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T E OCTOBER 2013

ADDER L PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER TO JUNE

BE A PART OF IT! SHA-BARK IN THE PARK PAGE 16

PARENTING WISDOM PAGE 8

MINDFULNESS MEDITATION PAGE 9

FOOD FESTIVAL PAGE 10

SHABBAT OF SONG PAGE 3


IN THIS ISSUE FEATURES

220 SOUTH BEDFORD ROAD CHAPPAQUA, NY 10514

WWW.BETHELNW.ORG 914.238.3928 T 914.238.4030 F BEGINNING YEARS 914.238.5735 RELIGIOUS SCHOOL 914.238.5641 TEMPLE@BETHELNW.ORG

TEMPLE STAFF ALAN D. FUCHS Rabbi GEOFFREY MITELMAN Associate Rabbi MAURA H. LINZER Rabbi-Educator STAR A. TROMPETER Senior Cantor GENNIFER KELLY Executive Director RAYNA ALPERSTEIN Director, Beginning Years LISA P. DAVIS President

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Activities 16 Beginning Years 7 Birthdays 14 B’nei Mitzvah 12-13 Cantor Trompeter 3 Caring Community Committee 11 Facility Rentals 20 Gifts 15 Joys and Sorrows 12-15 Rabbi Fuchs 3-5 Rabbi Linzer 6 Religious School 6 Shabbat Service Times 2 Temple Information 21 Tikkun Olam 10-11 Yahrzeits 14

Installations of Rabbi Maura H. Linzer and Cantor Star A. Trompeter

OCTOBER HIGHLIGHTS DATE PAGE Mah Jongg First Friday Family Shabbat Jewish Mindful Meditation Meg Akabas/Parenting Wisdom Family Shabbat Worship Service Mah Jongg Jewish Mindful Meditation Sha-bark in the Park Tour D’Shuls Family Cycling Knitzvah Corps Mah Jongg Jewish Mindful Meditation Tzahal Shalom Jewish Mindful Meditation with Rabbi Jeff Roth Mah Jongg Lunch ‘N’ Learn Jewish Mindful Meditation Mah Jongg

FRIDAY NIGHT SERVICES BEGIN AT 8:00 PM (except 1st Friday of each month) TORAH STUDY SATURDAY MORNING 8:30 AM SATURDAY MORNING SERVICE 10:00 AM

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BACK COVER

2 4 4 6 6 9 11 12 13 15 16 18 18 20 23 23 25 30

WORSHIP SERVICE TIMES

16 2 16 8 2 16 16 16 10 10 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16

OCTOBER 4 1ST FRIDAY FAMILY SHABBAT KABBAL-TOT SHABBAT 5:30 PM SHABBAT DINNER 6:15 PM FAMILY SHABBAT WORSHIP SERVICE with 7th Grade Participation and Special Guest Speaker, Rabbi Samuel Joseph

7:15 PM

$12 per person $40/family Children under 5 free with paying adult. Bring your own bottle of wine! (No corkage fee!) RSVP on our website or contact the temple office at 914.238.3928 x1320. Mail your check for dinner to Temple Beth El.

NEXT 1st FRIDAY: NOVEMBER 1 A Proud Member of the URJ

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RABBI ALAN D. FUCHS ROSH HASHANAH SERMON We spend time each year in northern New England. It is a beautiful part of this country − ancient, filled with history, quaint. New Englanders are special people. Some think them unfriendly. Certainly, they are exceedingly private and typically not loquacious. They might express a thought or a sentiment in two or three words, a single sentence, what others might say in paragraphs. I am a New Englander. I remember that when I first ventured into the south, I was amazed at how southerners seemed to say in a thousand words what we in New England would express in a single phrase. “Yup,” often serves the purpose. So when a local New Hampshire proprietor of a general store responded to my attempt to make conversation about the rain (when I asked the rather silly question,”Do you think it is ever going to stop raining?”) with “Always does,” I should not have been surprised − just a bit intimidated. The poet of New England, of course, is Robert Frost. He loved the countryside and the people. Rather astonishingly, Robert Frost never went to college. He could have been a student at Harvard and he did spend three months at Dartmouth, but writing was his love and he did that at an early age. It took some

twenty years before he became known, and then it only happened while he was in England. He and his family lived in England for a while. There, it was suggested that he publish his poetry. The English did what the Americans would not do. His book and his work immediately were given praise there, and as a result, met with applause here. He returned to the states somewhat of a hero. He finally was recognized for what he was − poet philosopher. Above my desk in my study at home is a framed passage from one of my favorite Robert Frost poems. You may know it. The Road Not Taken Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; (continued on page 4)

CANTOR STAR A. TROMPETER CANTOR’S CORNER

New and exciting musical programs are underway at TBE! JOIN THE JEW-BE-GLEE CLUB!

SAVE THE DATE! SHIR SHABBAT (SHABBAT OF SONG)

Do you have a 2nd through 12th Grader who loves to sing? The Jew-Be-Glee Club is up and running, and it’s not too late for your child to join!

Shir Shabbat is coming on Friday, November 8 at 8:00 PM!

JOIN TBE’S ADULT VOLUNTEER CHOIR! We are so blessed to have a wonderful, dedicated group of talented congregants who volunteer their time to sing for the High Holidays and other special events. I look forward to building upon this fabulous group by forming an Adult Volunteer Choir which will meet two Mondays per month. If you love to sing, whether with a group of friends or in the car along with the radio, then this choir is for you! The choir will participate in Shabbat services as well as other special events throughout the year. Our next rehearsal is Monday, October 7 at 8:00 PM.

This innovative, lively Shabbat service will be filled with more music than ever before! Various instrumentalists will be featured in the service, and you, our congregants of all ages, will have a role as well. You won’t want to miss this exciting service filled with song! No previous vocal or choral training is required for the choirs! The only requirements are a love for music and an open mind! For more information on any of the above programs, please contact Cantor Trompeter.

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RABBI ALAN D. FUCHS

(ROSH HASHANAH SERMON CONTINUED)

Then took the other, as just as fair, And having perhaps the better claim Because it was grassy and wanted wear, Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same, And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way I doubted if I should ever come back. I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I, I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. This congregation was founded to travel a road not previously taken, and thus to make a difference in the lives of people of this community. Its name, Beth El, most likely was selected not without purpose. Its origin is in a biblical story. Jacob, you will remember, is guilty of stealing the birthright from his older brother Esau. Jacob flees from his parental home and lives in constant fear that Esau will find him and take revenge. One evening, on his travels from Beersheba in what now is southern Israel, he falls asleep and dreams that a ladder is reaching to the heavens, and that angels are ascending and descending on the ladder. Even more striking, the god in whom Jacob believes, is standing beside him on the ladder. Jacob’s god promises him that he will bring him back to this land, and more important, that he will protect him. When Jacob awakens he is greatly shaken. He believes that something very special has happened, and he names the place Beth El, the House of El, Beit El, the House of God. Beth El became a major sanctuary in the northern kingdom of Israel. So I welcome you into this beit el on this Rosh Hashanah 5774, having been here twelve years ago under very different circumstances. Rosh Hashanah that year was seven days after September 11. It was a time when very few did not want to be here. The enormity of the tragedy and the sense of American community brought us all here, to a place of comfort, and perhaps, safety. Change of staff did not matter. The temple was here – it was open. As Jacob had realized, it was a place of awe, a place in which sanctity dwelled. It was, and is, here that the Jew would survive. What does it mean to be a beit el – a sacred Jewish space? As little boy, I went off to Hebrew School to begin what became a lifelong study.

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That Hebrew School was orthodox. Most of the other students did not want to be there. My images are classic. Students rolled pennies down the aisle and did everything imaginable to mock the teacher and the message he was trying to convey. My level of understanding was sufficient to realize that his knowledge and the heritage he had studied meant little to those young people before whom he stood. He was a small, kind man. His knowledge of text, as I later learned, was overwhelming. This humble, orthodox gentleman, who could read and discuss Talmud, who had studied Maimonides,who innately knew Hebrew grammar better than any teacher I ever met, was teaching the aleph-bet, beginning Hebrew reading, to students who did not want to learn. In later years, when I studied with him privately, and came to admire the extent of his learning, I asked him why he continued to teach at that low level to such difficult and ungrateful young people. “Who,” he responded, “will teach them? Someone who knows little and has no love of tradition? Who will try to make certain that they and their children will be Jewish? In so many countries for so many centuries we were not allowed to teach and study freely and we yearned to do so. Now we are free – free to teach, free to learn, free to be the Jewish community of which we could only dream just a couple of centuries ago.” The voice on the other end of the phone said: My children have celebrated their bar and bat mitzvah. Why should I remain a member? We have taken from the congregation all we wanted. “Oh,” I wanted to say, “but your children read the section in the service which follows the shema– ‘and you shall teach them to your children. You shall teach them when you are home and when you are away. You shall impress upon your children the value of being Jewish.’ What is it that you are teaching to your children? What is the message? You shall teach that it is OK to buy a few years of religious school, learn about what is the equivalent of a first grade education in hours spent here, and, with integrity, read in the service ‘and you shall teach them unto your children’? Is that what you are doing? Is that what you want us to do?” Learning, study – that always has been at the very heart of keeping Jewish life alive. It is not about an occasional ceremony; it is about who we are as a beit el – a place of study, a place of learning, a place of passing on commitment, a place in which the symbol of the Torah means something special, a place in which reading from that Torah is a source of pride because it is uniquely ours. (continued on page 5)


RABBI ALAN D. FUCHS

(ROSH HASHANAH SERMON CONTINUED)

Another voice was similarly disheartening: I come only once or twice a year. Why should I continue to pay for such minimal use? The purchase price is too high. You are right – the purchase price is high. To be a Jew, the purchase price always has been high. The price was high in Auschwitz and Birkenau and Treblinka and Buchenwald. The price was high in fifteenth century Spain. The price was high for refusniks in the Soviet Union. The price is high in modern Israel. You are right – the price is high. What is it worth to make certain that Jewish life lives and thrives? What is it worth to keep us safe and secure in whom we are? What is it worth to make certain that the synagogue, as an institution, is there − not only for us, but also for future generations? It is the synagogue, after all, that is the guarantor of Jewish survival in this country, and, perhaps, outside of Israel, in the world. Without a beit el, where will there be a Rosh Hashanah service next year? Without a beit el, what and who will care for my life cycle events? Who will marry my children if there are no rabbis, because rabbinic schools have disappeared as a result of no synagogues to support them? Who will officiate at funerals? What will happen to Jewish life in America? It often is said that this is a house of prayer. For many that may be true, but it is possible to pray anywhere. I will tell you a secret – coming from a rabbi who has served in major congregations – I do not come here primarily to pray. I come here to connect with my Jewishness. I come here to find my Jewish roots. I come here to survive as a Jew. A third conversation caught my attention. What might be my mitzvah for my upcoming bar or bat mitzvah? The congregation requires a child to have a mitzvah project. What a wonderful idea. Each young person must find some means of actually carrying out our strong belief that we help take care of the people around us. We do that each year when we collect food during the High Holy Days for the hungry and the needy. I was struck by the fact that we, the beit el, are preserving for these families the memory of what we as Jews have long been taught we should be doing. Have you read The Giver? It is dystopian literature, a genre of writing that speaks of a futuristic world, a world after the chaos. At some point in that society of The Giver, all historic community memory was erased. Only the giver and the receiver retained that memory. Without memory, there is no pain − if you cannot remember physical pain, you might as well not have experienced it. If you cannot remember the events that hurt you, then you are not plagued by grief or regret. Giving up memories of their collective

experience not only allowed them to forget all of the pain that had been suffered throughout human history, it also prevented members of the society from wanting to engage in activities and relationships that could result in conflict and suffering. It eliminated any nostalgia for the things the community gave up in order to live in total peace and harmony. But without memory, there is no love and there is no real caring. We Jews are all about memory. We remember all the evils that have beset us, but we remember them with purpose. Every Passover we remember that we were slaves in the land of Egypt. We use that memory to motivate us to do good – to make certain that others do not suffer the pain of slavery in any form. When this beit el discusses a mitzvah project, it is keeping alive the memory of who we are. It is reminding every young person and every family that we are a people who long ago made a promise – a covenantal promise – that we would take care of the widow and the stranger and the orphan and the needy. We are a people of memory. That is who we are; and it is the synagogue − the beit el − that is the repository of that memory. Robert Frost’s poetry applies to us. We are a people who has taken the road less travelled and that has made all the difference. We have travelled so many roads not taken. Those roads are like a trilogy of many works of literature. In tradition, it is represented by the stories of the three patriarchs. Jacob is said to be the scholar, spending much time in study. Isaac was capable of self-sacrifice, willing to offer himself if called upon. And Abraham showed kindness, welcoming the stranger into his tent. In literature it is listed as the three pillars of Jewish life – torah, avodah and g’milut chasadim − Jewish learning, work or prayer, and good deeds. Whichever metaphor you might choose, the message is the same – to be a Jew is to understand that our survival is not automatic – we always have had to work at it. It comes with a price. Complacency is potentially fatal. So, in this post-holocaust and modern Israel world, we no longer can rely on either historical event − the despair of the gas chambers or the exhilaration of seeing the breathtaking beauty of Jerusalem tucked in the Judean hills − to sustain American Jewish life. It is right that our survival not be dependent either on suffering or its memory, or the vicarious fulfillment of another person’s joy. We need something deeper, more enduring. That something is the vision of the road not taken, a vision found in this sacred space, in this beit el.

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MAURA H. LINZER, RABBI-EDUCATOR/RELIGIOUS SCHOOL Selichah - Forgiveness This month’s Religious School Jewish Value is Selichah, forgiveness. It has been taught that forgiveness involves three parts—asking for forgiveness, regretting engaging in the action, and committing to never doing it again. You might wonder why it is that Selichah was chosen as the value for the month of October, the month after Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. It is our hope that revisiting this value would help our students pause and reflect on how they are doing on the third portion, avoiding repeating the same negative behavior for which they atoned during the High Holidays. As the temperature drops and the leaves begin to change, it is a wonderful time to speak with your children about how they are doing at reaching their goals for the New Year.

by Toba Strauss, our rabbinic-education intern from Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, a new structure for class involvement in our first Friday Family Shabbat services, the addition of a trope class for some seventh graders taught by our talented cantor, Star Trompeter, and the beginning of “Rosh Chodesh: It’s a Girl Thing,” an informal Jewish learning program for our eighth grade young women to build self-esteem, led by our new Youth Group Coordinator, Joni Gehebe Kellog. We also implemented a new philosophy of Hebrew education, a school-wide discipline policy, a parent handbook and a new rigorous Hebrew program for grades three through six. In addition to the many exciting programs planned by our senior and junior youth groups, the senior youth group has been busy planning to make over the youth lounge and the junior youth group has organized pre-religious school activities, such as basketball and a study lounge for grades five and six on Mondays and Thursdays.

Our Religious School has been busy reaching toward our new goals. We kicked off our first few weeks with much excitement—welcoming a K/1 class of twenty-five students, which required us to hire two new K/1 teachers and two classroom aides, an inaugural class of Madricim, post-B’nai Mitzvah volunteer classroom assistants, a new and engaging 8th and 9th Grade curriculum overseen

While there is always room to grow and improve, there is much excitement in the air about the future of our program. None of these innovative changes would be possible in such a short time if it was not for our committed leadership. We thank them for their continued support and leadership as we work together to build the future of our program.

RELIGIOUS SCHOOL HIGHLIGHTS OCTOBER 4 6 13-14 31

7th Graders lead Family Shabbat Worship Serivce 4th Grade families will participate in a fun and innovative learning experience SCHOOL CLOSED/Columbus Day Weekend SCHOOL CLOSED /Teacher Training

See our website for the complete Religious School calendar.

JUNIOR YOUTH ACTIVITIES SEPTEMBER 24-OCTOBER 29 6 Tuesday Classes, 6:00-6:45 PM, $60 3rd/4th Grade Basketball Class boys/girls

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NOVEMBER 3, 11:00 AM 3rd/4th Grade Build-a-Bear Activity NOVEMBER 5, 10:00 AM K/1 Art Activity

BESTY IRON CHEF PROGRAM SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6 4:30-6:00 PM Join BESTY for our first event of the year! We will be having an IRON CHEF cooking competition! Join us in the Temple Beth El Resource Room

FREE! Please RSVP by October 4 to Joni at jgehebe@yahoo.com.


RAYNA ALPERSTEIN, DIRECTOR BEGINNING YEARS ECC “Making Friends with Failure” “There is a major disconnect between schools and the real world on the notion of failure. School teaches us there is only one answer for every problem. And if we don’t get it, we are a failure. This dissuades students from trying — they fear failure. We need to teach students how to make friends with failure.

In examining what makes for a successful life, researchers increasingly cite taking risks, failing, resiliency and executive function. Brain research and child development research increasingly support good early childhood practices as the way to promote successful education for children, regardless of socio-economic background. Unfortunately, this knowledge has not filtered down to legislators who increasingly promote high-stakes testing. During the years birth to age six, the brain is most receptive to forming new synapses.

Failure is hard for everyone, but interestingly, it’s particularly hard for high-achieving students. They don’t know how to deal with this unfamiliar territory. It kills their spirit because their performance is so linked to their self-esteem.

This is not to say that learning stops at age six – not at all. Learning continues all the way through old age. Our children will experiment, explore and pursue that which they have interest. The more varied the experiences within the structure of school the more logical their thinking becomes. And spilling paint, juice, water, the snack, knocking over buildings is all part of this growth. We all need to clean up our messes! In October when your child makes a mess, teach him/her to clean it up.

We need to give our children more opportunities to build a relationship with failure. In my estimation, science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education is a key way to do it. In STEM, failure is a fact of life. Experiments don’t work out, the data doesn’t look right, or someone knocks over your experiment.” Edutopia article, “Making Friends with Failure.” Ainissa Ramirez

OCTOBER BY HIGHLIGHTS 2, 16, 30 Music with Miss Pam 4 First Shabbat in Sanctuary/ Challah delivery begins 14 No school (Columbus Day)

BEGINNING YEARS PARENT COMMITTEE CO-CHAIRS

Leah Alani 917.763.9515 LeahAlani@yahoo.com Alonna Travin 914.238.1091 Alonna.Travin@gmail.com

23 Storyteller Miss Paulene 24 Sign language for fours 31 No school (Professional Development Day for Jewish ECC educators)

DOING GOOD WHILE HAVING FUN!

SPARKLE FOR A CAUSE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 6:00 PM Crabtree Kittle House 11 Kittle Road, Chappaqua Join us for cocktails and small plates! Each year Crabtree Kittle House generously donates at least 30% of the proceeds from these “sparkle” evenings to local non-profits. This is part of their memorial to Amy Crabtree. Mark your calendars and call the Kittle House at 914.666.8044 and make a reservation to support your early childhood program. Have a drink and some small plates with friends and neighbors.

BEGINNING YEARS STUDYING TORAH

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ADULT EDUCATION JEWISH BOOK COUNCIL AUTHOR MEG AKABAS OCTOBER 6 9:15-10:45 AM 52 Weeks of Parenting Wisdom How we parent matters, and we can all be better parents by working at it step by step. Informed by Jewish values, Meg Akabas builds on this philosophy, providing easy-to-implement strategies in once-aweek chapters that you can read in just a few minutes. Each chapter provides a salient piece of advice on one specific topic, such as: respect, self-control, cooperation, and sibling relations. Rather than overwhelm with psychological studies and theories, this book shows busy parents how to make attainable and effective changes in their parenting that will help them raise children who are committed, responsible, and valuable members of their family and the larger Jewish community. Written for parents of young children (birth to age 10), 52 Weeks of Parenting Wisdom offers real guidance you can use with your children today. Questions? Contact Maxine Olson maxineols@gmail.com

COMING UP

Lawrence Malkin, author of The War Within Israel’s Ultra-Orthodox Threat to Democracy and the Nation January 26 at 9:15 - 10:45 AM Jay Michaelson, author of Evolving Dharma Meditation, Buddhism, and the Next Generation of Enlightenment February 2 at 9:15 - 10:45 AM

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FUTURE EVENTS IN ADULT ED Adult Education at Temple Beth El is designed to create a center for Jewish learning in Northern Westchester that is relevant and meaningful. Under the guidance of our Adult Education Chair, Maxine Olson, and our Associate Rabbi, Geoffrey Mitelman, our intent is to provide temple members and members of the community with the opportunity to participate in programs and courses on a variety of Jewish topics that are infused with excitement and diversity. See our monthly bulletin and the temple calendar for additional program details.

AUTHORS AND SPEAKERS 9:15-10:45 AM

RABBI NORMAN COHEN

Jacob and Esau: Sibling Rivalries in Genesis. A Window Into Our Own Families November 3 & 17

LAWRENCE MALKIN

author of The War Within: Israel’s Ultra-Orthodox Threat to Democry and the Nation January 26

JAY MICHAELSON

author of Evolving Dharma: Meditation, Buddhism, and the Next Generation of Enlightenment February 2

SUNDAY MORNINGS MINI-COURSES WITH OUR CLERGY 9:15-10:45 AM

INTERFAITH MARRIAGE LIVING AN INTERFAITH LIFE November 24, December 8 & 15

ISRAEL

January 12

THE CHANGING FACE OF JUDAISM March 9 & 23

SCHOLAR-IN-RESIDENCE WEEKEND THE CHANGING FACE OF JUDAISM

wiith Professor Steven M. Cohen, Hebrew Union College Friday, March 28 at 8:00 PM Sunday, March 30 at 3:00 — 5:30 PM


ADULT EDUCATION A DAY OF JEWISH MINDFULNESS MEDITATION with RABBI JEFF ROTH DIRECTOR, AWAKENED HEART PROJECT

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM NO RSVP REQUIRED

WAKE UP TO A MORE VIBRANT LIFE!

Rabbi Jeff Roth is the founder and Director of The Awakened Heart Project for Contemplative Judaism. He was the co-founder of Elat Chayyim where he served as Executive Director and Spiritual Director for 13 years, and is the co-leader of the Jewish Mindfulness Teacher Training program. He has facilitated over 90 Jewish meditation retreats. Rabbi Roth is also the author of Jewish Meditation Practices for Everyday Life, from Jewish Lights Publishing. Learn more at www.awakenedheartproject. org/retreats/rosh-hashanah#sthash.LkOeH9ou.dpuf.

In today’s busy world, many of us go through life on a kind of automatic pilot, flying the same route over and over, as if we’re sleepwalking, our fate as uncontrollable as our dreams. Join us on October 20 at Temple Beth El for a day of presentation, discussion and meditation led by well-known meditation teacher Rabbi Jeff Roth. Rabbi Roth, who draws on the wisdom of both Jewish and Buddhist meditation practices, will introduce us to a path to cultivate an awakened state of heart and mind to help us to respond to life’s challenges with clarity and kindness. - Refreshments and snacks provided. Please bring your lunch. - In order that all may participate, please avoid wearing scented products. - Donation requested.

Awaken your heart and mind to see your own capacity for wisdom, compassion and kindness. QUESTIONS? Contact Leslie Hinderstein at 914.715.9067 Donations to the Amy and Sam Resnick Family Fund for Adult Jewish Studies, which supports this program and others at Temple Beth El, are welcome! Supported by Ruth Rosenblum, LCSW of Westchester Jewish Community Services and the TBE Mndfulness Meditation Group. Supported by Ruth Rosenblum, LCSW of Westchester Jewish Community Services and the TBE Mindfulness Meditation Group.

220 SOUTH BEDFORD RD, CHAPPAQUA, NY 10514 TEMPLE@BETHELNW.ORG • WWW.BETHELNW.ORG9 914.238.3928 T • 914.238.4030 F


TIKKUN OLAM SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13 at 9:00 AM All are welcome! Rain or shine! Join us for family cycling and community fun on the Westchester Bike Trail.

Come build a home for a family in need! Habitat for Humanity builds affordable homes for families who otherwise could not afford them. No building experience is required. Participants must be 12 or older. If you are interested, please e-mail Alissa Dorfman at alissadorman@aol.com for details.

In the spirit of Tikkun Olam, the Northern Westchester temples are planning to launch the first ever Tour d’Shuls biking event, bringing us together in a fun and healthy way and ride for tzedakah. This will be a family-oriented event that is intended to ready people for a larger event in the spring. The route is not yet determined, but it will possibly be on the Trailway.

NORTHERN WESTCHESTER FOOD FESTIVAL/WE FEED THE HUNGRY AT TEMPLE BETH EL

If you have suggestions about this and/or would like to help organize the event, please contact Dick Goldsmith at dgoldsmith@horah.com or 914-238-3360.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3 at 3:30 PM

KNITZVAH CORPS The Knitzvah Corps meets on the third Tuesday evening at 7:30 PM at the temple. We find easy projects such as ear warmers, scarves, lap blankets, prayer shawls, etc. Everyone is welcome, regardless of knitting or crocheting ability. Come sit, socialize and help solve the world’s problems! All skill levels welcome! Next date: October 15. While we’re looking for new projects, we’re continuing to work on afghans for African orphans with AIDS, lap blankets and scarves for homeless day laborers that stay at the temple We are always open to suggestions and our projects are easy and fun to do! We also are happy to tutor beginners! You can always bring your personal knitting for “show and tell,” advice from our expert knitters, etc. Questions? Contact Hillary Kent at hilaryk13@ gmail.com or call 914.238.9793.

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Socialize, stroll around the beautiful setting and tables set up by the vendors and sample the many savory food offerings that will be presented, meet some local chefs and restauranteurs, get some recipes and ideas for the holidays, learn about Mazon, and feel good about helping to combat hunger. Vendors from restaurants in supporting towns will be preparing samples of fall and holiday specialties to sample. Wines and beverages, as well as dessert samplers, will be available as part of the tasting. In addition, various farmers market vendors will be there with their specialties. All profits above costs for the event will be donated to MAZON, which feeds the hungry, regardless of denomination. All welcome! Supported by the Chappaqua/Millwood Chamber of Commerce, the Briarcliff Chamber of Commerce, the Armonk Chamber of Commerce and the Pleasantville Chamber of commerce. The event is open to everyone and we welcome everyone in the spirit of Thanksgiving. There will be takeaway bags for each participant! $18 per person/$25 per family. Questions? Contact Susan Pecker at brainstar2000@aol.com.


TIKKUN OLAM THE TEMPLE BETH EL CARING COMMUNITY COMMITTEE Our congregants have volunteered to drive to a doctor’s appointment or temple services, prepare a meal of consolation or family meal during the shiva period or an extended illness, pay a friendly visit or help fellow congregants in any way possible. The TBE Caring Community Committee is there for you. Please call Penny Hamlet at 914.666.2826 if you or someone you know is in need of our services.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO HELP? We understand how busy everybody is, so if you are unable to help on a particular day, don’t be concerned! We will check back with you another time! You can help us once during the year, or more if your schedule permits. Needs do not often arise, but when they do, assistance is greatly appreciated. The feeling of doing a good deed for a member of your temple family will far outweigh the time and effort required to do it! Please fill out the Volunteer Sign-Up form in this pamphlet and mail or fax it to the temple. A member of the Caring Community Committee will contact you. ******************************************************

CARING COMMITTEE VOLUNTEER SIGN-UP (Please mail or e-mail to temple office.)

HOW CAN YOU HELP?

(Please check activities of interest.) _____ Pick up and deliver food for meals of consolation _____ Set up house for a meal of consolation _____ Provide or purchase a meal for family during shiva _____ Be part of a shiva minyan _____ Be trained by rabbi to lead a minyan or other temple functions _____ Prepare or purchase a meal _____ Shop for food _____ Drive to a doctor, treatment, etc. _____ Drive to school _____ Drive to service, or any other temple functions _____ Drive homebound or elderly _____ Make a friendly visit to the homebound or elderly _____ Assist with delivering a gift to family on the birth of a child _____ Assist with tree planting certificates _____ Other ideas? Please describe:

NAME:__________________________________________ ADDRESS:______________________________________

I AM GENERALLY AVAILABLE:

_________________________________________________

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

_________________________________________________ PHONE:_________________________________________ E-MAIL:_________________________________________

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

_____ Mornings _____ Afternoon _____ Evenings

_________________________________________________

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JOYS AND SORROWS

OCTOBER B’NEI MITZVAH Appears in print version only

MAZAL TOV! 12

MAZAL


JOYS AND SORROWS

devn ipa

aeh lfn

TOV!

MAZAL TOV! 13


JOYS AND SORROWS OCTOBER YAHRZEITS OCTOBER 1-5 Helen Biren Philip Carson Robert Cohen Rebecca Goldman Nathan Greller Louise Gursha Miriam Hirschfeld Henry Horowitz Louis Jacobs Harvard Jacobs Stanley Kent Rose Kozierok Caroline Laster Pearl Marcus Harold Rabinowitz Leona Redston Jerome Rosenthal Ceil Schreier Henry Schwaeber Seymour Scolnick Ethel G. Sena Rita B. Simpson Albert Singer Albert Singer Craig Smith Theodora Unger Minni Silverman Weis David Wray OCTOBER 6-12 Steven Acard Sam Bilgrei Irving Blechner Samuel Brown Joseph Deutsch Charlotte Diamondstein Henry Gewitz Jerry Gleicher Rae Gluck Mannie Goldberg Rose Winer Goldstein Herbert Green Robert Haimovici Adele Hantman Estelle Richter Harrison Samuel Horowitz Sandra Lazarus Julia Lewis Louis Lieboff Manoocher Manoochehrian David Meisel Aaron Norkin Harry Nortman Minnie Oppenheimer Pauline Pollack Elda Mishkind Rabin Sadie Rose Leonard Rosenberg Ann Rosenzweig Walter Sachs Irving Shapiro Swanson Shields Esther Siegel

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OCTOBER 6-12 (cont’d) Gertrude Small Alex Sterling William Sussman Robert Wagner Maurice Wallack Molly Weiner OCTOBER 13-19 Natalie Bael Miriam Becker Mildred Blindman Elliott Brotz Robert Camac John A. Coleridge Joseph Cooper Irving Elias Myrna Fishbein Hyman Ginsburg Rebecca Glassman Aaron Goodman Sally Green Susan Hankin Joseph Hecht Paul Charles Himmelman Benjamin Jaffe Lloyd Kahn Jr. Elizabeth N. Kaplan Donald Lewis Leah Lowen Richard Marker Fay Pellicia Bernard Perelman Irving Posner Milton Rinzler Max J. Saks Gertrude Senft Susan Serenyi S. Budd Simon Hannah Slotnick Sadie Stern William Stern Helen Jonap Titunik Rose Widett OCTOBER 20-26 Jack Beeber Fannie Blasenheim Allan Dinhofer Lisa Dinhofer Helen Dreyer Robert Eaton Lillian Engelman Rose Flank Rae Green Mary C. Greenberg Lois M. Halper Werner Hamlet Alfred Kurland Morton Loring Daniel Maccoby Ann M. Marx Gertrude Miller James Posner

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OCTOBER BIRTHDAYS! (TBE Children Under 17)

Jake Abitanta Madelyn Adler Jacob Altman Maclane Auerbach Hannah Beilenson Lauren Berger Cameron Block Justin Bresner Noah Ceisler Samuel Cooperberg Madeline David Emma Diller Lauren Divack Beatrice Dorfman Eve Dorfman Noah Falbaum Dylan Fichtenbaum Grace Gefsky Samson Gelfand Carlee Gilbert Lily Glotzer Charlie Goodstadt Shail Highbloom Jamie Horowitz Noah Ives Alex Kassel Alexander Kaufman Matthew Kaufman Jenna Kirschenbaum Jeremy Klausner Damon Klein

Seth Kreisler Troy Laurence Jessica Leason Melanie Leason Nicole Levy Matthew Lohrs Isabella Marano Logan Marks Fabien Mathias Norick Mathias Hallie Miller Gregory Murray Gabrielle Neuberger Grant Panzer Abigail Pfeffer Jack Preschern Eliza Rader Benjamin Rothstein Sam Rothstein Aidan Sarrett Sydnie Schneiderman Jenna Shaiken Erica Silverman Samantha Solomon Danielle Tomer Matthew Traum Kyle Tucker Marlee Weill Dana Wintner Aaron Wolk Max Wilson

OCTOBER YAHRZEITS OCTOBER 20-26 (cont’d) Frieda Press Sima Ptaszek William Quinn Marcella Riegelman Abraham Robinson Harry Rose Jacob A. Sachs Phyllis Sanders Max Sauerhaft Jack Schandler Irma Schneider Sarah Schwartz Alfred A. Seligman Florence Siegel Mervin Stoll Linda Sussberg

OCTOBER 27-31 Pauline Berzok Lucille Cahn Lawrence H. Clayman Catharine Daub Joseph Glassman Jack Goldberg Sol Goldman Touba Hakim Harold Horowitz Warren Hyman Herbert Kahn David Leifer Walter Meyer Ruth Rubin Rose Saul Mollie D. Schieber Barbara Siverdick Eva Susman


JOYS AND SORROWS RECENT GIFTS August 14 — September 13, 2013 Associate Rabbi’s Discretionary Fund Samuel & Joan Ginsburg Robert & Anne Yerman in honor of Mackenzie Rae Finer’s baby naming Barbara Pollack Mitzvah Day Fund Perry & Sandra Levine in memory of Beatrice Levine Richard & Dianne Spitalny in memory of Ben Abramson Caring Community Fund Jane & Richard Zenker in memory of Barbara Mirken Chai Funds Adrienne & Jerome Shiloff in memory of Hyman Shiloff Adrienne & Jerome Shiloff in memory of Mollie Shiloff Ellis & Rae Zimmer Fund For Children In Need Victor & Suzanne Rosenzweig in memory of Mel Rosenzweig Francine Falk-Ross & Steven Ross in memory of Lee Ross Flower Fund Harold & Jean Baker in memory of Fred Susman Aaron & Elaine Fast in memory of Robert Jason Fast Arlen & Kathryn Goldberg in memory of Ruth Kramer Stan & Penny Hamlet in honor of the marriage of Cari Hamlet to Jonas Grossman Mitchell & Christina Kaufman in memory of Sally Silverman Louise Kaye in memory of Frederick Kaye Richard & Liselotte Laster in memory of Oliver Laster Fredric & Ann Price in memory of David Streger Francine Falk-Ross & Steven Ross in memory of Lee Ross Gregory Altman Music & Arts Fund Joseph & Adele Browdy in memory of Robert & Libby Browdy Israel Action Special Fund Joan & Dyke Kolbert in memory of Jon Kolbert Rabbi Chaim Stern Caring Community Endowment Fund Joseph Goldreich in memory of Marjorie Goodrich Religious School and Family Education Fund Barbara & Jeffrey Scheine in memory of Arnold Scheine Senior Rabbi’s Discretionary Fund Lee Blum Richard & Gloria Raskin in memory of Benjamin Ehrlich Richard & Gloria Raskin in memory of Arthur Ehrlich Temple Beth El Endowment Fund Leslie & Mitchell Rubin in memory of Barbara Mirken

Tikkun Olam/Social Justice Fund Jonathan & Maxine Ferencz in memory of Hy Levine Tributes Florence Glazer & Ronni Blaustein in honor of Hannah Rothschild’s birthday Alexander & Susan Sussman in honor of Jacqueline Goldberg’s bat mitzvah Yom Hashoah Fund Robert & Joyce Jonap in memory of Bella Fleischman Adrienne & Jerome Shiloff in memory of Nat Horowitz

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SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR ONEG SPONSORS Adam & Cathy Brodsky Lori & Mark Garbin Alan & Julie Gerstein Karen Issokson-Silver Susan & Jonathan Resnick Noah & Marilyn Rifkin Michael & Melissa Slive Craig & Diane Thaler

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CONGRATULATIONS TO Susan Friedman & Art Pearsall on the engagement of their son, Steven Friedman, to Melissa Lacks Debbie & Daniel Leonard on the aufruf of their son, Alex Leonard and future daughter-in-law, Emily Winograd (wedding on October 12)

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HEARTFELT CONDOLENCES TO Elise Wagner and Robin Stout on the death of their granddaughter, Joanna WS Price

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NOTES AND ACTIVITIES A WARM WELCOME TO OUR NEWEST MEMBERS! Whitney Bowe & Josh Auerbach Missy & Alex Cohen Melanie Harris & Rob Fraiman Amy Shipper & Neil Gleit Jacqui & Farrel Goldberg Jody & Daniel Googel Laura May-Grabell & Michael Grabell Sondra & David Lieberman Cari & Jon Lynch Melinda & Brian Margolies Amy & Josh Marlow Elissa & Jason Novick Orit Kadosh & Josh Nunberg Liz & David Rappaport Allison & Ross Schimel Linda & Barry Sommers Melissa & Matthew Sussberg Deborah & Dan Switzen Michelle & Vadim Turchin Carla Sereny & Jonathan Wildstrom LOOK FOR NEW MEMBER INVITATIONS TO: New Member Reception – October 19 New Member Shabbat – November 1

14TH ANNUAL SENIOR LAW DAY IN WESTCHESTER FREE LEGAL AND FINANCIAL ADVICE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM Free legal and financial advice on elder law issues will be presented in a dozen workshops. The event will take place at the County Center in White Plains. Workshop topics include Medicare and the new Affordable Care Act, wills vs. trusts, estate planning and the “nuts and bolts of financial planning.” Participants will also be able to register for free, 15-minute one-on-one consultations with attorneys, financial planners, and geriatric care managers. Don’t delay. Register now. Early sign-ups are encouraged. Visit www.westchestergov.com/seniors or call (914) 813-6400. There is no registration for individual workshops. Register for the pro bono sessions the day of the event.

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SHA-BARK IN THE PARK SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12 Gedney Park 6:30 PM

Bring your family and your dogs and join Rabbi Linzer at Gedney Park for a special outdoor Havdalah service. With the pond and trees as our backdrop, we will experience nature and our Beth El community in a unique way. Meet at the pavilion near the pond (just past the sledding hill) on October 12 at 6:30 PM for our first “Sha-Bark” in the park! For more information contact Stephanie Saltzman at ssaltzman5@gmail.com or 914-238-6658.

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TZAHAL SHALOM

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18 at 8:00 PM

Hear stories directly from active-duty officers of the Israel Defense Forces at our Friday Night Worship Service!

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MAH JONGG

EVERY WEDNESDAY at 9:30 AM All are welcome! Come to gab, play, or just relax with a cup of coffee! Join the ladies of TBE at mah jongg! Don’t be shy! Questions? Contact Myra Borchard at myra@ borchard.com.

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JEWISH MINDFULNESS MEDITATION EVERY FRIDAY at 9:30 AM

Please join us for a morning of wonderful, relaxing, and spiritual reflection (with Ruth Rosenblum 10/4, 11/2, and 12/6). Wear comfortable clothes! Free! RSVP to Maxine Olson at maxineols@gmail.com.

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LUNCH ‘N’ LEARN

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 at Noon at Temple Shaaray Tefila

For program information or directions, please call Temple Shaaray Tefila at 914.666.3133. Your check is your reservation. Firm cut-off 10/17. No walk-ins.


THANK YOU TO OUR SUKKAH BUILDERS!

King David Memorial Chapel, Inc.

G e n e r a t io n s o f l a s t i n g s e r v i c e t o the Jewish Community ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

Family Owned and Operated Handicapped Accessibility Graveside Services Monuments Preneed and Prepaid Planning Fully Accommodating Facilities

2 8 8 Ea s t M a i n St r e e t ▪ M t . Kis c o , N Y 1 0 5 4 9 9 1 4 - 2 4 1 - 7 1 0 0 ▪ www.kingdavidmemorials.com

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LARRY MILTON Owner OWEN CAHN Manager

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ADVERTISING

SUZ 11340 WMC-Beth El_SUZ 11340 WMC-Beth El 9/11/13 3:11 PM Page 1

Privately owned and operated by the Weinstein Family since 1930

Day after day, season after season, year after year, people come to us because they know we will be there for them. 1652 Central Park Avenue | Yonkers, NY 10710 (1 block North of Tuckahoe Road) P. 800.468.3232 | F. 914.793.2300 info@weinsteinchapels.com | www.weinsteinchapels.com A subsidiary of Weinstein Family Services of New York, Inc.

From weddings and life-cycle events to private gatherings, business functions, and lectures, Temple Beth El’s stunning new facilities provide an exceptional setting for all types of special occasions and events. For rental inquiries or to schedule a tour of our facilities, please call 914.238.3928. We look forward to helping you create a memorable event. For more information, please visit www.bethelnw.org.

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220 SOUTH BEDFORD RD 914.238.3928 T CHAPPAQUA, NY 10514 914.238.4030 F WWW.BETHELNW.ORG TEMPLE@BETHELNW.ORG

BEGINNING YEARS RELIGIOUS SCHOOL

914.238.5735 914.238.5641

TEMPLE DIRECTORY BOARD OF TRUSTEES OFFICERS

Lisa P. Davis President

TRUSTEES Term Expires 2014 Meryl Adler Stuart Berg Stephanie Saltzman Marla Schechner Lisa Shaiken Tracy Stein

Rabbi

Alan D. Fuchs

Associate Rabbi

Geoffrey A. Mitelman

Rabbi-Educator

Maura H. Linzer

Lisa Hamroff

Senior Cantor

Star A. Trompeter

Janet Levy

Term Expires 2015

Executive Director

Gennifer Kelly

Robert Medway

David Abrams Heidi Auerbacher Amy Robin Doug Zucker

afuchs@bethelnw.org

gmitelman@bethelnw.org mlinzer@bethelnw.org

strompeter@bethelnw.org executivedirector@bethelnw.org

Director of Rayna Alperstein Beginning Years ECC ralperstein@bethelnw.org NEW TELEPHONE EXTENSIONS 1110 1121 1120 1221 1300 1310 1311 1312 1316 1320 1321 1322 1323 1600

Joni Gehebe-Kellogg, Youth Coordinator Maura H. Linzer, Rabbi-Educator Religious School Assistant Rayna Alperstein, Early Childhood Ed. Director Life-Cycle Emergency Jaclyn Trustman, Life-Cycle Coordinator Rabbi Alan D. Fuchs Rabbi Geoffrey A. Mitelman Cantor Star Trompeter Leslie Aufieri, Executive Assistant to Gennifer Kelly Gennifer Kelly, Executive Director Ann Testone, Bookkeeper Galia Silverberg, Communications Coordinator Gregory Allen, Facility Manager

CEMETERY INFORMATION

914.238.3928

WE ARE AN INCLUSIVE CONGREGATION Temple Beth El of Northern Westchester welcomes all who wish to participate in Jewish life – singles, couples and families in all their forms, gays, lesbians, interfaith couples – all people regardless of age, sexual orientation, or financial means. The synagogue is a kehilah kedoshah – a sacred community. It’s like a sukkah. A sukkah is constructed of many different branches woven together. So is the synagogue: the young and the old, the rich and the poor, the married and the unmarried, single parents, grandparents, gays and heterosexuals, non-Jewish spouses. The broader the sukkah’s reach, the more tightly its branches are woven, the stronger it stands. So too the synagogue: the greater the variety of people welcomed within it, the closer they feel to one another, the stronger the temple stands.

Richard Albert

Executive Vice President Vice President Vice President Vice President

Rhonda Regan Vice President

Term Expires 2016

Susan Pecker

Matt Cantor Ruth Clark Robert Klein Rand Manasse Steve Ochser Kathy Raicht

Vice President

David Rolle Treasurer

Immediate Past President Harry P. Cohen Affiliated Organizations Sisterhood

Gail Schreier

Youth Group President

Samantha Regan

Past Presidents, Honorary Members of the Board Steve Adler Stanley Amberg Charlene Berman Melvin Ehrlich Ernest M. Grunebaum

Barry Meisel Gloria Meisel William Pollak May Rolle David Ruzow

Submissions should be e-mailed to bulletin@bethelnw.org. Deadlines are the 5th of the month prior to the month of issue: September, October, November, December/January, February/March, April, May and June. Published by the congregants of Temple Beth El of Northern Westchester. Advertising Hedy Simpson HGSimpson@aolcom Editor Galia Silverberg GSilverberg@bethelnw.org Proofreader Mel Wolfson

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220 SOUTH BEDFORD ROAD CHAPPAQUA, NY 10514

OR CURRENT RESIDENT

SAVE THESE DATES! CLERGY INSTALLATION SERVICES JOIN US

at these very special services when we install our new clergy!

RABBI LINZER and NEW MEMBER WELCOME FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1

CANTOR TROMPETER

Temple Beth El and the Chappaqua Interfaith Council invite you to take part in The Annual Chappaqua Interfaith Council

THANKSGIVING SERVICE AND FESTIVE MEAL

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24 Service 4:00 PM Dinner 5:00 PM ALL ARE WELCOME Share in this warm, wonderful community pot luck celebration!

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15

CHANUKAH

NOVEMBER 29 Party 5:30 PM Service 7:15 PM First Night of Chanukah: WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27

Bulletin oct 2013 web pdf  

The Ladder, October 2013

Bulletin oct 2013 web pdf  

The Ladder, October 2013

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