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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2015

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FEWER BUSES: A Greyhound employee in Thunder Bay looks up some ticket information Monday.

Greyhound cuts service in half THUNDER BAY

By Leith Dunick – TB Source reyhound is cutting its service through Thunder Bay in half, at least temporarily. The bus company, starting on Sept. 20, plans to drop the monthly number of trips between Sault Ste. Marie and Winnipeg to one a day. Currently there are two trips available. Heading east to Sault Ste. Marie, the bus will leave at 9:15 a.m. Traveling west to the Manitoba capital, the departure will be at 10:50 a.m. each day. “Due to a decrease in ridership that occurs after the Labour Day weekend, we're implementing a seasonal reduction of our frequency on some routes,” said senior communications specialist Lanesha Gipson in an email to the Sault Star published last week. “We will continue to monitor our capacity and will add extra buses as needed during peak periods, including weekends and holidays, to meet travel demands.” The company will re-evaluate the new schedule next spring, Gipson told the paper. “We typically see an increase in ridership during the summer months, as many of our customers travel on vacation during the summer. We assess our schedules along all corridors, including the actual customer count per trip, to determine which schedules have the largest demand. We've decided to reduce frequency on those schedules that have significantly low ridership.”

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The news does not sit well with the executive of the Northwestern Ontario Municipal Association. “The reduction in services is a major concern in the Northwest because most communities will be gravely impacted,” said Iain Angus, the organization’s vicepresident, adding public input should have occurred before the scheduling changes were implemented. “The reduction forces residents living in the Northwest without a personal vehicle to rely on family, friends, or in many cases emergency medical service paramedics for transportation. Travel to larger centres is necessary for medical appointments or to area DSSAB offices to obtain social assistance.” Angus went on to say, in a release issued on Monday, that successive governments have allowed the inter-city bus service to decay, and in some areas, be eliminated altogether. “While we know that volume levels have been decreasing over the past few years, it’s important to recognize the vastness of the region,” he said. “Providing some form of transportation service is necessary given the distances people must travel between communities.” NOMA has sent a letter to Minister of Transportation Steven Del Duca requesting the present level of service be maintained. Angus also noted in the past governments have subsidized routes with low ridership to ensure access to transportation in affected communities, adding Greyhound is the primary provider of bus service throughout the Northwest.


Thursday, September 17, 2015

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Campaign launched First Nations trying to raise $500K for murdered, missing women F I R S T N AT I O N S By Jon Thompson – TB Source t the halfway point of the federal election campaign, Ontario's First Nations chiefs have announced they won't wait to see whether the next government will call an inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. They'll be leading one themselves. Ontario Regional Chief Isadore Day was in Thunder Bay only days after he made the announcement in Toronto, along with a fundraising campaign to raise the $500,000 chiefs expect they'll need to get started. "What we're doing is getting in behind this call. We're doing things in the meantime," Day said. "It's a really important step launching the campaign for the fundraising but also to demonstrate to people that we're serious and we're not going to wait for any government. We're going to get that work done." Day described the prospective campaign as having "all the makings of a formal inquiry." His office is working with the legal community to ensure witnesses can testify and broader trends can be identified that TAKING TOO LONG: Chief Isadore Day says a murdered and missing indigenous contribute to the 1,200 Aboriginal women fundraising campaign is necessary because they can’t wait for government help. females who have gone missing across Canada since 1980. A website We're also going to be faced with the evidence Day expects the chiefs has already been lauched to connect fact that women that have left our would use to lobby government over communities have been policy and priorities. families and help them tell "We can tie a lot of those social lost, have been forgotten their stories. issues and ills that are happening in about." Day is ready to face We’re not Both the NDP and our communities back to family whatever the truth might be. going to wait Liberals have announced if violence or un-dealt-with grief or untheir parties form the next dealt-with investigations that have "One of those things is for any government, they will call a been swept under the carpet," Day going to be family violence government. national inquiry. For Day, said. in our communities," he We’re going part of making the "Clearly, many people experience said. announcement before post-traumatic stress as a result of "It has been stated that to get that part of this occurs within work done.” Canadians decide what the issues of violence but our communinext government will look ties are going through almost a our communities. Let's ISADORE DAY like is to ensure First collective post traumatic stress and face it: if we're going to go Nations have a blueprint for that's the result of colonial issues and into this process, we need how they want to engage in racism as a result of the systems that to harness responsibility are currently repressing our commuthere as well. That's going to be a that process. The inquiry would also provide nities from doing this work." shared responsibilty across the board.

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Firefighters keep skills sharpened THUNDER BAY By Leith Dunick – TB Source n most communities, fires are few and far between. That’s a good thing for home and business owners, but it makes training tough for firefighters, who often keep their skills sharp through on-the-job training. With fewer real fires to fight, supplemental training is necessary. In Thunder Bay and for many communities throughout Northwestern Ontario – and even northern Minnesota – this means spending a day or two at the annual FireCon simulations. Hosted by Thunder Bay Fire Rescue for the past 25 years and centred at their Intercity-area training facility on Hammond Avenue, this year’s event was the largest yet, with more than 100 firefighters taking part over two days of training. “We’ve never tried to do this many

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firefighters at once. Our largest was 20, I believe for live fires. This year we’ve taken it to a place where we weren’t comfortable going for a while,” said Fire Chief John Hay, overseeing operations. “It’s a big, big event for us and we use it as a tool for us to manage events too. So if there are big events in town, if there’s a big fire in town or a flood, we’ll be practiced in how to manage them across the city.” Firefighters were put through six separate simulations, ranging from propane cylinders, automobiles and backyard barbecues going up in flames, to breathing apparatus management to an interior fire breathing smoke and flames. The fires are all carefully monitored, and use controlled amounts of propane as an accelerant. With so many fires going at once, and so much that can possibly go wrong, caution is the word of the day, said Hay, praising his trainers as among the best Ontario has to offer.

That’s why they brought in Drager Canada to help with the simulations. They have the equipment to make it happen. “We can do this all with propane. It’s environmentally friendly, it’s able to be shut off. If something goes wrong we can shut it down immediately,” Hay said. “We have a burn master that’s running the props for us. And that’s how we’re able to put 120 people through.” Drager’s Joe Drouin said it’s a carefully orchestrated exercise, one that’s as close to an actual fire as possible. “It’s very close to a real fire environment. We’re working with propane, so we might not get the same temperatures, but the fire approach and the tactics they take are exactly the same. They’re seeing what they need to see,” Drouin said. “Yes, it is real fire and it’s hot in there. They’re seeing the rollovers that go across the ceiling that will take you to your knees.”


Thursday, September 17, 2015

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Rusty outlook for NWO employment T H U N D E R B AY

Di Matteo says. “Moreover, much of the decline in Northern Ontario was actually fueled f Southern Ontario is “the new by the Northwest where employment rustbelt,” Northern Ontario's went from a peak of 117,000 in 2003 to 99,800 in 2014.” labour market is even rustier. Di Matteo doesn't expect resource The Economist magazine coined the term in last week's issue, development to rebound until comparing the collapse of Southern commodity prices begin to recover Ontario's manufacturing industry to and even when that happens, he says that of the American Midwest a similarly advanced technology in the mining sector will mean fewer jobs decade ago. It suggests unless investements are will be created. Despite those figures, the North made in value-added production, Ontario's manufacturing future is Superior Workforce Planning Board is observing population growth and bleak. in-migration throughout Lakehead University Northwestern Ontario. economics professor “The North is far from Livio Di Matteo agrees over,” says planning lost manufacturing in the board executive director south is as unlikely to Madge Richardson. return as the pulp and “We need to continue to paper industry is in the encourage people to north. The new move here to sustain our “advanced manufaceconomy and keep turing” that is emerging, building upon it... There he points out, is techno- LIVEO DI MATTEO are jobs, there are job logically-intensive but not vacancies and that's labour-intensive. going to continue becausewe're an aging workforce. There's going to Jobs not there But while the provincial labour be enough jobs for all the markets have rebounded from the Aboriginal population and we're 2008-2009 recession, his data shows going to need a whole lot of people Southern Ontarians have found new moving in from outside the province as well.” jobs where Northerners have not. Consultations are underway to “There has been growth in other sectors of the economy -- services, collect new employment market transportation,tourism, retail -- that data that will be released later in the have created jobs that are replacing fall. Richardson says the Northern those lost in its declining sectors. In Growth Plan was designed to Northern Ontario however, total foresee and respond to fluctuations employment has declined in the in labour markets but the province wake of its manufacturing decline,” either isn't following through on By Jon Thompson - TB Source

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those commitments or it isn't making its findings public. “They had some wonderful indicators within that plan,” she says. “Workforce development was a very important aspect as it is in any economy because they're not going to have any economic activity without the people. We're not going to be able to sustain an economy without people having a wide range of skills and capabilities to be active in that economy. “If they're making strides within that plan, they're not communicating them.”

Combing back Sonja Waino is Richardson's equivalent in the Northwest Training and Adjustment Board. With Alberta's oil boom cooling off, she sees more skilled workers returning home to the region but doesn't think they will be enough to satisfy the appetite for business growth that has already begun. “I think it's coming but it isn't showing up in the numbers yet because it's in the process of happening. What I see as the biggest problem is, we don't have a labour force,” she says. “For too many years, we didn't encourage our youth to go into blue collar jobs, which are wellpaying. We wanted all our kids in university. We have a lot of young graduates but they don't have jobs that suit what they took. “That's where we've been focusing our efforts is to change that theme of thinking because we need our middle class back.”

ANNOUNCEMENT OF SCHEDULE CHANGE EFFECTIVE SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 20TH 2015 Greyhound Canada Transportation ULC announces the following schedule changes along the TransCanada Highway

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Please visit www.greyhound.ca for details

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T h u r s d a y, S e p t e m b e r 17 , 2 0 1 5

Editorial EDITORIAL

Bike lanes make sense orthern Ontario has a higher rate of obesity than the rest of the province. We also smoke more. We drink more. We live, generally speaking, unhealthy lifestyles compared to our average southern Ontario counterpart. But when it comes to bike lanes we’re just like everyone else in Ontario – we’re polarized. Those who like bike lanes, love them. Those who aren’t fans, loathe them. The bike-lane debate reignited last week when a group announced it was preparing to appear in council chambers with a petition supporting the idea of a protected bike lane corridor stretching along May Street and Memorial Avenue. While the feasibility of the idea isn’t entirely known just yet, the theory of a cross-town link to allow for safe cycling is one worthy of support. Having a safe corridor for cyclists to get through the intercity area is desperately needed. Our long winter season is deterrent enough for cycling, the least we can have is infrastructure in place to make the short cycling season inviting and safe. Bike lane opponents point out the “wasteful” spending of bike lane infrastructure. While this infrastructure certainly costs money, it still remains among some of the city’s least expensive investments. Spending any amount of money is worth serious discussion, but to argue that we shouldn’t invest anything in bike lanes simply because they come with a price tag seems more like a tactic to avoid thoughtful discussion.

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C O N TAC T U S : 87 North Hill Street, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7A 5V6 Ph: 807-346-2600 • Fax: 807-345-9923 Editor: Leith Dunick 346-2650 ldunick@dougallmedia.com Reporter: Matt Vis 346-2622 mvis@dougallmedia.com Web Manager: Scott Paradis 346-2527 sparadis@dougallmedia.com Web Reporter: Jamie Smith 346-2591 jsmith@dougallmedia.com Web Reporter: Jon Thompson 346-3558 jthompson@dougallmedia.com Production: proddept@dougallmedia.com Pepper O’Connor 346-2598 Jennifer Chicoine 346-2599 Sales Manager: Kathy Harris 346-2510 kharris@dougallmedia.com Advertising Policy: Ad adjustment for error is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad where the error occurred. Member of: Canadian Community Newspaper Association & Ontario Community Newspaper Association. Thunder Bay Source is published every Friday by T.Bay Post Inc. © Copyright No. 343384.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR NDP intolerant group To the editor: n his letter of Sep. 10, NDP MP John Rafferty is again promising all things to all people. The NDP are a bad joke. They don’t understand economics. They promise balanced budgets, then promise billions more in spending just to buy votes. The NDP don’t understand that the private sector creates jobs, not government. Every dollar government spends inhibits job growth. Mulcair’s promise to raise the federal minimum wage would only affect a small number of federal workers. Thankfully. Raising the minimum wage would be economic suicide. Businesses won’t pay it, they’ll lay off workers instead. Older workers and students would be the first to be laid off. 2015 was a bad year for student employment. It can get worse, much worse. Fewer workers mean less service, unstocked shelves, less sales, lower profits, less tax revenue, higher unemployment, and more welfare. A higher minimum wage would be an economic disaster. The NDP think they are morally superior. This is ridiculous. Mulcair kept evidence of a crime hidden for two years. He’s no boy scout. The NDP pay volunteers, truck in workers from Manitoba for provincial elections, mark ballots for residents of seniors homes, and attack the records of volunteers of other parties. NDP are vicious and intolerant of anyone with opinions different than their own. NDP candidate Andrew Foulds had a ridiculous diatribe in the same paper because Bruce Hyer left the party after the NDP sanctioned him for not goose stepping along with their sub-moronic ideas. Canada can’t afford NDP spending.. Ask Greece how it worked for them. A downturn in the resource sector got us into this recession. The manufacturing sector is starting to lead us out. It will, as long as Canada doesn’t elect idiots that think they can spend their way out of recession.

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James Sutherland, Thunder Bay

Casino continues to harm To the editor: hunder Bay has received more than $36.8 million since the casino opened downtown in August 2000. The city receives around $2.4 million a year as a host community. These amounts represent five per cent of proceeds from slot machines

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Thunder Bay gets and the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation keeps 95 per cent, as well as all revenue from gaming tables, etc. This adds up to a million dollars a week being taken out of circulation from our economy that is struggling. Projections that the casino would attract busloads of tourists bringing cash to the city never materialized. It is mostly local money that should be supporting local businesses and fueling our economic growth that is being sucked away. The five per cent the city gets is a token bribe for approximately a billion dollars in hard cash the casino has taken away in the past 15 years. Initially sold to us as a charity casino, this changed when local charities including our Multicultural Youth Centre have never been compensated for lost bingo revenue from the gaming windfall the city gets. We have to apply to the Ontario Trillium Foundation for grants from a small portion of the gaming proceeds allocated per-capita for the whole region. The casino sponsors community events and provides some jobs. The events are public relations to promote gaming among potential clients in order to reap more profits. On the other hand the jobs created are for taking millions of after-tax dollars from the city. Moreover, the casino does not fund training programs, activities and events for children and youth under

18 years old – dependents who are impacted adversely when family money is gambled away. The area around the casino has seen a slight increase in crime, and more seniors are spending time there. There are also issues with people going almost into bankruptcy. The social and economic conditions in our city are worsening with growing poverty, addictions, homelessness, unemployment, crime and so forth. The casino is to blame for siphoning money local charities relied on to run programs and provide services that helped to make our community better and safer. Our Youth Centre's bingo revenue dropped from $67,527.00 to $10,903.40 after the casino opened. We also lost what we used to get from the roving Monte Carlos. As a result, we have become mere spectators in various cases where we were involving the youth in positive activities and making a difference. Likewise, many volunteer groups also lost the capacity to fundraise. Consequently some have scaled down their operations or folded altogether, leaving a void that has not been filled. City council cannot address the deteriorating social conditions in our community alone. But as long as the casino continues to take away a million dollars a week, local charities will not have financial resources to engage the

grassroots to be part of the solution to problems, offer supports to vulnerable groups and individuals to improve their quality of life, and provide services that enhance our profile and make our community a great place to live and be proud of. It is hard for our economy to rebound and grow when we have growing costly social problems, and there are no new businesses to replace the hard cash the casino is sucking out. Closing the casino would certainly revive the charities' fortunes, and our economy, but this is unlikely to happen. The current OLG talk about privatization offers an opportunity to negotiate a new deal that really benefits our community and the region. The suggestion by Fort William First Nation Chief Peter Collins to move the casino from its downtown location to Big Thunder should be taken seriously as a viable option. Distance would deter spontaneous walk-in gamblers, and a partnership with First Nations using Casino Rama as precedence should see more casino money staying here while we share some with needy communities across Northwestern Ontario. This would be a better strategy to recoup what is being taken from our community daily. Moffat Makuto, Thunder Bay


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Thursday, September 17, 2015

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Perspective

Voting on the fringe

PUT A SMILE ON

Other options exist beyond three main political parties By J.R. Shermack Special to TB Source anada has three main political parties and come Election Day, most Canadians who vote will chose one of them. Unfortunately, the big three can’t please all the people all the time and many voters have trouble relating to mainstream politics. Often, we are faced with the prospect of either picking the best of a bad bunch or holding our noses to vote strategically. But some voters have a more sophisticated political palate and need more creative choices to consider at election time. Counting the Greens, there are only four national parties but there are many others registered in Canada which run smaller slates of candidates, often regionally. There is an Animal Alliance, the Communist Party, the Canadian Action Party and the Christian Heritage Party, not to mention the Marijuana Party and the Pirate Party of Canada. There are others as well that appeal to narrow, and often very dedicated, interest groups. They are all legitimate and if Canada ever dabbles in proportional representation some might eventually be represented in Ottawa. There is yet another group of voters in Canada, and other countries as well, that is disenchanted with politics and votes only as a form of protest.

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They also use elections for their and vote – he declared personal own entertainment and to have a victory after a record turnout at the advance poll that year. few good laughs. Ed the Sock (Stephen Kerzner) Fortunately there have always been several so-called frivolous, plans to continue providing joke or fringe parties to offer bizarre “smartass commentary for a dumbass political establishment”. alternatives to protest voters. Under Australian election law, Many Canadians are familiar with the Rhinoceros Party, offi- anybody with a crazy notion and a cially recognized by Elections few beers could register as a political party and stand for election. Canada in 2007. That might explain the “Sun Their platform includes repealing the law of gravity, promoting Ripened Warm Tomato Party” and higher education by building taller the “Party! Party! Party!”, a shortschools and a lottery with Senate lived political joke that won 8.69% of the vote in 1989. appointments as prizes. Australia has since tightened up New for 2015 is a plan to nationalize Tim Hortons and the Rhinos its regulations. New Zealand’s “Bill and Ben still intend to move Canada’s capital Party” ran on a platform of city to Kapuskasing. no policies, no promises and Although it is defunct, no disappointment. the Canadian Extreme They won enough votes to Wrestling Party made an attempt to enter federal “They are all get back their $1000 regislegitimate... tration fee, which they politics in April 2000. promptly spent at a bar in That year, in the riding some might of St. John’s West, pro eventually be Invercargill, a hotbed of B&B support. wrestler Quentin Barbini The Hungarian “Twobeat eleven other represented.” Tailed Dog Party” promised wrestlers and become eternal life, world peace, a leader of CEWP. one-day work week and two CEWP’s candidate, Sailor King “Moondog” White sunsets a day in various colors. In the 2008 Budapest Mayoral garnered a total of five votes in a federal byelection with the rallying Election their pledge was “More everything. Less nothing.” cry, “Ottawa needs a Moondog”. I think many Canadians enjoy a In our 2011 federal election, well-known sock puppet, Ed the little levity with their politics – just Sock, announced he was running look at Tom Mulcair’s comments for prime minister as a candidate about the “Pee-gate” scandal. Satire is a very high form of politfor the Fed Up (FU) Party. The gravelly-voiced puppet ical discussion and some constituents encouraged people to just get out prefer to vote on the fringe.

MATT VIS

OPINION

FOR A GOOD CAUSE: Tim Hortons franchise owner Jennie Prepp shows off a tray of smile cookies. Proceeds from all smile cookies sold this week will be donated locally to Toys for Tots.

HOW TO WRITE US:

Opera at the Lakehead A century ago, people had to make their own entertainment. Some of that entertainment was of excellent quality. This unidentified opera, set in what appears to be Medieval times, dates from the 1910s and probably featured a sizeable orchestral accompaniment.

etters to the editor are most welcome. Those kept to 350 words or less have priority.

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HELD UP AGAIN: A customer waits outside the Mac’s on Oliver Road.

Mac’s robbed olice are looking for leads on two men who robbed a Mac's convenience store at knifepoint early Tuesday morning. Just before 2 a.m., the men fled the Mac's Oliver Road outlet on foot with an undisclosed amount of money. One was wearing a hoodie with sunglasses while the other pulled a scarf over his face. Thunder Bay Police Services would welcome any information regarding this incident through calling the police or Thunder Bay District Crime Stoppers at 623-8477.

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Collision kills one, injures four ne person is dead and four people were sent to hospital on Wednesday after a Highway 17 collision last Wednesday east of Ignace. Police say 48-year-old Bimal Adhikari of Kenora was killed after an eastbound vehicle crossed the centre line and colided with an SUV headed the other direction. Adhikari was the driver of the eastbound vehicle, according to Kenora OPP. The female passenger in his vehicle was in critical condition and a male passenger was in stable condition. The woman was transported to Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre for treatment while the male was taken to Dryden The driver and passenger of the other vehicle suffered serious injuries, but were listed in stable condition. A post-mortem was scheduled for last Thursday.

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Body recovered from river body has been recovered from the Kaministiquia River, city police have confirmed. Thunder Bay Police Service officials said a passerby spotted a body floating in the river east of Hardisty Street, south of Arthur Street, just before 12:30 p.m. last Wednesday. Officers responded to the scene with CP police to investigate. The body was recovered from the water. Police say it appeared the deceased was in the water for “some time,” and are searching through their missing persons database.

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Public help sought in Fresh Air fire olice are now being asked to join the investigation into last month's devastating fire at Fresh Air Experience. Flames and heavy smoke were seen coming from the building on the night of Aug. 28, resulting in heavy smoke damage to the interior of the building. Fire Marshal investigator Tim Irish said he's waiting for fire samples to be tested.

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T H U N D E R B AY By Leith Dunick – TB Source ntario selling Hydro One to the private sector would be a mistake, says a group of protestors attempting a last-ditch effort to convince Premier Kathleen Wynne to put the brakes on the plan. About two dozen opponents of the plan marched through the downtown north core to Minister of Northern Development and Mines Michael Gravelle’s Algoma Street office on Thursday, seeking an audience with the long-time MPP. There are just too many risks and unknowns involved, said Terri Dimini with the Citizen’s Community Alliance Against Privatization. “There’s a long history that shows privatization costs us more in the long run,” she said. “Everybody relies on hydro all the time now. Everything is connected, all our computers, laptops, TVs, cellphones. “Everything is so reliant on hydro that if we don’t keep it public and ensure that it’s maintained properly, then it will cost us in the long run, both financially and in longer blackouts and power outages.” Described as one of the largest privatizations in Ontario’s history, the province under Wynne’s guidance plans to sell off 60 per cent of Hydro One. Of the money raised through the sale, $4 billion would pay for new

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STOP SALE: The proposed sale of Hydro One to the private sector draws protest. transit lines, while $5 billion would be applied to Ontario’s debt. Demini said she’s hopeful protests like the one in Thunder Bay can have an impact and convince the premier and her government to reconsider. “I think the more that we get together and have these rallies, it shows we’re not going to sit down and just take it,” she said. “There are a lot of people who think it’s a done deal and that there’s

nothing that’s going to change the fact that Premier Wynne is going to sell Hydro One. And that’s not the case. It’s not a done deal yet. It’s not a done deal until she sells off that first public offering and we’re hoping we can stop that.” Union activist Kim Chicago said they’ve met with Minister of Natural Resources Bill Mauro, Thunder Bay’s other representative at Queen’s Park.

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Thursday, September 17, 2015

MAKE A DIFFERENCE RECYCLE

LIVE ON LOCATION 1018 Victoria Avenue

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2015 11am -3pm

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L O C A L NEWS

City tries to get the lead out THUNDER BAY By Jon Thompson – TB Source ne in 10 older homes have lead concentrations in their tap water that exceeds the legal limit but the city believes it has the solution. In December, its environment division will begin a pilot project to add a small amount of sodium hydroxide into the water system of 600 Current River residences. Of the 30,000 homes connected to the municipal waterworks, 8,000 were constructed prior to 1950 and most of those draw water through lead or copper pipes on private property. Environmental planning and research analyst Erin Marcella-Fui said since the province mandated all cities to develop Corrosion Control Plans in 2007, sample testing of those older homes has shown 10 per cent have more than the legal maximum lead levels of 10 parts per billion. Cities like Hamilton, Sault Ste. Marie and London, Ontario have found adding the sodium hydroxide

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to drinking water has decreased lead content from pipe erosion while not impacting the water's odour or taste. "Absolutely, it's safe," MarcellaFui said. "Sodium hydroxide used in a certain concentration, is absolutely approved and safe." Lake Superior's pH level at the Bare Point Water Treatment Plant is already relatively high, she pointed out. That makes sodium hydroxide an ideal chemical to increase the alkalinity only slightly. "If it's successful in reducing the amount of lead leaching into the drinking water and does not compromise our disinfection process, it will be city-wide," Marcella-Fui said, adding that expansion is planned for late 2016. Current River was chosen as the pilot site because it's the smallest pressure zone that has a high concentration of older homes. The city's chemist will attend an open house at the Current River Community Centre on Thursday between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. to address community questions and concerns.

JON THOMPSON

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PILOT PROJECT:Environmental planning and research analyst Erin Marcella-Fui.


Thursday, September 17, 2015

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

L O C A L NEWS

Do you have an opinion to share? E-mail the editor at ldunick@dougallmedia.com

Council considering Memorial bike lane CITY HALL By Jamie Smith – TB Source ity council is considering a safer alternative for cyclists on Memorial Avenue. Council unanimously called for administration to look into building the Memorial Link, a proposed fivekilometre protected bike lane that would run between Miles Street and John Street, giving cyclists a safe North-South corridor to travel the city. Dean Stamler, who's heading up the campaign with more than 1,000 signatures from people across Thunder Bay, told council Monday night that the idea would be safer for everyone, not just cyclists. For too long the city has been planned around cars, the worst example being Memorial Avenue, where there is no safe way for bikes to travel right now. "Memorial is now terrible for anything but cars," Stamler said. "If we continue down this path it's only going to get worse." Stamler said that cyclists either ride illegally on sidewalks or dangerously, for both cyclists and drivers, on the road on Memorial and May Street. The link would turn the street's boulevard into a bike path, separated from the road with a buffer. He showed countless examples from all over the world with concrete treelined boulevards separating the

LEITH DUNICK

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BUSY ROUTE: A cyclist checks traffic while traveling down Memorial Avenue. traffic. While some might see the proposed $2-5 million price tag as a roadblock, Stamler said a lot of that money would be needed to relocate utilities, traffic lights and other things that would already be spent when the city did roadwork. "The money is going to get spent anyway," Stamler said. It's why the group proposes that the link could be built gradually when other work is being done. Coun. Iain Angus asked if staging the project might lead to a road to nowhere, leaving parts of it unfin-

ished. "A road to nowhere is better than no road at all," Stamler said. “The people who ride it now just want something and want it to start.” Coun. Aldo Ruberto said he knows some people might be concerned about the price tag. Safety and quality of life will eventually win out though like it did after council spent $1 million on the waterfront skatepark. "People thought we were crazy and it turned out to be one of the best investments we’ve ever made in our youth," Ruberto said.

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Thursday, September 17, 2015

Returning this fall BIG BANG THEORY SPECIAL TIME Monday, September 21 at 7:30pm.

GOTHAM Monday, September 21 at 8pm.

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

EVENINGS THIS FALL DON’T MISS THE DRAMA!!! SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

CASTLE Monday, September 21 at 10pm. The Big Bang Theory

GREY’S ANATOMY Thursday, September 24 at 8pm.

HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER Thursday, September 24 at 10pm.

8:00 Once Upon A Time

Gotham

Blood & Oil

Blindspot

The Flash

Arrow

The Goldbergs

The Amazing Race

Criminal Minds

Saving Hope

Grimm

9:00

BLUE BLOODS

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Friday, September 25 at 10pm.

ONCE UPON A TIME Sunday, September 27 at 8pm.

AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D. Tuesday, September 29 at 9pm.

CRIMINAL MINDS Wednesday, September 30 at 9pm.

THE FLASH Tuesday, October 6 at 8pm.

CSI: CYBER Tuesday, October 6 at 10pm.

ARROW Wednesday, October 7 at 8pm.

10:00 Quantico

Castle

CSI: Cyber

Code Black

How To Get Away With Murder Blue Bloods

New this fall BLINDSPOT

BLOOD & OIL

A beautiful woman is found naked and covered in tattoos in Times Square with no idea who she is. The one name she does have is FBI Agent Kurt Weller – tattooed on her back. Together, they will follow the road map on her body to find the answers.

Dreaming of a new life, Billy and Cody moved to North Dakota after the biggest oil discovery in American History. But their dreams never included a ruthless tycoon who would force them to put everything on the line, including their marriage.

Premieres Monday, September 21 at 9:00pm.

QUANTICO The FBI’s Quantico trains only the best of the best. Recruits are extensively investigated and tested, long before they even begin training. So how is it that one of them managed to mastermind the biggest attack on New York City since 9/11?

Premieres Sunday, September 27 at 10:00pm.

Premieres Sunday, September 27 at 9:00pm.

CODE BLACK Welcome to the most notorious ER in the nation – where the patients outweigh the resources. Here, the doctors and nurses do high-risk procedures and work with the most critical cases who have come to them either to die … or to find a miracle.

Premieres Wednesday, September 30 at 10:00pm.


Thursday, September 17, 2015

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

Returning this fall NCIS: Los Angeles

EVENINGS THIS FALL

Returning this fall BONES

DON’T MISS THE ACTION!!!

Monday, September 21 at 10:00pm.

NCIS

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Wednesday, September 30 at 9:00pm.

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

CHICAGO PD

FRIDAY

Tuesday, September 22 at 8:00pm.

Wednesday, September 30 at 10:00pm.

Angel From Hell

NCIS: New Orleans

THE BLACKLIST

8:00 Madam Secretary

Tuesday, September 22 at 9:00pm.

Supergirl

Survivor

NCIS

Heroes Reborn

Truth Be Told

Thursday, October 1 at 9:00pm.

9:00

SURVIVOR: CambodiaSecond Chance Wednesday, September 23 at 8:00pm.

MADAM SECRETARY The Good Wife

HAWAII Five-O Friday, September 25 at 9:00pm.

10:00

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Minority Report

NCIS: New Orleans

The Blacklist

Bones

Sunday, October 4 at 8:00pm.

Hawaii Five-O

THE GOOD WIFE

The Simpsons

The Simpsons

NCIS: Los Angeles

Limitless

Chicago PD

Elementary

Sunday, October 4 at 9:00pm.

Canadian Crime Stories

New this fall MINORITY REPORT

LIMITLESS

HEROES REBORN

A man haunted by his visions of the future and a cop haunted by her past mistakes work together in secret to stop the worst crimes of 2065 before they happen. But when they begin to rely on the help of others, they may be putting themselves at risk.

Using the brain-boosting power of the drug NZT, Brian Finch (Jake McDorman) is a criminal’s worst nightmare and the FBI’s greatest asset. However, his friend Senator Mora (Bradley Cooper) also uses NZT and he has his own plans for his new protégé.

A year ago, a terrorist attack left Odessa, Texas decimated. Blamed for the event, those with extraordinary abilities have gone into hiding. Some heroes will return. Others will emerge. Together, they are destined to save the world.

Premieres Monday, September 21 at 9:00pm.

TRUTH BE TOLD This is the story of two talkative couples who are both neighbours and best friends. They analyze everything and no topic is off limits: from sex and race to the new babysitter who may or may not be a porn star. Nothing is out of bounds, truth be told.

Premieres Friday, October 16 at 8:30pm.

Premieres Tuesday, September 22 at 10:00pm.

Premieres Thursday, September 24 at 8:00pm.

SUPERGIRL

ANGEL FROM HELL

Based on the DC Comics character, after a dozen years in hiding, Kara Zor-El, Superman’s cousin, decides to become the hero she was meant to be. With the help of a secret agency, Supergirl protects the citizens of National City from sinister threats.

Amy (Maggie Lawson) is an intense, driven doctor who is being followed by a strange woman (Jane Lynch) claiming to be her “guardian angel.” She may be a nut, but so far, all her warnings have come true. So maybe a weird new friend is just what Amy needs.

Premieres Monday, October 26 at 8:30pm.

Premieres Friday, November 6 at 8:00pm.

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Thursday, September 17, 2015

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

L O C A L NEWS

Teacher frustration mounts

government refuses to return to the table and refuses to speak with us, that may come down the road at some point, but we’re certainly ike Judge said other than the classroom, doing our very best to make sure that schools there’s no place elementary school are up and running and teachers are in the teachers in Ontario would rather be than at classrooms ready to receive students and offer them quality instruction.” the bargaining table. The province made an offer on Friday, but But the provincial government is making it then left the bargaining session. difficult, said Judge, the local presJudge said Education Minister Liz ident of the Elementary Teachers Sandals’ move is frustrating for Federation of Ontario, after union everyone involved. leadership on Monday rejected the “We still want to be at the table. province’s “cookie-cutter” We’re asking for dates and waiting approach to reaching labour deals for the government to respond,” with all of Ontario’s teachers. Judge said. As a result teachers have threat“I’m not sure the government is ened to escalate their strike action willing to provide any justification if a new contract can’t be reached for their tactics at this point, but and both the province and the we’re all kind of left wondering.” Ontario Public School Boards MIKE JUDGE Education Minister Liz Sandals, Association doesn’t start negotiating with a clear resolve to get an acceptable who presented an offer to teachers last Friday contract done that fits the needs of elemen- before walking away from the bargaining session, said the ball is in ETFO president tary school teachers. But Judge said that doesn’t mean a work-to- Sam Hammond’s court. “We need to hear from Mr. Hammond what rule approach. “We’re not simply going to have knee-jerk he does accept and what he doesn’t accept,” reactions when the government wants to walk she told the Toronto Sun. “I think the onus is away from the table,” he said, reached by really on him why what was acceptable to phone in Toronto, where he joined union offi- other teachers — both secondary and elementary — why that isn’t acceptable for his cials for a news conference. “If there has to be an escalation because the members.”

LABOUR

By Leith Dunick – TB Source

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Judge said the deal offered to high school teachers and Catholic board teachers earlier this year was not a one-size-fits-all solution for teachers across the province. It’s a bit of stretch to think so, he added. First of all, the first two deals had plenty of differences. And it’s too soon for that anyway, Judge said. “At this point, ETFO is still in the middle of negotiating items of working conditions. They haven’t even gotten to the full scope of a contract. So they’re still in the middle stages of this process when the government simply picked up and walked out,” Judge said. “And the mediator completely agrees with that, that it’s the government that’s walked away from the table. There was no commonthread contract that was put on the table.” Judge was adamant the union would not buckle in its resolve. “I can tell you at this point that ETFO is not going to agree to concessions that would gut contracts or set us back decades in terms of things that were fairly bargained over the years,” he said. “This is not at all about money at any point. Money hasn’t even been tabled yet.” Instead this is about the OPSBA trying to gain further claw-backs into teacher working conditions, he said.


Thursday, September 17, 2015

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

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L O C A L NEWS POLICE BRIEFS

Witnesses sought in hit-and-run itnesses are being sought in a hit-and-run Saturday night involving a pedestrian. Police, in a release issued on Monday, say the incident occurred just before midnight at the intersection of Waterloo Street and Brunswick Avenue. A 42-year-old woman was found on the ground on the right shoulder of Brunswick Avenue.. She was conscious and said she was struck by what appeared to be a vehicle resembling a PT Cruiser. She didn’t speak to the driver, as the vehicle immediately left the scene of the incident. The woman was then taken to hospital with serious, but non-lifethreatening injuries.

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Police said the collision took place near a busy coffee-shop drive through and are asking anyone who might have seen something to contact the traffic unit at 684-1226.

Crash kills 3 people ntario Provincial Police have released the identity of three people killed in a tragic motor-vehicle collision early Sunday morning near Dryden. In a release issued on Monday, police says that Aaron Thrones, 20, Todd Bousfield, 23 and Davi Arnold 23, were killed when their vehicle collided with a tractor trailer near Airport Road. The collision closed Highway 17

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completely for approximately six hours. Charges are not pending, though the investigation continues.

Weapons arrest hunder Bay Police have arrested a lone male after a weapons incident in the downtown south core on Friday night. Police, in a release, say the initial call stated a lone male had been seen waving and pointing what turned out to be a replica handgun at people in the vicinity of May and Arthur streets. A brief standoff ensured after the suspect was located in a nearby apartment. Police blocked off a

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portion of the downtown area while the standoff was occuring. Police originally said they apprehended a second man, but in a second release confirmed only one suspect was arrested. No injuries occurred, police said.

Several firearms were seized from the suspect’s residence. No injuries occurred and police have not named the suspect at this time.

Gun pointed

A deadly house fire in Nipigon has claimed two lives in Nipigon. The community’s volunteer fire department responded to the blaze early Sunday morning and found a home fully engulfed in flames. The Ontario Provincial Police told CFNO News that two elderly people were found deceased in the home. Names have not been released. The fire marshal’s office, along with the OPP, is investigating.

hunder Bay Police say they’re investigating a second incident involving a man waving a gun at people on the street. In a release issued early on Saturday, police say they arrested a 32-year-old man, without incident, after reports of a male suspect in a vehicle following three occupants of another vehicle.

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Nipigon fire kills 2


Thursday, September 17, 2015

LU goes international

Police backing off bylaw duty

EDUCATION

olice aren't responding to city bylaw infractions. Barking dogs, noisy parties and certain other bylaw enforcement was taking up too much time, especially at night when those calls were tying up officers from responding to more serious matters. Thunder Bay Police Services chief J.P. Levesque said that's the reason the service's annual report shows that officers were dispatched to more than 2,000 calls in 2013 as opposed to last year. "It's a bit of a waste of police resources," Levesque said Wednesday morning after a police service board meeting. "It's not an uncommon practice in policing." Police will instead refer those calls to the city's bylaw enforcement office. The annual report also shows that while the number of homicides were a record-high of 11 last year, violent crimes in general were down by almost 70 last year over 2013. Total property crimes were up by more than 170. Other offences, from bail violations to prostitution, were down 60 last year over 2013. J.P. Levesque said while he respects Statistics Canada's crime severity index, which put the city as the most violent in Canada last year, the raw data looks a lot different when the number of cases are considered.

anding at university fresh out of high school is tough enough. Combining this with acclimatizing one’s self to a new country and culture adds a whole new dimension to the post-secondary mix. Abdullah Alamari arrived at Lakehead University two years ago from Saudi Arabia, unsure of what the Canadian experience would bring. On Wednesday he took part in a special orientation event for first-year international students, aimed at helping foreign students make the adjustment to life in Canada and familiarize themselves with the services the City of Thunder Bay has to offer. “It’s so different from Saudi Arabia, the atmosphere – everything is different,” said Alamari, a third-year engineering student. “It might be a big culture shock.” International students are big business at Lakehead University. And no wonder. Unlike domestic students, anyone studying on a domestic visa at the Thunder Bay campus can expect to

L Saturday, September 19, 2015 11a.m.-3p.m.

L O C A L NEWS

L O C A L NEWS

By Leith Dunick – TB Source

470-C Hodder Avenue

Thursday, September 17, 2015

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

pay about three times as much for the privilege. A first-year arts program tuition costs $7,049, while international students can expect to pay $20,277. With more students, bringing in more cash, the school is doing its best to make them feel at home. Nancy Gallo, the associate director of Lakehead University International, said the student intake from foreign countries is on pace to match last year’s total. About 200 took part at the orientation lunch. “I think with declining enrollments overall, at all university and colleges from the domestic part of it, the international part of it becomes more attractive for us,” Gallo said. “And also, just to create diversity in the community. We haven’t had this kind of diversity for many years, so this is really nice to see groups coming in from abroad.” For now the school continues to target China, India and most countries in southeast Asia. But students are also arriving from Brazil, Mexico, Africa and the United States. Wednesday’s orientation, part of a

BACK TO CLASS: Students take part in orientation week at Lakehead University. campus-wide effort for all incoming first-year students, is that little extra effort the school puts on to make international students feel welcome. “They need to get to know our culture, our campus a little bit better, the services the city provides they may not be aware of,” Gallo said.

This includes cell-phone providers, banks and the multicultural association – contacts she feels they may need during the course of the school year. Obstacles for students to overcome extend beyond the classroom. Those coming from the Middle East or southeast Asia, for example, have to deal with a much cooler climate and the city’s famed harsh winters. There’s also visa issues that prevent or delay some foreign students from getting into the country on their first attempt. Abdullah said he’s glad to see an orientation event like Wednesday’s being put on by the school, adding there was nothing nearly this large in 2013, when he first enrolled. “It’s needed for international students, especially kids from Europe or Saudi Arabia or Africa or wherever,” he said. “They’re kind of alone here, so by doing this orientation, and showing them around, they’ll feel (welcome) here to start school.” Gallo said it’s too soon to provide exact international student enrollment numbers. The deadline to enroll is Sept. 25.

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NOT RESPONDING:City police chief J.P. Levesque says the force won’t enforce bylaw matters.

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Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m.

Phone:

FILE

Live on Location

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

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Knox Shuniah United Church 1 Shuniah Street • 345-5065 knoxshun@tbaytel.net http://knoxshuniahunited.webs.com Sunday Service @ 10:30 a.m. followed by Potluck Luncheon & Congregational Meeting. Worship Service Leader: Rev. Ann Camber Director of Music: Betty E. White Sunday School lovingly provided.

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Thursday, September 17, 2015

Life

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

Do you have an opinion to share? E-mail the editor at ldunick@dougallmedia.com

TB

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LIFESAVING GIFT: Terry Gallant (right) credits his friend Jennifer De Bakker’s organ donation for allowing him to survive kidney failure seven years ago.

‘I knew I had to help him’ Kidney Walk brings organ and financial donors together to boost cause THUNDER BAY

By Jon Thompson – TB Source

aybe it's a special kind of friend who gives a kidney to save a life. Maybe anyone could be that kind of a friend to a stranger. For almost all of 2008, Terry Gallant was taking dialysis 11 hours a day for kidney failure. Had his friend Jennifer de Bakker decided not to donate her kidney, he doubted he'd be at Sunday's Kidney Walk seven years later. Instead, the owner of Ozone and Street Legal walked Thunder Bay's waterfront with his new bride and donated the money his family and staff raised to help families in his situation. "I'm here today because of the wonderful gift of Jennifer and without that, I probably wouldn't be here today so I understand where people are with very little hope. I think we as a community can get behind

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that and rally and try to give a little more hope to people who are waiting." De Bakker was afraid at first when she and a group of friends were tested to see whether her kidneys would be a match for Gallant. "Most definitely, it was scary. It's the unknown of how you'll feel afterwards but seeing him healthy and happy is truly a miracle," she said. "I don't think I thought of it too much until I was a match. Once I knew I was a match, I knew I had to help him." Marion Harms is the local chapter coordinator for the Canadian Kidney Foundation. She was encouraging those who turned up for the one-kilometre or three-kilometre walks to fill out donor cards that would support those living with kidney disease, whose numbers have tripled over the last 20 years. "The importance of having the walk is to make people aware one in 10 people have kidney disease," Harms said.

"We're trying to get people to see their doctor and make sure they don't have kidney disease because it's a silent killer." Nine people are on a list awaiting a donor at the Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre but Ron Fetala isn't among them. He rode a motorized scooter for the walk with a sign taped to the seat's rear that read, "I'm walking for me." Fetala has been a cancer survivor since the same year Gallant had his kidney transplant. He does dialysis three times a week to compensate for the damage the bladder cancer did to his kidneys. One was removed and the other failed in 2014. Unrelated breathing problems make his doctors doubtful he'd survive the operation so he wheeled the walk for research. "It's just one day at a time," he said. "I've fought through lots of things through my life so I'm used to fighting. As long as I live a good and peaceful life, I'm happy."


Thursday, September 17, 2015

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

TB Life

Local growing scene thriving live in a small township. Around us are very big ones due to amalgamation that took place several years ago. But despite our Lilliputian size, we have five commercial market gardeners who sell at the Thunder Bay Country Market in town. I was thinking of them as my wife, Laura, and I were harvesting the tomatoes broccoli and other vegetables from our garden hoping to beat the first serious frost of this autumnal season. But five market gardeners alone in this bite-sized township. This revelation came as a shock. I remember some chap way out past Pass Lake on the way to Silver Islet who trundled to town each week to sell his produce at the farmers’ market then situated on Wilson Street. And while two of our local market gardeners have been at it for several years, three of the five are new to this bucolic pursuit. I knew about Shannon. Her moniker is The Squash Lady. She has been a market gardener for 13 years although it was only a couple of years ago that she and her husband Dan started ploughing up their backyard, which is a relative term out in the country. They planted squash plus sweet corn, cucumbers, and zucchini. They purchased a large greenhouse and added bedding out plants to their inventory. But then my neighbour, Mike, informed me about the other four market gardeners.

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FRED JONES RURAL ROOTS

Up the road, another member of the family, Bill and Jenny Groenheide of Tarrymore Farms also ploughed up one of their fields and started to make long rows in which to plant veggies. This is their fourth year investing time and sweat into that venture growing kale, chard, cabbages, squash, pickling cucumbers, onions, carrots and beets. Jenny and Bill first got started in 1999 raising and selling lamb and brown eggs and now beef and brown eggs. Their son, Robert, in Neebing Township has taken over the lamb side of things. Down in the village of Hymers, this is the second year for Mark Jantunen with his Whitefish Valley Vegetables. He inherited a plot of land owned by his grandfather that was allowed to lie fallow for years. It has been a struggle but Mark’s determination has brought back the land and made it productive, already raising enough to sell at the market. Then there is Renata Webber and Mile Hill Farms. She and her husband Moe have

been in the business for 10 years. They too have a field full of rows of cultivated vegetables of onions, beets, kale, garlic, and zucchini plus storage vegetables like parsnips, rutabagas, squash and peas - all the varieties that can be stored over the winter. Renata shares a table at the market with Evalisa Miccol-Fitzpatrick of Root Cellar Gardens who lives just down the road. Evalisa is just starting out, this being her first year also growing ‘storage’ vegetables. She has built a tall fence around her large garden to keep out rabbits, deer and bears that looks formidable. Evalisa also belongs to the Superior Seed Producers collective and grows veggies to produce seed that gardeners can purchase at the market. Outside of our wee township there is the Belluz family who grow and sell fruits, vegetables and pumpkins. Don and Claire have been a successful farming institution for decades. There are no doubt several other market gardeners living and thriving around the area of Thunder Bay but I have yet to learn who they are. I do know if you go to the Thunder Bay Country Market either Wednesday evenings or Saturday mornings, you can make their acquaintance and be the beneficiaries of their hard work. Yum!

Community Living Thunder Bay Walk for Inclusion Sunday, September 20, 2015 10:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Monty Parks Centre, 450 Fort William Road Supporting people with an intellectual disability to participate fully in community life

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Thursday, September 17, 2015

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

TB Life Grace Church will begin the Alpha Course on Wednesday September 23, at 6:30 pm 289 N. Court St. This 9 week practical introduction to the Christian faith offers answers to some key questions. Each weekly session begins with an informal dinner, followed by a video and ends with small group discussion and interaction.

Grace Church Sunday Service

JAMIE SMITH

10:30am Worship Service Children’s Program Toddlers to Grade 6, Supervised Nursery. For more information about our programs, please call: Grace Church, 289 Court St. N. 807-343-4263 or check out our website www.gracechurchthunderbay.com

CANINE RALLY: People and their pets rallied outside city hall Monday night in support of the area humane society.

No decision from council Humane Society seeks funding help to launch spay and neuter clinic THUNDER BAY

By Jamie Smith – TB Source he humane society is looking for the city's help to bring a spay and neuter clinic to the region. The Thunder Bay and District Humane Society is looking at a three-phase $2.2 million project that would first build a high-volume clinic, something that's missing between North Bay and the Manitoba border. It would also help the city's animal services by providing a low-cost spay and neuter option and result in fewer animals being euthanized. On Monday the humane society said that cities

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BENEFITTING

near high volume clinics report a decrease of up to 40 per cent in animals in shelters, which reduces costs. The second phase would see an animal centre with the third phase seeing a mobile spay and clinic to reach First Nations and other remote communities. The humane society is looking for $40,000 from the city and fees for things like building permits, estimated at around $16,000, waived. Council couldn't make a decision Monday. Before city council Monday around 20 people and their dogs rallied at city hall in support of the project.

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Thursday, September 17, 2015

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TB Life

Getting ready for the fall bounty MICK BOHONIS OUTDOOR LIFE he best time of the year to share food is when we get to do so with family and friends. Times like Christmas, birthdays, Easter, Thanksgiving and of course summer barbecues. To some that may be the only time of the year, but to a lot of outdoorsmen this sharing escalates when the hunting season rolls around when the bounty of wild game and the harvests of gardens and crop fields abound. With the moose and deer season just around the corner, there is no doubt that many hunters will be having some great success and will be enjoying tasty venison, whether in the form of sausages or some thick steaks. There is just something about serving a moose roast and a side of fresh potatoes and veggies to the family around the dining room table. Subconsciously your mind tells you it does indeed taste better than if it was bought and served from the grocery store. Why is it that food always tastes better in the great outdoors or when you harvest or grow it yourself? Why is it that a moose sausage tastes much better when it is roasted on a stick over a camp fire, rather than boiled on the stove at home? No matter what you’re eating it seems to please

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your taste buds a lot more when it is not eaten in the confines of your lunch room at work or sitting at the kitchen table at home. A simple bologna sandwich tastes much better when you're fishing in the boat rather than chomping on it at work in your cubicle. For some reason food always appeals more when it is eaten at your picnic table even if it’s in your backyard. There is a different taste when food is prepared over an open fire or a barbecue as compared to a conventional stove or oven. Not too many years ago, food was prepared over open flame on a regular basis as the modern stove is a mere infant in time. One hundred years in the time frame of 50,000 years is a relatively short span that modern day society has used electricity to darken and cook food. Thousands of years ago there were no modern day ovens that allowed you to slide a cookie sheet of pre-made fat infested easy bake cookies in and ready in seven minutes for the kids with a jug of Kool-Aid on the side. Rather, it was a piece of fire charred bannock or a skinned rabbit slow cooked on a spit over an open flame and done so quite plainly. How we look at preparing food today is quite interesting especially when it comes to wild game. So many people are intimidated by eating wild game. It boggles my mind how many folks do shun wild game. A lot of my hunting buddies’ wives will not eat moose or deer. Some won't even eat fresh walleye fillets. It’s almost a given that when guests show up to this house for dinner you are either going to be

eating venison, fish or upland game bird prepared as well if not better than the finest restaurants in Thunder Bay can do. Contrary to popular belief, venison, which includes deer and moose, is much more lean and carries a lot more protein than conventional domesticated beef. It is much better for you than a lot of the store bought cuts. There have been many studies done over the years by several universities and all were conclusive in their findings that wild game meats and fish were by far superior in their quality for human consumption. Wild game meat in this house has been served to many folks who to this day have no idea what they were eating. Has it made their skin turn green? Has it made them sick? Has it changed their lives in any way? Did it make them walk sideways? For some reason, people can get this idea if they eat moose meat, something bad is going to happen to them. In reality, a moose is a wild domesticated beef cow, running around the north woods and nothing more. With the big game season in full swing, it's a nobrainer thousands of hunters are hitting the woods in quest of that moose or big deer, and just as many freezers will be filled with protein rich venison to enjoy over the winter. If the moose or deer is field dressed and hung properly, the end result will be a lot of very tasty steaks, roasts and sausage to enjoy. I'm hoping by season’s end, my freezer will be one of them. When this goes to print I will be immersed in the deer woods, sitting in a tree stand, bow in hand, hoping to do the same.

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TB Life

Festival brings traffic to south downtown Thousands take in neighbourhood businesses during Fort William Fall Street Festival THUNDER BAY

number of businesses in this area as well as eateries and whatnot. Just come and join in and revisit those places f all the local summer street festi- again and just get in with the festival vals, the one held in the South Core idea, get in and have some fun." The layout of the eighth annual event on Saturday felt the most like a strolling snaked past 50 businesses from the tour of neighbourhood businesses. intersection at Victoria Ave. Downtown Fort William has and May St. through natural crannies for artists and McKellar, Justice and Brodie performers through its streets “We just Streets. The ride ended on and alleys. want people Archibald St. where human For many of the 5,000 to come and hamster balls, clown shenanipeople, the festival was an gans, pony rides and bouncy opportunity to revisit a revisit, recastles turned the commercial commercial district that has establish event into a wholesome been shaken and stirred over themselves in family outing. the last few years. the area.” "We had an excellent "We just want people to turnout today and I think it's come and revisit, re-establish ELLEN LEITERMAN all part and parcel to do with themselves with the area," the weather, as well as a said Fort William District BIA number of events that are happening coordinator Ellen Leiterman. "People tend to forget there are a here," Leiterman said. By Jon Thompson – TB Source

JON THOMPSON

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RIDING IN STYLE: There were many different ways for people to tour the south downtown during the Fort William Fall Street Festival.


Thursday, September 17, 2015

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23

TB Life

City celebrates royalty milestone Queen Elizabeth II becomes longestserving U.K. monarch T H U N D E R B AY

said she wanted to celebrate with the city as the monarchy is a big part of her heritage. "It was very very nice to hear," is Angus got to experience something that comes along once in a Korcheski said of the speeches, bagpipes and toast that marked the lifetime. At 97, Angus took in Thunder Bay's event. "I just think it's wonderful that she's celebration of Queen Elizabeth II becoming the longest-reigning U.K as old as she is and she served for so long. For 63 years that's monarch. really quite something." Around noon last Wednesday The Queen officially 89-year-old Elizabeth surpassed “To see her ascended to the throne on her great-great-grandmother come from Feb. 6, 1952 following the Queen Victoria, who reigned this child to death of her father, King for 63 years and 216 days. George VI. "It's just a thrill to be here and adulthood Acting mayor Coun. celebrate," Angus said and carry on Shelby Ch'ng said it was Wednesday afternoon at city as she has important for the city to hall. it’s been commemorate the mile"To see her come from this child to adulthood and carry on marvelous.” stone for someone who's done so much for as she has it's been marvelous SIS ANGUS Canada. to see that." "I think its important to Angus' friend Ann Korcheski, originally from Scotland honour the monarchy because they do where the Queen spent the day play a big part in how we interact with Wednesday to help reopen a railway, our history and our culture," she said.

By Jamie Smith – TB Source

JAMIE SMITH

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RAISE A GLASS: Coun. Shelby Ch’ng toasts Queen Elizabeth II for becoming the longest serving monarch in the history of the U.K.


24

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On October 1, 2, 3 BREW CREW: Athlete Rob Gordon hoists a beer keg over his head last week, launching Oktoberfest ticket sales.

2015

Oktoberfest grows More music, more activities and more beer at Sept. 26 event THUNDER BAY By Leith Dunick – TB Source

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itchener-Waterloo may have Oktoberfest down pat, but Thunder Bay is working at giving the southern Ontario communities a run for their money. This year’s event, slated for Sept. 26, is going to be bigger and better than ever, organizers said on Wednesday. There’ll be more music, more activities and a nighttime party that’s quickly becoming a staple on the city’s social calendar, one that’s caught the attention of the Huffington Post, which named the local Oktoberfest one of the top 11 in the country. Money raised – they’ve collected $30,000 combined in the events first two years – will be donated to Our Kids Count and other local charities. “Oktoberfest has been something that’s been building,” said organizer Matt Pearson, a co-owner of

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the Sleeping Giant Brewery, sponsors of the event. “It wasn’t really done on the level it’s being done, before.” Two years ago the local Rotary Club chapters approached Pearson about raising some money for charity. “Of course we were on board right away,” he said. “The event started out as a one-night party. We had a really great first year, a really great second year and in Year 3 we wanted to go bigger with it and involve more people.” As a result, the fun gets under way at 9 a.m. at the Canadian Lakehead Exhibition, with a series of events, including cross-fit and strongman competitions, a fivekilometre fun run put on by Fresh Air and a home-brew competition. The taps start flowing at 11 a.m. There will also be plenty of German-themed food on hand, from sauerkraut and bratwurst to kasespatzel and Sweet North Bakery’s pretzels.

The dance party, featuring the music of the Polka Pirates and Green Bank Trio, starts at 6 p.m. The Beer and Brawn motorcycle raffle will also take place during Oktoberfest. Our Kids Count spokesman John Trevisanutto said it was a great partnership. “We thought it was a perfect fit, particularly with our strongman competition and our cross-fit competition because competitors were finding the end of summer was a real tough time to get together. This has worked out well. The numbers are super high,” Trevisanutto. “And at Our Kids Count, we felt it was another opportunity for us to make people aware of all the good work we do in the community.” Tickets for the dance party are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. They’re available at Sleeping Giant Brewery, Our Kids Count and online at http://www.tbayoktoberfest.ca/sign-up-tickets.


Thursday, September 17, 2015

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I N   T H E   bay

Funny or fat shaming? Online video has created a stir and comedian has been taken to task Canadian comedian has been taken to task for her self-produced YouTube video segment “Dear Fat People.” Nicole Arbour has been shamed on-line and according to reports, lost a potential job due to her “comedic” rant against overweight people. So, of course, I had to watch it – all six minutes of her edited shtick. I didn’t really laugh, although there were moments when I could see her point. But did it really warrant such a public outcry?

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Didn’t enjoy I was never a fan of All in the Family, despite it being considered one of the greatest sitcoms of all time. In my mind, Archie Bunker was a mean bigot with few redeeming qualities. However, at the time, I was a child who didn’t understand the nuances of satire or the message the show was sending. Even as an adult, I still find the show hard to watch. Comedy is subjective. And its purpose is to find humour in everyday life – often by

mocking it. Stand-up comics make fun of drivers, church-goers, politicians, soup Nazis, bad dancers, senior citizens in Florida … no one is immune. So why is obesity so taboo? The late comedian John Pinette focused most of his act on his 450-pound frame. That is, until he lost 200 pounds and started working on a new act called “They Call Me Slim.” I’ve never liked fat jokes. I once struggled with an eating disorder so I don’t find fat to be funny. But comedians have been using it for years with little public outrage. So why is it that when Arbour talked about being asked to change seats on a flight for someone with “a disability” – and it was just “a really fat guy” who took up his seat and half of hers – suddenly she was “fat-shaming”? If you watched the entire video – and let’s be honest, how many people watched the whole thing? – she made it quite clear that this is a health issue. Doctors have been talking about the

effects of obesity for years. The news has called it a North American “epidemic.” Diet and exercise products infomercials have taken over latenight and daytime television, complete with before and after photos. Are they fat-shaming? And since when, have we lost the ability to change the channel when we don’t like what we see? That’s how shows are cancelled.

Would have disappeared Of course, this video wasn’t on TV. It was on YouTube. But had people seen it, been disgusted and just turned it off, it would have died a quiet death as did Arbour’s numerous other self-produced comedic videos. Instead, the public had to get selfrighteously angry so that others would hear about it, watch it and give it more coverage. And did their outrage change anything? Sure. Arbour went from relatively unknown to a “YouTube star” with her other videos getting a dramatic surge in views. You know, sometimes speaking out against something ugly simply adds flame to the fire. Just ask Donald Trump.

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I N   T H E   bay

Do you have an opinion to share? E-mail the editor at ldunick@dougallmedia.com

MATTHEW GOERTZ

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HONOURING THE MAN IN BLACK: Magnus Theatre’s production of Ring of Fire: The Music of Johnny Cash will continue through Sept. 26.

Cash musical hits high notes THEATRE By Linda Maehans – TB Source he curtain to a bright new season at Magnus Theatre rises with one genuine gem of a show. Ring of Fire: The Music of Johnny Cash is, in a word, irresistible. Even if up until now you’ve not considered yourself a trueblue fan of the man-in-black, you’ll be converted and long before it’s even intermission time. There is just so much fabulous talent and chemistry and energy happening on stage. On opening night the appreciation and emotion for both the music and the man named Johnny Cash flowed through the audience like a crackling current. Thanks to five incredible reincarnations named Lawrence Cotton, Hilary June Hart, Joshua Wiles, Dan Zadkovich and Danny Johnson, mentioned in no particular order here because easily the names are interchangeable for top spot in the limelight. Together this cast of five form a ring of fire that gleams and shines and burns before our eyes, in our senses and our minds. As said, it’s irresistible. The combined musical talent in this show is outstanding. All of the music is performed live. All of it is heartfelt and comes across as a sincere tribute to Johnny Cash and the people who mattered most to him in his none-too-easy life. The solid musicianship of every

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performer soon becomes evident; we settle back into the pace and tempo of the show, anticipating with a mix of amazement and pure glee the next combination of instruments and voices and harmonies on stage. There is a nice balance and progression to the songs on the program with poignant ballads contrasted by rockin’ hits, one after another and all immediately recognizable. A perfect testament to Johnny Cash’s versatility, the reason for his longevity on the charts, and his lasting and universal appeal over so many decades. Bruce Repei’s set and Adam Parboosingh’s lighting don’t interfere with what is taking place on stage: the very human and solid force of the actors with their repertoire. Rather, the set and lighting unobtrusively magnify the effectiveness of each scene, each vignette. As do Mervi Agombar’s costumes, in particular those worn by Hilary June Hart; given the lithe and lovely presence of Johnny Cash’s true love as we see her during much of the show, of course why wouldn’t this be the case. Directed by Mario Crudo; musical direction by Danny Johnson; created by Richard Maltby Jr. and conceived by William Meade. Ring of Fire: The Music of Johnny Cash is guaranteed to buoy you up and evoke some personal, private feelings and memories. Playing at Magnus until September 26, go see and hear and experience this absolute winner of a show for yourself.


Thursday, September 17, 2015

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WORD SEARCH

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28

Thursday, September 17, 2015

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Sports

local sports news information coverage

LU wrestling hires assistant By TB Source staff akehead's wrestling program welcomes back one of their own, and one of their best ever, as an assistant coach this season. Coach Francis Clayton announced today that Justin BeauParlant will serve as an assistant with the program this season. “I am fired up to have Justin BeauParlant as a part of the coaching staff to start the 2015 season,” Clayton said in a release issued last week. “Justin brings a winning, upbeat attitude that will enhance our competition and training environments.” BeauParlant made a name for himself as an elite wrestler with Lakehead and Canada during his career in the late 90s on

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the national and international stage. He has three CIS gold, and a silver medal to his credit, and the heavyweight placed second at the World University Wrestling Championships in 2000, and placed 12th at the World Junior Championships in 1998. “I'm so glad to be back in my hometown of Thunder Bay after 14 years,” BeauParlant said. “Being a part of the wrestling program again, assisting (Francis) feels like home too. I have always loved Thunder Bay and LU and to be part of it all over again is a little surreal. I can't express how excited I am to begin the season, to help where I can, and take an already great program to the next level.” MATT VIS

WRESTLING

BACK ON ICE:Returning goalie Jeff Bosch is expected to be the Thunderwolves starter in his fifth and final season.

Battle brews in net Thunderwolves have three goalies fighting for playing time UNVERSITY HOCKEY By Matt Vis – TB Source eff Bosch is looking to put last season behind him. When on the ice, the fifth-year Lakehead Thunderwolvesnetminder has established himself as areliable starter. The problem has been staying on the ice on a consistent basis. Last year the Thunderwolves had to make do without their goalie for much of the campaign after two fluke injuries. First, Bosch suffered a concussion on Oct. 10 when he lost an edge and crashed headfirst into the boards in a game against York. Then, three months later, a pointblank slap shot in a game against Guelph obliterated his mask, shelving him for the rest of the regular season and the team’s playoff push. “I’ve been approaching this season by taking it as a fresh start. I worked hard all summer to get back into condition and feel really good coming in,” he said before a Monday afternoon at the Port Arthur Arena. “I just have to have a short memory and forget about last year.” In the midst of the injuries and subsequent limited action, the 25-year-old struggled during regular season play, sporting a 2-6-0 mark with a .423 goals against average. That’s a significant slip from 2013-2014, when Bosch was one of the top goaltenders in the OUA with a 7-6-1 record but 2.32 goals against average and .923 save percentage while battling lower body injuries. Despite the lackluster numbers from one year ago, Bosch is determined to emerge from training camp as the team’s primary starter in a battle that includes experienced third-year Justin McDonald and rookie Devin Green. “I’ve been here for four years now and have a bunch of experience,” he said. “I’ve pretty much seen everything and know how this league works. I don’t like not playing

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and I don’t like sitting on the bench.” Head coach Bill McDonald has a simple philosophy for determining the role of each keeper, though acknowledges the past couple of years have shown it will be a fluid situation. “It comes down to who’s winning the games and who’s playing well,” he said. But Justin McDonald, who has appeared in 33 regular season contests over his first two years as the presumed backup, has starting aspirations of his own. Though shaky at times throughout the campaign, McDonald played a pivotal role in the playoff sweep of the favoured Western Mustangs in Februarywhen he stonewalled one of the most potent attacks in the conference. “I have high expectations for myself to not only be the starter for this team but also do good things and be one of the best goalies in the league, if not the nation,” he said. Green, the incoming freshman from the Alberta Junior Hockey League, has earned the praise from his veteran goaltending partners as well as the coaching staff during his first week on the ice. “I just wanted to come into this camp and prove to myself and the coaches I can be here, maybe get some playing time but work hard all season,” Green said.”Goaltending is so much of a mental game and whenever the opportunity comes you have to be ready to jump on it, whether it’s in practice or in a game.” While training camp has provided some indication, the coach is waiting for the start of the non-conference slate against the Manitoba Bisons on Sept. 25 to be the true test. “We’re going to have to put a lot of stock into the nonconference games,” he said. “The non-conference games are going to be a lot harder and a lot different than the scrimmages we’ve had…It will be interesting to see how these guys accept it and step up.”


Thursday, September 17, 2015

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sports

29

NEWS

HOCKEY By Leith Dunick – TB Source on Cherry won’t be along for the ride, but his longtime sidekick Ron MacLean will be in Thunder Bay in January for Rogers Hometown Hockey Tour. Each Sunday during the NHL season, the national broadcaster hosts a celebration from a Canadian community, featuring NHL alumni, hometown heroes, local entertainment and hockey stories delivered by MacLean. “Each weekend is a uniquely Canadian experience that brings us all together,” said MacLean in a release issued by the network. “Our mantra has been simple - take you someplace and tell a story. We've discovered at each stop a story that belongs to us as no other story could. It's of Canadians, with hockey at its core.” The broadcast takes place during Rogers’ airing of a regular-season game between the Ottawa Senators and Chicago Blackhawks at the United Centre in Chicago. Michael Smith, the city’s general manager of community services, said city officials are excited to be one of 24

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communities involved. “As everybody’s aware, Thunder Bay has got a rich history in hockey. We’ve produced a number of NHL talents and the list is certainly plentiful of the players who have gone on to have successful careers,” Smith said. “So certainly that was one of the things that attracted (Rogers). They loved the environment and the history of hockey and they were very impressed when we started to have the dialogue to be one of the 24 communities.” Present day NHLers include the brothers Staal – Eric, Marc and Jordan – Patrick Sharp, Robert Bortuzzo and Carter Hutton. Past NHLers include the likes of hockey hall of famers Jack Adams and Alex Delvecchio, Walt Poddubny, Vic Venasky, and siblings Greg and Ryan Johnson and Tom and Taylor Pyatt. Smith said it’s too soon to say where the event will be held, but Fort William Gardens is in the mix. “The location is something we’re working on with Rogers, specifically. The Gardens is a potential, but there are other areas within the city they’ve expressed some interest in. “We haven’t nailed that down yet, as

we move forward and a question we need to confirm as we move forward in the coming months.” The impact of having the event in the city, broadcast across the nation, and thanks to technology, around the world, could be huge, Smith said. “Exposure’s going to be great. It’s Jan. 3, and people are still kind of in that holiday mode from Christmas and New Year’s. I don’t know the exact spinoffs at this time and what that will do, but it’s very exciting to have exposure and to have that caliber (here),” he said. “Ron MacLean has had a long history with Hockey Night in Canada and has been the face of hockey for a long time.” Smith added he expects much of the broadcast activities to be accessible to the general public. Some of those events, in addition to the broadcast itself, include Sportsnet’s Be a Broadcaster, the Scotiabank Community Locker Room and the Dodge Slow ‘n Go Challenge." The second-year series kicks off on Oct. 11 in Kitchener. Thunder Bay is the 13th stop on the tour, which will take the show to all corners of Canada, from Yellowknife to Corner Brook N.L.

CBC

Hometown Hockey coming to town

CHERRY-LESS: Hockey Night in Canada host Ron MacLean will be in the city on Jan. 3.


30

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Looking for pt female drivers, For more info 628-9042 No calls after 10pm.

54. HOME IMPROVEMENTS

63. COMING EVENTS 53. GENERAL SERVICES

53. GENERAL SERVICES

#1 AFFORDABLE TREE REMOVAL, CEDARS, SHRUBS, etc. Dump runs. Low rates. Senior discounts. Call Brian at 622-7888.

#1 Dump Runs! Yard clean ups, grass cutting, small trees, hedge cutting, remove junk from houses, garages, etc., tear down sheds, fences, odd jobs, city wide. Frank 628-5919 767-0995.

#1 RJC Window Cleaning Handyman Services. Hedges, pruning, gardening, dump runs, clean dirty siding, eavestrough cleaning. What you need not listed? Call Robert 632-2161. Christina’s Home & Garden, Fall clean, Grass cut, Lawn Maintenance, Flower Beds, Weeding, Planting, Fertilizing, Weed Control, Cemetery plots, Painting, Handyman, Reno’s, flooring, Much more. 621-1505. EXTEND THE LIFE OF YOUR GARMENTS. For all your tailoring needs. Alterations, zippers, hemming, etc. Reasonable rates, prompt service. Home Visits For Seniors Only!! 7671705. FALL CLEAN UP! Monster size trailer! Rubbish removal, eavestrough cleaning and repair! We recycle. Part loads, no items too big or small! Commercial/residential, free estimates. SENIOR DISCOUNTS. 472-6371 or gapace@lakeheadu.ca Fences, decks, sheds, skid-steer work, or any outside project built for you by Octagon Contracting. Call 633-4488 for quick services.

TREE REMOVAL SERVICE, from take down to clean-up. In town rural or at the cottage. ++ experience very reasonable rates, free estimates, insured, and seniors discounts. Call 345-4363

54. HOME IMPROVEMENTS #1. Specializing in all types of fences: P.T. Wood, Ornamental, PVC fences and Cedar & Wood decks. Call Brian @ 6266937 COMPLETE HOME RENOVATIONS! Floors, siding, decks, bathroom, and kitchen. Free Estimates! Call 630-0288 or 622-4604. www.tecmanthunderbay.ca Flooring: laminate, ceramic, hardwood, competitively priced and installed by Octagon Contracting. Call 633-4488 for your free quote. FRED’S PAINTING, exterior house painting, pressure washing, 40 years experienced Journey-man Painter, fast friendly service. Free Estimates, Call 622-7994 or 707-0084.

Grass cutting, leaf raking and dump runs. Phone 768-9849 and leave message.

Renovations: bathroom, kitchen, basement or any part of your home or cottage, drywall and tile installation. Call Octagon Contracting at 633-4488 for your free quote.

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Port Arthur Ladies curling registration at P.A.C.C Thursday September 17th from 2pm-3pm. For ladies Tuesday/Thursday 1-3pm. Information Susan 344-3250.

64. BAZAAR & YARD SALE

St. Dominic’s CWL AUTUMNBURST BAZAAR Church Hall, 130 Redwood Ave.

Sunday, September 27 12:00 – 3:00pm,

Sandwiches and Dainties Crafts, Market Garden, Baking, Lotteries, Penny Auction, Grand Draw

ANSWERS TO THIS WEEK’S PUZZLES

Adults $5, Children (5 – 10) $3 Children 4 and under – free

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

RECYCLE BUSINESS DIRECTORY

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

The best in SERVICE come in to

FIREWOOD

DAVE KNIGHT OPTICAL

Campers & Backyard Fire Pits • Birch • Black Poplar • Cedar • Back Ash

Bundles from $5.00 - $120 .00 160 LAKESHORE DRIVE

touch Putting you inbusiness. with the right

(807) 345-9776 (807) 628-46 55

4

enue • 623-335

801 Atlantic Av

W

r NE Check Out Ou Saturday

ON OUR NEW LINE FEATURE Grey Shaker ~ Mocha Shaker ~ White Shaker

Our distributor only offered this one time sale, hurry, also we have the largest selection of vanities and tops in stock Tuesday - Friday 10-5pm • Saturday 10-2pm



BREAKFAST U N E M 9am. - noon y a d n & Su

Save the Tax 13% off

542 S. Syndicate Ave. • 62



ion Slovak Leg

of

2 FOR 1

906 E. VICTORIA AVE. (Corner McKellar) 622-0311 www.daveknightoptical.ca

Direct Cabinets

ION

ADIAN LEG

ROYAL CAN

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

2-4349

www.directcabinets.ca

rty card, and then Get your Join the Pa on the card to s on follow the instructi ch an ce s of ur yo e ov pr Im en ter ! as often as 's ey Jo g itin winning by vis le cards. ltip mu possible and entering

334 85950Art7hur.5St.7We7st,.4 Thunder Bay

1.2123

s Joeys.ca 1.800.66

Franchise Opportunitie

31


Thursday, September 17, 2015

32

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

+

$ $

96* @ 5.24% $17,999*

SOLD

86* @ 5.24% $25,999* Weekly for 84 Months

Weekly for 48 Months

$

$

49,999+

$

$

76* @ 5.24% 19,999*

$

$

74* @ 5.24% $18,999*

21,999+

+ HST & Licensing $

$

106* @ 5.24% $31,999*

BRING IN A CURRENT PAY STUB, VOID CHEQUE, PHOTO I.D.

$

$

83* @ 5.24% $24,999*

$

$

$

66* @ 5.24% 19,999*

$

Weekly for 84 Months

53* @ 5.24% $15,999* Weekly for 84 Months

18,999+

$

$

Weekly for 84 Months

Financing

$

76* @ 5.24% $31,449*

$

$

8,999+

TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS

11,999*

+ HST & Licensing

Weekly for 84 Months

63* @ 5.24% $18,999*

Weekly for 60 Months

OPEN TIL 9!

79* @ 5.24% $19,999* Weekly for 72 Months

+ HST & Licensing

$

83* @ 5.24% $24,999* Weekly for 84 Months

EXTENDED

9,999*

+ HST & Licensing

HOURS $

59* @ 5.24% $17,999*

343-2841

Weekly for 60 Months

+ HST & Licensing

76* @ 5.24% $22,999*

$

Weekly for 84 Months

Weekly for 84 Months

47* @ 5.24% 13,999*

99* @ 5.24% $29,999*

Weekly for 84 Months

$

$

$

Weekly for 84 Months

73* @ 5.24% $21,999*

Ari

WE’LL DO THE REST!

99* @ 5.24% $29,999* Weekly for 84 Months

Weekly for 84 Months

$0 DOWN AVAILABLE

$

Weekly for 84 Months

Weekly for 84 Months

Weekly for 72 Months

Weekly for 84 Months

63* @ 5.24% $18,999*

$

$

76* @ 5.24% $22,999*

$

53* @ 5.24% 15,999*

Weekly for 60 Months

$

29,999+

+ HST & LICENCING

+ HST & LICENCING

$

16,999+

+ HST & Licensing

$

8,999+

+ HST & Licensing

at

%

5.24

Charlene Pollari General Sales Manager Financial Services Manager

*HST & Lic. are not included.

Ari Peltonen

Finance Manager Used Sales/Finance Manager

Alyssa Craig Sales/Leasing

Tim Worthing

Cindy Levanto-Kawahara

Nat Kerber

Johnathon Falvo

Bill Vale

Sales/Leasing

Sales/Leasing

Sales/Leasing

Sales/Leasing

Sales/Leasing

*All inclusive pricing includes registration, tire and rim warranty, etching $444, CarProof $45, OMVIC fee $5. Financing example: $10,000 @ 5.24% over 48/60/72/84 months cost of borrowing is $1,101/$1,402/$1,692/$1,987. Financing O.A.C. All vehicles are used. †$2,500 PER CLAIM LGM.

Take a Test Drive & Receive a Free Large Pizza With a full sales presentation. Limit 1 per family. Coupon for Papa Piccolino’s Pizza. Take out only.


September 17, 2015 source