, including the popular Midlands Meander route, which boasts a wonderfully eclectic mix of artist’s studios, superb restaurants, boutique hotels, and spas, all in beautiful pastoral settings. But with its own wealth of attractions Pietermaritzburg is fast becoming a tourist spot in its own right and a great place to explore the charm of a not-so-sleepy Sleepy Hollow. >

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Malaria M

alaria is one of the most serious tropical diseases in the world. Africa bears the greatest burden of this disease which poses a serious risk to both travellers and residents in malaria areas. More than one million people die of malaria every year, mostly infants, young children and pregnant women, and most of them in Africa. The disease kills one child in twenty before the age of five, and a child somewhere dies of malaria every 30 seconds. South Africa is internationally recognized for its success in the control of malaria and relentlessly pursues an active advocacy campaign to educate and inform the nation that malaria is a treatable and preventable disease. Malaria transmission differs in intensity and regularity depending on local factors such as rainfall patterns, proximity of mosquito breeding sites and mosquito species. Some regions have a fairly constant number of cases throughout the year – these are malaria endemic – whereas in other areas there are “malaria” seasons, usually coinciding with the rainy season. In South Africa malaria occurs mainly in the areas of Limpopo, Mpumalanga and north-eastern KwaZulu Natal. Frequently asked questions

infected person has no symptoms. After as few as 8 days or as long as several months, the parasites leave the liver cells and enter red blood cells. Once in the cells, they continue to grow and multiply. After they mature, the infected red blood cells rupture, freeing the parasites to attack and enter other red blood cells. Organisms released when the red cells burst are what cause the typical fever, chills, and flu-like malaria symptoms. Q How serious is malaria? A Malaria is a serious disease and is a leading cause of death and disease worldwide. Most deaths occur in young children. Illness and death from malaria are, however, largely preventable. Q Can malaria be transmitted in other ways? A Because the malaria parasite is found in red blood cells, malaria can also be transmitted through blood transfusion, organ transplant, or the shared use of needles or syringes contaminated with blood. Malaria may also be transmitted from a mother to her foetus before or during delivery (“congenital” malaria). Q How is malaria treated? A Malaria is a curable disease and can be treated with anti-malarial drugs. If you suspect that you have malaria, go to the clinic or the nearest health facility. Treatment with anti-malarial drugs should be started as soon as possible after the first symptoms appear.

malaria

Q What is malaria? A Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite.

Q How does one get malaria? A People get malaria from the bite of an infected female mosquito named the Anopheles. Malaria is not transmitted from person to person like a cold or the flu. People cannot get malaria from casual contact with malaria-infected people. Malaria can only be transmitted by the bite of an infected mosquito.

Q What are the signs and symptoms of malaria? A The common first symptoms – fever, headache, chills, and vomiting – appear 10 to 15 days after a person is infected. If not treated promptly with effective medicines, malaria can cause severe illness that is often fatal Q How does the mosquito spread malaria? A When a mosquito bites an infected person a small amount of blood is taken which contains the microscopic malaria parasites. The parasite grows and matures in the mosquito’s gut for a week or more, then travels to the mosquito’s salivary glands. When the mosquito next bites, these parasites mix with the saliva and are injected into the bite. Once in the blood, the parasites travel to the liver and grow and multiply. During this “incubation period”, the

Q How can I prevent myself from getting malaria? A The most important weapon in the fight against malaria is prevention. This consists of two things – the taking of preventative medication and the prevention of mosquito bites (Insecticides, mosquito repellents and bed nets are effective tools). Other methods of prevention • For travellers to malaria-risk areas, other methods of prevention, together with anti-malarial medication, should be taken. • Wear clothing with long sleeves and cover your ankles – especially at dawn and dusk, when mosquitoes are most active • Use long-lasting insecticide sprays inside homes and buildings • Place wire or gauze screens on all doors and windows • Keep a fan on in the room during the night – the current seems to put off the mosquitoes • Apply mosquito repellents directly to the skin • Use mosquito netting over the beds – these can be soaked in certain types of insecticide • Try and spend evenings indoors rather than outdoors, as you are much less likely to get bitten by mosquitoes • Blankets treated with mosquito repellents are useful.


Buffalo City - we cant wait to meet you A warm welcome awaits you in Buffalo City, home of hospitality, on the south eastern seaboard of South Africa. Buffalo City incorporates the seaside village of Gonubie; port city East London; Mdantsane - the second largest township in the country; the provincial capital Bhisho; and old settler towns King William’s Town and Berlin. Cultural and historic attractions abound since the area has played a significant role in South Africa throughout the centuries during colonial times, the frontier wars and the liberation struggle. Specially designed tours offer a window into township life, while the cool forest walks and waterfalls of the Amatola Mountains, Game Reserves, sunset cruises and adventure sport are within easy reach. Buffalo City offers tourists some of the best beaches in the country – ideal for leisurely walks, sunbathing, surfing or snorkelling. Blessed with the perfect beach weather during the summer holidays and a temperate climate year round, you can soak up the sun

all day, every day on one of our unspoiled beaches.

hanging out at top class local restaurants, clubs and bars.

Located between two of South Africa’s premier tourism routes – the Sunshine Coast and the Wild Coast - Buffalo City is also the perfect base from which to explore everything the rest of the Eastern Cape has to offer.

Imagine the endless possibilities for holiday entertainment that this diversity signifies! A visit to the Tourism Buffalo City office on the East London Esplanade will give you all the insight you need to explore this fascinating city.

Entertainment for young and old abounds. From trips to the zoo or aquarium, to game drives at one of the local game reserves or

Contact Tourism Buffalo City on: (043) 721 1346 info@tourismbuffalocity.co.za www.tourismbuffalocity.co.za


Amor about music

Storie deur Mandi Jordaan Pic © Robert Hamblin

‘N Passievolle Pakket Sy sing, dans, tree op en is nog beroepsvrou, eggenoot en ma. Amor is ‘n bondel energie, vurig oor wie sy is, wat sy doen en hoe sy haar lewe leef. Hier deel sy haar grootste passies.

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ie Vermaaklikheidswêreld

Sy is gebore om op te tree, lag Amor, met ‘n pa destyds wat in ‘n band gespeel het en ‘n ma wat as kind dansklasse geneem het. “Ek het met my laaste sente op demo’s spandeer, en na vier jaar en vyf platemaatskappye het my deurbraak uiteindelik gekom! Om te perform was nog altyd my droom, en dis wonderlik om te weet ek lééf nou daardie droom.” Amor was doelbewus versigtig om die Afrikaanse musiekmark te betree en het geen kortpaaie gestap nie. “Ek wou nooit in die stigma van poppie-tipe Afrikaans musiek betrokke raak wat hulle destyds aan my wou verkoop nie. Ek het gewag vir regte Afrikaanse musiek en lirieke wat in my hart ook leef, omdat ek Afrikaanse musiek so bietjie verder wou vat en dit ‘n lekker, moderne, funky Kylie Minogue-klank gee. Dis ‘n voorreg om te kan sing en dans en glo in wie ek is en wat ek doen.” Haar musiek is vir haar profeties, iets wat sy oor haarself en haar gehoor wil uitspreek. “Ek voel sterk daaroor dat my musiek altyd geestelik opbouende boodskappe moet oordra. Dis my doel om saadjies van hoop in mense te plant, of mense van my musiek hou of nie. Daar is soveel stres vandag, mens moet ophou fout vind en die lewe geniet! My musiek moet die positiewe

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in mense wakker maak; ek glo regtig die land sal ‘n beter plek wees as ons begin om die beste in die lewe en ander raak te sien. My vorige CD Voluit was so ‘n sukses omdat die klank en boodskap wat ek wou oordra, so opbouend was.”

in my kinders se lewens te bou en hulle ‘n goeie grondslag te gee.” En as daar nog ‘n klein Van Der Westhuizentjie moet wees? “As die ooievaar kom kuier, sal ons nie glad omgee nie!” lag Amor. “Maar net die tyd sal leer...”

Ma-wees is vir seker Amor se gunstelingrol. “Ek is op ‘n baie gelukkige, rustige fase in my lewe. Al is ek gek oor wat ek doen, kom my man en kinders eerste. Ek het glad nie ‘n begeerte om ‘n internasionale ster te wees of om soveel albums te maak of soveel aantal rekordverkope te kry nie. Om in familiewees te investeer is baie belangriker vir my; die glans van roem kan so vlietend wees.” Amor se woeste werkskedule moet deesdae tyd maak vir die Jordan (4) en Kylie (2) se karate-, swem en gimnastiekklasse. “Ek verkies dit glad nie anders nie! Moederskap het definitief sy uitdagings, veral as jy pootuit na ‘n optrede is en net ‘n bietjie wil laat slaap! Ek huil ook baie meer vandat ek ‘n ma is - veral as ek die kinders moet dissiplineer. Maar selfs hierdie ‘slegte’ deel is lekker omdat ek weet ek het die geleentheid om

“Ek is mal oor my lewe! As ek net kan sing en perform en kan ma-wees, is ek op my gelukkigste,” gesels Amor. Vroeg volgende jaar begin Amor haar nuwe album opneem. “Ek kan nie wag om te begin nie! Dis dieselfde soort inspirerende dansmusiek soos op Voluit, maar daar is vars choreografie wat die publiek sal verras. Die materiaal vir die album is regtig kwaliteit – ek het saam met my platemaatskappy deur 3000 liedjies gewerk om die regte snitte te kies!” Behalwe die nuwe CD wat oppad is, wil Amor ook weer graag voor die televisiekameras te siene wees. “Ek sal dit geniet om weer ‘n aanbieder te wees en werk tans aan ‘n lekker konsep. Maar ek is nie haastig nie, ek weet dinge gebeur op die regte tyd. Intussen doen ek alles wat na my kant toe kom, en bly fiks deur op die verhoog rond te spring!” borrel sy. >

Moederskap

Die Lewe


about adventure

Bush

Story by Lisa Witepski

Pix © Kerrin Cocks & South African Tourism

Navigating the

A pair of amber eyes is staring into mine. Although they are undeniably beautiful, the feeling I have is more chill than thrill. They belong to a powerful, angry and rather hungry lioness. You look a ton of ravenous, infuriated muscle in the eye, with not even a car door between you for protection, and let

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me know how comfortable you feel. s Lioness is not in the best of tempers. In her brother’s attempt to catch dinner, I’ve watched a targeted wildebeest feint towards their malintentioned pursuer, then literally run circles around him, while he alternately looked determined, baffled and ultimately sheepish. Meanwhile, his peckish partner has sat watching him with the look I get when I can’t believe that the dishes haven’t been washed, as per my request. In a weekend of outstanding gameviewing, this piano-wire moment of cat and mouse – or should that be cat and antelope – is a hard-to-beat highlight. But the runners-up have come pretty close.

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This weekend is fast teaching me that it’s not the big boys of the bush that hold all the charm. We’re in the Waterberg for the launch of leading field guide Lee Gutteridge’s The South African Bushveld: A Field Guide from the Waterberg, and my inner game ranger is firmly beating down my city girl reserve. I’ve marvelled at the mysteries of the bush and learned that just because a member of the Big Five isn’t lurking, doesn’t mean that it’s a quiet day in the bush. I have, for example, watched a group of lions play with their food, literally. Imagine seeing a lioness toy with a freshly slain aardvark. With horror and pity we gazed on as she took playful swipes at his sides, and then somersaulted over his prone form, only to walk away from it without a second glance, never mind a

bite. It was a reminder that you truly are a visitor in someone else’s kingdom when you’re in the bush, and that Nature plays by her own rules. There was another heart-in-my-mouth moment the next day, although far less gory. We’d followed a herd of elephants, but their continued evasion proved how astonishingly quickly a group of colossal, ponderously heavy beasts can move when they have a mind to. Although I have a fondness for these unlikely looking animals, it’s never been a desire of mine to test their tempers. In other words, I would’ve been more comfortable had we not been approaching them on foot. We finally see them and stop not more than 40 metres away. Their giant might is magnified as we crane our necks up to


watch their flapping ears from our crouched positions. We hear the low growls of their stomachs—not a hungry tummy rumble at all, we’re informed, but a sophisticated form of sonic communication—and the woody rip as they strip trees of bark. It’s a primal and magical moment. The dramatic setting in the 25,000ha Entabeni Game Reserve, located in a bowl over which no less than three different mountain ranges stand bastion. All created at different times, and from different minerals, the result is a hodgepodge of terrains that make a comfortable home for very varied species. Those glaring amber eyes have given me an inkling of just how fragile the human body is, and how all our ambitions and abilities count for nothing against the finely honed senses and acute survival instincts of the animal in front of me. For now, I’ll keep that inner game ranger locked up just a little longer. And perhaps stick to identifying trees and flowers instead. The South African Bushveld: A Field Guide from the Waterberg, by Lee Gutteridge, is published by 30° South Publishers. It retails for R495.00 and is available from most major booksellers. For more information, visit www.30degreessouth.co.za. >


Looking for your team spirit? Come and find it on the beach at Lagoon Beach Hotel

A modern, world class hotel with luxury accommodation, superb restaurants and excellent service. It boasts unrivalled postcard views of the majestic Table Mountain, Robben Island, the V&A Waterfront and the Atlantic Ocean. Situated on the Beach at Milnerton, Lagoon Beach Hotel is ideally located for business, tourist and leisure travelers. The Hotel features outstanding conference, banquet and wedding facilities as well as our very own Camelot Spa. There are several dining options, including the elegant, exclusive Abalone Restaurant, and the more relaxed Pool Bar and deck. For those who prefer to take their meals in their bedrooms or suites, Lagoon Beach offers and excellent room service menu.

Half and Full Day conference packages that include a FUN SESSION with world renowned comedy illusionist ‘Russell Fox’ from only R400 per Team Member. At rates like these the question is: ‘Can you afford NOT to take your team? Valid until September 2009, subject to availability. Lagoon Beach Road, Milner ton, Cape Town, Wester n Cape , South Afr ica Telephone: +27 21 528 2000 / Facsimile: +27 21 528 2010 Email: reservations2@lagoonbeachhotel.co.za www.lagoonbeachhotel.co.za


Festivities about shopping

Frantic

Story by Jenna van Schoor Pix Š iStockphoto.com

Getting ready for the festive season

Whether it’s Hanukkah, Christmas or Eid you’ll celebrate this festive season, before you know it everyone you know will be rushing around overcrowded shopping malls searching for last minute gifts, anxious about finances and overwhelmed with the stress of organising big family reunions.

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he festive season is a time we all look forward to, but often the pressure of living up to expectations in this manic period can leave even the most organised of us exhausted, with little energy to relax and enjoy time with our friends and families. So to avoid the stress, here are some helpful suggestions to plan ahead and avoid becoming overwhelmed when the chaos hits. The festive season is most notably associated with shopping. Brightly lit malls with tinsel and baubles signal the advent of consumer craziness from as


about shopping

early as October, all to encourage the buying of gifts. To avoid the last minute rush, start buying gifts early and build up a stash of presents. This will prevent you from buying unnecessary gifts out of guilt and impulsiveness, and guarantee that everyone gets something appropriate and reasonably priced. To avoid blowing the budget, and to avoid present-buying competitiveness, agree with your family and friends to play “Secret Santa,” where each family member or friend draws a name out of a hat and has to buy that person a gift for an agreed amount. To make shopping for presents more convenient, do it online, and avoid the dreaded chaos of shopping malls altogether. There are so many websites that offer creative, more experiential gifts, such as www.egos.co.za which offers sport, adventure, gourmet or lifestyle vouchers, and www.healthspas.co.za for pampering vouchers, which are redeemable countrywide. When it comes to wrapping all your conveniently acquired gifts, you can save time and energy by using more creative and inexpensive ways to decorate your presents, and give the generic rolls of wrapping paper a miss. Use recycled or alternative wrapping methods, like newspaper, calendars and comic books and tie them up with ribbons or string. For beautiful locally designed gift wraps and tags, contact Cape Town-based design studio Flowermill, by visiting www.flowermill.co.za. The festive season is also a time for reconnecting, with large gatherings an inevitable part of the holidays. These big reunions can be a wonderful way to spend some quality time with friends and family; however, for those with less than perfect family relations, they can be a potential source of conflict. So to ease the stress of organisation, delegate duties to each family member, such as each making a dish for the family meal.

This will allow you to plan ahead, get everyone involved and give everyone the opportunity to contribute their ideas. To limit further opportunities for bickering, invite non-family members to ease the tension, as people will be less eager to discuss family issues in front of them. A fun way to do this is to engage the whole family in a fun outdoor activity, such as Marco Polo in the pool. This will help divert attention from strained relations, and create a fun bonding activity that will take everyone’s mind off any drama. But most importantly, have a laugh this festive season and try to steer clear of the dreaded rush. Take time out to enjoy yourself, and remember that whether it’s presents, family or finances you’re worried about, there is always a way to make it easier on yourself. The festive season is meant to be a relaxing time, so take advantage of your time off and enjoy your holidays! >

Best Shopping Spots across South Africa Take advantage of extended shopping hours and a wide selection of stores at all of the major shopping malls throughout the country this festive season: Pretoria: Menlyn Park, Brooklyn Mall Durban: Gateway, The Pavilion Cape Town: Canal Walk, Cavendish Mall, Victoria and Alfred Waterfront Johannesburg: Maponya Mall, Nelson Mandela Square, Rosebank Mall Bloemfontein: Mimosa Mall Port Elizabeth: Greenacres Mall, Walmer Park Shopping Centre For more quirky gifts, like clothing, jewellery and household trinkets visit: Pretoria: Bellbottoms in Sunnyside Cape Town: MeMeMe boutique, Milk and Misfit on Long Street; Kalk Bay Johannesburg: Ke-Ai in Melville Durban: Corner Café on Glenwood Road, Florida Road

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BIGGEST POKER BONUS BONANZA!

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Upgrade about travel

Story by Jane Barry, Pix © ACSA

cape town International

In recent months the Cape Town International Airport (CTIA) has been rather chaotic. This is all part of the massive transformation of the airport to accommodate the increasing number of tourists that flock to Cape Town and the Western

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Cape every year. e chatted to Deborah Francis, Senior Communications Officer, CTIA, Airports Company South Africa, to find out more.

What is happening at Cape Town International?

ACSA is investing R1.3 billion to improve the airport’s infrastructure and to ensure that CTIA can offer the best services and facilities to its airport users.

What can travellers expect once construction has been completed?

A world-class terminal building and improved services. We are increasing our parking capacity, creating a central terminal building, an elevated roadway (similar to O.R. Tambo airport) and putting in place ample retail space. The airport is the first point of contact for visitors coming to Cape Town, and the design of the new terminal will be a reflection of what the city and the Western Cape region has to offer our visitors.

How long will it take before construction is completed?

Airports are always under construction – that’s their nature, but this construction phase will be completed by 2010.

How will the CTIA transformation affect general passengers with regard to parking, access, etc.? And what do you suggest to passengers?

Given that the airport is operational amidst the massive construction, we are aware that it poses some inconvenience to airport users. This is why ask them to be patient amidst the airport’s transformation. That being said, airport users must ensure that they arrive at the airport timeously – at least 1.5 hrs prior to their flight. This will give them enough time to park, check in and pass through security. They should remember to have all identification and flight documentation available at the check-in and security counters. They should also be conscious of goods that they may or may not take with them through security.

What measures is ACSA putting in place to make the process easier for passengers?

One of our most recent interventions has been putting in place additional boarding capacity through our new temporary boarding facility – which has helped to ease congestion. Clearly identifiable Passenger Service Officers are deployed in the parking areas and drop-off zones to assist vehicles and pedestrians. Clear and visible signage is also in place to help easily direct airport users.

Anything else you would like to add?

CTIA has recently been awarded 10th Best Airport and the 2nd best airport for Friendliness of Staff in the world, as well as the Best Airport in Africa according to a survey conducted by Skytrax. By the end of the construction period CTIA will be completely transformed and will be an airport that the entire country will be exceptionally proud of. The new buildings will be comfortable and modern with advanced technological support for unprecedented service levels. Visit www.acsa.co.za for more information. >

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London

about gardens

Words & Pix © Solange Hando

blooming

The Royal B otanic Gardens at Kew London’s Royal Botanic Gardens may not be the first sightseeing destination that people associate with this mega-city. But, the gardens are filled with trees and plants from across the globe, intriguing historic buildings – including a palace – and make for a delightful escape from the bustling city streets.

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about gardens

S

ituated on the south bank of the Thames, the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew is a short underground train trip from the city centre, or for the more leisurely sightseer, a scenic upriver cruise from Westminster Pier on the old Royal Barge Route. The gardens are seductive all year round, as every season has its own highlights. During spring, five million bulbs erupt into a sea of magnolia, rhododendron, lilac and cherry blossoms, roses and lavender. As summer turns to autumn, flaming foliage and berries appear while the cold winter sees delicate blooms such as the Christmas rose or evergreen celmatis abound. There are almost 20 gardens at Kew,

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each of which is laid out according to a specific theme, ranging from rock and aquatic plants to grasses and woodlands, or even bamboo gathered around a traditional Japanese Minka house. Incidentally, this little gem is only one of a myriad of buildings which contribute towards the gardens’ unique character. These beautiful and intriguing buildings draw your gaze from afar or sit hidden in the greenery. Interestingly, the presence of these historical structures contributed towards Kew gardens being named a World Heritage site in 2003. Covering over 120 hectares of prime London real estate, it is a good idea to pick up a map and decide which areas appeal to you. One popular attraction is the iconic Palm House close to Victoria Gate. Built in the shape of the

upturned hull of a boat, the basement is dedicated to marine habitats while rainforest plants and palms are featured “above board.” The Victorian architect, who built Palm House, Decimus Burton, also designed the even larger Temperate House. Here you can see one of the world’s rarest cycads, the largest indoor plant (a Chilean wine palm), and a king protea from the Cape, which flowered in 1986 after 160 years of standing blossomless. Look out for the award-winning Davies Alpine House – shaped like a mountain – the Evolution House, and the state-of-the-art Princess of Wales Conservatory with displays of carnivorous plants, orchids and ferns. The gardens became a botanical garden in the 18th century under the


about gardens

auspices of Princess Augusta, assisted by the Earl of Bute and avid plant collectors Sir Joseph Banks and later Sir William Hooker. Before this time, the gardens belonged to a wealthy merchant and served as a private royal residence. By 1864, Kew housed over 13,000 species. Today it cares for the world’s largest botanical and horticultural collections. Such abundance encourages wildlife such as badgers, foxes, bats and stag beetles. The Lake and Waterlily Pond attract around 128 species of birds, butterflies, and dragon and damselflies. Here you might spot great crested grebes, cormorants, mandarin ducks and other waterfowl. Exotic or native, trees have also always played a major role in the

gardens. Among the favourites are the giant redwoods in the Woodland Glade, the Japanese cherry trees, the fiery maples in autumn, the 1846 Umbrella Pine and maidenhair tree, as well as the other “Old Lions” (as the oldest specimens are called) planted in the original garden of Princess Augusta. 2009 marks Kew’s 250th anniversary as a botanical garden and plans are afoot for exciting celebrations. For science and pleasure, this is a vast living garden, firmly rooted in the past, but looking to the future with unabated enthusiasm. Visit: www.aboutbritain.com/towns/kew.asp, www.kew.org, www.wpsa.co.uk (for Thames River Boats), or email info@kew.org for more information on the area. >

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The Cape Whale Coast - little more than an hour from Cape Town Where you can almost touch whales from a cliff top. Watch penguins raise their young - Have conversations with sharks - See more plants than anywhere else on earth. A place where the flora and richness of bio-diversity leaves an everlasting impression. A place where the golf course creates a magnificent experience between mountain and sea. A place where you can sleep peacefully.

A place where nature talks to man

Hermanus, Hangklip-Kleinmond, Gansbaai, Stanford www.whalecoast.info 028 3122 629 dmo@whalecoast.info Hermanus 028 3122629

Gansbaai 028 3841439

Stanford 028 3410340

Hangklip-Kleinmond 028 2715657


about language

Story by Jolene Bailey, Pic © iStockphoto.com

Smaak how do you

my language?

In most countries, instructions to turn left at the second robot will be met by blank stares, and the occasional Star Wars fan searching for something resembling R2D2. Jolene Bailey contemplates this strange reference to traffic lights, and other unusual words in the South African English dictionary of slang.

T

o call South Africa a cultural melting pot has become somewhat of a post-’94 cliché, but there can be no doubt that diversity of the country’s citizenry has left a fascinating mark on the local lingo. Yes, most South Africans can speak English (or a reasonable facsimile thereof), but in many ways our version of that language makes it one of a kind. Our bizarre reference to traffic lights as robots makes it sound as though the global technological

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revolution filtered very slowly through the South African consciousness, leading us to call any piece of intelligent electronics a robot. Then there is the very guttural, affirmative ja; a mono-syllabic utterance that punctuates even the most eloquent businessman’s speech, often to the bewilderment of international clients. But ja is not the only Afrikanerism that has wormed its way into everyday, South African English. Words such a jol (a good time), braai (South Africans will never

refer to a barbecue!), lekker (nice) and sommer (just because) have all become fundamental to the South African taal. It is also very rarely that you’ll hear any South African call a light pick up vehicle anything but a bakkie. Other Afrikaans words are loved and used for their sheer expressiveness. Agge nee! conveys exasperation and disappointment, while eina! is uttered in a moment of pain. Jislaaik! expresses surprise, while nogal né! captures a sense of bemused incredulity.


South Africa must also be the only nation in the world to distinguish between so many different degrees of the present. Indeed, you either need to be born here, or to live in South Africa for a couple of years to fully grasp the subtle nuances between “right now,” (the immediate present, with a sense of urgency) “now,” (a more relaxed immediate present) “now now,” (very soon), and “just now” (a bit later). Our country’s residents also display a strange compulsion to express sympathy by using the word shame. Used to denote compassion rather than disgrace, ag, shame! is also an appropriate response upon viewing something ridiculously cute, like a baby panda bear. South African slang reflects the vibrant tapestry of foreign communities that have come to South African shores and left an indelible mark on the local language. The Indian community can be credited for the popular expression “and all” – which means more or less the same as “etcetera”, but serves to act as the verbal equivalent of a space filler. The word skollie, used to describe a petty thief or troublemaker, comes from the Greek word skolios that means “crooked.” Often touted in affluent parts of Gauteng, the word kugel, which connotes an unashamedly materialistic woman usually from Jo’burg’s northern suburbs, is derived from the Yiddish word that describes plain pudding disguised as an extravagant delicacy. Of course, South African wouldn’t be South Africa without the colourful sprinkling of words that hail from indigenous African languages. Words like fundi (used to refer to an expert, from the Nguni “umfundisi” meaning teacher or preacher), indaba (meaning conference, from the Zulu word for “a matter to be discussed”) and shongololo (a millipede, from Zulu and Xhosa “ukushonga” – to roll up) have all been taken up into the average South African’s lexicon. It is also impossible to imagine our country without indignant exclaims of eish! and aikona! elated cries of laduuuuma! at soccer matches, and the ever-catchy greeting of yebo! From Afrikaans to Zulu, South Africa is blessed with no less than 11 official languages. It is no wonder then that foreign visitors are sometimes a little perplexed by our colourful colloquialisms. Next time your china tunes you howzit, make sure you know to respond with a prompt “ag lekker my larny!” >


about health

Story by Lindi van Rooyen Pix © iStockphoto.com

plate?

too much on your

As sure as death and taxes, stress is part of our lives. But while the first two are indeed unavoidable, stress can be kept at bay. With the festive season fast approaching, stress levels rise as we rush to wrap up the year.

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he dawn of technology was deemed to be the end of our problems – it promised to make our jobs easier and our very existence effortless. But instead, we have entered an age where there is no such thing as leisure or private time and every moment is open to cell phone or email interruptions. As convenient as it is always to be in touch, stress levels are soaring

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as workers find it increasingly difficult to switch off and leave the office behind. The workplace has become an ideal breeding ground for stress and stress-related illnesses. Decreased productivity and absenteeism are just two indicators of how modern corporate living impacts on employees. As a result of work related pressure, people will often not take time off when they need to, and try to

perform at all costs – often to their own detriment. According to Wikipedia, “In contrast to absenteeism, when employees are absent from work, presenteeism discusses the problems faced when employees come to work in spite of illness, which can have similar negative repercussions on business performance.” In South Africa, ailments such as depression, fatigue, backaches, headaches and


stomach maladies cost employers billions of Rands in lost productivity every year. Many companies today are under intense economic pressure. Takeovers, mergers, joint ventures and other major changes are common, and produce an enormous amount of anxiety for employers and employees alike. People become reactive, and only take action once they become dysfunctional. Although putting in extra hours at the office may initially seem like a good idea, it could eventually lead to increased stress levels. This is not only counterproductive, but often also places one’s job and health at risk. When faced with the harsh realities of the corporate environment, the answer to stress lies in becoming an effective self-manager. The ability to promptly identify negative stress is key in this regard, as is the capacity to identify the sources of stress. Other essential traits include good emotional intelligence, excellent interpersonal skills, such as assertiveness and conflict management, as well as skilful time management. If the uncertainty of potential future changes in your company is a cause for distress, start today by imagining how you would cope with sudden, considerable change. Think about likely scenarios and then brainstorm, on your own or with others, about how you might best respond. Assume that the rug could get pulled out from beneath you at any time. Then, if this happens, you will not be caught off-guard, as you will already be psychologically and emotionally ready. If the changes never come, you will still be better off. Having prepared yourself in advance will enable you to

feel much more confident and secure in your normal day-to-day activities. Effective self-managers have a vested interest in their own selfdevelopment. As such, it is important to continue learning and developing oneself, and never believe that you have “learnt it all.” Good self-managers are ruthless in ensuring that they develop all facets of their lives. Taking time out for yourself to do the things that you are interested in is another good way to lower stress levels. Personal lives should never suffer because of work. It is a well-known fact that our days are becoming more stressful, as families strive for balance in their home and at work. Working hours have become longer, crime has taken its toll on our sense of well-being and expenses have grown. Huge demands are placed on the modern workforce, and it is up to us to make sure we do not burn out. In today’s fast-paced world, stress is inevitable, but it is how you deal with it that makes the difference. >

Coping mechanisms for stress: • • • • • • • • • • •

Stress management training A positive mindset Rest and relaxation Regular exercise Adequate and balanced nutrition Good communication Emotional support Physical contact Humour Time planning Financial planning


Future

about family

proof your child From Future-proof your Child by Nikki Bush & Graeme Codrington

We need to wake up to the fact that the world has indeed changed. Our children are also changing. This is not our childhood. A shift in the way we parent our children is required. To miss this point is, quite possibly, to miss the boat and risk your children’s future.

A

hundred years ago, if a grandmother had gathered her grandchildren around her one late Saturday afternoon beneath the spreading oak tree in the back garden, the young tykes would have sat listening, spellbound, as Granny shared her wisdom and insights about the world. The children would have asked her how the world works, and would carefully have noted her answers – after all, this was the world they were soon to enter as adults themselves, and her experience of it was invaluable to them. Today, if that same scene played itself out, it is much more likely that it would be Granny, holding a mobile phone in her hand, who would ask the children, “So, my dears, how does this thing work?” Today’s adults have lived in a world that spans not just two centuries, but the cusp of a millennium too, yet there is a real sense that our past experience is inadequate preparation for what lies ahead. If we feel only vaguely confident about our own future, those of us who have children or grandchildren can sometimes feel overwhelmed at the task of preparing a new generation for a world that does not yet exist. The difference, possibly, between today’s parents and the generations of parents in the past, is that – at the start of the

third millennium – we know for certain that the world our children will inhabit will not be the same as the one we live in now. It will not just be different in small, subtle ways, but in markedly, remarkably different ways. We know for certain that we don’t know what that world will be like when our children grow up. When your children start asking you questions which no longer have definitive answers, then you know that the world has changed irrevocably, and the place we call “here” has never existed before. It is only with an understanding of the past and some insight into the future that you can conduct a meaningful dialogue with your children about possibilities. Parents no longer have all the answers, or at least answers that will be relevant in a few years or even a few months from now. This is how fast the world is changing. There are even times today when our children are better positioned to come up with solutions than we are, and they can be quite adamant or righteous or expressive or informed about their point of view. Rather than attempting to give our children “The Answers” to their questions, we need to be teaching them how to think, how to discern, and how to look

at various scenarios for themselves in order to prepare them for an unknown and uncertain future. In essence, as 21st century parents, we have been called to a new way of “being” with our children. Parenting is (and always has been) more about “being” than “doing” anyway. Future-proof your Child by Nikki Bush & Graeme Codrington retails for R140.00 and is available at all good book stores.>

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Established in 1990, Top of the Range is a dynamic marketing and reservations company that promotes a number of exciting camps

and

lodges

within

Zimbabwe and the region.

Camp Amalinda: Explore the magic and history of the Matobo Hills in Matabeleland in this beautiful 9-room boutique. Go rhino tracking in the park, or admire centuries’ old cave paintings and be entranced by the area’s majestic grandeur.

Gorges Lodge: Unwind at Gorges Lodge on the very edge of the Batoka Gorge, 250 metres above the mighty Zambezi River. This offers one of the most spectacular views in the area. The lodge is close enough for guests to be able to enjoy all that the Falls village has to offer, but is far enough away to melt back into the African bush at the end of an exhilarating day.

Varden Safaris: Go exploring with one of the only operators to have been given a licence to horse ride in the Hwange National Park, this exciting venture provides experienced riders with an opportunity to get up-close and personal with the wildlife.

Ichingo Chobe River Lodge: Nip across the border into Botswana, with six deluxe tented lodges tucked away on the Chobe River’s edge. If exploring the river further up is appealing, then a couple of nights on one of the up-market Ichobezi Houseboats can be arranged. To get in touch with Top of the Range Africa call

Ivory Lodge: Relax in one of the six comfortable lodges set at tree-top height on the outskirts of Hwange National Park. The lodge overlooks a waterhole, which is frequented by herds of elephants, buffalo and other game. Tempting meals and campfire evenings wind down the day’s activities.

+26 3924 5051/24 2298/24 3064, email toprange@gatorzw.com, toprange@yoafrica.com or visit www.toprange.com.


about technology

The Quest for

Story by Bernie Hellberg, Pix © iStockphoto.com

Clarity

G e t t i n g To G r i p s Wi t h H D T V

Switching to High-definition Television (HDTV) is pretty straightforward. You go to a store, settle on a size, pick a model with the best picture for the price, and pay the cashier.

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nowing the essential ins and outs of HDTV before you leave the house, means you won’t be sorry after you bring home your big new purchase. Here are the top 10 things to know before you buy:

1. Genuine HDTV?

A minimum of 1280 x 720 pixels — or little points of light — means you’re in genuine HDTV waters. Make sure the set has at least one HDMI connection port that supports 1080p and supports HDCP. This is the connection and

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protocol that guarantees you’ll be able to plug in a Blue-Ray DVD player as well as receive and view copyprotected broadcasts.

that “tube” type HDTVs have the best picture but, apart from the fact they’re a dying breed, you’ll need to recruit half a rugby team to move it.

The popular plasma-type HDTVs generally tout “truer blacks” when it comes to contrast, while LCDs, which cost more per inch, are typically brighter. Huge, boxy, rear projection sets are cheap, but the viewing angle and brightness can be spotty. Consider an HDTV projector if you want to fill a whole wall. Lastly, experts agree

Test-drive potential HDTV purchases with your own DVD. Colourful, fast-moving titles like Pirates of the Caribbean work best. Pay special attention to the set’s ability to handle quick action without the picture breaking up. A faster “response rate” means no blocky pixels when watching digital HD transmissions.

2. Slim is in

3. My favourite movie


And be ready for a little shocker: Channels that are not broadcast in HD won’t always look very pretty, because your new, super-sharp screen magnifies the poor quality of standard broadcast.

4. How hi is up?

Most HD broadcasts occur in 720p, which is great quality, while some transmit in 1080i, which is even higher – although the debate rages whether it is actually better. Most HDTVs offer some or all of three resolutions: 480p, 720p, 1080i. Some of the latest HDTVs are beginning to offer 1080p, but they cost more. Get at least 720p and 1080i capability.

5. Tune in or out?

Eventually South Africans might be able to grab free, local high-definition channels over the air with an antenna, and for this reason, you might want to make sure your HDTV has a built-in tuner. For satellite subscribers, consider an HDTV-capable “display,” or “monitor,” which leaves out the built-in tuner to save some bucks.

6. Good connections

While most HDTVs have component (red, green and blue) video inputs to connect to your satellite decoder and DVD player, double check to make sure. Two or more sets mean no swapping cables between cable and DVD and Xbox 360, for instance. Also, I repeat – make sure your new HDTV has an HDMI input with HDCP support – the connection and anti-piracy combo that future-proofs your purchase for years to come.

7. Plugging in

Connect your gear using the highest resolution connections possible. DVI/ HDMI is highest, followed by component, S-Video, plain Video-in, and finally the lowliest of low-quality lows, old-fashioned Coaxial cable. HDTV cable and video games require at least the component connection, while hi-def Blu-Ray players will plug in to the HDMI port for the highest resolution possible.

8. Wide or Not?

You can choose between showing bars on either side of a non-widescreen program so that the image looks correct, or you can zoom it to fill the screen. But doing so will squash and widen people and objects. Experiment with the TV’s remote, and your satellite decoder’s remote, to get the best picture.

9. Make Adjustments

HDTVs on the showroom floor have the settings cranked up high in order to show off. At home, choose the built-in picture preset settings like “Sports,” “Vivid,” or “Natural.” Tune to a program with dark and light scenery (or use a DVD), to help find the picture-perfect balance.

10. Surrounded by Sound

Now that you’re feasting your eyes on a super hi-def picture, don’t forget the sound. HDTV boasts Cineplex-like surround sound – providing you have a receiver and speaker system to hear it. “Home Theatre in a Box” systems have built-in DVD players, or consider a separate receiver and speaker system if you plan to buy a Blu-Ray DVD player. Make sure to use the “optical” or “digital audio” sound outputs from your HDTV cable or satellite or video game box when you connect to the receiver – that way you’re sure to be surrounded by the best possible sound around. For information on high-definition satellite broadcasts visit www.multichoice.co.za >


Era of Digital Televis

The Cabinet has approved the Broadcasting Digital Migration (BDM) Policy. Led by the Department of Communications, this migration will usher a new era of digital broadcasting in South Africa. The migration from analogue to digital broadcasting presents South Africa with an opportunity to address a number of challenges related to bridging the digital divide. It will be possible to provide e-government services over television, increase the competitiveness of the South African economy through developing an electronics manufacturing industry, create jobs and develop more local and diverse content. The digital migration process in South Africa will from part of government’s Poverty Eradication Strategy, led by the Presidency.

BDM EQUALS DEVELOPMENT o o

Short dual illumination period to speed up access to digital broadcasting benefits. Ownership support by Government for 5 million poor households.

o

Set Top Boxes for increasing access to government information and services for all.

o

Growing our STB manufacturing sector into a South African world-class electronic manufacturing industry.

WHY WE HAVE TO MOVE TO DIGITAL TELEVISION? Digital television is made possible by the technological developments in telecommunications. Similar to when the world had to move from black and white to colour television, this digital migration is a necessity. The International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the specialised agency of the United Nations for Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), of which South Africa is a member, has among other responsibilities, overseeing the efficient use of the radio frequency spectrum, which makes telecommunication and broadcasting possible. Like land, the radio frequency spectrum is a scarce public resource. One of the main characteristics of digital broadcasting is the efficient use of this spectrum, thus freeing up more spectrum which makes it possible for many more ser to be provided globally. The ITU resolved in 2006 that all countries of Europe, Africa, Middle East as well as the Islamic Republic of Iran should migrate from analogue to digital broadcasting services by 2015. Analogue broadcasting services will not be protected from interferences after this date. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF DIGITAL TELEVISION The process of Broadcasting Digital Migration brings many opportunities for the country: o Digital Terrestrial TV (DTT) will offer perfectly clear pictures of all free to air channels and fewer reception problems. o

It offers potential for special interactive services to cater for people with visual and hearing impairments such as audio description and subtitling,

o

It will ensure the more efficient use of Radio Frequency Spectrum resulting ultimately in more TV channels for more choice for TV viewers.


ion Dawns

HOW ARE WE GOING TO MIGRATE TO DIGITAL TELEVISION? Sentech, the national common carrier company responsible for the distribution of broadcasting signals, is modernizing all the transmission equipment to make them digital ready so that digital television is possible. Orbicom, which is a private signal distributor, will also modernise its infrastructure. In addition, all broadcasters will modernize their equipment for the provision of digital television. WHEN WILL WE START TO MIGRATE TO DIGITAL TV? South Africa will start its migration to digital TV when Sentech switches on the digital signal on 1 November 2008, placing it well ahead in respect of meeting one of our broadcasting guarantees for the 2010 FIFA World Cup. WHEN WILL THE ANALOGUE BROADCASTING END IN SA? The switch-off date for the analogue signal is 1 November 2011. This gives South Africa a three-year migration period. This is commonly referred to as the dual-illumination period because both the digital and analogue signals are transmitted.

WHAT DOES THE MIGRATION MEAN FOR SOUTH AFRICANS? All South Africans will need to migrate to the digital TV era. This does not mean that we have to get rid of our TV sets. During the dual illumination period we will still be able to continue watching television as usual. Only after November 2011, when the analogue signal is switched off, will we need to have a set-top-box (STB) in order to continue watching television using our current TV sets. There will also be digital television sets in the South African market which are customized for our country. In order to ensure a smooth transition to digital TV, we need to start purchasing STBs as soon as they are available late in 2009.

WHAT IS A SET-TOP-BOX (STB)? A set top box is a type of decoder that converts the digital signal into an analogue one so that households with analogue TVs can continue to watch television services after the analogue signal is switched off. These boxes will be made in and customized for South Africa. MAKING IT POSSIBLE FOR ALL SOUTH AFRICANS TO OWN STBs It is estimated that about 4.5 million households will not be able to afford a STB. Cabinet therefore approved an incentive scheme to assist 5 million poor TV households to own STBs. The incentive scheme is known as the Scheme for Ownership Support (SOS) for STBs, which will see Government providing 70% (R490) towards the cost. The subsidized households will therefore pay R210 for a STB. It is estimated that this will cost government about R2.45 billion.

Making South Africa a Global Leader in Harnessing Information Communication Technologies for Socio-economic Development

iParioli Office Park, 399 Duncan Street, Hatfield, Pretoria, 0001 Private Bag X 860, Pretoria, 0001 Tel: +27.12.427.8000 www.doc.gov.za


about travel

Story & Pix Š Nelson Mandela Bay

Bay

Nelson Mandela

Uniting Port Elizabeth, Uitenhage and Despatch

Nelson Mandela Bay is a destination that offers the freedom to choose from an array of world-class offerings.

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Donkin Reserve was proclaimed a public open space in perpetuity by Sir Rufane Donkin. The stone pyramid monument was erected by Sir Rufane Donkin in memory of his late wife, Elizabeth, after whom the city was named. The Lighthouse, built in 1861, is opened to the public on request at a nominal fee.

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ocated on the southeastern coastline of South Africa (SA), Nelson Mandela Bay boasts 40 km of magnificent golden beaches washed by the Indian Ocean. With its perfect combination of warm water, breathtaking seashore and protected beaches, it is the perfect value-formoney holiday destination. The Bay is the gateway to the Garden Route and allows easy access to other areas of the Eastern Cape including the Sunshine Coast, Frontier Country, Sundays River Valley, Kouga as well as the Karoo Heartland Routes. Its well-equipped international airport, harbour and port link it with other national and international destinations. Known for its many hours of sunshine, superb weather conditions, temperate climate and exhilarating sea breezes and a range of entertainment options for locals and visitors, account for this coastal city’s increasing popularity.

Beaches

Nelson Mandela Bay’s beautiful and unspoiled beaches remain the area’s top attraction. Three of the Bay’s beaches have been awarded the coveted international Blue Flag status, namely Humewood Beach,

Wells Estate and King’s Beach – an international award for beaches meeting safety, amenity, cleanliness and environmental standards. The Bay’s beaches provide safe swimming, body surfing, snorkelling, angling, sunbathing and walking opportunities as well as attractive playgrounds and splash pools for the kids.

Wildlife

Nelson Mandela Bay is home to some of the country’s most renowned luxury and upmarket game reserves – a pleasure for outdoor enthusiasts and nature lovers. Visitors to the area are ensured Big 7 (elephant, buffalo, rhino, leopard, lion, cheetah and wild dog) game viewing experiences within an hour’s drive from Nelson Mandela Bay in a tranquil and eco-friendly environment. Some of the most popular game parks include the Addo Elephant National Park, Shamwari Game Reserve, as well as the Seaview Lion Park and the Kragga Kamma Game Park. Wildlife fundis can also arrange for a boat charter around Algoa Bay or to St. Croix


about travel

Island for a sighting of African Penguins, Cape Fur Seal and Cape Gannets. Or they can enjoy an entertaining, yet educational experience, with Nelson Mandela Bay’s famed Indian Ocean Bottlenose Dolphins and Cape Fur Seals at the Oceanarium at Bayworld.

Nature/ open spaces

Nelson Mandela Bay is home to a range of beautiful natural areas. Experience the wide variety of outdoor activities – from horseback safaris to mountain climbing and bird watching, to exploring the unbeatable variety of scenic beauty through a selection of designated walking and hiking trails. Take a trip through the Gamtoos River Valley to the rugged and beautiful Wilderness area of the Baviaanskloof, jewel of the Eastern Cape, or walk the trail of the shipwrecked survivors on the popular Sacramento Trail in the Sardinia Bay Nature Reserve. Or simply go on a self-drive through the Bay’s most scenic areas such as Schoenies, Sardinia Bay, Mt. Pleasant, Lovemore Park and Chelsea.

Shopping/ entertainment

Nelson Mandela Bay has a number of well-established shopping centres such as Greenacres, The Bridge, Walmer, Park and Sixth Avenue Walmer with an abundance of cinemas and top class entertainment options. The Boardwalk Casino and Entertainment World opposite Hobie Beach, is the pride of Nelson Mandela Bay. Facilities include a top-class casino as the main attraction, as well as a

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kiddies and teens entertainment area, a sports bar, and a variety of shops and great restaurants – an ideal hang out spot for the entire family!

History/ heritage

With its numerous historic places, monuments, and museums, the Bay is a historical landmark offering a wealth of treasures in the form of historical attractions, which are guaranteed to provide a journey of discovery through its diverse history and culture. Specific attractions include the Donkin Heritage Trail, Bayworld Museum and Oceanarium complex, Settlers Park and many nature trails in and around the city. Alternative entertainment includes a city, township and shebeen tour.

Conferencing

Nelson Mandela Bay is an excellent value-for-money holiday and conference destination. Its adept conferencing facilities, combined with the uniquely tranquil setting make it a prime conference location. With an assortment of breathtaking and affordable conferencing venues, the historic area offers a wide variety of facilities and services to suit any conference or business gathering. Conferences with a difference can be hosted, and are fully supported by state-of-the-art technical equipment and video conferencing facilities. Seating arrangements are flexible, breakaway rooms are available and a variety of catering services can be arranged. Our hotels and conference venues are in close

proximity to one another and to the airport, making it easier for conference delegates to get around. Nelson Mandela Bay also offers conference delegates and visitors a one-stop booking service for all accommodation, car rental, tour and day trip requirements. Services offered include: • Accommodation call centre – sourcing of all accommodation requirements and making the relevant bookings, including bookings for all SA National Parks. • Car rental – assisting with securing discounted rates. • Pre and post-conference visits to tourist attractions – negotiating discounts and “special visits” for delegates. • Visitors’ information guides and tourist maps – collect your free visitors’ guides and maps from any of our local tourist information offices. >

Information Services Nelson Mandela Bay Tourism Head Office/ Call Centre: + 27 41 582 2575, email bookings@nmbt.co.za Donkin Information Centre: + 27 41 585 8884 The Boardwalk Information Centre: + 27 41 583 2030 Uitenhage Information Centre: + 27 41 922 5214 Airport Visitor Information Centre: + 27 41 581 0456/7 Email: info@nmbt.co.za, Website: www.nmbt.co.za


about whisky

Whisky

Story & Pix © Tribeca Public Relations

Ease yourself into

So you’ve decided to progress in your lifestyle from beer or cider, and you’re ready to make whisky your drink of choice. Well done.

W

hisky is an acquired taste and can be very overwhelming if you jump into the deep end and start taking on the big, bold and full-bodied whiskies of the world. When you become involved in the world of whisky, you enter a world of depth and complexity akin to the likes of brandy, cigars, wine and vodka. Whisky is a drink that has to be

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enjoyed for all its complexity and flavour. Drink it long, neat, over ice or even mixed into a cocktail. You won’t lose any of the characteristics that make it “whisky.” Think of it like adding salt to your food. The amount of salt – or the need for salt entirely – is a personal preference and adds to your enjoyment of the food. “In fact,” says FNB Whisky Live Festival ambassador and worldwide whisky expert, Dave Broom, “many of

the world’s finest single-malt whiskies were designed to be consumed long – with water or soda, for example.” Broom advises that the best way to ease into the world of whisky is to experiment. “There are hundreds of Scotch whiskies in the world – as well as whiskies from such places as Ireland, America and Japan – so you really are spoilt for choice. Apart from the experience of drinking a great whisky and enjoying


the flavours that it can conjure up on your palate, many argue that light to moderate use of alcoholic beverages has a healthy effect on the human body. Recent studies by the British Medical Journal (BMJ) suggest that, in healthy people, alcohol can have positive effects on the coronary system if used in moderation on a daily basis. Whisky, in particular, has been said to have certain medicinal properties and is thus a far better alternative for a leisurely drink than, say, wine or beer. The word “whisky” is derived from the Irish Gaelic word uisge beatha, which means “water of life.” The fact is that the spirit has been considered [and used as] a medicine for hundreds of years. Interestingly, during prohibition in the US in the 1920s and 30s, whisky could legally be imported and consumed because it was considered a medicine and not liquor. The old adage that you get what you pay for has never been more relevant than in the world of alcoholic beverages. With wine and spirits such as whisky, brandy and, to a certain extent, rum, the quality of the liquid and its adverse effects on the human body are indirectly proportional to each other. Higher quality (and subsequently higher price) equals less unfavourable side effects. Or so they say. Wine, brandy, rum and beer all contain very high levels of sugar and calories, which makes it very difficult for people who occasionally enjoy these drinks to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. This is of particular relevance to diabetics. Whisky, however, contains very little sugar and single-malt whisky only contains 55 calories per shot. Whatever your reason for moving to whisky – it’s a good start. It’s adaptable, full of surprises and, most importantly, a drink that’s growing in popularity. >

Taking place at The Cape Town International Convention Centre from 5th to 7th November 2008 and at The Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg from 12th to 14th November 2008, the FNB Whisky Live Festival provides the perfect platform from which to ease yourself into the world of whisky. It will run from 6 pm to 10 pm daily. Tickets cost R150 per person and are available at Computicket. The FNB Whisky Live Festival encourages responsible drinking. No persons under the age of 18 years old will be allowed into the Tasting Hall and dedicated driver tickets are available. For further information please visit www.whiskylivefestival.co.za or email info@whiskylivefestival.co.za.

Marvellous Maids®, South Africa’s Premier Domestic Agency is cleaning up across the country. From the Waterfront to Waterkloof, Parktown to Pretoria, Clifton to Constantia Kloof, Middelburg to Midrand and Hyde Park to Houghton

We have 2 Marvellous Solutions:

Our easy to hire char service can be booked as and when required, from a clean up for a day to regular outsourcing. By using our delivered service you are not liable for leave, sick pay, uif or CCMA. Call us on 086 111 5030 or go to www.marvellousmaids.co.za to order your MAIDONLINE. Alternately we can assist you by placing a housekeeper or domestic worker in your home permanently. With 11 years experience and a history of 1000’s of successful placements, Marvellous Maids® offices are strategically placed on main arterials to be accessible to the maximum number of work seekers.These are then carefully screened and scrutinized and offered to potential employers.

Tel: 086 111 5030 Fax: 086 676 3760 info@marvellousmaids.co.za

www.marvellousmaids.co.za


about motoring Compiled by Bernard K Hellberg

Box

out of the

New Fiesta ready to take South Africa by storm While the Fiesta brand first appeared in Europe in 1976, local buyers got their first taste of the car in 1994, which went on to win the South African Car of the Year title in 1998. The sexy new Fiesta comes with a choice of three powertrains – a 1.4-litre petrol, 1.6-petrol and 1.6-litre turbo diesel – in either 5-door or 3-door body styles. All three derivatives sport key standard features including a sound system, air conditioning, power steering, steering wheel audio controls, tinted windows and a headlamp delay feature. Safety is prioritised with dual airbags, a driver belt reminder, ABS with EBD and a high-mounted stop lamp, to name a few.

Renault Koleos

Lexus GS450h It is expensive, unusual, stylish – and uncannily quiet in “electric” mode. The Lexus GS450h is now available to those buyers who are intellectually curious, ecologically aware or just plain different. Most enthusiasts just love the low-down rumble of a powerful V8. However, given the thirst factor, these archaic vehicles will eventually disappear – to be replaced by hybrid technology – such as that developed by Lexus. These top-notch newcomers will cost R586,100 for the GS450h and R635,000 for the higher-spec GS450h SE. Imagine sneaking up on your destination with just the crunch of gravel under the tyres and no engine noise whatsoever. The expressions on the neighbours’ faces alone will be worth the price.

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The recently launched Renault Koleos, the company’s first SUV, has some mixed parentage. Built in Busan, Korea, at the Renault Samsung Works (and you thought they only made cellular phones and washing machines), the Koleos is based on the Nissan X-trail platform. So there you have it. A French vehicle, built by Koreans, that speaks with a Japanese accent. But, the quality is impeccable, the warranty is good for 3 years/100,000 kilometres, and you also get a 5-yrear/60,000 maintenance plan. Expect to pay between R270,000 to R345,000 (depending on the model).


about motoring

Story by Bernard Hellberg, Pix © Suzuki

great car, great looks

Peugeot 308 SW

Motoring journalists have to drive everything with four wheels and, occasionally, also two wheels. This inevitably leads to acquaintance with vehicles ranging from the sublime to the pathetic. Then a real gem appears on the horizon. The Peugeot 308 SW – a sporty wagon – is such a beast.

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ggressively styled (to put it mildly), the Peugeot sports feline frontal treatment that could be the envy of many so-called sports cars. With a dramatic downward slope, the bonnet seems to continue forever, eliciting stares and favourable comment from passersby. Based on the popular 308 Hatchback, the 308 SW offers excellent interior space and an amazing electrically operated sliding roof lining that provides occupants with either soft daylight or a view of the stars at night. At an extremely competitive price, it is literally crammed with luxury and safety features such as an athermic windscreen, which really helps to keep the car cooler, but also forces your Garmin to struggle for a clear signal through all that fancy glass, the panoramic glass roof and automatic rain-sensing wipers. But, there is more, as they say in the classics. Add follow-me-home

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headlights, front, side and curtain airbags, a fully adjustable steering wheel as well as height adjustable seats for both driver and passenger. Then there is great sound from the radio/CD/MP3 player (perfect for those boring hours on the N1 through the Karoo), and the refrigerated glove box. In addition, the all-disc brake system (ventilated at the front), a great turning circle (consider, with gratitude, the engineers responsible for this when next you see other drivers battling in tight spots), a footrest for your left shoe, and a pleasantly light clutch action, sets the scene for a truly excellent piece of mechanical engineering. Owners will also love the 88 kW of power (I have a confession – I initially thought it was a 2-litre), the stylish alloy wheels (good looking and easy to clean), and an amazing 20,000 km service interval. With vehicles becoming increasingly specialised, one frequently has to

compromise. Choose performance and you are likely to get a harsh ride. Choose comfort and you end with a car that handles somewhat like a marshmallow. Paradoxically, the Peugeot engineers have managed to blend a combination of long-distance tourer with stylish sports car-like styling and handling, class-leading interior space, and that indefinable something so very French – comfortable seats (for five adults) and supple suspension. A car for all seasons, the Peugeot 308 SW will gobble up a long distance trip with ease – claimed combined fuel consumption figures are a frugal 7.1 litres/100 kilometres. It is also a dream in stop-start city traffic, and the automatic climate control knows how to deal with Highveld humidity. The Peugeot 308 SW is an outstanding and competitive newcomer to the class and represents excellent value for money. Go get one! >


about motoring

Story by Bernard Hellberg Pic © Quickpic

In the BIG league pro_cee’d to the top of the pile Widely respected for their smaller hatches such as the Picanto, Kia Motors has finally joined the hot hatch fray with its 2-litre pro_cee’d pocket-rocket. But, will the motoring public accept this new offering?

B

ased closely on the pro_cee’d concept car shown at the 2006 Paris Motor Show, Kia’s production hatchback was developed by a European design team, assisted by their Korean colleagues. The result is a well-built, goodlooking newcomer that is so European in appearance that it signals a move away from what used to be regarded as quirky Korean styling. Manufactured in Zilina – a €1-billion operation in Slovakia – the pro_cee’d has played a major role in turning Kia into the world’s fifth largest vehicle manufacturer. The Kia pro_cee’d will appeal to consumers who would not have considered buying a three-door hatchback before, and who would not have considered buying a Kia until the availability of this new car. Longer, lower and lighter than its

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sister car, the five-door cee’d, the three-door pro_cee’d sports coupé brings sensationally stylish looks and much more sportiness to the C-segment marketplace. Described as tough but not rough, the pro_cee’d has a broad stance and flowing lines. The sporty three-door version of the popular cee’d hatchback is sure to embed the dynamic and exciting image of Kia in the minds of today’s most active South African generation. The clean, modern and elegant design theme that characterises the exterior of the pro_cee’d is replicated throughout the interior. The interior of the pro_cee’d has been designed and developed to the highest standards to fully demonstrate the brand’s growing power to surprise and to produce cars which are more in tune with consumers’ tastes and needs. Drivers will enjoy the responsiveness

of the 2-litre DOHC petrol, manual transmission model with its 17-inch wheels, producing 105 kW of power and a claimed average fuel consumption of 7.3 litres/100 kilometres. The pro_cee’d is available in two options, the “standard” pro_cee’d 2-litre CVVT and the 2-litre CVVT Sport, with the difference between the two versions apparent in different specification levels on offer. With an industry-leading 5-year/100,000 km warranty, as well as a 3-year/60,000 maintenance plan, Kia has demonstrated its faith in the quality of the pro_cee’d. With prices still to be announced – somewhere in the region of R235,000 to R275,000 – this may prove to be the sporty Kia’s Achilles heel. After all, it will have to compete with the likes of VW’s Golf GTi and the Ford Focus. >


about animals

PET Story by Karen Nel, Pic ©iStockphoto.com

vacation

Planning a holiday? Don’t forget to book accommodation for your pets too. You’ve probably already made plans for where you’ll be spending the festive season and are looking forward to relaxing in the sun, but have you made plans for your pets?

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ccording to NSPCA spokesperson Christine Kuch, the months from October to February are the most traumatic for pets, as they have to cope with fireworks, the stress of absent owners and, in some cases, even abandonment. Your loyal pet certainly deserves more respect than that! If you’re going away, booking your pets into boarding kennels is the best option. A good kennel will have staff members who are specially trained to recognise warning signs and meet your animal’s needs, as opposed to relying on a next-door neighbour to check on your animals once a day. Here are a few important guidelines to follow when choosing a kennel: Vaccinations A reputable kennel will only accept an animal with an up-to-date vaccination certificate, says Kuch. “If they don’t ask for proof of vaccinations, run away.” Many kennels also require you to have your animal dipped or sprayed for fleas before boarding. Visit the kennels in advance Things to look out for include sturdy enclosures, an outdoor exercise area and

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clean sleeping areas. “Ask how often the kennels are cleaned and which chemicals are used to control parasites and disease,” advises dog trainer Eddy Brett. Ask about the staff Staff should be properly trained to recognise symptoms of disease in animals. Watch how the staff interacts with the animals that are there. They should be confident with all the “boarders” and interested in their needs. Insist on a contract or boarding agreement. “This document should outline the kennel’s responsibilities and your rights,” says Brett. Book your animals in early. “Reputable kennels fill up early for the festive season, as satisfied pet owners tend to book their animals in at the same place every year,” says Kuch. What you should do: • Provide contact details for your vet in the case of an emergency. • Ask the kennels whether you can pack a few familiar toys for your animal. • Tell the kennel staff about your animal. Mention any conditions (such as epilepsy or diabetes) and talk about their personality. Kuch offers the following suggestion: “You might

want to say something like, ‘My dog loves to play, won’t you please throw a ball to him a few times a day?’ or ‘My cat is old and arthritic – she likes to sit in the sun while you sit and read next to her.’” • Don’t make a scene when you leave your pet at the kennels. “The more casual and relaxed you seem, the easier it will be on your pet,” says Brett. Kuch also recommends the insertion of a microchip ID for all animals. “It’s permanent and tamper-proof, so it gives you proof of ownership of your pet. It’s also makes it far easier to locate you if your pet goes missing for any reason, as all vets and branches of the SPCA have devices that can scan the microchip and retrieve your details.” The microchip is injected behind the head, in between the shoulder blades and it is the size of a grain of rice. If you choose the right kennel, chances are good that your animal will have a great time while you’re away. Many dogs and cats relish the interaction with new “friends” and the opportunity to play. Do your homework and you’ll find a place that your animals will enjoy just as much as you enjoy your holidays. >


Hire a , some games and UMDTM movies and be entertained all the way to your destination! *On selected flights

Exclusive to

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...and many more

.“‰” and “PLAYSTATION” are registered trademarks of Sony Computer Entertainment Inc.  is a registered trademark of Sony Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2008 Layout and Design Sony Pictures Home Entertainment, Inc. All Rights Reserved. All trademarks, artwork and or other are the property of their respective owners.


wireless mania! Lexmark: X6650 four-in-one printer with a 3-year guarantee Stockist details: IT Retailers Recommended retail price: R 1,299 Easy to install, your Lexmark X6650 will be ready for all your home copying, faxing, scanning and photo printing needs in a flash. Print from virtually anywhere in your home with built-in 802.11b/g wireless connectivity which allows you to share the X6650 among multiple family members. Complete your rush projects fast with print speeds at up to 25 ppm black and 18 ppm colour, copies with 1-touch of a button and direct photo printing of lab-quality photos. For heavy-duty projects put the 25-page automatic document feeder to work for large copy and fax jobs.

Lexmark: X4650 Wi-Fi enabled colour three-in-one printer with a 3-year guarantee Stockist details: IT Retailers Recommended retail price: R 999 Experience the convenience of wireless printing with the Lexmark X4650. Easily print, copy, scan and share memories. Print up to 25 ppm black and 18 ppm colour; copy with one touch of a button; scan on the 48-bit flatbed scanner. Also enjoy direct photo printing from Memory Cards, USB drive or with PictBridge.

Lexmark: X7675 four-in-one printer with a 5-year guarantee Stockist details: Makro Recommended retail price: R 1,899 Print with confidence with the X7675. Print and share the X7675 from virtually anywhere in your office with built-in wireless or Ethernet connectivity. Save time and money with included XL cartridges that deliver twice the pages. Manage large copy and fax jobs easily with the convenient 25-page automatic document feeder. Print fast at up to 32 ppm black and 27 ppm colour and save paper and money with one-touch, two-sided printing. Produce vibrant, lab-quality borderless photos directly from memory cards, PictBridge or USB flash drive.


Don’t miss out! Get

crazy bargains everyday on bid or buy.co.za

1036

Africa’s Largest Online Marketplace


TreeHugger is one of the premier sites dedicated to making sustainability more mainstream. They strive towards being a one-a one-stop shop for green news, solutions, and product information. As of March 2008, TreeHugger had 2,628,000 unique visitors and the site contains over 13,000 posts with more than 55,000 people subscribing to their newsletter. The site has an up to the minute blog, weekly and daily newsletters, weekly video segments, a weekly radio show as well as an user-generated blog, Hugg. If you want to go green and need more information on how to do it, who is doing it and where to do it, TreeHugger is the site for you.

mousing around

Go h ug some trees www.treeh ugger.com

S tay motivated and get f it www.f it day.com One of the most difficult things about trying to get fit and lose weight is staying motivated. There is an increasingly number of “food diaries” appearing on the web, which allow users the privacy of a diary but with the added benefit of helpful feedback about what they are eating. The FitDay online journal allows you to track your diet and exercise routine every day. This lets you take control of your fitness routine and makes reaching your diet and fitness goals easier. With over 2 million users, FitDay is a great way to keep track – and stay motivated.

How do I do that? www.instructables .com Have you ever wanted to know how to make homemade spaghetti, replace a damaged shingle on your roof or what is the best way to pack a suitcase? Instructables is a web-based documentation platform where passionate people share what they do and how they do it, and learn from and collaborate with others. Like the Wikipedia model this website draws from the enormous pool knowledge that Internet users have. From the weird to the downright practical, Instructables contains thousands of useful tips and advice.

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Colouring-In Competition

ThisMonth’sWinners

9 PayzeChloe

Catherine O’Con

yrs

nor - 10 yrs

India Hardie

- 8 yrs

We at 1time value our young flyers in the knowledge that we will grow together. This is why 1time is running a colouring-in competition especially for them. The pictures are found in the Activity Packs that are handed out on the plane and a winner is chosen every month. Winners receive a gift hamper, sponsored by 1time, including: • 1time paraphernalia, • A copy of the in-flight magazine, abouTime, in which the picture is published. Winners are notified by telephone and the hamper, together with a copy of the in-flight magazine, is delivered directly to their door. So come on kids, enter the competition! Who knows, you could be the next winner!

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Auctioneering’s

about auctioneering

Story by Eugene Goddard , Pic © iStockphoto.com

advance

Strategy secures progressive growth

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n spite of the various factors currently impacting on local consumer confidence, auctioneers remain cautiously optimistic about economic prospects for the foreseeable future. Contrary to perceptions that they only live off the regressive spoils of economic woe, auctioneers are increasingly challenged by the permutations of a market under pressure. In a market flooded by forfeited goods and buckling under the demands of diversification, only those with auction acumen, with an ability to read the market and act accordingly, are reaping real rewards. Says MC du Toit of Colliers International, “Prevailing optimism

and plummeting prices are pervasive characteristics of auctioneering in present times. The trick is to use price depreciation to lure more buyers to auctions. Growing the market is a very important aspect of real estate auctioneering as there’s a palpable feeling of potential, yet many people are not aware of the advantages of buying property at auction.” Alliance Group, with countless marketing accolades behind them, are at the forefront of hooking new sellers into hammer sales. Lately the lion’s share of the company’s marketing endeavours has gone towards encouraging distressed homeowners to forestall foreclosure by shedding property in a much quicker fashion than conventional realty can.

Apart from fetching top prices for top properties, Alliance’s Real Leavitt is forthright about the current state of the industry and its potential benefits. “The industry is not really known for miracles, but it’s the best pulse of macro-economic fluctuations. Through our Rapid Auction Program we try and assist homeowners to prevent repossession by making them come straight to us. It beats waiting for the sheriff.” Clever strategising is also fervently applied by Aucor. According to its managing director, Shannon Winterstein, “We’re seeing an increase in the amount of properties coming up for auction, especially leisure properties, because the debt of excess real estate is

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about adventure

becoming increasingly troublesome for encumbered homeowners.” But what about the general economic mood? Surely its impact can be felt across the board, especially at investor’s level. Winterstein doesn’t think so, “I don’t think the dip in investor confidence will affect the industry. People know they can pick up bargains at auction and we expect investors to tap into this potential.” Du Toit concurs, “Now is the time to buy. The best investors are always the most active when the market is depressed and fraught with inactivity.” Dirk Pienaar of Root X Auctioneers, one of the most low-key but acutely focused companies, is perhaps the most factual in his analysis, “The interest rate has increased by 500 basis points since June 2006 from 10.5% to 15.5%. This effectively means that the cost of servicing debt is 47.6% higher than it was two years ago. This is not only on a bond, but on all borrowing. CPIX inflation is the second largest factor impacting on the residential sales market. This index is up 10.4% year-on-year. The National Credit Act has also impacted on the market, although many perceive this to be a positive component in the long term. However, affordability has now put a strain on demand for residential property.” Pienaar adds, “To those who can see past high interest rates, the unstable political scenery and the unpredictable JSE, this implies opportunity. Low confidence in the residential property market means that the number of buyers is limited to putting huge pressure on those

desperate to sell. Buyers who invest in the market now do so at favourable terms and will be richly rewarded when the market turns.” It accurately sums up the general mood that the market currently favours clever investing, at least in terms of property auctions. Elsewhere in the industry it’s different. Says Chico da Silva, CEO of the recently formed Consolidated Auctioneers, “Things are looking very tough. There’s lots of stock but sales are generally low. Constant marketing is the key and above all – determination in the face of adversity.” Auctioneers generally believe that the Rand’s current standing is a “long haul” position, which is why Da Silva stresses, “The industry has never been for the faint-hearted. It’s especially in times of strain that good auctioneers deliver the best results.” He added that given the demand for auction services buyers and sellers alike should be wary of companies not affiliated to the South African Institute of Auctioneers (SAIA). The institute’s chairman, Bill Hartard, himself an astute auction realtor and partner of Segoale Property Mart, says, “Because the industry is not statutorily regulated, it’s become a kind of free-for-all, exposed to the exploits of companies that don’t subscribe to the ethics enshrined in our code of conduct.” Given the high premium paid to marketing, clients are advised to always look for SAIA’s emblem in the advertising of auction companies. All companies approached for the purposes of this article are affiliated to SAIA. >

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STORAGE OPPORTUNITY Self storage is becoming a popular choice as people find it difficult to manage the space they rent, own or lease and look for a solution to manage their cluttered personal and business lives. Storage Spot offers you a cost-effective, flexible and secure storage alternative, at sizes to suit your needs and prices to suit your pocket. Just because you've stored your possessions, doesn't mean you don't stop caring about what happens to them. The staff at Storage Spot, feel exactly the same way and will look after your belongings as if they were their own. Storage Spot offers you a host of innovative features and their friendly staff will gladly help you to choose from a variety of units to suit your business and household storage needs. Each unit is built from high-strength pre-cast reinforced concrete panels, making each unit stronger than the traditional industry standard storage units.

Household Storage • • • • • •

Are you in the process of: Selling your home and want to de-clutter? Moving homes and need a temporary place to store your furniture? Redecorating and need to store your belongings? Expanding your family? Clearing out to give yourself some room to move?

Whatever your personal storage needs, the chances are you'll find a solution in self-storage at Storage Spot.

Business Storage Do you work from home? Are all your files and paperwork starting to clutter up? Do you to feel as if your house is turning into your office? Make use of a Storage Spot unit to work comfortably from home. • • •

Store household furniture to make space for office furniture Archive paperwork and files Store extra office equipment

number of financial solutions to a valued client base that exceeds 5,000 individuals, companies and trusts. The company’s core activities encompass investments, insurance, property development and property management, with assets exceeding tens of millions of Rands. Operations embrace the full spectrum of residential, commercial and storage space property as well as life insurance, medical plans, fixed interest investments and income producing investments in property portfolios.

Storage Spot Investment Opportunity It is a well known fact that property is a trustworthy investment vehicle with sustainable value, but with high interest rates a factor, not everyone can afford that second or third property to generate extra income. It is not uncommon nowadays for first time buyers or even retirees to have to or want to purchase smaller dwellings with single or no garages and with little or no storage space. This has placed a demand for selfstorage that has shown a positive increase and although still some way behind the US and UK markets, we see it as a trend that is expected to increase significantly in the future. King Financial Services offers a variety of property investment packages, one of which is the investment in the development of self storage facilities like Storage Spot. This investment is an option to purchase different sized storage units, creating a unique opportunity to first-time property entrants with good return on investment, backed by our expertise of property leasing and management. The unique pooling system (a first by KFS) provides the guarantee of sure income, even with no tenant. Investment opportunities are geared toward the provision of long-term income and capital growth and targeted at investors seeking above average income returns through preferential interest rates with sustained capital growth beginning from the development stage of the project. Contact 0860 KINGFIN or visit www.kingfin.co.za if you are an interested investor.

Contact 0860 007700 or visit www.storagespot.co.za.

Investment Opportunity King Financial Services was formed in Wellington in 1997 by Adrian King, together with his two brothers, Stephen and Paul. A wholly owned National Financial Services and Brokerage network, it offers a

Branches:

Eastern Cape: East London – Gonubie and Port Elizabeth – Walmer Western Cape: Cape Town – Killarney Gardens Gauteng: Pretoria – Waterkloof

Coming Soon!

Limpopo Province: Polokwane

info@storagespot.co.za | www.storagespot.co.za


A division of

Rental Space

Your solution to managing your cluttered personal and business lives. Storage Spot offers you a cost-effective, flexible and secure storage alternative, at sizes to suit your needs and prices to suit your pocket.

0860 00 77 00 Investment Opportunity

Storage for sale to the public. Purchase different sized storage units – a unique opportunity to first-time property entrants and expert investors with good return on investment. Available storage sizes between 5m2 and 71m2. Finance available. Monthly rental income plus capital growth.

0860 KINGFIN info@storagespot.co.za | www.storagespot.co.za Branches in Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, East London and coming soon in Gauteng


the cutting edge

Gorillapod The ideal accessory for photographers on the go, the Gorillapod is the lightest and most versatile camera tripod available today. With over 24 flexible leg joints made from injection-moulded plastic that bend and rotate to 360 degrees, the Gorillapod can secure your compact digital camera onto just about any surface. With a slim line attachment that stays connected to your camera, the Gorillapod is easy to set up and comes with a lock ring to ensure your camera is safely attached. Portable and easy to use, the Gorillapod serves all the functions of a traditional camera tripod, such as steadying your camera in low light conditions and taking group timed shots. Whether you need it wrapped around a tree branch, perched on a rock or wound around a fence, the Gorillapod is the only camera tripod available that is malleable enough to provide you with the perfect shot from any angle. Available at most camera stores across South Africa.www.joby.com.

Travel Light – Toshiba Portege R500 When Toshiba launched the R500 towards the end of 2007 it was the lightest laptop on the market. A year later, and the Toshiba still ranks high up on the list of “niftiest” laptops around. Perfectly suited for the mobile professional, this little laptop is very handy. Weighing a mere 1.1 kgs and sexily slim, it slides easily into your briefcase –rendering those bulky laptop cases redundant. What immediately catches one’s eye is the screen. The 12.1-inch screen is crisp, clear and handles well in sunlight. The keys are not too small, which makes typing easy, and it has solid mouse buttons that can handle compulsive clickers. On top of that it has great battery life, a minimum of 1GB of RAM, a 120 GB hard drive, DVD reader and writer, Bluetooth, Wireless, a fingerprint reader and all the other bits and bobs you would expect from any good computer. In short, it has everything you need to get the job done, and look good while doing it. The Portege R500 retails for R19,999. For more information, go to www.toshiba.co.za.

Waterproof Gadget Cases Keep your valuable technological gadgets safe and dry outdoors this summer, with the diverse range of Overboard waterproof technology cases. Made from soft matte PVC and guaranteed to seal tight with a patented Slide Seal System, all the cases are 100 percent waterproof and will float if dropped in water. The cases will not only protect your gadgets from sinking to the bottom of the ocean, or your swimming pool, but will keep out all sand, dirt and dust too. All cases guarantee full usability of all technology once sealed in the case, and are submersible up to 6 metres. So to make the most out of your outdoor time these holidays, slip your gadgets into one of these cases. You’ll be able to listen to your iPod, take photographs underwater and talk on your phone, without worrying about any of your valuables getting damaged at all. Go to www.over-board.co.uk for more.

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about dĂŠcor

Story by Natalie Gillman Pix Š iStockphoto.com

Lighten up Decorating for Summer

If winter brings to mind heavy drapes, hot chocolate and rich food, summer evokes a wholly different kind of opulence.

T

he time for heavy comforters, hot water bottles and hogging the bedclothes is over. In summer, and indeed through the rest of the year, cotton is the undisputed queen of fabrics to use in the bedroom. It never goes out of style and feels like pure magic on the skin. Visit the websites of Faluca Linen (www.faluccalinen.co.za) or The Cotton Clique (www.cottonclique.co.za) for

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more information on Egyptian cotton, the best available. For window treatments, consider choosing horizontal blinds, which easily allow the air to blow through your living space, carrying the scents and sounds of summer. If you are not yet ready to trade in your curtains for blinds, use gossamer fabrics. Curtains have the advantage of blowing in the wind, bringing movement to your home.

With guests and long summer days in mind, stock up on a new set of fun and funky kitchen gadgets. Anything that aids the preparation of summery cocktails is sure to come in handy: ice crushers, blenders and a new set of beautiful glasses. Invest in an ice cream maker and you can churn out any flavour that suits your fancy: pear and caramel, cardamom, or rose and ginger. Buy a large vase and splurge on fresh


Carousel Holiday Resor t

flowers. For glasses, vases and so forth, visit Loads of Living, which has one of the best selections of home accessories. An absolute must is an air conditioner. Once ugly, bulky and suggestive of hot offices, today’s range of aircons are practically artwork. LG Electronics Artcool Range not only looks amazing, it is also very clever. The air conditioners deodorise, remove allergens from the air and have something called a Nano Plasma Air Purifying System. In the height of summer, feel free to drag your chair up to the aircon and have your troubles blown gently into the ether. We may have long been treating it with some derision, but the whispers are true: wallpaper is back. Tattoo your walls! Gone are the days of little posies and all things twee on your wallpaper. Now is the time for bold patterns that hark lovingly back to the 60s, 70s and 80s, yet look to the future too. Choosing to apply the wallpaper to only one focus wall allows you to add impact without frightening your guests. To add a personal touch, have a printing company enlarge a photograph you have taken and transfer it onto wallpaper to cover cupboards, walls and anything else you fancy. Summer means freedom. Rejoice in summer by taking off any kind of foot “stultifier” and luxuriate in walking around your home barefoot and unhampered. Of course, walking on carpet sucks the joy out of the exercise, so invest in some cool, cool tiles (check out the range from CTM or Malls Tiles) or fashionable wooden flooring. Large pieces of furniture are a big investment, but buying stunning, quality pieces from the likes of Coricraft, Bakos Brothers or Modular Comforts, makes the investment worthwhile. Accent your suite with cushions and accessories in whichever colours suit your taste, flouting fashion for personal style. In a few short months, winter will be back, angry from his summer pounding and intent on painting frost on windows and generally wreaking havoc. Make the most of the light half of the year. >

Tel: 039 699 2406 Fax: 039 699 2360

Email: carousel@telkomsa.net www.carouselholidayresort.co.za


about adventure M

Joburg to Cape Town T

W

T

F

S

S

5 1

2

3

4

5

6

1 7 1

2

3

4

5

6 7 6

3 1

2

3

4

5

7 6 7

1

2

1

3

4

3

4

5

6 6

4 6 1

2

3

4

5

7

5 5

7

Departure

Arrival

Flight

06h30

08h40

1T 135

07h10

09h20

1T 101

07h50

10h00

1T 129

08h45

10h55

1T 123

09h25

11h35

1T 103

09h45

11h55

1T 119

11h05

13h15

1T 133

11h10

13h20

1T 141

12h45

14h55

1T 109

14h15

16h25

1T 105

14h45

16h55

1T 121

15h20

17h30

1T 111

16h25

18h35

1T 131

16h40

18h50

1T 125

17h20

19h30

1T 127

18h00

20h10

1T 139

18h30

20h40

1T 115

19h20

21h30

1T 137

21h00

23h10

1T 117

Joburg to Durban M

T

W

T

F

1

2

3

4

5

2

3

4

5

S

S

Departure

Arrival

Flight

06h40

07h50

1T 201

07h00

08h10

1T 209

08h25

09h35

1T 235

09h00

10h10

1T 211

09h20

10h30

1T 227

11h30

12h40

1T 203

12h45

13h55

1T 215

13h00

14h10

1T 223

13h05

14h15

1T 239

15h00

16h10

1T 217

15h35

16h45

1T 205

16h30

17h40

1T 221

17h10

18h20

1T 219

18h05

19h15

1T 225

18h15

19h25

1T 207

7

19h00

20h10

1T 207

7

19h40

20h50

1T 229

20h40

21h50

1T 237

6 6 7

Flight Schedule

1

2

3

4

5 6 5 7 6

1

2

3

4 5 6

7

5 1

2

3

4

5

1time

Joburg to Port Elizabeth M

T

W

T

F

S

S

1 2

3

4 5 7 6

1

4 5 7

Departure

Arrival

Flight

07h20

09h00

1T 501

10h45

12h25

1T 505

11h20

13h00

1T 515

11h30

13h10

1T 511

12h25

14h05

1T 507

15h25

17h05

1T 503

17h20

19h00

1T 509

18h10

19h50

1T 517

Joburg to George M

T

W

T

F

S

S

5 1

Arrival

Flight

07h05

08h55

1T 831

07h50

09h40

1T 821

08h55

10h45

1T 821

09h45

11h35

1T 827

10h30

12h20

1T 825

12h00

13h50

1T 823

7

13h00

14h50

1T 833

7

15h40

17h30

1T 829

6 4 3 2 5

Departure

Joburg to East London M

T

W

T

F

S

S

5 7 6 1 4 5 7

128

Reservations:

2

3

0861 345 345

Departure

Arrival

Flight

06h50

08h15

1T 301

09h35

11h00

1T 319

10h45

12h10

1T 305

11h05

12h30

1T 331

13h00

14h25

1T 317

14h25

15h50

1T 307

14h55

16h20

1T 321

16h00

17h25

1T 309


about adventure

Cape Town to Joburg M

T

W

T

F

S

S

Departure

Arrival

Flight

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

06h45

08h45

1T 100

5

6

08h20

10h20

1T 118

7

09h00

11h00

1T 138

7

10h00

12h00

1T 102

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

12h00

14h00

1T 124

12h20

14h20

1T 104

13h25

15h25

1T 136

14h10

16h10

1T 134

7

15h40

17h40

1T 110

16h40

18h40

1T 106

7

16h55

18h55

1T 120

17h20

19h20

1T 106

18h00

20h00

1T 112 1T 132

5 6 1

2

3

4

5

1 6 1

2

1

3

4

5

7

3

4

19h15

21h15

4

20h15

22h25

1T 140

21h20

23h20

1T 116

5

7

M

T

W

T

F

1

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

4

S

S

Departure

Arrival

Flight

06h45

07h55

1T 200

6

07h00

08h10

1T 220

6

08h45

09h55

1T 210

08h50

10h00

1T 202

09h30

10h40

1T 234

10h40

11h50

1T 222

11h10

12h20

1T 240

13h20

14h30

1T 204

13h40

14h50

1T 238

14h40

15h50

1T 224

15h00

16h10

1T 208

5

15h20

16h30

1T 228

5

16h10

17h20

1T 236

17h00

18h10

1T 212

18h15

19h25

1T 206

18h30

19h40

1T 214

7

19h00

20h10

1T 214

7

21h30

22h40

1T 230

5 7 6 7

1

2

3

4

5 7 6 7

2

3

4

6 1

2

3

4 5

Flight Schedule

Durban to Joburg

T

W

T

2

3

4

F

S

S

1 6 1

4

5

7

5 7

Departure

Arrival

Flight

13h10

14h50

1T 506

13h40

15h20

1T 502

14h40

16h20

1T 508

17h50

19h30

1T 504

19h40

21h20

1T 510

20h30

22h10

1T 518

George to Joburg M

T

W

T

1

F

S

S

Departure

Arrival

Flight

10h45

12h35

1T 822

11h45

13h35

1T 822

12h25

14h15

1T 828

13h05

14h55

1T 826

14h55

16h45

1T 824

7

15h30

17h20

1T 834

7

18h20

20h10

1T 830

5 6 4 3 2 5

1time

Port Elizabeth to Joburg M

East London to Joburg M

T

W

T

F

S

S

5 7 6 4 5 7 1

2

3

Departure

Arrival

Flight

09h00

10h25

1T 302

12h25

13h50

1T 320

12h40

14h05

1T 306

15h15

16h40

1T 318

16h45

18h10

1T 308

16h55

18h20

1T 322

18h05

19h30

1T 310

w w w .1 t i m e . c o . z a

129


Cape Town to East London M

T

W

T

F

S

S

Flight Schedule

4 5 7 1

Arrival

Flight

08h55

10h25

1T 608

09h20

10h50

1T 606

12h35

14h05

1T 604

15h20

16h50

1T 602

Cape Town to Durban M

T

W

T

F

S

S

1 7 6 2

3

4

5

T

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T

F

Departure

Arrival

Flight

10h40

12h40

1T 656

11h00

13h00

1T 650

12h00

13h55

1T 652

13h15

15h15

1T 658

Cape Town to Port Elizabeth M

1time

Departure

S

S

1 3

4 5

7

Departure

Arrival

Flight

11h40

12h50

1T 708

14h30

15h40

1T 706

15h40

16h50

1T 702

Joburg to Zanzibar M

T 2

W

bouTime advert FINAL 8/20/08 5:08 PM Page 1

T

F

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Departure

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Flight

07h45

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1T 921

M

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MY

CY CMY

K


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Departure

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Flight

11h20

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1T 607

13h00

14h30

1T 605

14h45

16h15

1T 603

Durban to Cape Town M

T

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T

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S

S

Departure

Arrival

Flight

7

08h15

10h25

1T 649

09h00

11h10

1T 651

10h20

12h25

1T 657

13h25

15h35

1T 655

6 2

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4

5

1

Port Elizabeth to Cape Town M

T

W

T

F

S

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1 5 3

4

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7

Departure

Arrival

Flight

09h40

10h50

1T 707

13h45

14h55

1T 701

16h30

17h40

1T 705

Zanzibar to Joburg M

T 2

F

S 6

S

Departure

Arrival

Flight

13h30

16h00

1T 922

1time

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Flight Schedule

East London to Cape Town M


touchdown news

entertainment

Story by PR Worx, Pix © Gallo/Getty Images

In flight

I

have never been one to be highly fascinated by video and computer games – I leave that to the men in my life. However, on a recent 1time flight to Cape Town I discovered a new toy which has piqued my interest in the gaming world – the PSP. With 1time now offering these handy in-flight entertainment devices on selected flights, I no longer have to concern myself with keeping busy during my trip or worry about my laptop battery running out. I was surprised at how easy the PSP is to use, and how quickly I got hooked on my racing game. Granted I am not very good at racing rockets around the designed track. I was, however, proud that I had stepped into the advanced

at its best

gaming world and could compete with my fellow passenger, even if the five year old did end up beating me. There was a wide range of games and movies available for me to choose from, and if the game I was playing no longer tickled my fancy (or if I was tired of losing to the console), I could easily swap out. My personal favourite was the spy game – I’ve always wanted to be Sydney Bristow in Alias. Each game I tried came with its own tutorial so I was up and running within minutes.

Now with the PSPs onboard, it just gives me another reason to fly with 1time, besides the awesome legroom and great onboard service. If you’ve never had the opportunity of trying out a PSP, might I suggest booking a 1time flight and soon. Plus you’ll get a plane ride in the process, what more could you ask for? >


Zorgvliet

about wine

wines on board

What to drink with what

Silver Myn SemiSweet 2007 Silver Myn Shiraz 2006 Dark plum coloured. White pepper and black plum flavours with an underlying smokiness on the nose. A good combination between ripe and dry tannins with spicy and flavours on the palate. Firm but elegant structure with a good lingering aftertaste.

Best suited with: •

C

hri

st

s ma

S

Sandwich: Pastrami with wholegrain mustard Hotdog: a scrumptious pure beef sausage on a bun with either tomato sauce or mustard. Fairview Cheese Platter

ia pec

Silver Myn Sauvignon Blanc 2008 Pale green with light straw hues on the colour. The nose is laden with gooseberry, green apple, and sweet melon with underlying mineral tones. Clean, crisp acidity with an abundance of tropical and grape fruit showing on the palate.

Best suited with: •

Sandwich: Cheddar cheese with onion marmelade Fairview Cheese Platter

Light yellow in colour with hints of lime green. The wine shows pear and citrus fruit flavours.

Silver Myn Cabernet Sauvignon 2006 Garnet red colour. Classical cassis and ripe, red cherry with a herbaceous and tobacco nose. Mediumfull bodied wine with a soft integrated tannin structure, enhanced by a prominent lingering aftertaste.

Best suited with: •

Bagel: egg mayonaisse with bacon bits or turkey and mozzarella with fresh cranberry preserve. Fairview Cheese Platter

l

Schoongezich Spa is a luxury destination spa which offers a unique blend of relaxation and tranquillity set amongst a beautiful rose and lavender scented environment. We will help you to escape the pressures of everyday life and give you the opportunity to stay over a night or two for the ultimate spa getaway! The Spa will present you with internationally highly qualified therapists as well as high quality products and treatments such as Guinot and O.P.I. Schoongezich Spa is located in Pretoria, only 30 minutes drive from Johannesburg. Schoongezich Spa, 369 Schoongezicht street, Erasmusrand, Pretoria. Tel + 27 12 347 2052, fax +27 12 346 6775 or email spa@schoongezich.co.za.

Getting ready for Christmas? Receive 10% off any gift vouchers purchased in the month of November. Offer valid only when you produce a 1time Airline boarding pass at the time of purchase.


menu snacks & meals Items on this menu are subject to availability

Sandwiches (Available on brown or white bread variations - dependant on availability)

R22

Honey-roasted chicken mayonnaise Pastrami with wholegrain mustard Cheddar cheese and onion marmalade

Health Roll

R22

Smoked chicken with Danish Feta, crisp carrot strips and mayonnaise, on a pumpkin seed health roll.

Hot Dog

R16

Cheese Platter

A scrumptious pure beef sausage on a

Kosher / Halaal product

bun with either tomato sauce or mustard,

Fairview cheese platter consisting of Chakalaka Chevin, Black Pepper Chevin, Mature Cheddar, Blue Vein & Brie with a pack of five biscuits.

or even better, both.

Bagels

R22

Egg mayonnaise topped with bacon bits.

R22

Chocolates

Turkey and mozzarella with fresh

1time breakfast with tea / coffee. A scrumptious

cranberry preserve.

bacon omelette, served with French toast,

R12

Double Chocolate Blueberry Bran and Fruit Carrot and Almond

Danish Apple or custard

flights, until 9am.

R30

Your choice of sandwich with 200ml fruit juice / 200ml soft drink.

R8

Custard or Apple Danish with tea / coffee

R6

Smoked Beef Lightly / Plain salted Salt & Vinegar Cheese & Onion

R26

Snacks

R13

Salted Peanuts Peanuts & Raisins Jelly Babies Wine Gums

ANNOUNCEMENT!

R8

Bar One KitKat Lunch Bar

Crisps

grilled tomato and a beef sausage.

Jumbo Muffins

R20

Chilli Beef Snapstix Sliced Beef Biltong Dry Wors

Meal Deals

Only served on JHB/CT and JHB/George

Biltong 80g

R6

You can now pay for your onboard purchase with a MASTERCARD/VISA credit card


menu beverages & miscellaneous Alcoholic Beverages Beer

Hot Coffee /Tea

R8

Castle Lager / Lite

R12

Hot Chocolate

R8

Peroni

R14

Cappuccino

R10

Apple Ale

R14

Cold

Sarita Select Sarita Ruby Dry

Still / Sparkling Mineral Water (500ml)

R8

Soft Drinks (200ml)

R8

Coke / Fanta Orange (330ml)

R9

Spirits

Appletiser (330ml)

R12

Assorted Whisky

R20

Red Bull Energy Drink

R18

Rum

R18

Gin

R18

Brandy

R16

Vodka

R16

Wine

R22

Fruit Juice Orange Apple Tropical Blend

R6

White: Chardonnay Sauvignon Blanc Semi-Sweet Red: Shiraz Cabernet Sauvignon

Miscellaneous Merchandise

NEW!

Model 1time Airline MD80 Aircraft Scale 1:200

R130

Available on selected routes only

Kiddies Pack Our VIP passengers on board, up to the age of 12 are given a kiddies’ pack for FREE, to keep them occupied. The pack contains a packet of crisps, a juice box, sweets, a pack of crayons and a colouring-in sheet. Let the kids enter the colouring-in competition found in the pack for a chance to win a hamper of 1time goodies. Should you wish to purchase an extra pack, the cost is R14. Let us know what you think. Catering comments and suggestions are always welcome. Send an email to our catering manager at catering@1time.co.za


Zanzibar Flight Menu BREAKFAST

(JNB- ZNZ): R48 / US$ 6 FOR CARNIVORES

A croissant filled with crispy bacon and hard boiled egg, topped with a cranberry preserve, accompanied by a Danish apple and custard pastry, served with a fresh fruit salad and Greek yoghurt.

OR HERBIVORES

Sliced health bread sandwich with cottage cheese, sprouts, honey and carrot shavings served with a blueberry muffin drizzled with white chocolate and sliced fresh fruit.

LUNCH

(ZNZ – JNB): R48 / US$ 6 FOR CARNIVORES

Honey mustard chicken mayonnaise on an Italian ciabatta served with a penne pasta salad, grilled mushrooms, cherry tomato, rocket and parmesan cheese finished off with a pecan nut chocolate brownie.

OR HERBIVORES

Spinach and feta quiche accompanied by a cinnamon and roast butternut quiche both served with a Greek salad, mini bread roll and short pastry almond Florentine glazed in dark chocolate.

We hope you enjoyed your meal but comments and suggestions are always welcome. If you think our menu could be nicer, send an email to our catering manager at catering@1time.co.za

DRINKS S HOT

Coffee/Tea / H Hot ot C Chocolate hoco ho cola late te Cappuccino o

COLD

Still/Sparkling Mineral Miineeraal Water Wate Wa terr (500ml) ( 00 (5 00ml m) Soft Drinks (200ml) Coke / Fanta Orange (330ml) Appletiser (330ml) Red Bull Fruit Juice - Orange - Apple - Fruit Punch

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Castle Lager/Lite Peroni Sarita - Apple Cider

SPIRITS

Assorted Whiskies Assorted Rums Assorted Gins Brandy / Vodka

WINE

Off-Dry Dry White Red

R8 / US$1,00 R US$ S 1 R12 R1 2 / US$1,50 US$ US $

R8 / US$1,00 U R8 / US$1,00 U R12 / US$1,50 R12 2 / US$1,50 R18 / US$2,50 R8 / US$1,00

R12 / US$1,50 R15 / US$2,00 R15 / US$2,00

R20 / US$2,50 R16 / US$2,00 R16 / US$2,00 R16 / US$2,00

R23 / US$3,00 R23 / US$3,00 R23 / US$3,00

SNACKS Beef biltong 80g (Chilli / Sliced / Dry wors) Chocolates (Bar one / Kit Kat / Lunch Bar) Crisps (Smoked Beef / Lightly Salted / Salt & Vinegar / Cheese & Onion) Peanuts (Plain salted or with raisins) Sweets (Jelly Babies / Wine gums)

R20 / US$2,50 R8 / US$1,00 R8 / US$1,00 R8 / US$1,00 R8 / US$1,00

This menu is for our Zanzibar flights only

27284 1time Zanzibar Menu Rev.indd 3-4

3/26/08 11:08:11 AM



abouTime November 2008