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Inside This Issue: TBOF Fun Facts Don’t Change a thing Staying Connected Woodsman! Woodsman!


Archery Outfitters

y ph Tro etail it Wh unts rgia o H Ge & a rid Flo

Nickie Roth Outfitter & Guide P.O Box 55038, St. Petersburg, FL 33732 727-525-2825 9 am to 9 pm

GENERAL INFORMATION: Archery Outfitters has been in business since 1983., Our mission statement for the past 26 years has remained unchanged: To provide quality hunts designed to be... “affordable to all�. Archery Outfitters Georgia hunts include a scout day and four full days of hunting on a managed6000 acre and a 7000 acre (Archery Only) private property. Guides show you around the property, stand locations, active trails and food sources, assigning youan exclusive portion of the property. You then begin hunting with assistance from you professionalguide staff. You provide your own lodging, food, stand(s), license and personal needs.


Spring / Summer 2009

http://www.tbof.org

INSIDE EVERY ISSUE Rates / Officers .............................................. 4 President’s Column ....................................... 5 Cover Photo: Sunrise at the Ocala Youth Camp taken by Pam Brodeur

FEATURES

President’s Column ....................................... 5 TBOF Fun Facts .......................................... 6 - 7 Don’t Change a thing .................................. 7 Staying Connected.................................. 8 - 9 Trophy Room ................................................. 9 Woodsman! Woodsman! ..................... 10 - 12 Banquet ...................................................... 13 State Championship Winners .............. 14 - 15


T he Stickbow News is published electronically three times a year, Spring, Fall and Winter. We encourage articles and tasteful pictures from members and friends on issues of interst to bowhunters. Articles for The Stickbow News should be submitted to the editor electronically, whether by disk or email. Material submitted for the newsletter will not be returned unless a stamped/self addrssed envelope is included with the original material. Photos are not returnable. The Stickbow News is strict about their articles and reserves the right to reject or edit all submissions. Advertising Rates Business Card (3.5 x 2) .... $20.00

President:

Gregg Dudley (352)821-4067 E-mail: dudley4pack@aol.com

Vice President:

Jeff Hester (352)361-6908 E-mail: jlhester@embarqmail.com

Secretary/Treasurer:

Buddy Oswald (352)694-5969 E-mail: doswald304@aol.com

Directors:

Wayne Carter (904)287-5944 E-mail: wv126@aol.com

Quarter Page .................... $60.00 Half Page ....................... $100.00 Full Page ......................... $160.00 Full Page .......................... $250.00 All ad rates are for single insertion in one issue of The Stickbow News. Please contact Ad Manager, Herb Arndt at (352)732-4721, 4719 NE 18th Place, Ocala, FL 34470 fthrfltch@aol.com. Advertising Conditions: •

All Advertising must be

received properly scaled to the desired ad size in electronic format. Any ad larger than the established format size will be charged as the next larger ad size.

All materials are subject to

Mel Bulger (863)581-6006 E-mail: melbulger@msn.com

approval by the Ad Manager and Editor of The Stickbow News.

The

Stickbow

News

reserves the right to reject any

Karl Green (904)699-5080 E-mail: karlgreen@aol.com

advertising. No fraudulent or misleading

advertising,

compound

bows,

or

sights,

releases, crossbows or firearms will be accepted.

Andy Love (352)854-0564 E-mail: majorarcher51@yahoo.com

Location of ads within the

Stickbow News will be at the sole discretion of the Editor.

Advertiser agrees that the

Editor may freely use all submitted

Past President:

David Tetzlaff (239)514-7334 E-mail: david@napleszoo.com

Stickbow News Editor:

Pam Brodeur (727)392-4021 11644 Irving Ave Seminole, FL 33772 E-mail: pbrodeur@tampabay.rr.com

Ad Manager:

Herb Arndt (352)732-4721 4719 NE 18th Place Ocala, FL 34470 E-mail: fthrfltch@aol.com

materials and that the advertiser assumes all responsibility for any claims caused by the ad or related

to

the

advertiser’s

products and services.

Publisher’s liability for errors

and omissions will be limited to republication of a corrected error.

Change of Email Address? Please contact: Secretary/ Treasurer Buddy Oswald doswald304@aol.com


Welcome to the first electronically distributed edition of the Stickbow News. Our first attempt at electronic distribution will simply involve attaching the newsletter file to an email that is sent to all registered members. We will also post the file as a link on our website and on our message board. More sophisticated means of delivery may follow in the future if skill and finances allow. Please bear with us as we work through the new delivery concept. As we move into the electronic age, I hope that you are checking the TBOF message board on a regular basis to keep up with issues related to traditional archery in the state of Florida. I also hope you are using this tool to advertise your events. Robert Russell does a great job promoting the Long Hammock shoots in Oxford. Gary Royce has faithfully promoted the events at Fort Caroline. Chris Horsman has used the forum to seek and find members for his hunting clubs. Ronnie Weatherman uses the forum to keep members apprised of current FWC activity that may impact hunters. Your TBOF officers have used this tool to advertise policy changes and to solicit member input for important decisions. The message board can be accessed through the state conferences section of tradgang.com or it can be reached off of our club website at tbof.org . The direct

link is http://tradgang.com/cgi-bin/ ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=forum;f=81 . The message board is evolving to be the best tool that we have for communicating club information to our members. Please take the time to check it out. In this issue you will find information about the Fall Rendezvous Shoot held August 79, 2009 and the 20 th Anniversary Celebration/State Championship Shoot being planned for March 5-7, 2010. Mark your calendars now for these exciting events. You will also find information on online resources for stickbow shooters, FWC proposals and guidelines, and pictures/ results from the state shoot in March 2009. What you won’t find this time around is a lot of hunting stories. Pam and I need you , the members to contribute to our efforts to have a quality publication by taking the time to write up your experiences and send them to us. We will be glad to help get the information in a printable/publishable form, but we need you to send us your stories. I look forward to seeing each of you at the Fall Rendezvous and State Championship Shoot. In the interim, I will be looking forward to seeing more of you use the online resources that TBOF has put together to help you stay connected and involved in archery throughout the state.

Gregg DON’T FORGET TO VISIT US ON THE WEB HTTP://WWW.TBOF.ORG


Fall Rendezvous August 7-9, 2009 As most of you will remember, we will be trying a new format for our Fall Rendezvous. Input from club members has indicated a desire to try a less structured competition for the Fall Rendezvous which allows them to shoot with their friends rather than being regrouped. Member input also indicates a desire for more shooting opportunities (possibility of shooting in multiple classes). The August shoot (Fall Rendezvous) competition will be restructured as follows: The competition round will consist of two 15 target ranges (Fred Bear and Howard Hill). A competition round will be finished upon completion of those two ranges. Score cards should be turned in upon completion and no later than 11:00 AM on Sunday. A shooter may compete in multiple classes by paying a separate competition fee. A shooter may also pay to shoot the course again with the same equipment, but may only turn in the score card from their first attempt. Shoot fees will be reduced to $15 per competitive round to accommodate the economic conditions as well as acknowledge the shorter course. Remember too, that our complimentary shoot fee age has been raised to 17. The Fall Rendezvous is a perfect time to introduce a friend or young person to archery. We look forward to trying out this new format in August. As always, we welcome your input in this process. If it works we will adopt it as our Fall Rendezvous regimen. If it does not work we will modify it or return to our traditional forum. 20th Anniversary Celebration/State Championship Shoot March 5-7, 2010 A lot of memories are made and traditions forged in 20 years. As you may recall, my first president’s column addressed the deep sense of responsibility and respect for club history that I felt as I assumed the leadership of our organization. In 2010, we will celebrate 20 years of TBOF history. The anniversary is actually in the fall, but we will celebrate at our State Championship Shoot March 5-7, 2010. We plan to celebrate in style with great shooting opportunities, awesome vendors, anniversary banquet activities and top shelf entertainment!

The keynote speaker for our banquet will be Monty Browning. Monty has hunted all over the globe and is well known for his love of dangerous game and heavy arrows. He is revered as a humorous and informative story-teller. A quick google search on the internet will turn up a wealth of information about his exploits. One interesting site is http:// www.trueflightfeathers.com/news01.htm where you can find information about Monty’s 10 yard shot on a massive Cape Buffalo! Mark Baker will also be on hand to host a campfire singing and storytelling session that is sure to be well received. Mark entertained us at our first annual banquet and we will be glad to have him with us again in a less formal setting. Banquet Report Our first annual banquet was held in conjunction with our state championship shoot in March 2008. While ticket sales started off slow, they soon picked up and we actually sold out at a little over 125 people. The food, fellowship, prizes and entertainment were extraordinary. With the success of our first endeavor, I recommend that you buy tickets to our 20th anniversary banquet when they become available! THIS JUST IN: 2010 BANQUET TICKETS WILL BE AVAILABLE AT THE 2009 FALL RENDEZVOUS. Your Club Needs You! TBOF is actively planning a stellar 20th anniversary celebration! As part of that effort we are trying to put together a spectacular raffle table. We are soliciting raffle items for the traditional Sunday raffle as well as for our banquet raffle. Please use your traditional bowhunting contacts to help us put together a great raffle table. As you find items that may be appropriate for our banquet raffle, please let me know so that I can advertise them to our general membership. TBOF members never cease to amaze me with their generosity. Let’s all pull together to come up with a special effort for our 20th year celebration. Do We Have Your Correct Email Address? As we move towards more electronic means of communication, it is imperative that we maintain a current email address for you. Please be sure to notify us of any changes to your email account. Please also be sure to set your firewall settings and spam filters to allow email from dudley4pack@aol.com so that you can receive all


of our correspondence. I get 20-30 rejections each time I send out a club email. FWC Proposals Most of you are familiar with the fact that the FWC is using the internet to sell licenses online. You have probably at least browsed through their website a few times to see what else they might have available as an online resource. One section of their website that I would like to call your attention to is the Deer Management Program link. The link is available on the main web page (myfwc.com). I encourage each of you to access this link and read about the various proposals that are being considered for hunting in the state of Florida. According to Diane Eggeman, Director of Hunting and Game Management, the primary impetus for

After forty four years of bowhunting the only change for Clifford Smith (Pappy) are the new hunting stories after each season. Pappy, a 70 year old native of West Virginia has chased whitetail deer over the last forty four years with just stick and string. He is a traditional bowhunter who started with Fred Bear take down recurves and for the last eight years has built his own custom takedown bows. Each year he is set up on opening day of bow season in the hills of West Virginia. Not many years have passed when Pappy is left with an empty tag and most years end with three in the freezer. When asked, “Why do you still hunt with a recurve?” Pap just says it’s in his blood. Not long ago on the phone, Pappy said that there is just no better feeling than to release that bow on a deer. Even at age seventy, Pappy is still going strong with a bow weight of sixty pounds. At hunting camp each year the guys ask when he will lay down the recurve and shoot a light weight compound. The answer is always, “when I have to”. So let Pappy be an example for us all, we don’t have to change a thing.

the proposed changes is to increase hunter satisfaction. The plan has been developed by the FWC with input from their Deer Management Stakeholders Committee. A series of six public hearings has been concluded that afforded hunters the opportunity to provide additional input. In a letter written by Cory Morea, FWC Game Biologist, it is clear that some changes have already been made to the plan based on hunter input. A revised plan will be posted to the FWC website and hunters will be encouraged to make additional comments directly to Cory or other committee members. There will also be some additional public hearings hosted in the fall. Please take the time to make yourself familiar with these proposals. They are designed to increase your satisfaction as a hunter. If they do not, take the chance to express your point of view.

Picture of Pappy during the 2008 archery season with a beautiful five point buck taken with his recurve.


There are literally millions of reasons that a primitive stickbow shooting hunter should embrace something as technologically advanced as the internet. The information superhighway is a literal treasure trove for hunters. Whether you are researching a tutorial, a hunting opportunity, a shopping outlet, or hunting resources, the answers to your questions are at your fingertips with the internet.

One of the more popular search engines is google. Accessed at google.com, this search engine can provide a direction for you to explore the vast information available on the internet. Search engines work by matching key words that you enter with words contained in the title or body of other web pages. The search takes mere seconds and is a better shortcut to research than any technology known before. Usually the search results are arranged with the closest matches showing up first. The following key word searches produced the indicated number of matches: Key Word/Topic

Matches

Primitive archery ....................................................................... 1,960,000 Traditional archery ....................................................................... 439,000 Traditional archery chat forum ........................................................ 42,100 Vintage archery ........................................................................... 174,000 Bear archery antiques ................................................................... 47,200 Bow and arrow tuning .................................................................... 66,200 Traditional bowhunters of Florida ..................................................... 18,900 Deer hunting ........................................................................... 3, 940,000 Florida outdoors .................................................................... 425,000,000 Hog hunting ................................................................................ 554,000 Florida hunting ....................................................................... 15,000,000 With search results numbering in the millions, it is sometimes necessary to revise your search to narrow down the results. In the example above, narrowing the search from the keywords “primitive archery” to “primitive hickory selfbow” will drop the matches down to 1,060 possibilities. With the best matches showing up first in the search it is likely that you would find what you were looking for right away. If you know exactly what you are looking for you can be very specific in your search. Virtually every well known bowyer and archery manufacturer or retailer has a website. Entering the name of a known company into a search engine will usually result in the company website showing up within the first match or two. Accessing these sites is a quick and easy way to preview products and shop. Sometimes, bowyers or retailers list closeout products on the internet that are not available or advertised anywhere else. Sometimes you can have your questions answered right on the website. Sometimes it is just fun to drool over the pictures of custom bows and exotic woods. Some of my favorite sites for window shopping are: 3Rivers Archery Supply .................................................. 3riversarchery.com Kustom King Archery ............................................... kustomkingarchery.com Black Widow Bows .................................................... blackwidowbows.com Traditional Bowhunter Magazine .............................................. tradbow.com Ebay Online Auctions .................................................................. ebay.com


Another really good reason to be internet savvy is that you can stay up to speed on the happenings and events hosted by archery clubs, state organizations and wildlife agencies. Some great sites are: Traditional Bowhunters of Florida .................................................... tbof.org Traditional Bowhunters of Georgia ................................. tradbowgeorgia.com Florida Wildlife Commission ....................................................... myfwc.com Georgia Outdoor News ................................................................. gon.com Of course, one of the best reasons to be online is to exchange information with other likeminded individuals. Message Boards and chat rooms are good places to meet hunters from your area and plan exciting hunts locally or abroad. Some of you may remember my story from the Spring 2009 edition of The Stickbow News concerning a hog hunt on the Chickasawhatchee WMA. That entire hunt was organized and promoted on the internet. When I decided to go on that hunt, there were only two other people that I had ever personally met in attendance, but there were over a dozen folks that I had talked to online. Similarly, I am booked for a Texas Hunt this New Year that I will be attending with guys from over nearly a dozen states. On the Texas hunt, I will be hunting with some guys that I have talked to online for several years, but I have never physically met any of them. There are a wide variety of chat rooms and message boards devoted to hunting. However, the one that hosts the official TBOF message board for free is: Tradgang ............................................................................tradgang.com While most of us are becoming comfortable living in the information age, I know that some of us still resist the change. I hope that I have given some of you a reason to explore the wide world of the internet. The process of high tech internet exploration can be an adventure that will enrich your enjoyment of a decidedly low-tech hobby.

Tom Voutour Missouri Buck, Fall 2008


This article first appeared in Gray’s Sporting Journal. Reprinted with permission from E. Donnell Thomas, Jr.

To Little Red Riding Hood, he was a wolf-bashing hero. George Pope Morris portrayed him as an agent of environmental destruction whose rapacious instincts required the poet to thrust his own refined sensibilities between axe and tree. In the recent film by the same name, Kevin Bacon invoked him as a metaphor for his character’s guardedly successful struggle with his own demons. Who is this archetype – the woodsman – and what is the nature of his craft – woodsmanship? The question arose recently as I reviewed a manuscript by my friend and fellow lover of wild places, David Petersen. The essay was only two pages long, but the words woodsman and woodsmanship appeared nearly a dozen times. I was struck by the fact that I could scarcely remember the last time I had seen or heard either term, in print, around the campfire, or during the course of ordinary conversation. Things were different when I was growing up. My father and his friends used both words frequently. To refer to someone as “a real woodsman” was to bestow high compliment… an honorific, by the way, that had nothing to do with numbers of trout caught or grouse shot. And woodsmanship became the craft I practiced almost every time I went outdoors. In rough terms, it meant the parts of my days in the field that didn’t immediately involve a shotgun, fly rod or bow, and my father made sure I understood that these was just as important as the parts that did. To name the component skills of woodsmanship as I understood the concept at age 15 threatens a list as long as the contents of Merlin’s room in The Once and Future King, but here’s a start: knots, canoeing, fire starting, tracking, wildlife identification, camp cookery, working with dogs and horses, wading streams, staying dry, preparing fish and game for the table, interpreting and analyzing sign, skinning and stretching pelts, sharpening knives, using an axe and crosscut saw, repairing equipment, map reading, backcountry navigation by dead reckoning and compass, never getting lost and knowing what to do when you did. Incomplete as it is, this compendium is still instructive. Few of these skills have anything to do with felling

trees. (Take that, George Pope!) Most all take place outside. Tying flies and reloading shotgun shells were an important part of my childhood too, but they weren’t woodsmanship. The list lacks both the selfconsciousness of the modern survivalist movement and the grim determination of the Outward Bound crowd. I saw no reason to kill rabbits with a figure-4 deadfall when I had a perfectly good .22 at home and I enjoyed nature too much to declare it an obstacle to be conquered. But attitudes and imponderables define woodsmen even better than checklists of skills. Real woodsmen are patient and observant. They are comfortable in the woods alone, and when they are in the company of others their own comfort in the outdoors becomes contagious. They are not competitive; they’d be happy if they caught some fish but they’d be even happier if everyone else did too. They consider the process at least as important as the result. They never ignore an opportunity to learn from what they see and hear, but they know they’ll never learn it all. This struggling definition begs for examples. No doubt our own frontier offered plenty during the Colonial era, as idealized by Hawkeye in James Fennimore Cooper’s historical first swing at the Great American Novel, The Leatherstocking Tales. Among real life figures, few personify the meaning of woodsmanship better than Meriwether Lewis and William Clark; certainly, none left a comparable written record. The simple fact that they reached the Pacific and returned alive provides ample measure of their skill, but their Journals document powers of observation and reasoning that would be remarkable for biologists operating in a modern laboratory. Charged by Jefferson with describing and collecting the biota of the new American west, the expedition’s leaders gave this mission the highest priority save for the well being of their men. In all, they accurately described nearly 300 species of flora and fauna previously unknown to Western science, a remarkable accomplishment for naturalists with no formal training operating under primitive survival conditions. Their Journals practically define woodsmanship at its best. John James Audubon represents another excellent historical example. Audubon spent most of his productive years in the field and his periodic returns to civilization served primarily to get him in trouble


with everyone from his wife to the law. The research behind his spare, elegant bird portraits involved trekking through more wilderness than any of us will ever see, not to mention more riding and shooting per day than most John Wayne westerns. But despite his rough personal edges and the even rougher life he led, Audubon’s Birds of America forever transformed our view of the continent we call home. No studio artist however talented could have accomplished that feat. It took woodsmanship. Among more recent examples I can think of none better than Col. James Corbett, again with considerable indebtedness to a fine written record: his own superb Man-Eaters of India. While Corbett attained legendary status as a hunter by ridding northern India of man-eating tigers and leopards responsible for the deaths of hundreds of people, his writing conveys none of the safari swagger that so often taints the dangerous-game genre. Corbett held the great cats in the highest regard and killed them only when they killed human residents of the Himalayan foothills first. Tracking down and dispatching a specific cat roaming across hundreds of square miles of forest, usually alone and lightly armed, was a daunting mission, but Corbett never seemed impressed with his own repeated success. He relied on nothing but his own skills, particularly his powers of observation and personal knowledge of the jungle. At the sight of a human kill, his crime scene analyses demonstrated Holmesian qualities as a bent blade of grass here and a shred of clothing there told him what he needed to know about his quarry. But he always reserved his praise for the cats…and the hill people themselves, for whom he had the utmost respect long before such egalitarian attitudes became popular. Corbett provided an early personal role model, since my father used to read his stories aloud to me at an age when most kids were lucky to get Winnie the Pooh. His memoirs made me promise myself I would grow up to hunt and travel, and perhaps the ability to inspire others deserves inclusion in our earlier list of defining traits. As my father himself put it, Corbett was a real woodsman. So where have all the woodsmen gone? And why are they disappearing from the pages of the sporting press? Dave Petersen pointed out one obvious problem when we discussed the matter: the term woodsman lacks gender neutrality. Let’s get that part straight right off the bat. I grew up in a family that extended equal outdoor opportunities to women and men. It is an accident of language that woodsman and woodsmanship seem to refer to one sex alone. I now a number of women who qualify handily, but that’s the title they’ll have to accept:

woodsman, not woodswoman or, God help us, woodsperson. There’s just no other way to say it. But the woodsman’s problems go far beyond semantics nowadays. He or she – as far as I will go in that department – is not becoming an anachronism because the woods are disappearing but because our culturally driven relationship to the wild is doing its best to render woodsmanship obsolete. And the ultimate culprit may be the progressive lack of the one commodity our busy culture fails to provide in abundance: time. For woodsmanship skills cannot be borrowed or bought. They may be inspired by books but they cannot be learned there, even in the best of them. Assimilating new tips from the latest Big Buck publication or outdoor video contributes nothing to the art. In fact, such handy presentations actually detract from the learning process by implication. Real woodsmen know there’s no substitute for time spent in the woods, the only classroom in which one can truly observe, analyze, and learn. Granted, changing circumstances are partly to blame. It is no longer physically possible to walk, ride, and paddle from Missouri to Oregon and back without crossing a single road. As India’s human population skyrocketed, suitable native habitat for Corbett’s beloved Bengal tigers became limited to game sanctuaries, one of the largest of which now bears his name. But inviting as those epic venues sound in retrospect, they are not necessary to the practice of woodsmanship and their loss, while regrettable, constitutes no excuse. One August day I was glassing for caribou from a middle-of-nowhere ridge in southwestern Alaska when I realized how little I actually knew about the tundra I’d been tromping across all week. For the next six hours I remained stationary, moving only a few yards on hands and knees to pee and pick a few berries (and being careful to crawl in opposite directions to perform each task). The groundcover beneath me proved endlessly fascinating as I poked, prodded and examined. What was connected to what? Why was the red stuff red, the green stuff green? Why did bears eat one thing and caribou another? Why wasn’t the tundra a forest, or a field of grass? Those hours passed as quickly as any afternoon I’ve ever spent in the field, even though the caribou never showed up. Point being, when you’re outside in wild places you can always find something worthy of study, even if it isn’t a tiger. Travel to Alaska or other remote wilderness locations isn’t essential to such exercises. Opportunities to slow down and observe arise during virtually all outings whether or not they fall under the rubric of hunting and fishing. I try to spend at least some time


poking around outside almost every day. Granted, I may invent some specific excuse — deer tracks, the camera, fresh morels, my life list of birds – but most days I’ll settle for anything. I classify these limited excursions as woods time. It’s cheaper than psychotherapy and has fewer side effects than Prozac. Works better, too. Our collective failure to appreciate woodsmanship these days stems not from failure of opportunity, but from failure of will… specifically, our unwillingness to slow down and become part of the outdoors instead of engaging in a constant effort to extract something tangible from it. As a culture, were just so damn busy… Need a ready example to define the problem? How about cell phones and computer modems in fishing lodges, a phenomenon I encounter with increasing frequency when I cover angling destinations for various publications. No more wasting free time poking around in tide pools or picking guides’ brains, not in the Age of Information! (Never mind that our times should properly be labeled the Age of Bullshit, a more honest description of most of those beeps and bytes coming down the line.) Nope, woodsmanship takes time, of which too many of us have – or think we have – too little. Real or imagined, our sense of urgency too often makes us rush right past what should be most important of all. And it’s not just a matter of failure to stop and smell the roses (or the tundra). In our all-consuming hurry, we’ve let fixation upon the result negate the process… a temptation to which no real woodsman would succumb.

Hence my disillusionment with tournament fishing, record books, and most all that accompanies them. The idea of reducing any outdoor experience to a matter of inches, pounds, medals or plaques on the wall runs contrary to the concept of woodsmanship. Not to suggest that I don’t enjoy killing large animals or catching large fish… but the problem solving and process of discovery prior to the catching or killing have always mattered more to me than the results themselves. In the age of instant media gratification, that’s a hard concept to convey in a thirty-minute television slot, minus commercials. But I’ve always been an optimist, and I like to think that woodsmanship’s core values will prevail in the end. The process begins at home of course, in which respect I acknowledge my own good fortune. But we in the outdoor media need to assume our share of responsibility and leadership. Big bucks do not automatically make good stories. This season’s Ten Hottest Tips cannot replace woods time. And the latest offerings from the Product Review section are no substitute for woodsmanship. Of course, not all outdoor media sources have forgotten these principles, which is one reason I so enjoy writing for Gray’s. So let us make a collective vow this season: to move more slowly, take more time, pay more attention, use less stuff, and remember the wisdom of those who came before us. That’s all real woodsmanship requires.


1. Dominic Dantone 2. Jeremy McBeth 3. Chris Spikes

1. Linda Graham 2. Debbie Smith (not pictured) 3. Diana Smith (not pictured)

1. Tom Swift 2. John Rollen 3. Roger Gross

1. Linda Archer 2. Martha Varney 3. Helen Claudio

1. Paul Leipold 2. Allen Sparkman 3. Roger Wilburn

1. Shelby Mascaro 2. Shari Keener 3. Mary Post


1. Logan Suratt 2. Ronnie Kaneer 3. DJ Buchanan

1. Isabela Robinson 2. Bridget Hill 3. Grace Blair

1. Noah Bates 2. Mac Murphy 3. Matt Coates

1. Courtney Copeland 2. Rachel Zinkham 3. Annie Hays

Coon Shoot 1. Brandon Wigent 2. Chris Wigent 3. TJ Fountain Iron Man 1. Jeremy McBeth 2. Jeremy Duncan 3. Chad Margetta


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TBOF Newsletter June 2009