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alice in wonderland


contents

s t n e t n co On the Cover

Travel

Features

Tim Burton has achieved cult status in many moviegoers’ minds. With a career that began at The Walt Disney Company in 1979, he has been involved in classics such as Beetlejuice, Batman, Edward Scissorhands and Nightmare Before Christmas. Bur ton’s latest project saw him directing the epic 3D fantasy adventure Alice in Wonderland, in which 19-year-old Alice returns to the fantasy world she first visited as a child. Cover pic © iStockphoto.com

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Alice in Wonderland

World Press Photo

Talking to Tim Burton

2010 Winners

54 47

Zambia

Victoria Falls

The Beer Route

In KZN

41 73

Identity Theft Soccer

Are you safe?

SA’s history

56 62

Peermont Business and pleasure

77

Cape Town Cycle Tour

44 Stanley Eclectic shopping

Health

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111

Health Focus

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Tuberculosis

The greatest race


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contents

Business Entertainment

64 70 89

Regulars

s t n e t n co

12 14 20 22 20 50

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83 106

Love Lens

Lizelle Lotter photography

One Bakkie Town

Baglett

66 84

Jazz It Up

Breakfast Included

Afrikaans

Jack Parow

More Music

Mozambique

Property

Sales Coaching

Editor’s Letter

Richard Mulvey

Laura Cooke

Passenger Letters

March diary

More Style

The latest trends

Go To

www.aboutime.co.za

Your opinion counts

More To Do

More For You

Lifestyle guide

East London

105 80 98 96 90 114 120 128

Good Food

Col’Cacchio Pizzeria

Something Different

More Fun More Tech

Event Lighting

Wacky news Gadgets

Motoring 1time Good News Flight Schedule Domestic Menu


editor’s letter contents

r o t i ed Earlier this year I was inundated with phone calls from the most intriguing and irritating of callers – “Private Number”. Ever curious, I found myself unable to ignore the incessant ringing. Unfortunately, Private Number is usually hiding their identity for a reason. I ended up listening to all sorts of sales pitches, most often for cell phone contracts and life insurance – areas in which I am fully covered. And the calls just kept on coming. One caller made me particularly uncomfortable. When I politely declined her offer for a life insurance policy, she proceeded to aggressively explain the many ways in which I might meet my untimely demise. Not exactly what you want to listen to on a Friday evening! Even though, like the curious cat, I knew better, I just kept on answering the increasingly frequent calls. That was until one day I pleaded: “Tell me how to get my number off this database!” The answer was surprisingly simple – go to the website of the Direct Marketing Association of South Africa (DMASA) and “opt out”. After only a few clicks of my mouse, my life has since been blissfully free of unwanted sales pitches. While the DMASA warns you that you could be missing out on some great specials, I am sure that I can get by without them. Enjoy your flight,

Laura

1time Airline Tel: +27 861 345 345 Publisher TCB Publishing PO Box 11273, Hatfield, 0028 Tel: +27 861 THE MAG Fax: +27 88 012 346 2367 mail@tcbpublishing.co.za Chief operations officer Bernie Hellberg bernie@tcbpublishing.co.za Editor Laura Cooke laura@aboutime.co.za Key accounts manager Marinda Scharneck marinda@tcbpublishing.co.za Advertising Sales Group sales director Andre Scharneck +27 72 739 8855 sales executives Bobby Cousins +27 83 532 6773 Calvin van Vuuren +27 82 582 6873 Dino Boonzaaier +27 79 082 9713 Estelle van der Westhuizen +27 83 947 7331 Andrew Scharneck +27 72 739 8855 Robyn Shillaw-Botha +27 82 795 5995

Images iStockphoto.com, stock.Xchng, SA Tourism, Lizelle Lotter, Jonx Pillemer, Alessandra Raath, Laura Cooke, Antonie Robertson, Sean Brand Design & Layout Joanne Mc Laren Virtual Da Vinci Creative Room joanne@virtualdavinci.co.za Webmaster webmaster@aboutime.co.za PRINTING Business Print Centre, Pretoria Contributors to this Issue Wilma den Hartigh, Nicky Furniss,Tshepi Matloga, Lesley Stones, Christel Liebenberg, Laura Cooke, Baglett, Peter Raath, Joan Muller, Jacqueline Cochrane, Bernard K. Hellberg, Beth Cooper

Q IN! W ons? uesti m at e

January Winners Film for the Next Century James Clark Muse and Patrizio Agril Crozette Trisha Lord Taryn Long Natasha Govender Beverly Mouton

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Ask th ab

City Sightseeing Cape Town is the city’s most loved open-top red bus and is by far the easiest and most convenient way to discover the thriving metropolis of Cape Town and all it’s highlights. Go to www.citysightseeing.co.za for more. 5 people stand a chance to win 2 tickets! Simply SMS the word TIME followed by the word BUS to 35131. Cost per SMS is R3. Competition closes 31st March 2010. Vouchers must be used before 31st May 2010.By entering this competition you consent to receiving electronic information pertaining to abouTime and/or 1time Airline.

abouTime is published monthly by TCB Publishing on behalf of 1time Airline. Opinions expressed in the publication are not necessarily those of TCB Publishing, 1time Airline or any of their clients. Information has been included in good faith by the publisher and is believed to be correct at the time of going to print. No responsibility can be accepted for errors and omissions. No material (articles or photographs) in the publication may be reproduced,in whole or in part,without specific written permission from the Editor. Submissions of articles and photographs for publication are welcome, but the publisher, while exercising all reasonable care, cannot be held responsible for any loss or damage. Please ensure that all material is posted by registered mail to PO Box 11273, Hatfield, Pretoria, 0028. Copyright © 2010. All copyright for material appearing in this magazine belongs to TCB Publishing and/or the individual contributors. All rights reserved.


1time letters

s r e t let Letter of the Month Dear 1time, On a recent flight I was overwhelmed by the service, onboard meals and drinks. It was my first time on 1time and I was extremely impressed. On the trip back I was even more impressed, as I was seated next to a local celebrity from 7de Laan. I am glad to see that celebs like him choose to fly 1time. It just goes to show affordable flights with good quality service can be enjoyed by all.

The writer of the Letter of the Month will receive a Chocolate Affair: a hatbox containing a selection of imported chocolates, Lindt truffles, Toblerone One on Ones,

Thank you for always having such good prices and expanding travel to destinations like Zanzibar and Livingstone. Keep up the excellent service, Fatima Hajat

Bouchees, Ferrero Rocher & Mignonettes. Buy your own and other gifts online from NetFlorist. Visit www.netflorist.co.za or call 0861 300 600 Dear 1time, Flying on a 1time flight in December, I was extremely disappointed, but I decided to book again recently.

Dear 1time, I am blind and travel with a guide dog, and I want to express my appreciation for the care, sensitivity and friendliness of the 1time ground staff as well as cabin crew. It is such a pleasure to fly with an airline which has clearly taken the time to think about disabled passengers. The staff are not fazed by disability and are friendly and efficient. Kind regards, Michael Watermeyer

And it was the most pleasant flight I have ever experienced. The service was exceptional and the attendants were upbeat and friendly. In fact, the 1time staff were some of the friendliest people I have ever met. It was fantastic to be on that flight and I will definitely sing the praises of 1time for as long as they keep up the great service. Well done, Michael

Letters may be edited, shor tened or translated from the original language.

Have a compliment or comment?

Ask your flight attendant for a feedback form and let us know what is on your mind or send an email to cr@1time.co.za.

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MORE

diary

Compiled by Tshepi Matloga

Enter the

Big Top

Come and experience the finest circus spectacular ever seen in Mzansi this March and April at the Carnival City’s Big Top Arena and GrandWest’s Grand arena.With its rich tradition and wealth of talent,The Great Moscow Circus has been in constant and high demand around the world for the past 90 years. Book your ticket now at www.computicket.com from as little as R50.

Joburg gets

Creative

Whether it is browsing fine art, shopping for a unique piece of interior design or simply enjoying the creatively vibrant and active space, the 3rd annual Joburg Art Fair is the place to be the last weekend of March. Held at the Sandton Convention centre, this year’s FNB sponsored event introduces a new range of special projects inspired by the convergence of art and industry, displaying work commissioned by Grolsch, St. Leger and Viney and Pirelli. For more visit www.joburgartfair.co.za.

Countdown to

K-Day

For a day of great music in a stunning setting, get yourself to the Cape on 20th March. 94.7 Kfm and Santam have lined up the hottest local acts for this year’s K-Day concert at the Lourensford Wine Estate in Somerset West. The line-up includes Freshly Ground, Prime circle, Flat Stanley, HHP, Lira and last year’s Pop Idol co-winner Sasha Lee. It promises to be a great day out for families and friends. Go to www.kfm.co.za for more.

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Cullinan’s Groot Gat

Festival

Tango Time

Did you know Cullinan actually has the biggest open mine hole in the country? Find out more about this little village at their three day festival, which runs from 20th – 22nd March. Entertainment includes live shows, street parades, exhibitions, a huge beer garden, antiques and arts and those who love the outdoors can take part in mountain bike challenges, or even the village fun walk to raise money for the underprivileged. For more information, visit www.grootgatfees.co.za.

The La Motte estate in Franschhoek is hosting a Cape Town Tango Ensemble for its annual harvest time concert on 13th March. The Cape Town Tango Ensemble is internationally acclaimed for their interpretation of Argentine dances – which explores the mix of African rhythms and the sounds of the “Tango Nuevo” style. Don’t miss the rarely performed compositions that include the works of celebrated tango composer Piazzolla. Visit www.la-motte.com for more.

Sci-Fest

Africa

Explore science in motion and realise its fun side at the National Science Festival in Grahamstown from 24th – 30th March. You can take part in exciting workshops and talks, and enjoy exhibitions and enlightening lectures about interesting things like nutritional technology and therapeutic cloning. Watch out for Arthur Benjamin, the man who can multiply faster than a calculator, and learn how to memorise 100 digits of pi. Go to www.scifest.org.za for more.

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trends

e l y t s MORE

Waltz Away Planning your wedding can be a nightmare, but if you rely on the professionals, it can be a breeze. Event Flooring specialises in constructing any kind of flooring you can think of. Want to get married in a garden, but don’t want to ruin the lawn? Want a marquee wedding without the mud on your shoes? Event Flooring has all the solutions to these pesky problems. Not only are they au fait with weddings, but any event from sporting to entertainment can be dealt with without a hitch. So all you have to worry about are those dance classes. For more, visit www.eventflooring.co.za.

Get the Party Started Having played at Cape Town Fashion Week, the J&B Met and supported acts such as Goldfish and Freshly Ground, DJ Darren Rose has what it takes to set any party rocking. Originally hailing from Scotland, Darren Rose was hooked on South Africa as soon as he set foot on its shores and decided to make Cape Town his home. With roots in the UK club scene, Darren now uses his diverse musical talents to concentrate on corporate events, weddings, fashion shows and private parties. Contact 5 Seasons Music on 0860 110 309 for more info.

Gotta Pop Opening your bubbly with a sabre is one way to make a statement. Last month Andrew Duminy (GM of The Bull Run Restaurant in Sandton), with Pongrácz, successfully set a new sabrage Guinness World Record. Sabrage is a lavish ceremonial technique whereby the top of a champagne or sparkling wine bottle is removed with a sabre or sword. The force of the blade causes the cork and collar to shoot off the neck of the bottle in a show stopping display of bubbles and blasts. Duminy popped open 27 Pongrácz Méthode Cap Classiques to secure the title.

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lifestyle

u o y for MORE

Okha Luxury Treat yourself and your home to hand picked imported pieces or contemporary South African designs at the new Okha store in the vibrant Cape Quarter. The open plan showroom environment features coordinated living, dining, bedroom and entertainment areas. Look out for their unique selection of hand blown glassware, ceramics, art and sculpture from leading South African artisans.

Origin Roasting Loyalty Bean Attention all coffee lovers! Origin wants to share their fabulous coffee and tea with the world with the introduction of their Loyalty Bean Card. With every 10th stamp, you will receive 250g of coffee for free – this can be ground to your specification or packed as espresso beans. If you prefer tea, you will receive two 100g packs of your choice. Bring your copy of abouTime with you to claim your card at 28 Hudson Street, De Waterkant, Cape Town or call +27 21 421 1000 or email info@originroasting.co.za. Treat Yourself

If you feel the need for something sweet and decadent, spoil yourself with the Ferrero Collection – a gift pack containing all three of their treats. These include the classic hazelnut Ferrero Rocher, the dark chocolate Ferrero Rondnoir and the coconut and almond Ferrero Garden. The Ferrero Collection is available at leading supermarkets around the country.

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feature

Story & Pix © Walt Disney Studio Motion Pictures

e c i l A

in

d n a wonderl An interview with Tim Burton

Tim Burton has achieved cult status in many moviegoers’ minds. With a career that began at The Walt Disney Company in 1979, he has been involved in classics such as Beetlejuice, Batman, Edward Scissorhands and Nightmare Before Christmas. Burton’s latest project saw him directing the epic 3D fantasy adventure Alice in Wonderland, in which 19-year-old Alice returns to the fantasy world she first visited as a child.

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Q:What appeals to you about this story? TB: In any fairy tale land there is good and bad. What I liked about Underland (according to the film version, when Alice visited as a child, she misheard the name and called it Wonderland), is that everything is slightly off, even the good people. That, to me, is something different. It’s so much a part of the culture. So whether you’ve read the story or not, you’ll know certain images or have certain ideas about it. It’s such a popular story. The reason we did something with it is that it’s captured the imagination of people for a very long time. Q: Why do you think Alice in Wonderland is still popular, more than 140 years after its publication? TB: It somehow taps a subconscious thing. That’s why all those great stories stay around, because they tap into the things that people probably aren’t even aware of on a conscious level. There’s definitely something about those images. That’s why there have been so many versions of it. As a movie, it’s always been about a passive little girl wandering around a series of adventures with weird characters. There’s never any kind of gravity to it. The attempt with this was to take the idea of

those stories and shape them into something that’s not literally from the book, but keeps the spirit of it. Q: When you were first approached to direct, what was your reaction? TB: They gave me a script and they said 3D. And even before I read it, I thought, that’s intriguing. What I liked about Linda Woolverton’s script was she made it a story, gave it a shape for a movie that’s not necessarily the book. So all those elements seemed exciting to me. What I liked about this take on the story is Alice is at an age where you’re between a kid and an adult, when you’re crossing over as a person. A lot of young people with old souls aren’t so popular in their own culture and their own time. Alice is somebody who doesn’t quite fit into that Victorian structure and society. She’s more internal. Q: Which characters in Alice appealed to you more? TB: I like them all. I think this material suffered in the past www.1time.co.za

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because all of the characters are just weird. Okay, Hatter’s weird. Cat’s weird. Rabbit’s weird. We tried to give each one their own particular quirks, so that they each have their own character. Q: Growing up, did you have a favourite children’s book? TB: I was a Dr. Seuss fan. It was easy to read. I liked his drawings. But the reason I wanted to do Alice is that it was a really interesting challenge. I didn’t feel personally, like I might on another project, like, oh, there is one great version out there, so to try and do another one might be a problem.With Alice, there are some interesting ones, but I don’t know if any are completely successful. Q:What was your approach to the film? TB: I was much more fascinated by the iconic images. I think people are always surprised when they go back and read the stories, because they don’t have that Lord of the Rings sweeping narrative. They’re absurdist. Surreal. But those characters are in our dreams, our tales. Those things that stay in your brain. Why do all these musicians write songs about it? Illustrators are recalling it all the time. You see it in other imagery. It was key to try to make that world. The things that I felt were unique to Alice, they’re unique because they’re so different. Like the bizarre size changes. And where you have some animals that talk and some that don’t. It seems quite random in what Carroll did. But at the same time, it’s not.There’s something very deep. Things that seem random maybe aren’t? The goal is just to try and capture that. Q:What is Johnny Depp’s approach to playing such a vivid character as The Mad Hatter? TB: It is an iconic character and it’s been portrayed in animation, in live-action. I think Johnny tried to find grounding with the character, something you can feel, as

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opposed to him just being “mad”. With a lot of versions, it’s just a one-note character, and his goal was to bring out a human side to the strangeness of the character. I’ve worked with him for many years, and he always tries to do something like that, and this time was no exception. Q: Can you talk about why you chose Mia Wasikowska for Alice? TB: She has both a young quality and an old quality. Very grounded – some people are just all over the place. But some people, they have that old soul quality. And that’s what we felt was important for this Alice. But at the same time, to be young – there are people with old souls who are also naïve at the same time. There’s a certain slight passiveness to Alice that’s always in the material. So we wanted to give her more of a quiet strength,


feature which Mia has herself. I just liked her quality. I always like it when I sense people have that old-soul quality to them. Because you’re witnessing this whole thing through her eyes, it needed somebody who can subtly portray that. Q: Is it Underland or Wonderland? What does it look like in this film? TB: It is Underland and has always been Underland, but according to the film version, when Alice visited as a child, she misheard the name and called it Wonderland. Everybody’s got an image of Underland. I think in people’s minds, it’s always a very bright, cartoony place. We thought if Alice had had this adventure as a little girl and now she’s going back, perhaps it’s been a little bit depressed since she’s left. It’s got a slightly haunted quality to it. Q: Are you taking a unique approach to technology with this film? TB: Well, [senior visual effects supervisor] Ken Ralston’s done this. I haven’t done this before. It’s a puzzle, and the movie doesn’t materialise until the end. What’s been the most difficult thing is, after production ends, you usually have a movie – you see the shots and then you spend six months to a year cutting it.This doesn’t work that way. It’s a very Alice in Wonderland-like process. It’s a little backwards. Q: How did you incorporate available technology into this film? TB: Our approach to this was a bit more organic, in the sense that Ken Ralston and I discussed what we liked and didn’t like about animation, live-action and other technologies. We had that conversation. We decided on a mix – we’d have real people, but also animate characters, and then manipulate them. So, we just tried to pick and choose what we used with each situation. That’s the thing about technology. There are so many ways to use it. Q:Why did you choose to make the film in 3D? TB: Well, 3D is not a fad. It’s here to stay. It doesn’t mean that every movie’s going to be made in 3D. But at the same time, Alice in 3D, just because of the material, it seemed to fit. So, instead of it just being a given, we tried to treat it as though it was a part of Wonderland. Matching the medium with the material. Q: Where do you see the future of movies going, now that you have this mixture of 3D and live-action? TB: I was in animation several years ago. It was pronounced dead, and then they stopped doing hand drawn. So, the good news is that there are more forms for everything, which is great. There should be 3D, drawn animation, computer animation, stop-motion. It’s all valid. It’s all great. And it’s better now than it’s ever been. I was struggling for 10 years to get a stop-motion movie made. Now, you can do it – no problem. 'Alice in Wonderland' premieres this month in cinemas across South Africa.

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fine art

Story & Pix Š World Press Photo

d worl

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photo


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The annual World Press Photo Contest is the most prestigious and largest press photography contest worldwide. Each year the competition honours those photojournalists who create and capture extraordinary, insightful and beautiful images.


fine art 8

World Press Photo is most well known for organising the World Press Photo Contest. Since its inception in 1955, some of the images that have been on display at the event have become iconic – a naked girl running after a napalm attack in Vietnam; a Buddhist monk who has set himself alight; a sole demonstrator standing in front of tanks on Tiananmen Square. Others have set

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trends and established styles of press photography that can be seen re-emerging in years to come. In addition to the contest, the prize-winning photographs are assembled into the world’s widest ranging exhibition that is visited by over two million people in some 45 countries worldwide. A yearbook presenting all prize-winning entries is also published annually in six languages. While the competition is at the core of the non-profit organisation’s activities, World Press Photo is also deeply concerned with stimulating developments in photojournalism and encouraging transfer of knowledge. With this in mind, they organise the annual Joop Swart Masterclass as well as seminars, workshops and other educational projects all over the world. The 2009 exhibition is currently still on tour, while the 2010 exhibition will kick off in Amsterdam in April. For more information on the awards and the organisation, go to www. worldpressphoto.org.


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World Press Photo is also deeply concerned with stimulating

developments in photojournalism and encouraging

transfer of knowledge

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fine art 14 15 1.

© Pietro Masturzo, Italy. Women in Tehran, Iran shout from a rooftop in protest against the regime.

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© Gihan Tubbeh, Peru.. Adrian, 13-year old autist.

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© Annie van Gemert, the Netherlands. An image from the photostory entitled Boys and girls.

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© Gareth Copley, United Kingdom, Press Association. England's Jonathan Trott dives in vain as he is run out by Australia's Simon Katich during the fifth Ashes test match at Oval, London.

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© Robert Gauthier, USA, Los Angeles Times. Yankee fans try to distract Angels left fielder Juan Rivera, Yankee Stadium.

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© Kent Klich, Sweden. Gaza photo album: Tuzzah, Gaza Strip.

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© Kitra Cahana, Canada, Fabrica for Colors. An image from the photostory entitled Rainbowland, New Mexico.

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© David Guttenfelder, USA, The Associated Press. US soldiers respond to Taliban fire outside their bunker, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan.

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©

Walter

Astrada,

Argentina,

Agence

France-Presse.

Bloodbath

in Madagascar. 10.

© Stefano De Luigi, Italy, VII Network for Le Monde Magazine. Giraffe killed by drought, northeast Kenya, September.

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© Donald Miralle, Jr. USA. Ironman World Championships, Hawaii.

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© Joe Petersburger, Hungary, National Geographic Image Collection. Hunting kingfisher, Hungary.

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© Paul Nicklen, Canada, National Geographic. South Georgia, Antarctica.

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© Elizabeth Kreutz, USA. Lance Armstrong's comeback.

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© Charles Ommanney, United Kingdom, Getty Images for Newsweek.

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© Malick Sidibé, Mali, for The New York Times Magazine. Fashion portfolio: Prints and the Revolution, Mali.

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Story by Wilma den Hartigh, Pix © iStockphoto.com

stolen Are you at risk? When it comes to being a victim of crime, most of us don’t consider identity theft a major risk. We secure our homes with burglar bars and alarm systems, lock away our belongings, and take precautions when it comes to personal safety. But what are you doing to prevent your private information from being used for criminal purposes? We’ve all heard stories about identity theft – a colleague discovering that he shares an identity number with another person, or someone being erroneously blacklisted. In what has been called the most daring case of identity theft yet, a man in San Francisco is currently being prosecuted for stealing 130 million debit and credit card numbers online in the USA over the past two years. It always seems like something that happens to “other people”, but everyone is at risk. Identity theft is one of the fastest

growing crimes globally. In South Africa it is becoming a crime of choice, particularly among white collar criminals, as it is so easy to execute. All countries are targeted, but evidence suggests that identity theft increases during times of economic stress. According to Costin Raiu, chief security expert at Kaspersky Lab, a developer of secure content management solutions, people are most vulnerable when they experience financial difficulty. “You will find more identity crime wherever there are unemployed people looking for a quick way to make money,” he says. Pat Cunningham, executive director of the Southern African Fraud Prevention Service (SAFPS), says that identity theft has become so prevalent in South Africa because its identity book system is outdated and alterations or copies are easy to make. With technological advances, it is also easy to manufacture false documents at home to support applications for goods or services. Shehnaz Somers, head of Personal Lines Underwriting at Santam, says that obtaining ID documents is still the most common way for criminals to steal identities in South Africa. A Cape Town magazine journalist realised that he had fallen prey to identity fraud when he experienced difficulty in renewing his passport. He was unknowingly sharing his identity with another man for ten years, apparently a resident from another African country living in South Africa. “I can’t describe how shocked I was,” he says. It took just short of 12

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feature months to set right his stolen identity. No criminal offence had been committed in his name, but others aren’t so lucky. Victims suffer serious trauma and some are wrongly arrested and struggle to remove bad debt reports from official records and credit bureaus. You may even find yourself married to someone you’ve never met. South Africans shouldn’t be afraid, though, experts say. “Be aware that somebody out there will use your identity, if you give them a chance. Don’t give them that chance,” Cunningham says. Peter Dempsey, deputy CEO of the Association for Savings and Investment South Africa (ASISA), says criminals are becoming more sophisticated. A pay slip or bank statement can provide an experienced identity thief with enough information to perpetrate fraud in your name. Regularly check pay slips and bank account statements to make sure all deductions are authorised. Suspicious deductions must be reported to the company making deductions and your bank. The SAFPS recommends that people conduct bi-annual credit profile checks. “If there is something on the report that you know nothing about, follow it up,” Cunningham says. Be aware when using ATMs, particularly in high traffic areas such as airports and conference centres. “These are a greater risk because people with higher bank balances are likely to draw money here,” Raiu says. Before using an ATM, push all the buttons and the screen to ensure they have not been tampered with. “I once did this and the display fell backwards into the machine!” he says. Another major trend is to steal consumer data through Internet skimming, wireless hacking and phishing. Raiu says even social networks such as Facebook are becoming easy targets for criminals.“There are estimates that the cybercrime industry makes more money than security companies selling services

and technology,” he says. Users of social networks should only accept friendship requests from people they know. “If the person can’t tell you where you met, then it is a scam,” he says. Don’t publish personal information such as your residential address and birth date. Identity fraudsters can steal your identity from kilometres away, not to mention from another country, but if you are on guard you are less likely to become a victim.

Stay Protected • Don't give your personal details, credit card numbers and PIN numbers over the phone, the Internet or anywhere else. • Don’t let anyone make copies of your ID document unnecessarily. • Don’t shop online with your credit card unless through a reputable payment gateway. A good tip is to look for a “thawte certified” button which will verify the site as secure. • If your ID book is stolen or lost, or if you have been a victim of impersonation, contact the SAFPS to register for its free Protective Registration service. (www.safps.org.za) • Never let your credit card out of sight when shopping at retailers or paying at restaurants. • You can verify your ID status on the Home Affairs website (www.dha.gov.za) to make sure you are registered as “alive” and not “deceased”. • Ensure that your computer runs the latest security updates for all applications.


Story by Nicky Furniss, Pic © Shongweni Brewery, The Zululand Brewing Co

oute

Beer R l a t a N u l u Z a The Kw Beer is serious business in KwaZuluNatal. If the Western Cape worships the culture of the vine, then Natal bows down to the good old keg, a draft pump and a head of froth. Beer lovers from all over the country have the opportunity to don a pair of beer goggles and breathe in the heady aroma of barley and hops on KZN’s very own Beer Route.

The Big Guns There isn’t a beer drinker in this country who doesn’t have the granddaddy of South African beer – South African Breweries (SAB Ltd.) – to thank for much of their beer-drinking pleasure, and so it seems fitting to start one’s tour at the SAB Prospecton Brewery in Durban. Founded in 1895, SAB Ltd. is the historical birthplace of SABMiller plc. – one of the world’s argest brewers. The Prospecton Brewery (one of seven SAB breweries dotted around the country) was opened in 1974, but is now one of the most modern breweries in the southern hemisphere, producing more than 400 million litres of such favourites as Castle Lager, Hansa Pilsner and Carling Black Label every year. The brewery runs two tours daily from Tuesdays to Fridays, which includes a video on the beer making process and a tour around the brewing and packaging sections of the brewery, with an ice cold beer or two waiting for you to enjoy at the end.

For the Connoisseurs Travelling inland, the coast rises up to meet the Valley of a Thousand Hills, home to the Shongweni Brewery that – with its picturesque surrounds www.1time.co.za

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feature

Part of the beer brewing process.

of rippling green sugar cane fields and a full sea view in the distance – promises visitors “Beer with a View”. A relative newcomer to the SA beer industry, Shongweni’s range of Robson’s beers is already drawing accolades and critical acclaim from beer connoisseurs both locally and abroad. Owners and brewers Sherene and Stuart Robson believe this is because their brewing process is completely unlike anything else currently available in South Africa. Not only is their beer made of only natural ingredients, but it is also unfiltered, unpasteurised and has no artificial carbonation. In fact, Robson’s is made more like a champagne than a traditional beer in that a small amount of brewer’s yeast is bottled with the beer, allowing for a secondary fermentation in the bottle. As a result, Robson’s beer matures with age – just like your favourite wine – allowing for a more complex variety of flavours and making it ideal for pairing with different foods. Sherene and Stuart brew a range of five different types of beer – inspired by great brewing styles from around the world. The East Coast Ale is a South African-inspired lager of the pilsner style; the Durban Pale Ale is a stronger, full-bodied beer, and the West Coast Ale is made in the Californian style. They also make a Wheat Beer in the German Weissbier tradition, as well as a variety of seasonal fruit beers (strawberry, mango and pineapple) inspired by Belgian brewers. The brewery offers tours on Saturday afternoons (booking essential) and has beer available for purchase from its shop from 09h00 to 12h30 Monday to Saturday. It’s worth the drive out here to revel in the view and hear the delicious fizz as you crack open a bottle of Robson’s.

Petite but Popular When the mist rolls down from the Drakensberg, blanketing the Natal Midlands and setting the evening temperatures plummeting, roaring fires, quaint thatched buildings and welcoming laughter-filled pubs ensure that beer drinking is a favourite activity here. And nowhere more so than at the Nottingham Road Brewery. Part of the Rawdons Estate, this popular micro brewery greets its visitors with the enticing aroma of hops and the glint of the shiny copper vats that are used for brewing their range of naturally brewed ales and lagers. From the full Pickled Pig Porter, to the Pye-Eyed Possum Pilsner with its rich bitter flavour, the light Tiddly Toad Lager and

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The spectacular view over the Valley of a Thousand Hills from the Shongweni Brewery.

the invigorating Whistling Weasel Pale Ale, there is a beer here to suit most tastes. The beer labels, with their comical animal characters, are also a favourite of this brewery, and fun branded gifts (t-shirts, caps, aprons and stuffed toys) are available from the shop. They serve as a wonderful reminder of your trip to the land where breweries dot the landscape, the beer list is always more important than the wine list and where the amber liquid always flows free and fast. Cheers!

Brewery Contact Details SAB, Prospecton: Contact +27 31 910 1111 for more information on brewery tours. Shongweni Brewery: Call +27 31 769 2061, email realbeer@shongwenibrewery.com, or visit www.robsonsbeer. com for more information. Nottingham Road Brewery: Phone +27 33 266 6728, email breweries@rawdons.co.za or visit www.rawdons.co.za for more information. The Zululand Brewery Co: Located at The George Hotel in Eshowe, this is the smallest brewery on the KZN Beer Route, but the owners’ enthusiasm and love of beer easily make up for its size. Phone +27 82 775 9998 or email richard@eshowe.com for more information. The Congella Brewery: Based in Durban, this brewery lays claim to the title of the world’s largest sorghum brewery with a production of seven to nine million litres annually. Guided tours of the brewery are available. Phone +27 31 205 5311 for more information.


destination guide

Compiled by Tshepi Matloga, Pic © SA Tourism

GO TO

n o d n o l ast e With the family

Known to locals as Buffalo City, East London is the sixth biggest city in the country and is home to the only river harbour in South Africa. In this edition we look at some educational, informative and fun excursions for the family to enjoy here.

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East London Museum

Visit the East London Natural History museum and marvel at one of nature’s most remarkable fish – the coelacanth. This prehistoric fish lived in the Indian Ocean for 400 million years. Thought to be extinct, a living coelacanth was discovered in South Africa in 1938. The museum is also home to the only dodo eggs in existence. A visit to the museum is entertaining and educational. For more information contact +27 43 743 0686.

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East London Aquarium

This is the oldest public aquarium in the country and while it is quite small, it still houses a variety of unique displays. It is home to stars such as Guido and Molly, two male penguins who are raising a chick together. Look out for the whale watching deck, which offers uninterrupted hours of whale watching free of charge. Contact Slain Tinley on +27 43 705 2636 or visit www.elaquarium.co.za for more.

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Khayalabantu Cultural Village

Explore the sacred rituals and the daily way of life of the local Xhosa people with mama Tofu and her daughter Zinzi as your tour guides. You’ll learn about the life of a sangoma (traditional healer), taste traditional beer at the chief ’s burial site and witness a display of stick fighting. For more information, call +27 43 851 1011 or go to www.khayalabantu.co.za.

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Steve Biko Garden of Remembrance

Every part of South Africa has a history to tell about its part in the fight against Apartheid, and so does East London. Formerly known as the Gingseng Garden Cemetery, the Steve Biko Garden of Remembrance is now a national monument. It is also a resting place for the famous Black consciousness movement leader who was killed in police custody during Apartheid, as well as for the victims of the Bisho Massacre. Contact +27 43 642 1177 for more.


travel

Story by Nicky Furniss, Pix © African Sun Limited

The Two Faces of

Victoria Falls

Since David Livingstone “discovered” and named the Victoria Falls in 1855, this breathtaking natural wonder of the world has been a definite must-see on the bucket lists of would-be explorers, adventurers and tourists. Straddling the border between Zimbabwe and Zambia, each country offers not only a unique view of the falls itself, but also a unique holiday destination.

The Victoria Falls Hotel

The Old When the Cape to Cairo railway finally reached the falls in 1905, it brought with it a host of visitors keen to experience the best of colonial Africa and to see Livingstone’s discovery for themselves. In the following hundred years, they succeeded in making the little town of Victoria Falls Zimbabwe’s most visited. But despite its boom, the town to this day retains a certain old world, colonial charm. At the centre of this, is the classic grande dame of the Victoria Falls Hotel, which, since its opening in 1904, has welcomed everyday travellers, statesmen and royalty with

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equal charm and grace.The hotel lives and breathes its history, and a little exploration reveals corridors literally wallpapered with quaint old photos of the hotel’s colonial past. Each of the hotel’s 161 rooms retain the décor and feel of a bygone era, while also boasting many of the mod cons that modern guests have become accustomed to. The hotel’s lush gardens offer pretty views, while those lucky enough to stay in rooms facing the falls are rewarded by the magnificent view of the Victoria Falls Bridge with the plume of “smoke” rising up behind it – a view for which the hotel is almost as famous for as it is for its gracious hospitality.


The Victoria Falls Hotel

Silver stands with scones and cucumber sandwiches – as well as its signature view – have made afternoon tea at the Victoria Falls Hotel an institution, not only for hotel guests but for most visitors to the town. Sipping on the hotel’s delicious signature cocktail, the “I Presume”, as dusk falls is another memorable must do, while dining in the Edwardian Livingstone Room with its high vaulted ceilings, classic candlelit table settings and tinkling grand piano is a wonderful trip back to a time when every meal was an occasion. A pathway at the front of the hotel leads one on an easy walk to the falls, while the hotel’s concierge service is happy to arrange other activities around the town, ranging from sedate river cruises and games of golf to safaris on elephant back, gorge swings and jet boating for the more adventurous. For generations, a trip to Victoria Falls has been about the spirit of African adventure and the romance of the “grand tour”, and nowhere is this more elegantly epitomised than at the Victoria Falls Hotel.

The New

While Victoria Falls still basks in its colonial glory days, major tourist development only came to its Zambian counterpart, Livingstone, much later. As a result, the town buzzes with new shop fronts and an enticing energy that is truly African. One of the area’s newest additions is the five star Royal Chundu Zambezi River Lodge, perfectly positioned along an untouched stretch of the Zambezi River. To make the most of its spectacular river views, floor-to-ceiling windows in each of the elevated walkway-connected suites flood the rooms with

Royal Chundu Zambezi River Lodge

light, and allow guests to watch pods of harrumphing hippos and the flash dance of malachite kingfishers from the comfort of their own beds. In the lodge’s communal area, wooden decks and the river-facing infinity pool encourage guests, once again, to soak up the view. For the ultimate luxury getaway, though, a short boat ride upriver takes guests to their own private island, where outdoor bath tubs, sumptuous furnishings and private balconies add an extra touch of romance and glamour to the Island Suites. For those who can tear themselves away from their loungers, canoe trips, fishing and game viewing trips offer guests the chance to get even more intimately acquainted with the lodge’s glorious natural surroundings. No trip to Livingstone would be complete without at least one trip to marvel at the sheer volume of water that cascades over the Victoria Falls. Standing in the middle of the Victoria Falls Bridge, with the Zambezi River roaring far beneath your feet, you straddle the divide that separates two countries and two completely different experiences – the old and the new, the colonial and the African. An iconic destination that is unmatched by any other in Southern African, Victoria Falls offers a unique face to each visitor and an experience to enthral all. The Victoria Falls Hotel in Zimbabwe and Royal Chundu Zambezi River Lodge in Zambia are both run by African Sun Limited. For further information or reservations, contact African Sun Limited on +27 11 442 0488, email info@africansunhotels.com or visit www.africansunhotels.com.

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Story by Lesley Stones, Pix Š Lesley Stones

travel

the secret If your home will never be quite complete without a statue of Buddha that sparkles like a disco mirror ball,I know just where to buy one. You need to go shopping at 44 Stanley in Milpark, on the fringe of central Johannesburg.

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This lovely shopping area would feel perfectly normal anywhere in Europe, but it’s decidedly quaint in this country of soulless shopping malls and repetitive franchises. It’s been going strong for six years now, proving that there’s a real demand for the oddball and eclectic items that are on sale. You can buy some more practical things too, but they’re not quite as amusing and I almost regretted flinging out my warped Bowie albums when I saw a collection of carefully restored old gramophones in a shop called Vintage Cowboys. Its owner, Colin Davids, says 44 Stanley’s mixture of shops, restaurants, tenants and customers is “like a jigsaw mix where all the pieces fit together”. The area was created in an abandoned workshop once used by Auto Mobile, and its industrial past gives all the shops interesting shapes to work around.The unusual layout includes twin courtyards housing open-air cafes, while little side alleys lead into quieter corners. You can order a meal, sit in the sun surrounded by trees and shrubs, and leaf through a book you just picked up at L’Elephant Terrible, a Dickensian style bookshop run by Wolf Weinek, who looks like a character straight out of one of his European classics. There’s a story behind the name of his shop, of course, but go and hear Wolf tell the tale with his Austrian accent. Wolf got the lease on his bookshop because the shop is small and poky, making it ideal for an enchanting bookshop, but unworkable for anyone trying to manufacture anything. Fashion designer Tiaan Nagel waited for ages for larger


travel premises to become available so he could create his outfits at a studio in the back and sell them from a showroom at the front. “This is such a cool environment because a lot of creative people like designers and directors frequent the place, and they’re our kind of customers. It’s got a nice urban edge to it – it’s not a contrived and glossy shopping mall,” he says. Tiaan believes 44 Stanley is perfect because it’s a destination in itself, not just a place to go to tick off a shopping list. He designs his clothes for sophisticated ladies aged 25 to 45 who appreciate something “left of centre but not too avant garde”. They’re the type of ladies who meet at 44 Stanley for lattes on a Saturday morning at the Salvation Café, which is run by Claudia Giannoccaro. She’s nicknamed “The Salty Chef ” because she used to cook for the rich and famous on their luxury yachts. Now that she’s a landlubber, we can all eat like rock stars without getting seasick. I order a Salvation Smoothie and find this is no fat-free goody-two-shoes version. This is a delicious creation of thick yoghurt, honey, berries and paw-paw that tones your cheekbones with the effort needed to suck it up the straw. As I explore some more, I realise that none of the tenants are likely to get rich in these Bohemian buildings, but that’s probably the whole point. They’re here to be artistic and creative, not commercial and money grabbing.

I follow a strong coffee aroma and walk into Bean There, where a roaster is grinding up coffee so fresh that you get a caffeine kick just by inhaling. In a nearby corner there’s an ATM, in case you can’t resist splurging on a Vespa from Vintage Cowboys or buying a chic and unusual outfit from one of the designer clothes shops. Walk a little further and you find the second courtyard filled with tables spilling out of Il Giardino restaurant. This is one of the few outlets keen to keep 44 Stanley buzzing in the evenings. At the moment it’s very much a daytime destination, but another lounge bar is opening soon and there are plans to make 44 Stanley an evening venue in time for the 2010

T h e r e ’ s a r e a l d e m an d f o r the oddball and eclectic i t e m s t h at a r e o n s a l e .

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World Cup. I hope it works, because it would be excellent to see another part of Joburg reclaimed as part of the urban nightlife scene. The whole area has become so popular that Pirelli has even opened a showroom. Even Nino’s has set up a restaurant outside, perhaps to offer some comforting familiarity to anyone who feels a little disoriented to discover so much innovation. For more, go to www.44stanley.co.za.


Story & Pix © Peermont

TRAVEL

Where Business meets

The prestigious Gaborone International Convention Centre at The Grand Palm

The Department of Trade and Industry has identified business travel as a niche tourism segment for South Africa. Not only do international business tourists see South Africa as a popular, value for money destination, but local business travellers are also seeking out destinations that offer world class facilities. Peermont, South Africa’s most empowered hospitality and gaming group, is on track to meet this demand. With nine resorts in Southern Africa and five in Botswana, the group offers superlative business facilities together with exciting and convenient leisure and entertainment options. “In today’s hectic corporate world business travellers want to stay in a resort that offers world class business facilities, premium safety standards, and a chance to relax and unwind from work pressures. All our properties are situated close to business hubs and have unique venues that are ideal for business lunches and entertainment,” says Mark Jakins, Chief Commercial Officer. Emperors Palace, Peermont’s flagship property, is located five minutes away from O.R. Tambo International Airport. From the five star D’oreale Grande hotel to the four star Peermont Mondior hotel and the three star Peermont Metcourt Suites and Peermont Metcourt hotel, these hotels set a new standard in business and conference accommodation. Rooms at the D’oreale Grande come complete with a business panel offering the latest technology and Wi-Fi connection.The hotel’s convention facilities provide a range of venues, from intimate breakaway rooms to a state-of-the-art grand banqueting hall. After a hard day’s work, business travellers can enjoy unparalleled entertainment and dining at the new Entertainment Emporium, or visit the Emperors Palace Casino. The Gaborone International Convention Centre (GICC) at The Grand Palm Hotel, Casino and Convention Resort in

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Botswana hosts numerous high profile events for groups ranging from 20 to 1,800 delegates. The four star Peermont Walmont Hotel, which is part of the resort, has an executive floor providing business travellers with a business lounge, executive boardroom and other business facilities. Khoroni Hotel, Casino and Convention Resort in Thohoyandou, Limpopo, hosts a dedicated business centre with a range of venues, fully equipped with the latest technology. In Klerksdorp, the Rio Hotel, Casino and Convention Resort boasts a newly opened conference centre that can accommodate 400 delegates, and an elegant executive boardroom that can be used for smaller meetings. For those business travellers wanting a bit of sand and sea, the exclusive Peermont Mondazur Resort Hotel on the KwaZulu-Natal South Coast is one of the most desired locations in the Peermont portfolio, with a state of the art business centre. For bookings and more information, visit www.peermont.com or call 0860 777 900.


photography

Story by Christel Liebenberg, Pix © Lizelle Lotter

lo v e She might only be 27 years old and may not have said her own “I do’s” yet, but this vibrant wedding photographer has wisdom, insight and the ability to capture intimate moments on film. Her name is Lizelle Lotter, and I met up with her to find out just what goes on in the world of a wedding photographer.

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Lizelle grew up on a farm in the beautiful Overberg town of Caledon and has always seen the world around her as snapshots in her mind’s eye. She’s had a keen interest in photography since early childhood, but only actively started pursuing this hobby once she had saved enough pocket money to buy her first mik-en-druk (point and shoot) camera and had the cash to pay for development. Although Lizelle initially intended to focus on conceptual and documentary photography, she had a change of heart while working as an assistant and second shoot for a wedding photographer during her studies.With Lizelle, the heart is what it’s all about. She sets out to capture the emotions the bridal couple, their family and friends experience throughout the day in a split second click of the lens. If you visit her website (www.lizellelotter.co.za) and read her blog, it becomes clear that the brides and grooms she has photographed have often become friends. Her website is refreshing and fun – exactly as she intended it to be. “It is important that your website reflects your personality and style in order to attract the kind of people most likely to match your personality,” stresses Lizelle. “As a wedding photographer, you spend most of the day with the bride – often in her intimate and personal space while she is getting ready for the ceremony – and it is extremely important that she is completely comfortable with you.” She emphasises that although she’s easily touched emotionally by wedding photography, it is still a business that has to be run professionally in order to meet client expectations. “Through my website I tend to attract like-minded people and most of the time it feels as if I’m linking up with old friends when we meet to plan the shoot schedule for the wedding day. Couples often don’t realise how much they add to the creative

process through the positive energy that comes with young love. I love seeing people in love and make mental notes of the small gestures that I hope to catch on film on the day of the wedding,” says Lizelle with a smile. It is clear that this free spirited woman, who has photographed bridal parties as far away as Denver, Colorado, loves the art of photography and has the ability to find inspiration in hidden corners. Adventure excites her and Lizelle enjoys shooting in new locations, because to her the unknown is a treasure chest filled with opportunity On a more practical note, I also wanted to know what makes a good wedding photographer, and whether Lizelle had any words of advice for prospective brides looking to appoint a wedding photographer? Lizelle stresses that there are so many key factors that play a role, that it is quite difficult to single out anything in particular. A good eye and technical know-how are as important as your personality, a positive mindset and reliability. “A wedding photographer can cost anything between R3,000 and R30,000, so it is important to make sure you pick the right person for you. Ensure that you don’t only view icon shots provided by photographers, but ask to see a complete wedding to get a feel of their style and technique. When discussing costs, be clear on the breakdown of any potential hidden costs you might not budget for, such as travel and accommodation. Proper back-up facilities are also non-negotiable.” Making the right decision when it comes to your wedding photographer will guarantee that you are left with beautiful images to remember your big day. Visit Lizelle’s website at www.lizellelotter.co.za. Email her on hello@lizellelotter.co.za or call her during office hours on +27 76 548 1007.

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entertainment

Story by Laura Cooke, Images © Jonx Pillemer

it up Breakfast Included Breakfast Included has been a favourite on the South African jazz scene for over a decade. With two critically acclaimed albums under their belt and a host of phenomenal individual achievements between them, they combine musical excellence with a fresh, vibrant attitude. abouTime got to know a little bit more about Breakfast Included by chatting to Jason Reolon, one of the co-founders of the band. Q. Breakfast Included has been around since 1999, but has undergone quite a few changes along the way. Tell us a bit about how the band has evolved over the last 10 years. A. Has it been 10 years? Wow, it’s been an amazing journey so far. Yet somehow it still feels like we are at the beginning of it all, which is exciting. We’ve recorded and released great albums, performed on amazing stages and festivals, collaborated with incredible artists and shared our music with many audiences; it’s sometimes hard to recall what happened when. Our sound has matured, we’ve gained a wealth of experience in the music business as a whole, we've refined our style, and our approach to music has definitely developed and evolved. As bandleaders myself (Jason Reolon) and Shaun Michau have always worked passionately to further the Breakfast Included vision, concept and reputation, and are very fortunate to work with the calibre of artists that we have in the band. Q. Breakfast Included has quite a unique approach to performing? Tell us about this? A. Music is one form of art. Performing that music is an art in itself and we treat each gig as a new canvas. As jazz artists, we try not to plan or overthink our songs too much. We rather let them evolve organically on stage. We find this approach allows for a certain spontaneity which gives each performance a unique and fresh feel. Q. How would you describe your sound? A. It’s groovy. It’s hip. It’s organic. It’s jazz at its coolest. It’s proudly South African with a whole lotta soul! Q. Does Breakfast Included write all their own music, or do you also perform covers? A. Yes and yes! As well as writing and performing our own music, we take pride in our ability to rework well known jazz standards and present them in our own unique way, giving them our Breakfast Included flavour – that’s essentially what serious jazz groups do around the world.

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Q. Tell us about the variety of musicians who make up Breakfast Included? A. It’s such a pleasure to look around at your band when on stage or at a rehearsal and realise that you’re surrounded by such phenomenal musicians. Each individual is established, accomplished and respected in their own right. The best part about this group of artists is the absence of ego, which is the essential ingredient to any successful band. I play piano and run the band along with class-act drummer and long time friend Shaun Michau. Shaun and I were two of the original co-founders of Breakfast Included back in 1999. As for the rest of the band: We have the awesome and highly respected Wesley Rustin on double bass, renowned saxophone legend, Buddy Wells, and we’re really excited to be showcasing two sensational vocalists, Nomfundo Xaluva and Haydn Gardner. What a treat to work with each one of these humble stars. Q. I know you collaborate with a number of notable South African musicians; what is the advantage of bringing in different artists to the band? A. Collaborating with other musicians is always fun, it pushes you as an artist to perform differently, it takes you out of your comfort zone, stretches your musicality, exposes you to other styles, approaches and ideas. Q.You’ve performed at a wide variety of venues and events. What have been some of your most memorable performances? A. Performing on the North Sea International Jazz Festival was definitely a highlight along with performing to a packed Kirstenbosch Sunset Concert. Q. In the past Breakfast Included has brought out a number of successful albums. Are you planning on bringing out a new one? A. Absolutely, we are currently working on an exciting new third album. Watch this space! Q.Who are some of your influences? A. Bill Evans, Sting, Miles Davis, Joshua Redman, Herbert, Brad Mehldau, John Mayer, James Brown, Thelonius Monk, Winston Mankunku Ngozi, Harry Connick Junior, Sonny Rollins, Herbie Hancock, Chet Baker, Diana Krall, Prince, Relax, Keith Jarrett. Q.Who are some of your favourite South African bands? A. Bed on Bricks, Reality Radio, Offshore, Rudimentals, Beatenberg, Merseystate. Q.What are the band’s plans for the year ahead? A. We’re excited about the FIFA World Cup, as we’ll have opportunities to perform to our visitors from around the world and show them what South African jazz artists are all about. We have also just launched our new website which features our new band concept, new sound clips, new everything – very exciting! Go check it out at www.breakfastincluded.co.za. www.1time.co.za

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column

Story by Baglett, Pix © iStockphoto.com

one

town

Piet Retief, porches and bovine alarm clocks My favourite town in South Africa has always been Matjiesfontein in the Little Karoo. I have fond memories of staying in the Olive Schreiner cottage where my dad convinced me she not only wrote her novels, but also croaked and her ghost still haunted the room. As I got older, I spent my days in the old English pub attached to the hotel when, after enough drinks, I was pretty convinced I was having drinks with Olive Schreiner herself. As one-street towns go, Matjiesfontein is the bomb, but I have to admit it's got some competition from Riebeek East. I wasn't sure what to expect of the town I couldn't find on Wikipedia, but since it was next door to Grahamstown, I pictured hot student types who harvested crops by day (shirtless) and then joined me at the local pub for drinks (still shirtless). My stay was going to be romantic and dreamy. When I saw the sign for Riebeek East and hit a dirt road, I became suspicious. Assuming I had taken a back road, I stopped to ask a passer-by. He was neither hot nor shirtless, but toothless. I enquired as to where the “high street of Riebeek East” was. “You're on it,” he said. As the road got bumpier and my cellphone signal weaker, I pulled up to the Mooimeisies guest house. It was more charming than a lecture hall full of shirtless men studying charm. I was taken to the wraparound porch where I was given a glass of wine (good thinking), and found I had inadvertently joined the daily ritual of Riebeek East: Sitting on the porch drinking wine and watching the world go by. After I was given home made cheese and marmalade, I was planning early retirement and enquired about available property in the area. Had I been able to afford it (unlikely), I could have bought Piet

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Retief's house which was surrounded by mountains and forest. I was offered a walk up the mountain to Piet Retief's baths, but since I had been driving from Jo'burg, I was more interested in the large welcoming baths of the guest house. I enquired as to where the restaurants were and I was told I was in it. After a braai with the locals accompanied by flowing red wine and an amazing Piet Retief sunset, I fell into the luxurious bed with the stray cat I had smuggled into my room. At 10h00, had a cow not stuck his nose through my curtains, I would have slept until lunch time. A full English breakfast later and following a shopping spree of local jewellery, jams and mosaic art, I was back in my car with the entire town waving me off. As I drove off and a springbok walked across the zebra crossing, I came to the conclusion that ol' Piet Retief knew what he was doing when he settled in Riebeek East – he wasn't going to do a lot but damn, he was going to enjoy doing it.

Why you'll love it • A cow is your alarm clock • You have the urge to say “Met ys ja, met ys” • An old bakkie drives past every four hours and it’s considered rush hour

Who is Baglett? She’s a 20-something girl who doesn’t take life too seriously. Read her blog at www.baglett.blogspot.com.


Story by Peter Raath, Pix © Alessandra Raath

r e c c SA So A History

South African soccer, which has one of the most fascinating histories in the world, has grown enormously from its humble 19th Century beginnings. With the country about to host the FIFA 2010 World Cup, there is no better time to turn the clock back and find out where it all began for the “Beautiful Game”.

The Early Days The first recorded football match in South Africa took place in May 1862 at Por t Elizabeth’s Donkin Reserve. Here a Home Born XI and a Colonial Born XI – with the men dressed in long trousers, long-sleeved shir ts and hats – battled it out. 20 years on, in 1882, at the London Restaurant in Durban’s West Street, the Natal Football Association (FA) formed, while ten years later, the South African FA (SAFA) came into being together with the popular inter-provincial Currie Cup competition. This century also saw bir th of the whites-only soccer Springboks, who in 1897 lost all three “test” matches to the mighty Corinthians of England – the first foreign football team to visit our shores. After the turn of the 20th Century, as the popularity of the spor t grew, so did the links with Britain and they were responsible for sending numerous sides on tour to South Africa. However, it took a long time before local teams were able to match the craftiness of outfits like the English FA XI, Aberdeen and

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sport Motherwell. They created havoc by scoring hundreds of goals, while our provincial sides and the Boks wilted far too easily in the face of this superior opposition. For example, in 1910, the English slaughtered Western Province 13-0, ten years later the Boks were hammered 9-1 and just before the outbreak of World War II they lost another test 8-2.

Apartheid Damages Soccer

Perhaps if players of “colour” had been allowed to participate in these impor tant games, the results would have been very different. But the structure of soccer and society was different in those days and skin colour divided soccer as much as the rest of society, even in the early years. In later years, with the imposition of Apar theid’s Group Areas Act in 1950, many black clubs were literally torn apart by government bulldozers when thousands of so-called “non-Europeans” were expelled from their residential areas. Naughty Boys FC, a team of renowned ball ar tists, had to disband when players were dispersed to the Soweto district of Meadowlands and although some outfits were able to regroup, others like Western Rangers, Blackpool United and Ferreirstown Dynamos met their demise.

The Growth of Professionalism

Professionalism burst onto the local scene in 1959 with the whites-only National Football League (NFL), taking soccer to a new level.

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Prior to this, talented amateur clubs like Wanderers, Rangers and Marist Brothers had spectators flocking to grounds. This trend continued throughout the 1960s, but during the 1970s sponsors switched to the ever-growing black side of the spor t – resulting in the collapse of the NFL in 1977. Some of the famous semi-professional clubs that made good impressions during the 1970s included Hellenic, Cape Town City, Durban City, Durban United and Arcadia Shepherds. In 1978, a few joined forces with the likes of AmaZulu, Orlando Pirates and Kaizer Chiefs under the umbrella of the National Professional Soccer League, while clubs like Cape Town Spurs, Berea and Manning Rangers campaigned in the Federation Professional League.

Historic Moment

Earlier, on 9th July 1973, a poignant moment in the 111 year history of South African soccer was achieved when a SA Black XI with stars such as Joseph “Banks” Setlhodi, Lucas “Masterpieces” Moripe, Ephraim “Jomo” Sono and Kaizer “Boy Boy” Motaung hosted the boycott-busting British All Stars in Soweto. “I really believe our game in Soweto was the turning point in black football,” says former Kaizer Chiefs goalkeeper Setlhodi, who made some spectacular saves that day.


“I was motivated by the fact that the All Stars were not only the first white side to play in Soweto, but that they were a team from England which included stars who’d won the 1966 World Cup. “A few days earlier, we had seen them hammer the white side 3-0 and wanted to compare ourselves. We used to watch whites playing – they were predictable, didn’t have the skills like us. “After the match people star ted to believe in us, understand that we could really compete and we had a long chat in the dressing room with the British guys, who made us believe in ourselves. They said ‘don’t look back; one day things will change!’”

Rejoining the International Soccer Community

On 4th July 1992, this is exactly what happened when FIFA re-admitted SAFA into its fold, allowing for the birth of our new national team, Bafana Bafana. They went on to capture the prestigious African Cup of Nations in 1996, but have fallen from grace in recent years and, significantly, are the lowest FIFA-ranked team ever to host a World Cup tournament. Bafana drew in the same group as Mexico, Uruguay and France – the latter two past winners of this tournament will have their work cut out trying to get past the opening round and into the knockout stages. Even Bafana’s Brazilian coach, Carlos Alber to Parreira, who was at the helm of his own country when they won the Jules Rimet gold World Cup trophy in 1994, likens Bafana’s three opening matches to “climbing Mount Everest”. However, South Africa may well spring a surprise. After all, they have been playing football for nearly 150 years, and after suffering almost three decades of isolation, certainly deserve a place amongst the world’s best where Brazil, Italy and Germany have won the cup twelve times between themselves.


Story & Pix © Cape Town Cycle Tour Trust

n of o i t u ol v E The st Our Greate The 1978 Cycle Tour

It is midday in Cape Town and a lone man is staring intently down the road. He's lost deep in thought next to the new Cape Town Stadium. In June and July this year, it will play host to thousands of soccer fans from all over the world, but he’s not thinking about soccer. He is looking at the finish line for the March 14 th Cape Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour.

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sport

The 1978 Cycle Tour finish at Maiden's Core.

Ken Sturgeon is one of the directors of the Cape Town Cycle Tour Trust, the non-profit organisation that plans the annual Cycle Tour as well as a number of other prestigious cycling events. Sturgeon is part of a team dedicated to crafting the Cycle Tour into the event it is today – one of the world's top races, attracting 35,000 riders from all over the world. "Every year we see more riders from across the country and the world registering for the Cycle Tour. Sometimes the weather plays havoc, sometimes the route changes, but cyclists’ passion for the event never wanes." Sturgeon says it is the cycling community’s passion that makes Cycle Tour the race it is. One group of riders – affectionately known as the Magnificent Seven – have completed every single Cycle Tour to date! It all started in 1977 when Bill Mylrea and John Stegmann organised the Big Ride-In to raise awareness of the need for dedicated cycling lanes in Cape Town. The Argus newspaper came aboard as main sponsor the following year, and the name of the race was changed to the Argus Cycle Tour. By 1991 the race had grown to over 15,000 riders, and its name changed to the Cape Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour, after the retail chain took over co-sponsorship from M-Net. To accommodate the growing number of cyclists competing annually, organisers have had to adjust the route a few times over the years. The inaugural event started outside the Castle in Strand Street with the finish line in Camps Bay, a distance of 104 km. In 1981 the start of the race was moved to Hertzog Boulevard, where it remains to this day. Chapman's Peak was closed due to safety concerns exacerbated by destructive mountain fires in 2000, and it was decided to bring cyclists back along the less impressive Blue Route and through the city centre to the finish.

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Four years passed before Chappies was reopened and this sparked a veritable frenzy of entries, with almost 1,700 international entrants that year from all five continents. "The ride over Chapman's Peak is one of the most impressive parts of the race. When riders get to this stage they are exhausted, but crossing Chappies brings them into a nice downhill home stretch with one of the best views in the world. It's a profound experience for riders who may not be used to the beauty of the Cape, or those who are simply praying for some relief from the relentless climb!" says Sturgeon. Since most of the Cycle Tour route runs through a National Park and World Heritage site, the race organisers have a full environmental management plan that looks at every impact the race could have on the environment – from fire risks, traffic management and noise pollution to its new Stash Your Trash campaign. According to Sturgeon “the Cycle Tour was the first cycling event in the world to incorporate a comprehensive environmental management plan”. Today, the International Cycling Union requires all events under its patronage to have similar plans. Riders drop about 70,000 energy gel sachets along the way with each race. Apart from spoiling the beauty of the route, this also has a potentially harmful effect on the local Chacma baboon families. “The natural beauty of the Cape is such a core aspect of why people come to the race. It’s hugely important for us to minimise the Cycle Tour’s impact on the environment." When riders finish the 33rd Cape Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour this year, they will be greeted by the towering presence of the new stadium. It marks another milestone in the evolution of one of cycling’s great races – and one of South Africa’s greatest events.


events

Story & Pix © Something Different

something Event technical production steps up a notch Today technical production is vitally important for any occasion. Lighting is not just a practicality; it should be a feature in itself. Something Different gives you the freedom to customise every technical aspect of your event with bespoke lighting, slick sound systems and uniquely made staging.

The niche market of technical decor bridges the gap left And anything from structural set design to classic dance wide open by industrial technical companies, who often have floor styling can be tailor made to fit colour schemes, damaged or ugly fixtures that clash with the slick décor and stationery or the craziest of ideas. designs that people have come to expect at their events. The The constant education that Something Different provides very aesthetically driven nature of the decor industry provided to their clients and team is something very distinctive in an Something Different with the opportunity to bring a very unique industry where quality and service is not always achieved. approach to the technical side of the events market. They are a young, energetic, motivated company who “We have specialised generic lighting concepts which blow are always available for their clients. With professionalism, the competition out of the water, and our continual research and development – we means we are always thinking out of the “If you can box.” Something Different’s eager team can create it! Something works round the clock to provide the something , something excellence that is required from a technical , something … supplier. Along with power management and personalised consultations, this talented team provides clients with peace of mind on the day of their event through their professional service and expertise. experience, reliability and unique international products, Something Different also offers a range of glamorous and Something Different provides a value-for-money service exclusive lights, including custom lampshades and chandeliers that is sure to place your event one step ahead of the rest. in all shapes, sizes and styles. www.something-different.co.za

imagine it sassy, bright loud classic Something Different!

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Story by Joan Muller, Pic © Laura Cooke

The next big thing? South Africans and Europeans are rediscovering once war-ravaged Mozambique as a holiday hot spot on the back of a rapidly growing economy and a significantly improved road and tourism infrastructure.The renaissance has been led in part by new legislation introduced by Mozambique's government in 2007, allowing foreigners to buy into multiple ownership property developments. Developers have been quick to get in on the act. Over the past three years a number of upmarket leisure resorts have mushroomed in popular coastal areas such as Inhambane, Pemba,Vilanculos, Bilene, Ponta do Ouro and Benguerra Island. Prices of holiday villas in those resorts typically range between US$200,000 (R1,54 million) and $800,000 (R6,16 million), while a luxury beachfront home in a top-end development can set you back up to $2,5 million (R19,25 million). Demand for leisure property investments has taken off to such an extent that South African-based real estate agencies – such as Pam Golding Properties and RE/MAX – have recently opened their first offices in the Mozambican capital of Maputo. Banks are also keen to cash in on Mozambique's burgeoning real estate market. Absa Bank, in association with Barclays Bank in Mozambique, is currently creating a dedicated mortgage product to make it easier for South Africans to buy property there. Currently, overseas buyers have limited access to mortgage finance in Mozambique and still need to put down hefty cash deposits – typically 60% – when buying leisure property. Although foreigners aren't entitled to own land outright in Mozambique, property can be leased for a period of 50 years, renewable for another 50 years. Overseas investors also have the right to develop land. The holder of such a land title may transfer the infrastructure, buildings and improvements to buyers offshore. Therefore, the sale of leisure property in Mozambique constitutes the transfer of usage rights, similar to the share block ownership schemes used in some leisure property developments in SA. Adrian Frey, director of Pam Golding Properties Mozambique and a Swiss-qualified lawyer, says the major draw card for South African investors is the value proposition. He says property may well be priced in US dollars but holiday homes are still reasonably affordable in rand terms. As such, buying a holiday home in an upmarket resort on Mozambique's

coastline or its offshore islands is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to owning property in Plettenberg Bay, Clifton or Mauritius. Frey says the rand's current strength also makes it a good time to invest in dollar-based assets. Moreover, Mozambique's legal framework is being developed quite extensively to offer attractive incentives to South African investors, such as the recently adopted double tax treaty. Frey says a Dutch prince and SA's Human Settlements Minister Tokyo Sexwale are among a number of well-heeled dignitaries who have recently bought luxury holiday homes in Mozambique. Investment opportunities currently marketed by Pam Golding Properties include Kubali Beach Estate, in the Chidenguele area, a three-hour drive from Maputo. At this resort two-bedroom units of 170 m2 set back from the beachfront are selling off plan for R1,43 million. The same units on the beachfront cost R1,78 million. Three bedroom, 198 m2 villas range in price between R1,644 million and R1,999 million. At Praia do Paraiso, a resort just outside the town of Vilanculos in southern Mozambique, villas are selling off plan from R1 million for a two-bedroom apartment to R3,7 million for a five-bedroom beachfront house. On Benguerra Island, adjacent to Benguerra Lodge in the Bazaruto Archipelago National Park, luxury units at The Villas at Benguerra (two, three or four bedrooms sized between 400 m2 and 900 m2) start at $1,5 million (R11,55 million). Copy courtesy of Finweek. Call 0860 103 911 to subscribe.

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entertainment

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Storie deur Jacqueline Cochrane / www.jacquelinecochrane.com, Foto’s © Antonie Robertson, Sean Brand

Ons gesels met Jack Parow Jack Parow is die nuutste groot nuus in die alternatiewe Afrikaanse musiekbedryf, en sy lirieke – met tye satiries, met tye omstrede, maar altyd onweerstaanbaar skerp – vind aanklank by ’n wye gehoor. Maar wie is die rapper nou eintlik? abouTime vind uit.

Hoe behandel 2010 jou sover? Wat is op Jack Parow se kalender vir die res van die jaar? Dinge gaan mal sover – baie, baie. My kalender lyk ook lekker; baie parties, baie dronk raak en baie rap. Klink lekker. Jou album kom in Maart uit... Wat kan fans verwag? Dit gaan die gevaarlikste album wees wat Suid Afrika nog getref het... wees gereed. Dit sal in Maart die rakke slaat ja, so teen die einde, en sal beskikbaar wees by alle goeie en slegte musiekwinkels, asook op die interweb. En dit word gelaunch met ’n paar next level secret goed wat alles net nog fancier gaan maak. So, hoekom in Afrikaans rap? Hoekom nie? Dis die beste taal wat bestaan. Ek is mal daaroor – ek kan nie dink om ooit weer nie Afrikaans in my musiek te hê nie. Ek kry nou record deals uit Europa, Amerika en Australië, en meeste van hulle verstaan nie eers wat ek sê nie. So ja, Afrikaans is die koning en dit word nou bewys. Wanneer, en hoe, het jy besef dat rap en musiekmaak jou ding is? Ek like nog altyd rap, vandat ek 12 was en die eerste keer Snoop Dogg se Doggystyle album gehoor het, was ek hooked. Ek het ook nog altyd van goed gehou wat rym, soos Dr Seuss ensovoorts, en dit het toe maar net gelei na ’n gevaalike rap career. Herken mense jou op straat? Wat doen hulle? Haha, ja, actually gebeur dit nogal baie. Ek het die ander dag by die robot gestaan, toe spring die ou in die kar voor my uit en hardloop na my toe en neem ’n foto en vra vir my autograph... Dis mal, ek is glad nie gewoond daaraan nie.

Wat is die vreemdste ding wat al ooit tydens ’n optrede met jou gebeur het? 'n Meisie het my met haar bra gegooi en dit het perfek op die voorkant van my mike geval – dit was nogal dêm kief. Jy werk saam met ander groot name in die (Suid-)Afrikaanse musiek industrie. Met wie sal jy nog graag plaaslik wil saamwerk? En internasionaal? Ek sal graag nog saam met Robbie Wessels iets wil doen – ek like hom dik stukke, hy’s kwaai. En dan natuurlik saam met David Kramer en Koos Kombuis sal ook next level kief wees. Internasionaal weet ek nie, daar’s baie... Major Lazer, definitief. Hoe sal jy die woord "kief" aan ’n buitelander wat geen begrip van Afrikaans het nie, verduidelik? Dit beteken iets is lekker kwaai (of in Engels seker maar cool). Dis ’n lekker woord om te sê, en dis ’n lekker woord om te gebruik. Byvoorbeeld: “Daai is ’n paar kief mags op daai Datsun van jou.” Hoe wil jy hê moet mense jou rap ervaar? Soos ’n koue dubbel ná ’n lang dag se werk. As iemand nou R1,000 in jou hand gestop het en jy dit binne ’n uur moes uitgee, wat sou jy daarmee doen? Van daai smoke screen goed vir my kar se vensters koop, en die res spandeer op brannas. Hoe werk jou song writing proses – van inspirasie tot die finale produk? Ek kry gewoonlik eers die beat, en dan van daar af sit ek maar net en luister dit totdat dit met my praat, en dan skryf

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entertainment ek net wat ek dink en hoe dit my laat voel. Ek skryf nie eintlik topics nie, ek werk nie goed uit voor die tyd nie, ek probeer my liedjies so real hou as moontlik en skryf net wat ek voel. Wat maak Jack Parow 16h00 op ’n Sondagmiddag? Babaleer. Wat is vir jou die mooiste Afrikaanse woord? Eierstokke. Kyk jy TV? Waarna? Ja – rugby. Wat is die grootste kompliment wat jy al ooit ontvang het? Jy lyk blêrrie sexy as jy dronk is... En ’n ander meisie het my getune my song Die Vraagstuk het haar laat ophou drugs doen. ...en die grootste belediging? Ek dink nie jy moet nog drink nie. Beskryf die Jack Parow experience in vyf woorde? Zef romantiese Afikaanse rap extravaganza. Waar kan fans meer oor jou uitvind? Op www.myspace.com/therealjackparow, en op Facebook by my fan page Jack Parow. Met een r, weet nie hoekom so baie mense dit met twee skryf nie... Dis soos die plek, nie soos wat ook al die ding is wat twee het nie. Jou liedjie Cooler As Ekke was op die Vredefest Elektro-album ingesluit. Hoe voel dit om deel van iets so spesiaals te wees? Amazing. Herman was ’n amazing mens en chommie, so

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ek is baie trots daarop. Is daar enigiets anders wat jy graag wil noem? Street racing.

WIN!

Win 1 of 3 copies of ons? Supra Familias's new uesti m at Q e Vredefest Elektro album Ask th featuring Jack Parow, b a Die Heuwels Fantasties, Die Antwoord, Jax Panik and Flash Republic. Proceeds from the album will go to the Vrede Foundation.The Foundation was established in the memory of Herman Pretorius, an MK Amp presenter and an integral member of the Bellville music scene. The Foundation helps to create awareness among young South Africans regarding cancer. It also provides financial aid to young South Africans who have cancer but no medical aid. SMS the word TIME followed by the word PAROW to 35131. Cost per SMS is R3. Competition closes 31st March 2010. By entering this competition you consent to receiving electronic information pertaining to abouTime and/or 1time Airline.Terms and conditions apply.


MORE

c i s u M elf

the sh What’s new on

ner Music Gallo l website for War a.co.za – the officia mg w.w ww to go other artists, on on these and For more informati

Africa.

l HITS Album: Sea Artist: Seal

decades, Seal more than two at has spanned th Awards, and y er m re m ca ra G ble e In a remar ka , including thre es lad co classic songs ac d ss an untle tinctive voice dis A has received co s. um le CD alb an 15 million nces. This doub has sold more th genres and audie ss Killer, ro s ac gle s sin es cc rly su al’s includes the ea d have defined Se an er The re d ca an remar kable s like Amazing documents his st more recent hit be e d th an , d se an Ro s a m llection for fan co e Crazy, A Kiss fro tiv ec sp tro ic. is a great re Right Life. HITS iliar with his mus al for those unfam Se to n io ct du intro Hurricane Album: Hello t oo hf itc Ar tis t: Sw

ying e band is enjo set to thrive. Th is ity t tiv oo ea hf cr itc s ot Sw rricane, a return-to-ro With Hello Hu as the new label, and a ing , rk Q H wo o of di year s a new home stu ten non-stop hard-charging purpose. After rock band, the g llin se and sense of on illi i-m aptly titled ult m eir th ble r m fo rding sessions world’s most hu co re w sa , et ss reflect and d quint ance to reasse San Diego-base as a unique ch um ing to date . If rd alb co h re gt seventh full-len t accomplished os m eir th um. is e result ally get this alb rededicate . Th u, you should re yo re pi ins ay U2 and Coldpl otion Picture ic from the M us M – ar at Av Album: Ar tis t: Various ticipated was the most an rld over, Avatar wo e since his th s film rd a co d re se lea fice eron hadn’t re Breaking box of m Ca o time es Tw o. Jam . Director s 13 year s ag movie of 2009 e similar record nered rt ok pa br o ic als an o Tit wh , rk r James Horner se most famous wo able po m or co em m ed d renown itably epic and Oscar winner an atar) composed a su Av s m ha fro ic, e an em Tit on u (th with Cameron p ballad I See Yo also includes po score. The album s. by Leona Lewi

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motoring

Compiled by Bernard K Hellberg, Pix © Quickpic, Hyundai

out of the

The latest models to enter the mar ket

Subaru Impreza

x o B

Impreza sedan buyers now have the option of another specification level, thanks to the recent introduction of the racy RS – a model with more than a passing resemblance to the WRX. It’s the ideal stepping stone for those who aspire to the turbo model and want a car which emulates it in look and feel, if not outright performance. Currently there’s a huge perception gap between the Impreza 2.0R and the WRX, and while the newcomer is identical to the range’s entry level model in terms of mechanicals, the RS fills that gap by adding not only a large dollop of visual appeal, but also enhanced road holding and handling capabilities thanks to the 17-inch wheels and wider, lower profile tyres. Under the bonnet is the free-revving 110 kW/196 Nm 1 994 cc DOHC Boxer engine, which uses just 8.9 litres/100 km in mixed driving.There’s plenty of torque across the rev range, but it likes to be revved too: Peak power is at 6, 400 rpm and working through the ratios and taking the engine to the red line in between each shift is a recipe for driver satisfaction. With the Impreza sedan’s taut chassis, sharp steering and plentiful grip, affordable performance is now available at Subaru Southern Africa’s 21-strong dealer network for just R269,000 for the five-speed manual, and an additional R10,000 for the SportshiftTM automatic.The price includes a three year or 63,000 km full maintenance plan.

Hyundai H1 Diesel People Carrier Hyundai’s new nine seater luxury wagon is now available with turbodiesel power. This highly refined and smooth-running power plant – a 2.5 litre four cylinder – produces 120 kW at a mere 3,800 rpm, and slots in above its 2.4 litre petrol sibling. Hyundai have clearly aimed this newcomer at the high end of the market, as evidenced by the comprehensive specification list. There’s rear park distance control, alloy wheels, leather seats and a sophisticated air conditioning system with four vents aimed at the rear passengers. During the launch drive, the H1 turbodiesel reveals itself as a well built vehicle with a brilliant turning circle, and an automatic gearbox that will bring a smile to the face of the driver. Capable of transporting eight passengers in style with 850-litre luggage capacity, the H1 is destined to make a major impact on the market – particularly the hospitality industry. Expect to pay in the order of R360,000 for a vehicle with an industry leading five year/150,000 km warranty, and a five year/100,000 km service plan. Service intervals are at 15,000 km.

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sport

Story by Bernard K Hellberg, Pix © Quickpic

Set to become another legend in the Volkswagen line-up, the latest generation Polo will be manufactured at the Uitenhage production facility in the Eastern Cape. In fact, every single right hand drive Polo for world markets – including Japan, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia, Singapore, Malta and Cyprus – will come from the Eastern Cape. Volkswagen SA has set its sights on exporting 55,000 vehicles this year – an indication of the confidence in its products and the reputation which VW vehicles enjoy worldwide. Six models will be on offer to the South African public. These range from the 63 kW 1.4i petrol engine Trendline at R144,900 to the 77 kW 1.6-litre turbodiesel at R209,900. When it comes to dynamic performance, the Polo 1.4i has a top speed of 177 km/h and a 0-100 km/h sprint time of 12.5 seconds. The TDI engine has 250 Nm of torque – available from 1,500 to 2,500 rpm – and uses an incredible 4.2 litres of fuel every 100 km.The top speed is an impressive 189 km/h. Crammed with luxury and safety features – depending on the model chosen – the Polo offers a comprehensive range of airbags, air conditioning, power steering, power windows, height-adjustable driver’s seat, and additional 12V power points in the centre console and luggage area. The launch drive reveals superb handling and braking characteristics – on a par with vehicles in a much higher price bracket – while the general build quality is beyond reproach. Volkswagen offers the Polo with two different headlights,

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depending on selected options: the “Trendline” base version is fitted with single headlights. Dual headlights are installed starting with the “Comfortline”. Also integrated in the headlights are the turn signal lights. Many aspects of the new Polo’s chassis have been redesigned, including the McPherson front suspension and semi-independent rear suspension.Track width was increased by 29 mm in front and 30 mm in the rear. Visually speaking, the new Polo is based on the company’s latest design DNA. The Scirocco was the first vehicle with this design and the second wave of the new DNA appeared in the new Golf. Both these cars were well received by the local customers, with the new Golf being named as a finalist in the 2010 South African Guild of Motoring Journalists Car of the Year competition. The Polo brand has been an overwhelming success in South Africa since it was first introduced in 1996 as the Polo Classic sedan. The hatch (Polo Playa) was added two years later. Warranty coverage is good for 3 years/120,000 kim, and there’s also a 12-year anti-corrosion warranty included. The service interval (diesel and petrol) is 15,000 km.


h c Te

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gadgets

Compiled by Tshepi Matloga

Three little Piggies

Tevo has added three funky little piggies with potent high quality sound to their popular shoX range. shoX iPiggi, shoX iPig and shoX iPig Mobile all come with five speakers that put out a heart-pounding 23 watts of refined power. The shoX iPig and iPig Mobile include a docking speaker, input cable, adaptor, infrared remote and iPig cradle remover. These piggies give you plenty of bacon for your buck. Available at leading retailers or direct from Tevo at www.tevo.co.za.

Power in your Pocket The Powerchimp is a nifty charger for a variety of por table gadgets, including your mobile phone, iPod or MP3, PDA, PSP or iPhone. The Powerchimp works by using two rechargeable AA batteries and will fully recharge most mobile phones before the batteries in the chimp themselves will need recharging. Choose from grey, blue, pink or yellow. You'll wonder how you ever lived without this little chap. Visit www. wintecsolutions.co.za for more information, or email info@wintecsolutions.co.za.

No ignoring the iPad The launch of the Apple iPad saw the Internet explode with reviews, comments and opinions, making it one of the most talked about gadgets out there. The 9.7 inch, 12.7 mm thin touch-screen gadget functions a lot like an iPhone. You can use it to surf the web, write emails, look at photos, watch videos or play games. You will be the trendiest one in the office with this one. For more, visit www.apple.com/ipad.

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NO DIET DIET

You too, can look this good (for the hottest body in town) • 6 Weeks • 6 Injections Th e o n l y s o l u t i o n , a M e d i c a l s o l u t i o n . Cellulitis, weight control Programme. Contact DR Gregory J Gieryn on Tel: +27 11 803 3299 / Cell: +27 82 555 2938


entertainment

Fun MORE

Pix © stock.xchng, iStockphoto.com

Grand Old Duck

The oldest recorded living mallard in the United Kingdom, Edwina, has died at the age of 22. Edwina was adopted by Ian Knight and Christine Chistopher after they discovered the abandoned and injured mallard near a lake.They initially thought that it was a male, but when Edward laid eggs for the first time, they changed her name to Edwina. She is reported to have enjoyed drinking tea and swimming in the sink. The family are heartbroken over her demise.

Hugs All Round Valentine’s Day last month saw Jeff Ondash fully embracing the Valentine’s spirit. Teddy McHuggin, his alter ego for the occasion, dished out a whopping 7,777 hugs in 24 hours to set a new world record from his base outside the Paris hotel and casino in Las Vegas. This speedhugging fanatic also holds the Guinness World Record for the most hugs in one hour and aims to raise money for the American Hear t Association with his escapades.

The Mummy Project

d i o t c a F

y orn bab A new b ll a sm is o kangaro to fit enough oon sp a te into a

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It turns out one of Egypt’s best known pharaohs, King Tutankhamun, was far from a beacon of health. Two years of DNA testing and CT scans on the 3,300-year-old mummy has revealed that he suffered from a cleft palate, a club foot and died from complications from a broken leg that were exacerbated by malaria. To top it off, it turns out that his parents were probably brother and sister. The study will be published in the Journal of the American Medical Association and is part of a wider programme involving the identification of hundreds of mummies and their family relations.


sport

Story by Dale Hayes, Pix ©Stock.Xchng

t i me In most parts of the world the official golf season starts in April, which is coincidently when the first Major of the year takes place: the Masters tournament at Augusta, in Georgia in the USA. It was started in 1934 by the all time greatest amateur golfer, Bobby Jones, because he wanted to have a tournament at the new golf course that he had built in conjunction with golf course architect Alistair Mackenzie. Jones invited all his friends, who were also the greatest golfers of the time, to play. Jones himself had retired in 1930 after he had won the Grand Slam, which in those days consisted of winning the US Open and US Amateur, and the British Open and British Amateur all in a single year. To promote his event, he was convinced by his friends that he should come out of retirement and play, which he did. Unfortunately, after a gap of four years, Jones’ golf wasn’t anywhere near what it had been at the height of his career, and he was really just a ceremonial golfer, but the appearance of the great man caused spectators and the media to flock to the tournament.

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Jones didn’t like the title Masters; he thought it was too pretentious so he called the original event the Augusta Invitational. Every one of the best golfers of the time was there, including future champions Sam Snead, Ben Hogan and Jimmy Demaret. Walter Hagen was in his forties and past his prime, but golf ’s great showman still attracted the galleries, as did another great of the time, Gene Sarazen. It was Sarazen that further enhanced the reputation of the tournament in its first year. Standing on the fifteenth tee, he was three strokes behind the leader. As it is today, the 15th was a Par 5 with the second shot played over water. After a good drive Sarazen took out a fairway wood, saying to his caddie that he had nothing to lose. He then knocked the ball into the cup for an albatross (or “Double Eagle” as it is called in America) and it became known as “the shot that was heard around the world”. For


days it put golf on the front pages of newspapers. That win by Sarazen immediately lifted the stature of the tournament above all regular PGA events. Jones was later convinced to change the name to the Masters, and it is still the only major golf tournament that is organised by a golf club. The members of Augusta National control every aspect of the Masters with an iron fist. They even dictate to the television channel CBS how many adverts they can show and who those advertising companies can be. Their power and determination to do things their own way was illustrated during what was referred to as the “Martha Burke” affair a few years ago. She campaigned to get sponsors to stop supporting the event due to the fact that they don’t allow lady members. She completely misjudged the power and importance of the event to the town of Augusta, and the economy of the State of Georgia.To ensure that the television sponsors weren’t going to be more embarrassed, the Club advised them to withdraw their television advertising that year and the club went on to foot the entire bill for the television production that year – millions and millions of dollars worth. The Masters has the advantage of staging the event at the same venue each year, and they are therefore able to improve on all aspects of the event to ensure maximum comfort for

both the patrons (as the spectators are referred to) and the competitors. There is no advertising on the grounds of the event and that even extends to the cups that they serve cold drinks in! As usual, all South African eyes will be on “our boys” to see if Ernie, Retief, Tim, Rory or Trevor can lift that amazing trophy – they all have the game. Gary Player and Trevor Immelman are the only South Africans to have won the Masters. Gary did so three times: in 1961, 1974 and 1978. Of course we’ll also be waiting anxiously to see if Tiger will use it as his return to professional golf. Realistically he would need to get in some competitive practice before then, so watch this space. This year’s tournament will take place from the 8th to 11th April and SuperSport will have full coverage of the event. Make sure you don’t miss a minute of the highlight event of the year! It’s a perfect day for golf at Zwartkop! Zwartkop is one of the oldest and most prestigious clubs in Pretoria. It’s a classic parkland layout which incorporates the Dale Hayes Golf Academy, golf shop and clubhouse, which has various function rooms. Tel: +27 12 654 1144 / +27 12 654 2111 www.zwartkopcountryclub.co.za.


Story & Pix © Col’Cacchio Pizzeria

up

Col’Cacchio Pizzeria Ready for Another Great Year Established in 1992, Col’Cacchio pizzeria epitomises true Italian fare with its thin base gourmet pizzas and generous salad and pasta selection. With their exceptional quality in both service and wholesome food, they are the reason you crave pizza.

New to the Col’Cacchio pizzeria menu: Mini pizza breads, Brioso Salad and Spaghetti and meat balls.

Totalling 18 stores across the country, Col’Cacchio pizzeria recently extended the same warm welcome to the Umhlanga area near Durban which it has been offering around the country for the past 18 years. Using only the freshest ingredients, Col’Cacchio pizzeria not only offers a wide and interesting selection of food, but also offers wheat- and gluten-free pizza bases, wheat-free pasta options, MSG-free tomato base on the pizzas and the use of organic ingredients where possible. It is easy to see why they were the first pizzeria to be endorsed by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of South Africa. An extensive wine list is also available which recently scooped up a Gold Award in the 2009 Diners Club Wine List Awards. Col’Cacchio pizzeria is also passionately giving back to the community through the Col’Cacchio pizzeria Celebrity Chef Series; a gourmet charity project that aims to raise funds for the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital. After a successful campaign in 2009 which raised over R120,000, Col’Cacchio pizzeria have welcomed another six of our country’s top chefs to flex their culinary muscles in this year’s gourmet charity project which will run from April until September 2010. David Higgs (Rust en Vrede), Michael Broughton (Terroir), Franck Dangereux (The Foodbarn), Jodi-Ann Pearton (The Food Design Agency), Nicky Gibbs (The Westcliff) and Chantel Dartnall (Restaurant Mosaic) will each create their own masterpiece under the guidance of pizza doyenne Kinga Baranowska from Col’Cacchio pizzeria. This challenge will showcase the emergence of a true master in something as “simple” as rolling out dough and scattering some ingredients. For six months, diners will have a taste of what each celebrity chef has brought to the table; with each month showcasing a different chef ’s masterpiece on promotion. R5.00 from the sale of every special gourmet celebrity pizza, plus a further R30,000 from Col’Cacchio pizzeria, will be donated to the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital and 100% of these funds will go towards upgrading the Burns Unit at the hospital. With delectable food, wine, great service and ambience, one can’t miss visiting a Col’Cacchio pizzeria. Who needs to travel to Italy when you have a Col’Cacchio pizzeria right on your doorstep? www.1time.co.za

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business

Story by Jane Barry, Pix © Richard Mulvey

h c a Co n o g n i s i l a t i cap

It may be easier to stick to what you know, but if you aren’t willing to adapt to a rapidly changing sales environment, you might very well be left behind. Richard Mulvey shares a new and innovative approach to sales training that embraces the convenience and power of the web.

Richard Mulvey is an internationally recognised sales coach and motivational speaker with over 17 books under his belt. Having worked in sales throughout his life, rising through the ranks to sales director of a large organisation, he finally decided to make what to him seemed the natural progression from sales person to sales speaker. “ I resigned and decided to write a book, Presenting for profit,” says Mulvey. Soon afterwards, people began asking Mulvey to talk to their teams to help improve their skills, and his career as a public speaker and sales coach grew. Having been in this industry for many years, Mulvey has come to the realisation that the way in which sales people approach their tasks has to change.

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“Customers are different today,” explains Mulvey. “They are more choosey.There is more competition. Selling over the last 18 months has become very challenging and sales no longer means simply taking down orders.” According to Mulvey, many people in sales are doing things in the same way that they always have, and it is crucial that sales people learn to differentiate themselves, their products and their companies in order to succeed in a highly competitive market.

Rethinking the Short Course Traditionally, sales courses have tended to take place over a few short days.The problem, according to Mulvey, is that while


ing the course may provide them with valuable advice and tools, most people tend to immediately fall back into their old habits. Additionally, short courses tend to cram in as much as possible and while different issues are discussed, individuals don’t have the time to try out each skill as they learn. Although Mulvey still presents short courses regularly, it is inevitable that some of the ideas are going to be forgotten.

An Innovative Solution

which they can track their team’s progress, and they receive separate information on how to manage their teams more effectively through the training. Mulvey says: “ The course is totally measurable. Sales managers get the results of the quizzes and strike rate reports. They can monitor improvements and see how their team is doing.” This marks a shift from the short course, where it is often hard to track the effect that the training has had on an individual’s performance and how much they have learnt from the course.

Commit to Yourself Salescoachingworx.com offers a new and innovative approach to sales training that some people may find intimidating. “It’s a different discipline. It takes time, but is a better long term way to train. It is, however, not something people are used to,” says Mulvey. “ People expect to be spoon fed. But the reality is that spoon-feeding is not going to help sales people change their behaviour and methods to suit the current business environment.” For more, go to www.salescoachingworx.com or call 0861 444888 (International +27 31 5635316).

The difficulties that face sales people today are numerous. “Every step of the way is challenging. We’re not getting faceto-face time. We expect customers to come to us.The market is very competitive and all sales people are doing the same things in the same ways.”The only way to be successful, explains Mulvey, is to do things differently and attract customers in a creative way. Unfortunately, it can be very intimidating to change the techniques and strategies that have always worked for you in the past. This is where Mulvey’s latest training solution comes ? tions in. It embraces the web and all the advantages that come with Quskesthem at A it to offer a long term, ongoing sales training course: www. ab salescoachingworx.com. Through the website, Mulvey offers a different approach to sales training that fills the gaps that are so often found during short courses. “The coaching is spread over time.The idea is that the individual will apply each new skill and be able to come back to the site and interact with others. I am on the forum every day sharing solutions,” explains Mulvey.“It is so much more interactive. It’s easy to apply yourself and more cost effective, because you will be earning as you apply the skills you learn.” The course takes place over an entire year, which is spilt into four-week periods. Each month will deal with particular issues and twice weekly subscribers will have access to video, mp3 audio which they can download, and a text summary. At Win a “Six Pack” of Sales the end of each four-week period, there is a quiz which lets Training DVDs. subscribers know which areas they should focus on. In addition, the site offers strike rate tracking, including items such as number Sales Coaching Worx is conducting their annual of appointments, closed deals, number of phone calls and so on. Sales Industry Survey to uncover trends in sales over “In this way they can see the tracking and their improvement. It’s the past year and help predict the future growth. very simple.” You can help by taking just six minutes to complete The site also contains a huge resource centre with templates, the survey at www.salescoachingworx.com – and articles and weblinks to other sales related sites. “It is my hope to you have a chance to win six Sales Training DVDs make this site a hub for all sales people to come and share their worth R2,100.00. ideas,” Mulvey says. For sales managers, there is a dedicated section through

WIN!

www.1time.co.za

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to your ticket Most people enjoy the thrill of flying, but before you get to fasten your seatbelt, you often have to wait in a busy airport terminal. Don’t you sometimes wish that you could just relax in a comfortable lounge? The good news is that now you can. Get to the airport early and book into a Premier Lounge.

Traditionally, airport lounges have always been reserved for business class passengers and VIPs, but these facilities are no longer only available to select travellers. The new BIDAir Premier Airport Lounges afford everyone the opportunity to enjoy lounge comforts, whatever the airline or class of ticket you hold. Whether travelling for leisure or business, guests will find that the Premier Lounges offer a variety of home and office comforts. BIDAir specialises in lounge catering and guests can look forward to tasty complimentary light meals, snacks and drinks. Passengers can unwind in comfy chairs to read their favourite magazines and newspapers, watch television or browse the Internet. Lounges are equipped with business centre facilities where busy executives can prepare for presentations and meetings. Most lounges even have shower facilities, so you can arrive refreshed at your destination. The lounge facilities remain open for international and domestic passengers travelling on very early morning or late evening flights. All lounges open one hour before the first flight leaves an airport, and close 30 minutes after the last flight has departed for the day. During the FIFA World Cup, all lounges will be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The comfort of a BIDAir Premier Lounge is available to anyone who purchases a lounge pass. Lounges are located

in Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban (from May 2010, when a new lounge will open at the new King Chaka Airport), Port Elizabeth, George and East London. Group booking available on request and there is a boardroom in Johannesburg, landside (before the security check point), available for meetings and mini conferences. Simply present a Diners Club International, ABSA, Investec Private Bank, RMB, Nedbank, FNB Private Client, Hertz Club Gold or Priority Pass Card to gain easy access to the Premier Lounges. Cash and all other major credit cards also welcome. Go to www.comfortguaranteed.co..za for more.

www.1time.co.za

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Story by Beth Cooper, Pix © stock.Xchng

us foc Tuberculosis A leading cause of death in South Africa, Tuberculosis (TB) is a potentially deadly disease that affects us all.

On 24th March each year, millions of people across the globe join hands to mark World TB Day – a celebration of the many doctors, nurses, patients, researchers and community workers who tirelessly fight against this dreaded condition. While the disease has been eradicated or controlled in many parts of the world, it remains a crippling problem among developing nations, including Africa and Asia. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), a staggering 1.1 million to 1.77 million people died of TB in 2008 – the equivalent of thousands of deaths a day. These victims were HIV-negative. A large number of TB deaths also occurred among HIV-positive patients, who already have severely weakened immune systems and so are particularly susceptible to the disease. Many people who have never encountered TB dismiss it as a disease of the poor. However, although it is linked to poverty, it is highly contagious – and an untreated sufferer can infect an average of 10 – 15 people annually. It’s essential for South Africans – and visitors to the country – to be up to speed on local developments on the TB front. WHO statistics reveal that, while case detection rate has remained “above target” for several years, treatment success rates here are low, resulting in high default and death rates. A sobering reality is that South Africa reports the highest number of confirmed MDR-TB and XDR-TB cases in this region. In layman’s terms, this essentially refers to multi-drug resistant TB and extensively drug-resistant TB respectively. While the country is forging ahead with collaborative TB and HIV activities, WHO reports that in 2007 alone, almost 40% of notified TB patients were HIV-tested – and 35% - 67% received HIV-positive results. Digesting the reality of TB may not be easy, but it’s certainly necessary. Since more than two billion people – a third of the global population – are infected with TB bacilli (the microbes that cause the disease), it’s not surprising that one in ten people will become ill with active TB during a lifetime. Health authorities, however, are working hard to control the pandemic.The Stop TB strategy, a WHO brainchild, aims to

decrease the prevalence of – and deaths due to – TB by 50% in 2015, compared to figures from 1990. Melissa Gaba, an Eastern Cape domestic assistant, says that access to information about the disease helped her to identify symptoms in her four-year-old daughter, Andiswa, early last year. “Her coughing was worrying me and she was also losing weight. Before we received information about TB, I would have ignored these symptoms – but I took her to the clinic and she tested positive.” Andiswa was put on the correct medication and is now on the mend.Without access to grassroots knowledge, however, she may have become another statistic of the worldwide pandemic. Doing your bit to understand TB will help greatly in the fight to halt its spread. Keep these tips in mind: • Always wash your hands frequently, particularly if you’ve been in contact with someone who suffers from a chronic cough. • Do not stand too close to people when they are coughing and you feel that you or your family might be at risk of contracting TB. • Lots of fresh air is very healthy – so get outdoors and avoid being in closed, stuffy environments for prolonged periods. • Eat healthy, nutritious food, ensuring that you have enough fibre, protein, calcium, minerals and vitamins in your diet. • An annual TB skin test is available at local clinics. Alternatively, a chest x-ray is suitable if you are sensitive to the skin test procedure. www.1time.co.za

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good news

Story by Laubcher van Zyl

a 1time ecome B How to Part 2: The Hard Work Begins Each new First Officer who joins our airline would not have flown any of our MD80 series jet aircraft. In fact, many of the new recruits have never flown a jet, let alone a jet weighing almost 73,000 kg fully laden. A daunting task lies ahead of each new recruit.

Training We are convinced that our recruits already have the “right stuff” and it’s up to us to train them to proficiency. Although we follow a non-punitive approach during training, it does sometimes happen that a candidate does not make the grade, even after extra training. Our flying standards have to be met by all recruits before being released for flights with passengers on board.That is our obligation to you as our clients.

Eat, Sleep and Dream MD 80

For the next 10 weeks, our new pilots learn everything there is to know about the MD 80 aircraft. First of all, it’s back to school. Our new pilots find a new home in the classroom and you can feel the excitement on the first day of the course – induction. The classroom training starts by explaining all the

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different aircraft systems to the pilots such as hydraulic systems, engines, fuel, electrical systems, autopilot, pressurisation, landing gear and brakes, to name but a few. The aircraft is discussed from nose to tail. And of course, no training is complete without an exam.

Beyond the Technical

After the technical training, a battery of different courses is presented. These include: Human factors, risk management, dangerous goods, fire fighting, emergency equipment training, low visibility procedures, company operational procedures, mass and balance, safety and quality reporting systems, traffic collision avoidance and a few other advanced qualification modules.

Flight Simulation

With the theory completed, the new pilots finally get


their hands on a real aeroplane – sort of. Pilots now get the opportunity to sit in front of a cockpit mock-up and learn where to find all the little switches and dials as well as practice all the normal and abnormal procedures until they can recite them backwards in their sleep. Next up is full flight simulator training. We currently conduct all our full flight simulator training in Zürich, Switzerland. Candidates get the opportunity to practice all the normal procedures, abnormal and emergency procedures while “flying” the aeroplane. The simulator is extremely realistic: It moves, makes the same noises and feels like the real thing. Candidates can now put into practice all the theory of the previous five weeks. All this is done under the watchful eyes of our pilot instructors and designated flight examiners. Finally a flight test is conducted in order to facilitate the pilot’s licence renewal as well as to ensure minimum company standards have been met.

The Real Deal

Back in Johannesburg – the real aeroplane. An instructor and aeroplane is allocated to facilitate the student’s first real encounter with an MD8O aircraft.The instructor oversees each student doing a minimum of three take-offs and landings. At least one landing is done with an engine inoperative – simulated of course and without any passengers! This is a proud moment for any pilot.They are now a fully qualified MD80 Series First Officer.

Co-pilot Day Job

The new pilot now enters the rostering system. He or she is allocated a minimum of 20 flights under the supervision of a pilot instructor (commonly known as a Training Captain). Once a satisfactory level of proficiency in line operations is attained, the student undergoes a final check flight before being allowed to fly with our senior captains on the flight line for three months before being let loose completely, subject to yet another check flight. Up to this point, the airline would have spent approximately R200,000 to train each new pilot.

Beginning their Career Our newly trained First Officers now continue with their flying career within our airline. Once he/she has accumulated sufficient experience and has proven to maintain a high standard of flying, he/she will become eligible for selection as a captain. Typically a captain in our airline has at least 7-10 years flying experience. Did yo Once selected as a candidate to u miss Part 1? You be trained as a captain, the training can re ad it process is started all over again. Letous nlin kn e ow at at Do you have any flight or wb a wou w tim .a e.tico.za bou aeroplane questions? Email them to me. co.za. laura@aboutime.co.za.

About the Author: Laubcher van Zyl I am currently the Chief Training Captain for 1time Airline. My main responsibility is to maintain and develop flying and training standards for the pilots within our airline. I also oversee the maintenance of flying standards on the flight line. I have a passion for training pilots and obtain a great deal of satisfaction every time a new pilot qualifies from one of our training programs. As we employ 75 pilots, I have the privilege of working with a team of very capable, professional and passionate instructors and check pilots assisting me to accomplish my mandate.They do all the hard work behind the scenes to ensure that every time you get on board a 1time Airline aircraft, you are in good hands.


n I g n i r Colouetition Comp

W in ne r

mith - 12

Victoria S

ThisMonth’s

Winners

yrs

2n d

Netznee

n Piladia

- 12 yrs

3rd

We at 1time value our young flyers in the knowledge that we will grow together.  This is why 1time is running a colouring-in competition especially for them.  The pictures are found in the Activity Packs that are handed out on the plane and a winner is chosen every month. 1st Prize Samsonite’s Sammies Funny Face - Busy Bee upright 50cm suitcase valued at R995.00 A copy of the in-flight magazine, abouTime, in which the picture is published. 2nd & 3rd Prize A gift hamper, sponsored by 1time, including 1time paraphernalia and a copy of the in-flight magazine, abouTime, in which the picture is published. Winners are notified by telephone and the prize is delivered directly to their door. So come on kids, enter the competition!  Who knows, you could be the next winner!

Jacqueline v.d. Watt - 12 yrs

Designer Luggage is Child’s Play Cute and cheeky, Samsonite’s Funny Faces collection is ideal for the trendiest of little globe trotters. Manufactured to the very same exacting quality standards as their adult counterparts, this luggage for littlies is not only a perfect fit for youngster's needs, but also features creatures that children can’t help but love. The Sammies family started out with the Lovely Ladybird, the Cute Crocodile and now also includes the Busy Bee.  Your child can choose from small and medium sized backpacks, a gym bag, a school bag, pencil box, two different sized duffel bags, 45 and 50cm uprights, a purse and an umbrella.  All models are made from hardwearing 300 x 300 denier polyester and are now available from top luggage retailers countrywide.  One lucky child will wheel away a Sammies' upright 50cm trolley case valued at R 995.00.  To locate a stockist near you, log onto www.samsonite.com or call +27 31 266 0620.


flight schedule contents

Joburg to Cape Town M

T

W

T

F

S

1

2

3

4

5

6

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1 7 1

2

3

4

5

6 7 6

1

2

3

4

5

7 6 7

1

2

1

3

4

3

4

5

6 6

4 6 1

2

3

4

5

7

5 5

7

Departure

Arrival

Flight

07h10

09h20

1T 101

07h50

10h00

1T 129

08h45

10h55

1T 123

09h25

11h35

1T 103

09h45

11h55

1T 119

11h05

13h15

1T 133

12h45

14h55

1T 109

14h15

16h25

1T 105

14h45

16h55

1T 121

15h20

17h30

1T 111

16h25

18h35

1T 131

16h40

18h50

1T 125

17h20

19h30

1T 127

18h00

20h10

1T 139

18h30

20h40

1T 115

19h20

21h30

1T 137

21h00

23h10

1T 117

Joburg to Durban M

T

W

T

F

1

2

3

4

5

2

3

4

5

S

S

6 6 7 1

2

3

4

5 6 7

1

2

3

4

5 6

1

2

3

4 7 5 6

1

2

3

7

4 5 7 5 7

Departure

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Flight

06h40

07h50

1T 201

07h00

08h10

1T 209

08h25

09h35

1T 235

09h00

10h10

1T 211

09h00

10h10

1T 227

11h30

12h40

1T 203

12h45

13h55

1T 215

13h05

14h15

1T 239

13h30

14h40

1T 247

15h00

16h10

1T 217

15h35

16h45

1T 205

16h00

17h10

1T 249

16h30

17h40

1T 221

17h10

18h20

1T 219

18h15

19h25

1T 207

18h15

19h25

1T 231

19h00

20h10

1T 207

19h10

20h20

1T 237

19h40

20h50

1T 229

Joburg to Port Elizabeth M

T

W

T

F

S

S

1 3

4 5 7 6

2 1

4 5 7

Departure

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Flight

07h20

09h00

1T 501

10h45

12h25

1T 505

11h20

13h00

1T 515

11h30

13h10

1T 511

12h25

14h05

1T 507

14h30

16h10

1T 519

15h35

17h05

1T 503

16h50

18h30

1T 509

17h00

18h40

1T 517

Joburg to George M

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F

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5 1 6 2 4 3 7 5 7

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07h05

08h55

1T 831

07h50

09h40

1T 821

08h55

10h45

1T 821

09h00

10h50

1T 823

09h45

11h35

1T 827

10h30

12h20

1T 825

12h00

13h50

1T 833

15h40

17h30

1T 829

16h20

18h10

1T 835

Joburg to East London M

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F

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5 7 6 1 4 5 7

122

3 2

Departure

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Flight

06h50

08h15

1T 301

09h35

11h00

1T 319

10h45

12h10

1T 305

11h05

12h30

1T 331

13h00

14h25

1T 317

14h25

15h50

1T 307

14h55

16h20

1T 321

16h05

17h30

1T 309

16h40

18h05

1T 327


Cape Town to Joburg M

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1

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6

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06h45

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5

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08h20

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1T 118

7

09h00

11h00

1T 138

7

10h00

12h00

1T 102

1

2

3

4

5

6

12h00

14h00

1T 124

1

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12h20

14h20

1T 104

11h05

13h05

1T 106

6

14h10

16h10

1T 134

7

15h40

17h40

1T 110

7

16h55

18h55

1T 120

17h20

19h20

1T 106

20h00

1T 112

7 1 1

2

3

4

5 6

1

2

1

3

4

3

4

5

7

18h00 19h15

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1T 132

5

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21h20

23h20

1T 116

Durban to Joburg M

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1

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3

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1

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06h45

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6

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09h55

1T 210

09h00

10h10

1T 202

09h30

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1T 234

10h40

11h50

1T 222

11h10

12h20

1T 240

11h25

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1T 248

5

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13h20

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1T 204

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1T 238

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1T 224

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1T 236

17h00

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1T 212

17h10

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18h15

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1T 206

19h15

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22h00

1T 250

21h30

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1T 230

5 7 6 7

2 1

2

3 3

4 4

7 6 7 1

2

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4 6 5

1

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4 7 5 7

Port Elizabeth to Joburg M

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4 5 6

2 1

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Departure

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11h40

1T 502

13h15

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1T 506

14h05

15h45

1T 512

14h40

16h20

1T 508

17h10

18h50

1T 520

17h50

19h30

1T 504

19h05

20h45

1T 510

19h20

21h00

1T 518

George to Joburg M

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W

T

1

F

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5 2 6 4 3 7 5 7

Departure

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Flight

10h45

12h35

1T 822

11h25

13h15

1T 824

11h45

13h35

1T 822

12h25

14h15

1T 828

13h05

14h55

1T 826

14h30

16h20

1T 834

18h20

20h10

1T 830

18h45

20h35

1T 836

East London to Joburg M

T

W

T

F

S

S

5 7 6 1 4 5 7 3 2

Departure

Arrival

Flight

09h00

10h25

1T 302

12h25

13h50

1T 320

12h40

14h05

1T 306

13h55

15h20

1T 332

15h15

16h40

1T 318

16h45

18h10

1T 308

16h55

18h20

1T 322

18h00

19h25

1T 310

18h35

20h00

1T 328


flight contents schedule

Cape Town to East London M

T

W

1

T

F

4

5

S

S 7

Departure

Arrival

Flight

09h40

11h10

1T 602

12h35

14h05

1T 604

East London to Cape Town M

T

W

1

T

F

4

5

S

S 7

Departure

Arrival

Flight

12h00

13h30

1T 601

14h45

16h15

1T 603

Cape Town to Durban M

T

W

T

F

1

2

3

4

5

S

S 7

6 7

Departure

Arrival

Flight

06h30

08h40

1T 644

11h00

13h00

1T 650

12h00

14h00

1T 652

14h00

16h10

1T 654

1

2

3

4

5

14h30

16h40

1T 646

1

2

3

4

5

17h45

19h45

1T 648

M

T

W

T

F

1

2

3

4

5

Durban to Cape Town S

S 7

6 1

2

3

4

5 7

1

2

3

4

5

M

T

W

T

F

Departure

Arrival

Flight

06h30

08h40

1T 643

08h15

10h25

1T 649

09h00

11h00

1T 651

10h20

12h30

1T 645

17h00

19h00

1T 653

18h00

20h00

1T 647

Cape Town to Port Elizabeth

1

2

3

4

5

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

Departure

Arrival

Flight

7

10h00

11h10

1T 701

13h20

14h30

1T 702

Port Elizabeth to Cape Town

1

2

3

4

5

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

Departure

Arrival

Flight

7

12h00

13h10

1T 703

15h20

16h30

1T 701

Joburg to Zanzibar 2

S

S

6

Departure

Arrival

Flight

07h45

12h15

1T 921

Zanzibar to Joburg M

T

W

T

F

2

S

S

6

Departure

Arrival

Flight

13h10

15h40

1T 922

Joburg to Livingstone M

T

W

T

F

S

S

5 1

4

7

Departure

Arrival

Flight

09h35

11h20

1T 953

10h10

11h55

1T 951

Livingstone to Joburg M

T

W

T

F

S

S

5 1

4

7

Departure

Arrival

Flight

12h10

13h55

1T 954

12h50

14h35

1T 952


1time food

at e o t more We regret that we do not accept foreign exchange coinage Due to the popularity of certain items on our menu, your choice may not always be available. Please accept our apologies for this. All sandwiches and rolls are served cold

Sandwiches

R24 ($ 3.50)

(Available on brown or white bread variations - dependent on availability)

1time Hot Breakfast

R30 ($ 4)

Scrambled eggs served with two rashers of bacon, two beef sausages, French toast, grilled tomato and mushrooms. Only served on JHB/CT/JHB, JHB to George, JNB – ZNZ and DUR/CT/DUR flights, depar ting until 9 am.

Egg Mayo & Cheese Chicken Mayo Seeded Rolls

(20cm)

R28 ($ 4.00)

Lean salami & emmenthal cheese Mozzarella with sundried tomato pesto Chicken Burger

v

R25 ($ 3.50)

Grilled chicken breast marinated in a lemon & herb sauce, served on a bed of lettuce, in a sesame seed bun German Hot Dog

R20 ($ 2.50)

A traditional Bockworst sausage on a bun with either tomato or mustard sauce, or even better, both! Muffins

R15 ($ 2)

Strawberry & Mixed Nuts Coconut & White Chocolate Banana & Pecan Nuts Bran & Raisin Cheese Platter Kosher / Halaal product

R22 ($ 3)

Fairview cheese platter consisting of cream cheese French onion, cream cheese black pepper, camembert, blue rock and havarti and served with six Wheatsworth biscuits.

130

www.aboutime.co.za

ANNOUNCEMENT!

Purchase our onboard snacks and merchandise with your M A S T ERC A RD / V I S A credit card

Biltong 80g R24 ($ 3) Chilli Beef Snapstix Sliced Beef Biltong Dry Wors Chocolates

R9 ($ 1)

Bar One KitKat Lunch Bar Crisps

R6 ($ 1)

Smoked Beef Lightly / Plain Salted Salt & Vinegar Cheese & Onion Snacks Salted Peanuts Peanuts & Raisins Jelly Babies Wine Gums

R6 ($ 1)


r ink d o t more Beverages

Alcoholic Beverages

Hot

Beer

Coffee / Tea Hot Chocolate Cappuccino

R8 ($ 1)

R10 ($ 1.50) Peroni R10 ($ 1.50)

Cold

Soft Drinks (200ml)

R8 ($ 1)

Coke / Fanta Orange (330ml)

R9 ($ 1)

Red Bull Energy Drink Fruit Juice Orange Apple Tropical Blend

Apple Ale

R13 ($ 2) R15 ($ 2)

R15 ($ 2)

Sarita Select

Still / Sparkling Mineral Water (500ml) R8 ($ 1)

Appletiser (330ml)

Castle Lager / Lite

Sarita Ruby Dry

Spirits Assorted Whisky R12 ($ 1.50) Rum R19 ($ 2.50)

R6 ($ 1)

R22 ($ 3) R18 ($ 2.50)

Gin

R18 ($ 2.50)

Brandy

R18 ($ 2.50)

Vodka

R18 ($ 2.50)

Wine

R23 ($ 3)

White: Sauvignon Blanc Semi-sweet Red: Merlot / Cabernet Franc Cabernet Sauvignon

Miscellaneous Merchandise

R130

Model 1time Airline MD80 Aircraft Scale 1:200

($ 17)

Kiddies Pack Our VIP passengers on board, up to the age of 12 are given a kiddies’ pack for FREE, to keep them occupied. The pack contains sweets, a pack of crayons and a colouring-in sheet. Let the kids enter the colouring-in competition found in the pack for a chance to win a hamper of 1time goodies. Should you wish to purchase an extra pack, the cost is R12. ($ 1.50) Let us know what you think. Catering comments and suggestions are always welcome. Send an email to our catering manager at catering@1time.co.za



abouTime March 2010