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The Stickbow News TBOF - Traditional Bowhunters of Florida -

Ryan Gill

TBOF.org -

January 2017


OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS President:

Bryan Finder (863) 207-9614 finder.bryan@gmail.com

Vice President:

Bill Green tbofbillgreen@embarqmail.com

Secretary:

Casey Green (239) 410-6074 caseygreen@embarqmail.com

Treasurer:

Buddy Oswald (352) 817-5824 dhoswald@gmail.com

Directors:

Wayne Carter (904) 307-1723 wv126@comcast.net Carolyn Faunce seekye@comcast.net Gary Linn (352) 299-3634 gnslinn@yahoo.com Rob Mathews (352) 361-1568 robmmathews@gmail.com Gregg Dudley tradbow70@gmail.com Ron Sumner (352) 267-1265 ronsumner@cfl.rr.com

Immediate Past President:

David Tetzlaff (352) 450-5514 dtfiretiger@gmail.com

Ad Manager:

Ray Tareila (352) 638-1496 22107 Draw Bridge Dr. Leesburg, FL 34748-2303 strayarrow@comcast.net

Traditional Bowhunters of Florida

www.tbof.org

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CONTENTs 2... 3... 4... 5... 6... 7... 8-9.. 11.. 12-15.. 16-21.. 22-25.. 26-27.. 28-29.. 30..

Officers & Directors Charity Shoot Flyer President’s Column TBOF Life Members News & Notes Silver River Knap-in Flyer New Officers & Directors Bios The Cabbage Palm Chronicles Camping Tips & Tricks Knife Buyers Guide Vendor information 2016 Rendezvous Pictures Harvest Pictures Recipes State Championship Flyer


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President’s Column 4

January 2017

Hello allSadly, this will be my final President’s column as my three-year term ends at the closing of the 2017 Spring Championship in March. I have absolutely enjoyed my time as president and feel fortunate to work with such a great team of officers and directors. I am truly thankful for all the hard-working volunteers that have turned out at each event since I have been in office. Without your support, none of these events would be possible. TBOF has also reached record attendance at most of these events. I would like to thank all the loyal participants as well. I am looking forward to supporting the incoming officers, volunteering at work parties and competing on the ranges alongside my family and friends. Anyone that missed the last Fall Rendezvous missed a great time! I would like to thank all the volunteers. I always like to name the folks who turned out to help before, during and after each event. Unfortunately, I have misplaced the sign in sheet, but none the less your help was greatly appreciated. The shoot was a lot of fun with decent weather, for August anyway! Thanks to all the shooters as well, it was good to see all of you. Attendance was excellent and everyone seemed to have a good time. I am already looking forward to the 2017 Fall Rendezvous! As you know the annual charity event is coming up in January, we will keep our fingers crossed for good weather. A flyer with more info is contained in the newsletter. See you there! Take care, Bryan Finder


TBOF Life Members 5

Chris Brodeur and Family

Douglas Durant

Tom Brunofsky and Family

Walter Fussell, Jr.

Elvy Carter and Family

Joe Galloway

Dick Giles and Family

Morgan Gilreath

Danny Duboise and Family

Sharon Gordon

Sterling Holbrook and Family

Gary G. Hooper

Jack Keener Jr. and Family

Van C. Keebler

Dick Knowles and Family

Charlie Knoll

Jim Knowles and Family

Christopher Kuhn

Ron Miller and Family

Mike Kuhn

E.Bruce Selman III and Family

Buddy Manley

Johnny Smith and Family

Barry Merritt

David Tetzlaff and Family

Lonnie Mills

Cass Vickers and Family

Ronald R. Moye

Ronnie and Barbara Weatherman

Frank Scott

Mike Wyatt and Family

Ivor Undertajlo

Wayne Carter

Bob Walker

Nick Coullias

Roger Wilbourne

Tami Davern It looks like this somewhere where there is a winter


News and Notes 6

Bryan Finder

ANNUAL MEETING : 6:00 pm, Friday, March 3, 2017, in the registration hall NEW! Wildcrete African 3D targets Look for these NEW and EXCITING targets at the State Championship Shoot March 3rd. More Fences and Sidewalks Please do not drive over new sidewalks. New construction at the FWC Conservation Center is reducing the size of the primitive and generator camping areas. If there is any confusion on where to make camp please find TBOF president Bryan Finder or Vice President Bill Green and we will handle these issues in real time. Vegetation Flagging Have you noticed the flagging of vegetation and seedlings all over the FWC Camp? This is to keep our big feet and ATV’s from flattening their plantings to the ground. They are just about everywhere, so it’s hard to avoid them, but do your best, especially at night when they are harder to see. Leave it better than you found it How we leave things at camp after we have all gone home reflects directly upon us as a group. We should show by our actions what type of people we are and set an example for others to follow. Please pick up around your camp and the event site in general so that casual observers will see that we are different. If you rent a cabin from us and leave it messy you will not be permitted to rent a cabin in the future……no exceptions! Ground Fires If you want a campfire, either use one of the provided fire rings or bring an above the ground fire proof container. Your container should be dumped in one of the fire rings when you leave. If you dump it on the ground, it looks like you had a ground fire. If you need fire wood, there is wood sold at camp on the honor system. It is in the big bin between the registration building and the vendor area. New Showers and Bathrooms There have been several new bathroom and shower facilities constructed at the conservation center. These facilities are constructed at the rear of each big bunkhouse and are accessible by those renting the bunkhouse as well as the public through a door in the rear. If you are renting one of the bunkhouse style cabins with one of the new bathroom attached, please leave the door leading from the bathroom outside unlocked. Please…please…please help us keep the new and old facilities clean! Safety Statistically competition archery is a very safe sport and TBOF has an excellent record for having virtually no accidents on the range. However, complacency can lead to accidents. Please remember to always look out for each other on the ranges as well as the practice butts.


Other Upcoming Event Information 7


New Officers and Directors 8

President - Kevin Gregorious I was born in Jacksonville, FL in 1966. I have lived in North Florida pretty much my whole life, except for 6 years in the late 90’s where I lived in Northern California. I grew up in Middleburg, FL where I learned to hunt and fish with Darren Hengerer, who is still a best friend to this day. I picked up archery in 1990 and Art Stevens taught me how to shoot compound and how to hunt white-tailed deer and hogs. Rob Mathews introduced me to Traditional archery 3 years ago and it has been my passion ever since. I have attended every shoot since the State shoot in 2013. I can be found hunting public land all over North Florida with Lochloosa, Jennings Forest and Camp Blanding WMA’s being my favorites. I look forward to serving as your President and honored to have been nominated.

Vice President- Rob Mathews Rob is always on the go, and is an avid outdoorsman and can be often found in the woods or on the water. His first TBOF shoot was 8 years ago, and instantly fell in love with the people that work and attend the events. He has served one term as a member of the TBOF board, and has not missed a single shoot setup in 8 years. He is said to have a major in fun, and a minor in everything else! He runs a small pool business encompassing Alachua, Levy, and North Marion counties. He is married to Amanda-Mary Mathews the only person remotely capable of keeping him somewhat inline! Rob has 4 cats, 2 dogs, and 5 snakes.

Treasurer - Ron Sumner Director - Ben Butler My name is Ben Butler. I am 66 years old and I live in Jacksonville with my wife a blind cat and a fat dog. I am retired. I enjoy hunting, fishing, camping, bushcraft and of course archery! I also like trying to build bows. I shoot modern longbows, recurves and primitive bows. I hunted with rifles for many years but picked up traditional archery about ten years ago, and haven't looked back. I'm not very successful but love trying. I have been on the Board for North Florida Archers and help set up and design the course for our Rendezvous. I am looking forward to serving on the Board of Directors.

Director - Gregg Dudley Gregg has been an active member of TBOF since 2003. He has served on the board of directors for multiple terms and has also served a term as president. He currently co-manages the TBOF Facebook page. He loves camping, traveling, kayaking, hunting, fishing and all things outdoors. He is blessed to be married to Renee, who shares most of those passions with him and is understanding of the rest. He feels honored to be affiliated with TBOF and is proud to serve you as a director.


New Directors 9

Director - David Bielawski My name is David Bielawski and I have been an avid hunter and fisherman for most my life. I currently live in Southwest Florida with my Wife. We are expecting our first child in April! My wife, Janine, and I both shoot in the Longbow class and look forward to seeing everyone at the upcoming shoots!

Director - Carolyn Faunce A good friend introduced me to Traditional Archery in 2011. I have loved every minute of it. I have met the nicest people and formed wonderful new friendships. I have been on the board for 3 years. Looking forward to 3 more. I live in Palatka, FL where I was born and raised, but my roots are in the bayou country of Louisiana “Geaux Tigers”. I raised 4 children and have 3 grandsons. You may have seen me pulling the wagon around the last few years with 2 of them. Looking forward to them slinging some arrow in the next few years. I have worked for the Putnam County Property Appraisers Office and the Elections Office for the past 29 ½ years and waiting to retire. I am a mapper by trade but have held several positions over the years. Archery has become my favorite pastime but I am able to include several others while participating, like camping and learning new skills. TBOF has been a real joy in my life. See ya on the range!

Director - Gary E. Linn

Age: 68 Military Service: Army (1st Air Cavalry) Florida resident for 34 years Occupation: Yellow Freight Transportation Manager (Retired) Hobbies: Hunting, Fishing, horseshoe pitching and woodworking (Hog hunting is my favorite)

I got involved with TBOF initially as a learning experience about 9 years ago. I thought that with the diverse member base I could not only meet new people, but also learn new techniques and possibly improve my skills. I did not realize that I would make so many new friends and be accepted into the club as readily as I was. I hope that I can help recruit new members into the club and make them feel as welcome as the club members have for me.


The Cabbage Palm Chronicles 10

January 2017

" On the Trail" The two does did exactly as I had imagined earlier in the day. They came in from the right, fed under the large oak then exited the strand on a well used trail a scant five yards from my stand. Rarely do hunts go as planned but this one did, right down to the double lung shot with my new Robertson longbow, it's very first trip afield with me. The doe bounded off to the west and I thought I heard her fall. But experience and habit had me wait a half hour or so before I got down and checked my arrow. By this time the sun had set and I had to use my flashlight to find my arrow. As expected, it was coated with blood and bubbles, the best possible sign. But I had a bit of trouble picking up the sign with my old eyes. Undeterred, I retreated to my truck and retrieved my tracking glasses. Using them along with my LED flashlight allowed me to pick up the trail and find the doe in only about 10 minutes. Tracking glasses?? Yes, tracking glasses or, in reality, low powered reading glasses. I normally wear 1.50 reading glasses for any up close work and reading. Without them I literally cannot easily read or see anything up close. But when standing, these same reading glasses blur the ground and are useless for trailing unless I stay on my hands and knees. But one day, quite by accident at my local CVS, I discovered that, for me, a lower powered 1.00 set of reading glasses allowed me to see the floor clearly. Coincidentally, there was a piece of red lint on the carpet that seemed to glow light a light bulb. I immediately purchased the glasses and the result was being able to trail the doe mentioned above like I was thirty years younger, though the drag quickly reminded me of my true age. I would suggest everyone who has aging eyes requiring reading glasses give it a try. Just try on various powered glasses until you can see the floor clearly. It's that easy, and quite useful. On a separate note, earlier this season I shot a doe a good bit back in the paunch. Knowing this, I quietly backed out and called my friend Kenny Mullins. Kenny is a prominent member of the Florida Blood Trailing Network and works a remarkable bloodhound named Buddy. Kenny suggested we wait a minimum of six hours which allowed us time to get supper and visit as well as work out another trail for a fellow club member, successfully I might add. Buddy got on the trail where I shot and after a few zigs and zags found the deer. Total time on the trail was about 15 minutes. The key to the success with Buddy or any dog is patience. If you have ANY doubt about the trail, don't push on. Doing so will scent up the trail making the job more difficult for even the best dog. I am actually guilty of calling Kenny on deer I know I will recover just to watch Buddy work his magic. Kenny actually has great success on gut shot deer if the deer isn't pushed and a minimum of six hours is allowed to pass before taking up the trail. Again, patience and not contaminating the trail will greatly enhance your chances of recovering your deer. To utilize the services of the Florida Blood Trail Network, simply like their page on Facebook. If you need them, post a message on the page and you will get a response and someone will help. Kenny and most of the dog handlers do not charge for their services. But considering the time and travel involved, a healthy tip should be given to the tracker who comes out. It's all about the dogs for the members of the Florida Blood Trailing Network. Take the time to get acquainted with their Facebook page, follow the advise offered and when the situation arises, utilize them. You will not be disappointed. DonD Don Davis


Camping Tips and Tricks 11

Have you heard about the Swedish torch log, aka Swedish torch candle, aka Canadian candle? It’s a really neat camping hack that has been around for a while but has recently gained popularity. Making your own Swedish torch is easy to do. Read on for simple step by step instructions for how to make a Swedish torch log. Items You’ll Need to Make a Swedish Torch Log:  dry log, roughly 3ft tall and 1ft wide (bigger log will burn longer)  chainsaw  kindling or lighter fluid  matches or lighter Step 1: Prepare Your Log You don’t want your burning Swedish torch to be unstable! Examine the ends of the log. You want the cut to be as perpendicular as possible so that the Swedish torch log will stand upright. You also want a perpendicular surface on the other end, especially if you plan to cook on top of the fire. If the ends are not perpendicular then recut your log. Don’t skip this step! Step 2: Make Vertical Cuts Stand the log upright and make two or three crisscrossing, vertical cuts down the log. For a long burning fire make sure you cut down about 3/4th’s the length of the log. A shallower cut will result in a fire that doesn’t burn quite as long. Step 3: Light the Log Now it’s time to light a fire and begin turning the log into a Swedish torch log. You can squirt some common lighter fluid or kerosene into the cuts in the center of the log to get it going. Another good method is to soak something combustible like paper or cotton balls in vaseline or oil. You can push these down the cuts and they’ll light very easily and burn for a while. Alternatively you could also just use duff and small sticks to build a small fire on the flat top of the log. As the sticks burn down the hot coals will fall down into the cuts. You want the inside of the log (the cuts) to catch on fire and start burning. All the cuts allow air to enter and keep the fire going. Your Swedish torch log will actually burn from the inside out! Step 4: Enjoy Your Swedish Torch Log! Now that the work is done you can sit back and enjoy your Swedish Torch log. If you cut the top nice and flat you can throw on a cast iron pot or pan to cook up an excellent campfire meal. You could also make that campfire classic s’mores. Or better yet, do both! Article from : http://www.loveto.camp/camping/how-to-make-a-swedish-torch-log/


Knife Buyer’s Guide 12

Knife Buyer's Guide Author: David Mead

Whether you’re hunting, camping, butchering or just going about your everyday business, the right knife makes life much easier. But which knife is the right one? Simply typing in the word “knife” into an Internet search and hitting enter pulls up an overwhelming amount of options. Heck, even narrowing it down and typing something as specific as “skinning knife” leaves you with seemingly countless choices. But don’t worry – this buyer’s guide will help you whittle down the choices so you can pick the exact knife you need.

Knives by Application   

Boning – Should have a thin blade 5" to 6½" in length. You’ll want a fairly stiff blade for boning out big game, while a flexible blade is preferred for turkeys or upland birds. Skinning – Generally short with a deep drop, limiting the area of impact. Ideal for working in tight areas when caping an animal. Slicing – Have a narrow, thin blade, usually 8" to 12" in overall length and are effective when cutting ultrathin slices of meat. The more flexible the blade, the easier cutting thin slices is. Specialty slicers have a curved or scimitar-style tip to assist in tight spots, like between the wing and breast of birds. Everyday-Carry (EDC) – Should be small and light. However, if your knife is excessively small, some of the tasks you run into throughout the day may be too much for it to handle. A knife with a 3" blade is often a good balance between compactness and functionality, but this may not be perfect for everyone. Consider what you do most on a daily basis when deciding which EDC to purchase. Tactical – Designed for self-defense, but many can double as EDC knives. They are typically dark in color to aid in concealment. Easy-to-conceal folding-blade tactical knives generally have assisted opening for fast access. Deeppocket clips that mount close to the end of the handle are often used so little knife is visible when it’s clipped to a pocket. Fixed-blade knives are harder to conceal and carry, but they’re stronger and provide instant access. Replaceable-blade – With these knives, you’ll never have to sharpen a blade again. The blades are dispensable and replacements are relatively inexpensive, so when one blade becomes dull, you simply change it out for one that’s razor sharp. These are used for many applications, from skinning to slicing. Fixed vs. folding blade – Fixed-blade knives are stronger, while folding blades are more compact and thus easier to carry.

Blade Materials Blades are made of a wide variety of materials, and each has its own advantages. There is upside and downside to every material. Here is a breakdown of the most common materials you’ll encounter when shopping for the ideal blade. • Crucible – Developed by Crucible Steel for the cutlery industry and known as the pinnacle of knife-making metals. It’s tempered for hardness, making it excellent at holding an edge. Also, it’s extremely corrosion-resistant, ensuring it will last for years, but fairly hard to sharpen. • High-carbon steel – Also called cutlery steel. Holds an excellent edge and is easy to sharpen. A higher carbon content means increased blade hardness. The downsides to high-carbon steel are that it’s somewhat brittle, has a tendency to rust and reacts to both acids and alkalis, causing it to discolor. The discoloration doesn’t affect its performance. • Stainless steel – Excellent if you want a blade that doesn’t discolor, but this alloy is a real chore to sharpen once it loses its edge. However, the extreme hardness does help the blade hold its original edge longer.


• Titanium – Good for all-purpose knives. Lightweight, durable and retains sharpness longer than steel. Relatively 13 easy to sharpen. Titanium-coated knives or knives with titanium edges don’t have the same quality as those made purely of titanium or titanium alloys. Since sharpening removes metal, titanium-coated blades have a shorter life span. • Ceramic – Lightweight, hard, dense space-age material that is stronger than steel, but far more brittle. Ceramic blades hold an edge significantly longer than steel and can be manufactured into much thinner blades, which makes cutting considerably easier. They are best used for slicing and should never be used for chopping due to their brittleness. Unlike steel, their hardness makes them impervious to chemical reactions with either acidic or alkaline foods. Diamond hones are used for sharpening and repairing chips.

Construction A blade’s hardness is determined by using a Rockwell machine that forces a small penetrator into the metal’s surface. The depth of penetration is correlated to an A, B or C scale reading called the Rockwell hardness scale. A higher number is assigned to harder steel that allows less penetration. Blade steels are measured on the "C" scale (Rc) and range from Rc 55-60. In comparison, a diamond will range in the 80s on the Rockwell "C". Stainless steel bears a number of industry designations, generally with a number such as 154 or 420, followed by alpha characters like CM or HC. The numerical value indicates the amount of each element used, and the letters reveal the alloys that were used. 154CM is a high-carbon, high-alloy stainless steel made with 1.05% carbon, 0.5% manganese, 0.4% - 0.55% Molybdenum and 14.0% chromium. Therefore, the 154 indicates 1% carbon, 0.5% manganese and 0.4% molybdenum. The CM indicates chromium. This grade of steel is widely used by top specialty-knife makers. The chart below compares the most common blade materials in terms of hardness, corrosion resistance and edge quality. • Forged – Typically high quality and recommended for most applications. A prominent bolster between handle and blade will usually identify a forged knife, although a few are made without a bolster. They are usually heavier, better balanced and easier to keep sharp. Also, with care, they can last for generations. • Stamped – Cut or stamped out of flat metal stock. They don’t undergo the numerous steps associated with forging and are thus lighter in weight and usually not as well balanced. Since the metal is not as dense as a forged knife, stamped knives won’t hold their edge as well. • Sintering – An innovative process that results in all the durability, flexibility and light weight of titanium, plus the incredible edge retention of ceramic materials. Unlike ceramic blades, sintered titanium knives can be re-sharpened with standard sharpening stones. Some forged knives have parts that are manufactured separately and sintered together to form a knife of good quality at a lower cost than forged knives.

Blade Types • Spear point – Symmetrical geometry on its point and down the blade give it two identical edges. • Trailing point – Cut upward, higher than the spine of the blade. Excellent for skinning and caping. • Sheepsfoot – Has a blunt, rounded tip and straight cutting edge. The lack of a traditional point reduces the chances of accidental punctures. Great for cutting around inflatable watercraft, livestock and during emergencies. • Drop point – Largely popular. Common and especially useful in EDC knives. It has a lowered point that provides control and adds tip strength. • Clip point – Similar to the drop point. An excellent all-around knife. It has a lowered tip with a long belly area that punctures well and is great for slicing. • Tanto point –Specializes in piercing. It has a thick point that absorbs impact well. • Gut hook – Used for skinning and field dressing. The hook is used to split the skin, unzipping the animal.


Knife Buyer's Guide continued

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• Saw blade – Has a toothed edge that cuts when force is applied and a back-and-forth cutting motion is employed. Used to cut through hard material such as bone or wood. • Saw blade – Curved tip reduces possibility of punctures when working in tight areas. Good all-purpose blade.

Edges • Plain – A sharpened edge with no serrations or teeth – sometimes referred to as a smooth edge. Excellent for slicing, control, and accuracy. Produces clean cuts. • Serrated – A more aggressive, saw-like cutting edge. Although they produce unrefined cuts, serrated blades retain their ability to cut long after straight blades have lost their edge.

Blade Grinds • Hollow – Produces an extremely thin edge that is excellent for slicing. Many hunting knives use this grind. • Chisel – Only ground on one side. This creates an extremely sharp knife. However, it isn’t symmetrical, forcing the knife to curve when slicing, thus making accuracy difficult. • Sabre – Leaves a fairly thick edge that is ultra strong, making it excellent for chopping. • Flat –Excellent at slicing yet strong enough to chop. Ideal for kitchen cutlery. • Convex – Essentially the opposite of a hollow grind. This leaves a lot of steel behind the edge, making it extremely strong – excellent for jobs that require a lot of force.

Blade Finishes There seems to be countless blade finishes on the market, all with unique names. The purposes for blade finishes range from purely cosmetic to rust resistance to friction reduction. Below are the most popular coatings. Many finishes fit into one of these categories even though they may have a different, brand-specific name. • Black electroplating – A non-reflective coating bonded to steel using an electrostatic process. It reduces the steel’s reflectivity. • Teflon® – Slick and cuts better because of reduced friction. • Satin – Has a medium luster. Shows fine buffing lines with two directional finishes that better display the bevels of a blade. Used for cosmetic purposes. • Black-coated – Gives the blade a dark matte finish. This helps with concealment. Also ups a knife’s corrosion resistance.

Lock and Joint Mechanisms • Lockback – Similar to a fixed-blade knife, though still not as rigid. When opened, this blade locks into position, giving it more strength and stability. • Slip joint --– Blade doesn’t lock. Rather, it’s held in place by a spring device that allows the blade to fold when a certain amount of pressure is applied. • Frame and liner locks – Can be opened easily with one hand. Most often used on folding tactical knives.

Handle Materials • Wood – Offers an excellent grip but requires regular care. Keep it out of water and rub occasionally with mineral oil. • Plastic – May become somewhat brittle in time and can be slippery in the hand. Plastic-impregnated wood has properties similar to wood but requires less care and lasts longer.


Knife Buyer's Guide continued 2015

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Fall Rendezvouz Pictures

• Synthetics (G10, Kraton, Micrarta, polymide, etc.) – Provide phenomenal grip and comfort, plus they last longer than natural materials. • Metal – Fairly indestructible when used for handle material. Can be slippery or firm – many knives have a patterned metal grip, which provides a solid grasp in all conditions.

Blade Finishes There seems to be countless blade finishes on the market, all with unique names. The purposes for blade finishes range from purely cosmetic to rust resistance to friction reduction. Below are the most popular coatings. Many finishes fit into one of these categories even though they may have a different, brand-specific name. • Black electroplating – A non-reflective coating bonded to steel using an electrostatic process. It reduces the steel’s reflectivity. • Teflon® – Slick and cuts better because of reduced friction. • Satin – Has a medium luster. Shows fine buffing lines with two directional finishes that better display the bevels of a blade. Used for cosmetic purposes. • Black-coated – Gives the blade a dark matte finish. This helps with concealment. Also ups a knife’s corrosion resistance.

Lock and Joint Mechanisms • Lockback – Similar to a fixed-blade knife, though still not as rigid. When opened, this blade locks into position, giving it more strength and stability. • Slip joint --– Blade doesn’t lock. Rather, it’s held in place by a spring device that allows the blade to fold when a certain amount of pressure is applied. • Frame and liner locks – Can be opened easily with one hand. Most often used on folding tactical knives.

Handle Materials • Wood – Offers an excellent grip but requires regular care. Keep it out of water and rub occasionally with mineral oil. • Plastic – May become somewhat brittle in time and can be slippery in the hand. Plastic-impregnated wood has properties similar to wood but requires less care and lasts longer. • Synthetics (G10, Kraton, Micrarta, polymide, etc.) – Provide phenomenal grip and comfort, plus they last longer than natural materials. • Metal – Fairly indestructible when used for handle material. Can be slippery or firm – many knives have a patterned metal grip, which provides a solid grasp in all conditions.

Original article: http://www.cabelas.com/product/outdoor-info/articles-information/camping-articles%7C/pc/103794480/ c/105924780/sc/105988680/knife-buyer-s-guide/532585.uts?destination=%2Fcategory%2FCamping-Articles%2F105988680.uts


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Harvest Pictures

Ryan Gill


Harvest27Pictures

Don Davis

Herb Arndt

Rob McAbee

Ryan Gill

Tom Voutour


28 Recipes

“Rattlesnake” Stew Serves 8

Dr. Pepper is a spicy cola and adds just the right “bite” to this one-pot meal. Ingredients:  3/4l b. Ground beef  3/4 lb. Ground sausage  1/4 tsp. ground cloves  1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon  Large onion, peeled and diced  2 tsp. powdered bouillon (chicken, beef or vegetable)  1 1/2 cups raw pasta such as macaroni or veggie-spirals  15-ounce can pinto beans, undrained  2 cans, 12 ounces each, spicy cola such as Dr. Pepper (regular or diet)  Salt, pepper and hot sauce to taste Spray a cold cast iron Dutch oven with cooking spray and arrange your beef and sausage in the bottom. Sprinkle the meat with cloves and cinnamon. Next add diced onion, bouillon powder and pasta. Spoon the diced tomatoes into your pot, add beans, and pour the cola on top. Cover and place the pot in hot coals for 50 to 60 minutes. Stir and continue to cook, covered, until the onion and pasta are tender. When finished, add salt and pepper to taste. Don't forget to pass the hot sauce.

Firehouse Special Serves: 6-8

Ingredients:  2 slices bacon, chopped into small pieces  2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breast  1 packet dry mushroom soup mix  4 cups diced root vegetables such as potato, yam, carrot, parsnip, onion, turnip and rutabaga  2 cans condensed  low-sodium cream of mushroom soup  1 soup can water Spray a cold cast iron Dutch oven with cooking spray, and scatter bacon on the bottom in an even layer. Cut chicken into bite size pieces and put it in a clean bag with the soup mix. Shake to coat all the pieces. Cover the bacon layer with your marinated chicken, discard the bag and arrange your root vegetables over the chicken. Spoon the mushroom soup evenly over your vegetables and pour a can of water over the top. Cover your Dutch oven and nestle it in hot coals for 50 to 60 minutes. Check for doneness every 30 minutes until it's done. Continue to stir, and add water if needed. These two recipes from https://www.reserveamerica.com/outdoors/cast-iron-cooking-2-quick-recipes.htm


29 Recipes

Cupboard Stew Serves 2 Cooking time 30 minutes Ingredients

 1 lb. ground wild game (bear, venison, elk, antelope, etc.)  1 medium onion, chopped  4 large cloves garlic, pressed  1 11-oz. can Mexicorn  1 4-oz. can sliced mushrooms  1 6-oz. can tomato paste  1 ½ tsp. basil  Salt & pepper to taste  2 ½ cups water  1 8-oz. pkg. favorite pasta or noodles  Parmesan cheese Spray deep cast iron skillet or heavy Dutch oven with non-stick spray. Cook meat, onions, and garlic till meat is lightly brown and onions are soft. Add remaining ingredients. Mix well. Bring to boil. Turn down heat and simmer about 15 to 20 minutes until pasta is done. Serve and sprinkle with freshly grated Parmesan cheese.

Venison Stir Fry           

3 Tbsp. vegetable oil 1 large onion, cut into chunks 4 large cloves garlic, sliced 1 tsp. minced fresh ginger 1 lb. venison, cut in small strips 1 bunch broccoli, cut into florets 2 carrots, sliced ½ lb. mushrooms, sliced 1 large green pepper, cut into chunks 1 large red pepper, cut into chunks ½ tsp. soy sauce

Heat 3 tablespoons oil in wok or large skillet. When hot, add ginger, onion and garlic. Add venison and cook until color changes. Add remaining ingredients except for soy sauce, 1 at a time, stirring often. After all ingredients have been added, add soy sauce and mix till coated and continue to stir-fry 5 minutes. Serve over rice.

These two recipes courtesy of “Cooking on the Wild Side” http://www.aetn.org/programs/cookingonthewildside


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2016 stickbow winter  
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