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Non Emergency tel. no. 0300 111 2222

Tayside Police Monthly Performance Report

Eastern Division/Angus

 

July 2010

Violent crime down by 29%! Vandalism down by 30%!

Further information is available from the Performance and Planning Unit. Telephone 01382 596701 / 6710 / 6711 / 6713. Email : performanceandplanning@tayside.pnn.poli ce.uk

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TABLE OF CONTENTS This document is aligned with the Tayside Police Strategic Priorities and underlying Objectives. The publication is formulated under the three strands of Public Confidence

Public Safety

Public Protection.

The Force Control Strategy, Single Outcome Agreements and the Scottish Policing Performance Framework are also supported by the performance information on the following pages Introduction

3

Guidance information

6

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

7

Overview of Key Performance Indicators PUBLIC CONFIDENCE

8-15 17

Public Perception/Consultation Update

18-19

Community Engagement update

20-21

Telephone response times ~ 999 & non emergency calls

22

Class A Drugs

22

Proceeds of Crime Act

23

Crimestoppers update

23

Crime Prevention

24

Partnership Working/Education in Schools ~ Wildlife Crime

25

PUBLIC SAFETY

27

Key Performance Indicators

28-29

Roads Policing

30-31

Alcohol-related Crime and Disorder

32

PUBLIC PROTECTION

33

Domestic Abuse

34

This section is subject to ongoing development EFFICIENT & EFFECTIVE FORCE

35

Reports to the Procurator Fiscal

36

Sickness Absence

37

This section is subject to ongoing development 38

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INTRODUCTION This report is published monthly and shows progress against force Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and improvement targets. It draws information about operational performance together with details of service delivery. The aim of the document is to provide information to the public and other stakeholders on force performance, and to support future planning and service development. The report is framed around the three overarching principles of: Public Confidence - evidencing the effective delivery of policing services which meets the needs of the communities, Public Safety - focusing on crime, the detection of crime and bringing offenders to justice, and Public Protection - ensuring that the public are safe, and feel safe from crime, disorder and harm. The document contains information in support of one or more of the following frameworks and national outcomes. Where this appears it will be clearly marked with a symbol. The diagram below shows links to those other frameworks and outputs that impact upon Tayside Police. N a tio n a l F o c u s S c o ttis h G o v e rn m e n t N a tio n a l O u tc o m e s S c o t tis h P o lic in g B o a rd (A C P O S p r io r itie s )

S c o ttis h C o n tr o l S tra te g y & S tr a te g ic A ssessm ent

S c o t tis h P o lic in g P e rfo rm a n c e F ra m e w o rk

F O R C E

G O V E R N A N C E

F R A M E W O R K

Local

Focus

D iv is io n a l P o lic in g P la n s D e p t. B u s in e s s P la n s (in c o rp o r a tin g C o n tro l S tr a te g y a n d S in g le O u tc o m e A g re e m e n ts )

F in a n c ia l P la n W o r k fo r c e P la n C o r p o r a te R is k R e g is te r

T a y s id e P o lic e P o lic in g P la n

P e r f o r m a n c e R e v ie w a n d Assessm ent

S in g le I m p r o v e m e n t P la n

L e a d in g to ...

C o m m u n it y O u t c o m e s

O r g a n is a t io n a l O u t c o m e s

( Q u a lit y o f lif e )

( B u s in e s s B e n e fit s )

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THE NATIONAL FOCUS The National Focus features the Scottish Government Framework (National Outcomes), the establishment of the Scottish Policing Board (ACPOS Priorities) and the Scottish Policing Performance Framework (SPPF) all of which contain elements which inform the Scottish Strategic Assessment and subsequent Force Control Strategy. SCOTTISH GOVERNMENT NATIONAL OUTCOMES These outcomes underpin the Government’s Strategic Objectives ~ to create a Scotland which is

added Class A drugs and Roads Policing as very high priorities. SCOTTISH POLICING FRAMEWORK

PERFORMANCE

The Scottish Policing Performance Framework (SPPF) was launched across Scotland in April 2007. The SPPF is the product of significant collaborative working between the Association of Chief Police Officers in Scotland (ACPOS), the eight Scottish Police Forces, the Scottish Government, Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary for Scotland (HMICS), Audit Scotland, the Scottish Police Authorities Conveners’ Forum and the Scottish Police Services Authority.

Wealthier & Fairer,

Smarter,

The key aims of the SPPF are:

Healthier

♦ To develop a single suite of performance

Safer & Stronger

Greener

There are 15 national outcomes in all, several of which rely on the contribution made by the police in order to achieve them. (More information under Single Outcome Agreements on the next page.) ACPOS PRIORITIES Each year the Scottish Police Service under ACPOS develops a Scottish Strategic Assessment and this explains the strategy for the police in Scotland for the year ahead. The document draws on information provided by all the Scottish forces and law enforcement agencies as well as information from key partner agencies including the Scottish Government, Local Authorities and the public. It is through this document that the risk regarding crime and disorder threats impacting on Scottish communities is prioritised. The very high risk crime and disorder issues identified by the most recent Scottish Strategic Assessment were:

measures which reflects the breadth and variety of policing activity across Scotland; ♦ To create a framework which supports managers throughout the police service in understanding, reflecting on and improving performance so that forces can provide more effective policing within Scottish communities; ♦ To provide a mechanism for improved accountability at local and national levels through the publication of consistent and transparent performance information, which will support the Scottish Government, Police Authorities and the general public in their understanding of policing performance; and ♦ To provide a basis for robust performance management and, in turn, performance improvement. ACPOS endorses the incorporation of the SPPF in forces’ performance reports and indeed the force is subject to external scrutiny to this effect. This supports greater consistency and transparency when reporting performance information to Police Boards, other stakeholders and the public throughout Scotland.

• Serious and Organised Crime Groups • Violence • Public Protection • Anti Social Behaviour • Terrorism

From a local perspective, Tayside Police has

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THE LOCAL FOCUS CONTROL STRATEGY The threat and risk assessment contained within the Tayside Strategic Assessment 2010/11 highlighted the following High Risk areas for the force: •

Serious and Organised Crime Groups

Class ‘A’ Drugs

Public Protection and Safety

Alcohol Related Crime and Disorder and Anti-Social Behaviour

Terrorism

Roads Policing

National Outcome 13: ‘We take pride in a strong, fair and inclusive national identity’, supporting Local Outcome: ‘Our area will have a positive image locally, nationally and internationally.’ National Outcome 14: ‘ We reduce the global environmental impact of our consumption and production’, supporting Local Outcome: ‘ Our area will have a sustainable natural and built environment.’ National Outcome 15: ‘ Our public services are high quality, continually improving, efficient and responsive to local people’s needs.’

BENCHMARKS Where information is available, the Tayside Police performance is shown in relation to the most recent results from other forces or partner agencies.

SINGLE OUT COME AGREEMENTS Each local authority is responsible for developing its own set of Local Outcomes in line with appropriate national outcomes. The measures differ across councils (rightly so) as the three local authorities differ in relation to geography, demographics, areas of deprivation, unemployment, etc. Tayside Police performance contributes to the achievement of these outcomes. Angus Council measures fall under National Outcome 9: ‘We live our lives free from crime, disorder and danger’ which contributes to the Angus Council local initiative ’Communities in Angus are safe, secure and vibrant’. Dundee City Council measures fall under National Outcome 9: ‘We live our lives free from crime, disorder and danger’ and Outcome 11:’ We have strong, resilient and supportive communities where people take responsibility for their own actions and how they affect others’ , which contributes to Dundee City Council Local Outcome 7: ‘Our communities will be safe and feel safe.’ Perth & Kinross Council measures under a comprehensive range of outcomes: National Outcome 9: ‘We live our lives free from crime, disorder and danger’ supporting Local Outcome: ‘Our communities will be safer.’ National Outcome 11: ’ We have strong, resilient and supportive communities where people take responsibility for their own actions and how they affect others’ , contributing to Perth and Kinross Council Local Outcome : ‘Our communities will be vibrant and active.’

TAYSIDE POLICING PLAN This document sets out a clear commitment to delivering the highest possible standards of policing to Tayside communities. Three Strategic Priorities identified for 2010-2011 are:−

Working with Partners towards Safer Communities

Increase Trust and Confidence

Effective Performance

PUBLIC CONSULTATION - SURVEY RESULTS The force undertakes a rolling programme of consultation whereby 300 members of the public, randomly selected from the edited electoral registers of the three council areas encompassing Tayside, are contacted monthly and offered the opportunity to complete a Public Perception Survey. In addition, 300 Public Satisfaction surveys are distributed. These are designed to act as a measure of the extent to which the force and divisions are achieving published standards of service contained within the policing plan. Results from each survey are reported in alternative quarterly performance publications. For the first time, targets have been set for 2010/11 for public satisfaction levels with the service provided by the police. Public satisfaction is a key driver for improved force performance.

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GUIDANCE INFORMATION

CONTENT OF DOCUMENT The subjects of reporting differ from month to month depending on the level of performance. Where performance is adhering to the ‘norm’, based on remaining within upper and lower control limits, only minimal reporting takes place. Areas of concern or exceptional performance, lying outside the upper or lower control limits, is commented upon. In addition, areas of police business not contained within the key performance indicators are reported on with a view to producing a balanced document, the aim being to promote the diverse range of services and interventions provided by the police that impact upon the communities served by the force .

Control charts have been produced for reported crime. These are monitored in the background and analysed on a monthly basis. The charts set 'controls' described as Upper Control Limits (UCLs) and Lower Control Limits (LCLs). Applying statistical formulae to historical data defines the control limits. (Currently set at 2 standard deviations from the mean (average) for the years 2007/08 to 2009/10). This means that results lying outwith these limits should be regarded as significant and would benefit from further investigation as to whether the outcome was the result of a known causal factor as opposed to random or natural fluctuation.

The following broad rules are applied to control charts to highlight causal factors other than random or natural variations operating within the recorded data: •

any point that lies outside the UCL or LCL

six or more consecutive points running upwards or downwards

seven or more consecutive points zigzagging above or below the mean

PUBLICATION OF DOCUMENT The document is published monthly on the force web-site in accordance with the statutory requirement under Section 13 of the Local Government (Scotland) Act 2003 which covers public performance reporting in relation to the publication of performance information and evidence of continuous improvement.

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TAYSIDE POLICE KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

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TAYSIDE POLICE: Crime in more detail PERIOD APRIL to JULY FORCE 2009/2010 CRIME CLASSIFICATION

Made known

2010/2011

DETECTIONS number %

Made known

JULY

DETECTIONS number %

INC./DEC. number %

Made known

DETECTIONS number %

GROUP 1 Murder Attempted Murder Culpable Homicide Serious Assault Robbery (Incl attempts) Child Cruelty/Neglect Pos of Firearm with intent to endanger life Abduction Threats Others

3 18 0 76 36 35 3 7 10 2

3 15 0 61 28 31 3 7 10 2

100.0% 83.3% 80.3% 77.8% 88.6% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%

0 17 0 97 48 19 3 7 7 1

0 16 0 81 34 20 3 7 5 0

94.1% 83.5% 70.8% 105.3% 100.0% 100.0% 71.4% 0.0%

0 4 0 27 13 4 1 2 2 1

0 4 0 19 7 6 1 1 1 0

100.0% 70.4% 53.8% 150.0% 100.0% 50.0% 50.0% 0.0%

190

160

84.2%

199

166

83.4%

9

4.7%

54

39

72.2%

14 3 40 50 11 67

12 3 29 33 9 56

85.7% 100.0% 72.5% 66.0% 81.8% 83.6%

25 2 44 17 11 23

10 1 23 15 8 17

40.0% 50.0% 52.3% 88.2% 72.7% 73.9%

11 -1 4 -33 0 -44

78.6% -33.3% 10.0% -66.0% 0.0% -65.7%

4 1 11 5 5 10

1 0 1 2 5 7

25.0% 0.0% 9.1% 40.0% 100.0% 70.0%

185

142

76.8%

122

74

60.7%

-63 -34.1%

36

16

44.4%

231 91 116 180 194 165 9 56 2526 108 29 5 190 51

68 11 49 150 33 97 9 41 1354 30 26 8 111 16

29.4% 12.1% 42.2% 83.3% 17.0% 58.8% 100.0% 73.2% 53.6% 27.8% 89.7% 160.0% 58.4% 31.4%

352 161 160 112 170 145 6 80 2476 118 15 6 229 37

91 24 43 33 24 69 6 49 1326 21 15 5 106 15

25.9% 14.9% 26.9% 29.5% 14.1% 47.6% 100.0% 61.3% 53.6% 17.8% 100.0% 83.3% 46.3% 40.5%

121 70 44 -68 -24 -20 -3 24 -50 10 -14 1 39 -14

52.4% 76.9% 37.9% -37.8% -12.4% -12.1% -33.3% 42.9% -2.0% 9.3% -48.3% 20.0% 20.5% -27.5%

92 38 47 23 51 39 1 22 718 35 4 1 65 6

24 3 13 2 8 18 1 18 328 5 4 1 33 3

26.1% 7.9% 27.7% 8.7% 15.7% 46.2% 100.0% 81.8% 45.7% 14.3% 100.0% 100.0% 50.8% 50.0%

3951

2003

50.7%

4067

1827

44.9%

116

2.9%

1142

461

40.4%

77 2074 69

35 638 43

45.5% 30.8% 62.3%

75 1809 67

24 617 49

32.0% 34.1% 73.1%

-2 -265 -2

-2.6% -12.8% -2.9%

14 410 24

4 140 16

28.6% 34.1% 66.7%

GROUP 4 - TOTAL

2220

716

32.3%

1951

690

35.4%

-269 -12.1%

448

160

35.7%

SUB-TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 4

6546

3021

46.2%

6339

2757

43.5%

-207

-3.2%

1680

676

40.2%

90 13 140 38 0 276 131 219 793 37 30

91 13 139 35 0 265 124 221 796 35 28

101.1% 100.0% 99.3% 92.1% 96.0% 94.7% 100.9% 100.4% 94.6% 93.3%

71 3 122 26 0 267 141 201 852 17 42

72 3 122 25 3 262 127 197 853 17 39

101.4% 100.0% 100.0% 96.2% 98.1% 90.1% 98.0% 100.1% 100.0% 92.9%

-19 -10 -18 -12 0 -9 10 -18 59 -20 12

-21.1% -76.9% -12.9% -31.6% -3.3% 7.6% -8.2% 7.4% -54.1% 40.0%

19 3 43 6 0 63 28 59 295 5 12

19 3 43 6 0 61 27 52 295 5 12

100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 96.8% 96.4% 88.1% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%

GROUP 5 - TOTAL

1767

1747

98.9%

1742

1720

98.7%

-25

-1.4%

533

523

98.1%

TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 5

8313

4768

57.4%

8081

4477

55.4%

-232

-2.8%

2213

1199

54.2%

GROUP 1 - TOTAL GROUP 2 Rape Assault with intent to rape Indecent assault Lewd & Libidinous practices Public Indecency Others GROUP 2 - TOTAL GROUP 3 Housebreaking ~ domestic dwelling Housebreaking ~ domestic non-dwelling Housebreaking ~ commercial Theft, attempt theft from locked premises/property Theft, attempt theft from locked motor vehicle Theft, attempted theft of a motor vehicle Convicted thief in poss.of tools etc. w.i. to steal In building with intent to steal Theft Theft from motor vehicle Reset Embezzlement Fraud Others GROUP 3 - TOTAL GROUP 4 Fireraising Malicious Damage/Vandalism Others

GROUP 5 Public mischief & wasting police time Escape or rescue from police custody or prison Resisting arrest or obstructing police officer General attempts to pervert the course of justice Sex Offenders' register offences Bail - Fail to keep conditions Possession of offensive weapons Drugs - supply, with intent to supply etc Drugs - personal possession Drugs - manufacture etc Others

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-3 -100.0% -1 -5.6% 0 21 27.6% 12 33.3% -16 -45.7% 0 0.0% 0 0.0% -3 -30.0% -1 -50.0%

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Overview of Key Performance Indicators TAYSIDE POLICE 2010/11 Target

JULY 2010

2010/11 RESULT

2009/10 RESULT

(cumulative)

(cumulative)

% / pp change against 2009-10

Best recorded in last 3 yrs (annual)

Customer Satisfaction: First Contact: Overall satisfaction rating for service provided at first contact

91.5%

91.6%

*

91.8%

First Contact:% of respondents who stated they were provided with the name of the person dealing with their enquiry

78.0%

82.9%

*

78.3%

Updating the Public:% of Service Users who received an update on the progress of their enquiry

60.0%

54.9%

*

54.8%

Visibility: % of respondents who had seen a police officer patrolling in the past month

75.0%

56.5%

*

74.7%

Customer experience: Overall satisfaction rating for the customers experience of the service provided by Tayside Police

85.0%

81.2%

*

84.8%

(*Whilst survey results will be provided monthly for 2010, comparisons with 2009 results are only available quarterly. )

Crime: Groups 1-4 recorded

18700

6339

6546

-3.0%

17997

Groups 1-4 detected

46.5%

43.5%

46.0%

-2.5pp

47.5%

Violent crime recorded

610

199

190

+4.5%

578

Violent crime detected

83.0%

83.5%

84.0%

-0.5pp

85.5%

Robbery recorded

160

48

36

+33.5%

135

Robbery detected

63.0%

71.0%

78.0%

-7.0pp

69.0%

Vandalism recorded

5750

1809

2074

-13.0%

5264

Vandalism detected

31.0%

34.0%

31.0%

+3.0pp

31.5%

Domestic Housebreaking recorded

775

352

231

+52.5%

725

Domestic Housebreaking detected

30.0%

26.0%

29.5%

-3.5pp

33.0%

Sickness Absence:police officers

4.5%

3.9%

3.9%

~

4.2%

Sickness Absence:police staff

5.0%

4.8%

4.6%

+0.2pp

4.6%

Resources:

pp = percentage point

*Note: Variation in results may occasionally appear extreme due to the very small volume of crime involved

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CENTRAL DIVISION: Crime in more detail PERIOD APRIL to JULY CENTRAL DIVISION 2009/2010 CRIME CLASSIFICATION

Made known

2010/2011

DETECTIONS number %

Made known

JULY

DETECTIONS number %

INC./DEC. number %

M/K

Det

% Det

GROUP 1 Murder Attempted Murder Culpable Homicide Serious Assault Robbery (Incl attempts) Child Cruelty/Neglect Pos of Firearm with intent to endanger life Abduction Threats Others

1 9 0 34 22 6 1 1 2 0

1 7 0 26 13 9 1 1 2 0

100.0% 77.8% 76.5% 59.1% 150.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% -

0 12 0 40 30 6 2 3 4 1

0 11 0 28 17 6 2 3 3 0

91.7% 70.0% 56.7% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 75.0% 0.0%

0 2 0 12 8 2 0 0 2 1

0 2 0 9 4 3 0 0 1 0

100.0% 75.0% 50.0% 150.0% 50.0% 0.0%

76

60

78.9%

98

70

71.4%

22

28.9%

27

19

70.4%

4 1 20 24 5 55

5 1 11 16 2 53

125.0% 100.0% 55.0% 66.7% 40.0% 96.4%

13 0 19 6 7 16

6 0 8 2 6 14

46.2% 42.1% 33.3% 85.7% 87.5%

9 225.0% -1 -100.0% -1 -5.0% -18 -75.0% 2 40.0% -39 -70.9%

0 0 7 3 4 8

1 0 1 1 4 7

14.3% 33.3% 100.0% 87.5%

109

88

80.7%

61

36

59.0%

-48 -44.0%

22

14

63.6%

158 58 60 71 151 117 6 25 1287 50 12 4 95 28

40 6 22 71 27 69 6 16 779 17 11 4 57 8

25.3% 10.3% 36.7% 100.0% 17.9% 59.0% 100.0% 64.0% 60.5% 34.0% 91.7% 100.0% 60.0% 28.6%

252 100 58 55 133 78 6 32 1367 52 12 1 106 15

52 3 16 18 18 32 6 16 785 4 12 0 57 4

20.6% 3.0% 27.6% 32.7% 13.5% 41.0% 100.0% 50.0% 57.4% 7.7% 100.0% 0.0% 53.8% 26.7%

94 42 -2 -16 -18 -39 0 7 80 2 0 -3 11 -13

59.5% 72.4% -3.3% -22.5% -11.9% -33.3% 0.0% 28.0% 6.2% 4.0% 0.0% -75.0% 11.6% -46.4%

69 29 27 12 43 20 1 8 337 20 4 1 24 1

11 1 6 1 8 10 1 6 170 2 4 0 17 1

15.9% 3.4% 22.2% 8.3% 18.6% 50.0% 100.0% 75.0% 50.4% 10.0% 100.0% 0.0% 70.8% 100.0%

2122

1133

53.4%

2267

1023

45.1%

145

6.8%

596

238

39.9%

41 931 43

14 221 22

34.1% 23.7% 51.2%

49 965 36

12 304 27

24.5% 31.5% 75.0%

8 34 -7

19.5% 3.7% -16.3%

10 230 8

2 70 6

20.0% 30.4% 75.0%

GROUP 4 - TOTAL

1015

257

25.3%

1050

343

32.7%

35

3.4%

248

78

31.5%

SUB-TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 4

3322

1538

46.3%

3476

1472

42.3%

154

4.6%

893

349

39.1%

48 3 45 12 0 121 58 104 364 9 16

49 3 44 11 0 109 55 104 365 9 16

102.1% 100.0% 97.8% 91.7% 90.1% 94.8% 100.0% 100.3% 100.0% 100.0%

35 0 41 12 0 137 79 72 389 11 25

35 0 41 11 3 133 71 73 383 11 23

100.0% 100.0% 91.7% 97.1% 89.9% 101.4% 98.5% 100.0% 92.0%

-13 -27.1% -3 -100.0% -4 -8.9% 0 0.0% 0 16 13.2% 21 36.2% -32 -30.8% 25 6.9% 2 22.2% 9 56.3%

7 0 13 2 0 32 17 14 82 3 7

7 0 13 2 0 30 16 13 82 3 7

100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 93.8% 94.1% 92.9% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%

GROUP 5 - TOTAL

780

765

98.1%

801

784

97.9%

21

2.7%

177

173

97.7%

TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 5

4102

2303

56.1%

4277

2256

52.7%

175

4.3%

1070

522

48.8%

GROUP 1 - TOTAL GROUP 2 Rape Assault with intent to rape Indecent assault Lewd & Libidinous practices Public Indecency Others GROUP 2 - TOTAL GROUP 3 Housebreaking ~ domestic dwelling Housebreaking ~ domestic non-dwelling Housebreaking ~ commercial Theft, attempt theft from locked premises/property Theft, attempt theft from locked motor vehicle Theft, attempted theft of a motor vehicle Convicted thief in poss.of tools etc. w.i. to steal In building with intent to steal Theft Theft from motor vehicle Reset Embezzlement Fraud Others GROUP 3 - TOTAL GROUP 4 Fireraising Malicious Damage/Vandalism Others

GROUP 5 Public mischief & wasting police time Escape or rescue from police custody or prison Resisting arrest or obstructing police officer General attempts to pervert the course of justice Sex Offenders' register offences Bail - Fail to keep conditions Possession of offensive weapons Drugs - supply, with intent to supply etc Drugs - personal possession Drugs - manufacture etc Others

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-1 -100.0% 3 33.3% 0 6 17.6% 8 36.4% 0 0.0% 1 100.0% 2 200.0% 2 100.0% 1 -

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Overview of Key Performance Indicators CENTRAL DIVISION 2010/11 Target

JULY 2010

2010/11 RESULT

2009/10 RESULT

(cumulative)

(cumulative)

% / pp change against 2009-10

Best recorded in last 3 yrs (annual)

Customer Satisfaction: First Contact: Overall satisfaction rating for service provided at first contact

91.5%

89.4%

*

92.1%

First Contact:% of respondents who stated they were provided with the name of the person dealing with their enquiry

78.0%

83.3%

*

76.8%

Updating the Public:% of Service Users who received an update on the progress of their enquiry

60.0%

55.2%

*

50.2%

Visibility: % of respondents who had seen a police officer patrolling in the past month

75.0%

54.7%

*

76.9%

Customer experience: Overall satisfaction rating for the customers experience of the service provided by Tayside Police

85.0%

86.3%

*

85.1%

(*Whilst survey results will be provided monthly for 2010, comparisons with 2009 results are only available quarterly. )

Crime: Groups 1-4 recorded

10000

3476

3322

+4.5%

9600

Groups 1-4 detected

45.5%

42.5%

46.0%

-3.5pp

47.0%

Violent crime recorded

300

98

76

+29.0%

276

Violent crime detected

74.0%

71.5%

79.0%

-7.5pp

79.0%

Robbery recorded

112

30

22

+36.5%

93

Robbery detected

58.0%

56.5%

59.0%

-2.5pp

64.5%

Vandalism recorded

2800

965

931

+3.5%

2586

Vandalism detected

27.0%

31.5%

23.5%

+8.0pp

28.0%

Domestic Housebreaking recorded

545

252

158

+59.5%

500

Domestic Housebreaking detected

26.0%

20.5%

25.5%

-5.0pp

28.0%

Sickness Absence:police officers

4.5%

3.7%

4.7%

-1.0pp

4.2%

Sickness Absence:police staff

5.0%

3.1%

4.1%

-1.0pp

4.8%

Resources:

pp = percentage point

*Note: Variation in results may occasionally appear extreme due to the very small volume of crime involved

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EASTERN DIVISION: Crime in more detail PERIOD APRIL to JULY EASTERN DIVISION 2009/2010 CRIME CLASSIFICATION

Made known

2010/2011

DETECTIONS number %

Made known

JULY

DETECTIONS number %

INC./DEC. number %

M/K

Det

% Det

GROUP 1 Murder Attempted Murder Culpable Homicide Serious Assault Robbery (Incl attempts) Child Cruelty/Neglect Pos of Firearm with intent to endanger life Abduction Threats Others

2 5 0 18 2 20 0 2 3 0

2 4 0 12 3 13 0 2 3 0

100.0% 80.0% 66.7% 150.0% 65.0% 100.0% 100.0% -

0 0 0 22 2 10 1 1 1 0

0 0 0 21 2 11 1 1 0 0

95.5% 100.0% 110.0% 100.0% 100.0% 0.0% -

-2 -100.0% -5 -100.0% 0 4 22.2% 0 0.0% -10 -50.0% 1 -1 -50.0% -2 -66.7% 0 -

0 0 0 6 0 1 1 0 0 0

0 0 0 4 0 2 1 0 0 0

66.7% 200.0% 100.0% -

52

39

75.0%

37

36

97.3%

-15 -28.8%

8

7

87.5%

6 1 8 16 5 7

4 1 9 9 6 2

66.7% 100.0% 112.5% 56.3% 120.0% 28.6%

6 1 13 5 1 3

2 1 9 8 1 1

33.3% 100.0% 69.2% 160.0% 100.0% 33.3%

0 0 5 -11 -4 -4

0.0% 0.0% 62.5% -68.8% -80.0% -57.1%

2 0 2 1 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0.0% 0.0% 0.0% -

43

31

72.1%

29

22

75.9%

-14 -32.6%

5

0

0.0%

27 22 22 38 12 17 0 13 492 30 11 0 29 11

11 0 8 22 3 11 0 12 226 7 11 1 18 1

40.7% 0.0% 36.4% 57.9% 25.0% 64.7% 92.3% 45.9% 23.3% 100.0% 62.1% 9.1%

43 37 40 34 11 23 0 25 513 27 3 2 69 4

23 14 9 11 4 11 0 15 262 10 3 2 24 1

53.5% 37.8% 22.5% 32.4% 36.4% 47.8% 60.0% 51.1% 37.0% 100.0% 100.0% 34.8% 25.0%

16 15 18 -4 -1 6 0 12 21 -3 -8 2 40 -7

59.3% 68.2% 81.8% -10.5% -8.3% 35.3% 92.3% 4.3% -10.0% -72.7% 137.9% -63.6%

7 5 6 5 2 5 0 5 158 5 0 0 26 1

5 0 1 1 0 1 0 3 79 1 0 0 9 1

71.4% 0.0% 16.7% 20.0% 0.0% 20.0% 60.0% 50.0% 20.0% 34.6% 100.0%

724

331

45.7%

831

389

46.8%

107

14.8%

225

101

44.9%

17 619 14

9 195 12

52.9% 31.5% 85.7%

12 432 18

4 167 15

33.3% 38.7% 83.3%

-5 -187 4

-29.4% -30.2% 28.6%

2 81 8

0 31 7

0.0% 38.3% 87.5%

650

216

33.2%

462

186

40.3%

-188 -28.9%

91

38

41.8%

1469

617

42.0%

1359

633

46.6%

-110

-7.5%

329

146

44.4%

13 2 36 7 0 79 42 54 144 1 6

12 2 36 6 0 80 39 54 145 1 5

92.3% 100.0% 100.0% 85.7% 101.3% 92.9% 100.0% 100.7% 100.0% -

9 3 34 7 0 59 27 52 144 1 12

9 3 34 6 0 58 26 52 145 1 11

100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 85.7% 98.3% 96.3% 100.0% 100.7% 100.0% 91.7%

-4 1 -2 0 0 -20 -15 -2 0 0 6

-30.8% 50.0% -5.6% 0.0% -25.3% -35.7% -3.7% 0.0% 0.0% 100.0%

3 3 11 2 0 18 8 8 26 0 4

3 3 11 1 0 18 8 8 26 0 4

100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 50.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% -

GROUP 5 - TOTAL

384

380

99.0%

348

345

99.1%

-36

-9.4%

83

82

98.8%

TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 5

1853

997

53.8%

1707

978

57.3%

-146

-7.9%

412

228

55.3%

GROUP 1 - TOTAL GROUP 2 Rape Assault with intent to ravish Indecent assault Lewd & Libidinous practices Public Indecency Others GROUP 2 - TOTAL GROUP 3 Housebreaking ~ domestic dwelling Housebreaking ~ domestic non-dwelling Housebreaking ~ commercial Theft, attempt theft from locked premises/property Theft, attempt theft from locked motor vehicle Theft, attempted theft of a motor vehicle Convicted thief in poss.of tools etc. w.i. to steal In building with intent to steal Theft Theft from motor vehicle Reset Embezzlement Fraud Others GROUP 3 - TOTAL GROUP 4 Fireraising Malicious Damage/Vandalism Others GROUP 4 - TOTAL

SUB-TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 4 GROUP 5 Public mischief & wasting police time Escape or rescue from police custody or prison Resisting arrest or obstructing police officer General attempts to pervert the course of justice Sex Offenders' register offences Bail - Fail to keep conditions Possession of offensive weapons Drugs - supply, with intent to supply etc Drugs - personal possession Drugs - manufacture etc Others

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Overview of Key Performance Indicators EASTERN DIVISION 2010/11 Target

JULY 2010

2010/11 RESULT

2009/10 RESULT

(cumulative)

(cumulative)

% / pp change against 2009-10

Best recorded in last 3 yrs (annual)

Customer Satisfaction: First Contact: Overall satisfaction rating for service provided at first contact

91.5%

93.8%

*

93.1%

First Contact:% of respondents who stated they were provided with the name of the person dealing with their enquiry

78.0%

82.4%

*

82.0%

Updating the Public:% of Service Users who received an update on the progress of their enquiry

60.0%

52.7%

*

50.9%

Visibility: % of respondents who had seen a police officer patrolling in the past month

75.0%

55.8%

*

75.4%

Customer experience: Overall satisfaction rating for the customers experience of the service provided by Tayside Police

85.0%

80.3%

*

81.9%

(*Whilst survey results will be provided monthly for 2010, comparisons with 2009 results are only available quarterly. )

Crime: Groups 1-4 recorded

4000

1359

1469

-7.5%

3854

Groups 1-4 detected

47.0%

46.5%

42.0%

+4.5pp

48.5%

Violent crime recorded

140

37

52

-29.0%

134

Violent crime detected

95.0%

97.5%

75.0%

+22.5pp

97.0%

Robbery recorded

10

2

2

~

6

Robbery detected

80.0%

100.0%

150.0%*

-50.0pp*

100.0%

Vandalism recorded

1550

432

619

-30.0%

1413

Vandalism detected

33.0%

38.5%

31.5%

+7.0pp

35.0%

Domestic Housebreaking recorded

90

43

27

+59.5%

77

Domestic Housebreaking detected

40.0%

53.5%

40.5%

+13.0pp

49.5%

Sickness Absence:police officers

4.5%

5.3%

3.0%

+2.3pp

4.0%

Sickness Absence:police staff

5.0%

4.6%

4.5%

+0.1pp

3.5%

Resources:

pp = percentage point

*Note: Variation in results may occasionally appear extreme due to the very small volume of crime involved

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WESTERN DIVISION: Crime in more detail PERIOD APRIL to JULY WESTERN DIVISION 2009/2010 CRIME CLASSIFICATION

Made known

2010/2011

DETECTIONS number %

Made known

JULY

DETECTIONS number %

INC./DEC. number %

M/K

Det

% Det

GROUP 1 Murder Attempted Murder Culpable Homicide Serious Assault Robbery (Incl attempts) Child Cruelty/Neglect Pos of Firearm with intent to endanger life Abduction Threats Others

0 4 0 24 12 9 2 4 5 2

0 4 0 23 12 9 2 4 5 2

100.0% 95.8% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%

0 5 0 35 16 3 0 3 2 0

0 5 0 32 15 3 0 3 2 0

100.0% 91.4% 93.8% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% -

0 2 0 9 5 1 0 2 0 0

0 2 0 6 3 1 0 1 0 0

100.0% 66.7% 60.0% 100.0% 50.0% -

62

61

98.4%

64

60

93.8%

2

3.2%

19

13

68.4%

4 1 12 10 1 5

3 1 9 8 1 1

75.0% 100.0% 75.0% 80.0% 100.0% 20.0%

6 1 12 6 3 4

2 0 6 5 1 2

33.3% 0.0% 50.0% 83.3% 33.3% 50.0%

2 0 0 -4 2 -1

50.0% 0.0% 0.0% -40.0% 200.0% -20.0%

2 1 2 1 1 2

0 0 0 1 1 0

0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 100.0% 100.0% 0.0%

GROUP 2 - TOTAL

33

23

69.7%

32

16

50.0%

-1

-3.0%

9

2

22.2%

GROUP 3 Housebreaking ~ domestic dwelling Housebreaking ~ domestic non-dwelling Housebreaking ~ commercial Theft, attempt theft from locked premises/property Theft, attempt theft from locked motor vehicle Theft, attempted theft of a motor vehicle Convicted thief in poss.of tools etc. w.i. to steal In building with intent to steal Theft Theft from motor vehicle Reset Embezzlement Fraud Others

46 11 34 71 31 31 3 18 747 28 6 1 66 12

17 5 19 57 3 17 3 13 349 6 4 3 36 7

37.0% 45.5% 55.9% 80.3% 9.7% 54.8% 100.0% 72.2% 46.7% 21.4% 66.7% 300.0% 54.5% 58.3%

57 24 62 23 26 44 0 23 596 39 0 3 54 18

16 7 18 4 2 26 0 18 279 7 0 3 25 10

28.1% 29.2% 29.0% 17.4% 7.7% 59.1% 78.3% 46.8% 17.9% 100.0% 46.3% 55.6%

11 23.9% 13 118.2% 28 82.4% -48 -67.6% -5 -16.1% 13 41.9% -3 -100.0% 5 27.8% -151 -20.2% 11 39.3% -6 -100.0% 2 200.0% -12 -18.2% 6 50.0%

16 4 14 6 6 14 0 9 223 10 0 0 15 4

8 2 6 0 0 7 0 9 79 2 0 1 7 1

50.0% 50.0% 42.9% 0.0% 0.0% 50.0% 100.0% 35.4% 20.0% 46.7% 25.0%

1105

539

48.8%

969

415

42.8%

-136 -12.3%

321

122

38.0%

19 524 12

12 222 9

63.2% 42.4% 75.0%

14 412 13

8 146 7

57.1% 35.4% 53.8%

-26.3% -21.4% 8.3%

2 99 8

2 39 3

100.0% 39.4% 37.5%

555

243

43.8%

439

161

36.7%

-116 -20.9%

109

44

40.4%

1755

866

49.3%

1504

652

43.4%

-251

-14.3%

458

181

39.5%

29 8 59 19 0 76 31 61 285 27 8

30 8 59 18 0 76 30 63 286 25 7

103.4% 100.0% 100.0% 94.7% 100.0% 96.8% 103.3% 100.4% 92.6% 87.5%

27 0 47 7 0 71 35 77 319 5 5

28 0 47 8 0 71 30 72 325 5 5

103.7% 100.0% 114.3% 100.0% 85.7% 93.5% 101.9% 100.0% 100.0%

-2 -6.9% -8 -100.0% -12 -20.3% -12 -63.2% 0 -5 -6.6% 4 12.9% 16 26.2% 34 11.9% -22 -81.5% -3 -37.5%

9 0 19 2 0 13 3 37 187 2 1

9 0 19 3 0 13 3 31 187 2 1

100.0% 100.0% 150.0% 100.0% 100.0% 83.8% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%

GROUP 5 - TOTAL

603

602

99.8%

593

591

99.7%

-10

-1.7%

273

268

98.2%

TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 5

2358

1468

62.3%

2097

1243

59.3%

-261 -11.1%

731

449

61.4%

GROUP 1 - TOTAL GROUP 2 Rape Assault with intent to ravish Indecent assault Lewd & Libidinous practices Public Indecency Others

GROUP 3 - TOTAL GROUP 4 Fireraising Malicious Damage/Vandalism Others GROUP 4 - TOTAL

SUB-TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 4 GROUP 5 Public mischief & wasting police time Escape or rescue from police custody or prison Resisting arrest or obstructing police officer General attempts to pervert the course of justice Sex Offenders' register offences Bail - Fail to keep conditions Possession of offensive weapons Drugs - supply, with intent to supply etc Drugs - personal possession Drugs - manufacture etc Others

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0 1 25.0% 0 11 45.8% 4 33.3% -6 -66.7% -2 -100.0% -1 -25.0% -3 -60.0% -2 -100.0%

-5 -112 1

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Overview of Key Performance Indicators WESTERN DIVISION 2010/11 Target

JULY 2010

2010/11 RESULT

2009/10 RESULT

(cumulative)

(cumulative)

% / pp change against 2009-10

Best recorded in last 3 yrs (annual)

Customer Satisfaction: First Contact: Overall satisfaction rating for service provided at first contact

91.5%

91.6%

*

92.4%

First Contact:% of respondents who stated they were provided with the name of the person dealing with their enquiry

78.0%

83.0%

*

78.3%

Updating the Public:% of Service Users who received an update on the progress of their enquiry

60.0%

56.9%

*

61.1%

Visibility: % of respondents who had seen a police officer patrolling in the past month

75.0%

58.4%

*

73.7%

Customer experience: Overall satisfaction rating for the customers experience of the service provided by Tayside Police

85.0%

77.8%

*

87.8%

(*Whilst survey results will be provided monthly for 2010, comparisons with 2009 results are only available quarterly. )

Crime: Groups 1-4 recorded

4700

1504

1755

-14.5%

4543

Groups 1-4 detected

47.5%

43.5%

49.5%

-6.0pp

49.0%

Violent crime recorded

170

64

62

+3.0%

134

Violent crime detected

90.0%

94.0%

98.5%

-4.5pp

92.5%

Robbery recorded

38

16

12

+33.5%

36

Robbery detected

73.0%

94.0%

100.0%

-6.0pp

75.5%

Vandalism recorded

1400

412

524

-21.5%

1265

Vandalism detected

37.0%

35.5%

42.5%

-7.0pp

38.5%

Domestic Housebreaking recorded

140

57

46

+24.0%

134

Domestic Housebreaking detected

40.0%

28.0%

37.0%

-9.0pp

48.5%

Sickness Absence:police officers

4.5%

4.5%

3.6%

+0.9pp

4.0%

Sickness Absence:police staff

5.0%

6.7%

6.4%

+0.3pp

4.3%

Resources:

pp = percentage point

*Note: Variation in results may occasionally appear extreme due to the very small volume of crime involved

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PUBLIC CONFIDENCE Building public confidence and trust is how Tayside Police aims to improve satisfaction with the quality of service provided to its communities. This is achieved through the effective delivery of policing services which meet the needs of the public. It is about ease of access to services, giving the public a voice in order to influence how the force responds to issues that matter to them, delivering appropriate and robust interventions, working with partners, providing feedback to the public and keeping them informed of progress and improvement.

Thank You! After being arrested for a domestic breach of the peace and kept overnight in custody, a lady later telephoned to thank the officers who had dealt with her, particularly, the custody staff. The lady in question stated that whilst she had no wish to repeat the experience, she was thankful for the manner in which she was treated and the professionalism of the staff involved.

A measure of this is the experience, perception and attitudes of Tayside communities. This can be assessed through a process of consultation and gathering views on how the public think the police deal with anti-social behaviour and crime in their neighbourhood. The force uses performance indicators to do this and these are illustrated below. Measures marked with a tick contribute to the following: 

The Scottish Policing Performance Framework



The National Government Framework (Single Outcome Agreements)



The Force Control Strategy

MEASURES

Public Perception/Consultation Update









Community Engagement Update FCC - 999 Telephone response times



- non Emergency response times



Class A Drugs



Drug Awareness



Proceeds of Crime Act Crimestoppers Crime Prevention Partnership Working



Education in Schools



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PUBLIC PERCEPTION As part of a continuing rolling programme of consultation, 900 copies of the 2010 Public Perception survey were distributed by post, between April and June this year, to members of the public randomly selected from the edited electoral registers for each of the three council areas covering Tayside. The survey aims to ascertain public views on issues such as crime in neighbourhoods, antisocial behaviour, community policing, service delivery, communication and information and police activity across the Tayside area. A 27% response rate has been achieved to date. The following paragraphs provide a few points of note from the quarter April to June 2010. (Where available, comparisons are made with the results of the same quarter in 2009). Crime in Your Neighbourhood Taking everything into account, 91% of respondents agreed that their neighbourhood was a ‘fairly’ or ‘very’ safe place to live. Divisionally, 83% of residents in Central compared to 94% in Eastern and Western divisions considered their neighbourhood a safe environment in which to live. Whilst an identical 25% of respondents for both years felt that crime had increased in their area, a lesser percentage, 14% in 2010 compared to 22% in 2009, felt that crime had decreased. This indicates that 61% of residents in 2010 compared to 53% in 2009 felt that crime levels had remained static between the two years. The main issue of concern to respondents in their neighbourhoods was ‘drug dealing or drug abuse’ followed by ‘dangerous/reckless driving’. These results were consistent across the divisions apart from Western where ‘dangerous/reckless driving’ was deemed to be of most concern. ‘Antisocial behaviour’ followed by ‘vandalism/ graffiti’ and ‘dangerous/reckless driving’ were considered to be the most prevalent crimes/offences occurring in local neighbourhoods. It is interesting to note that whilst ‘antisocial behaviour’ was deemed to be most prevalent in 2009 followed by ‘dog fouling’ and ‘dropping litter’, due to a change of wording of the question where the latter two options were not provided and the option given to please specify ‘other’, only 1 respondent chose each of the ‘dog fouling’ and ‘dropping of litter’ categories in the 2010 survey. 70% of respondents confirmed that they were not

concerned at becoming a victim of crime in their area. This represents a twelve percentage point increase when compared to the results for 2009 where 58% provided the same response. Notable differences in opinion were evident within divisions for this question whereby 81% of residents in Western compared to 54% in Central confirmed that they were not concerned at becoming a victim of crime. Of those residents who stated that they were concerned, ‘housebreaking’ followed by ‘antisocial behaviour’ and ‘vandalism/graffiti’ were perceived to be the issues of most concern. 95% of respondents agreed that they felt safe walking alone in their neighbourhood ‘during the day’ and 66% felt safe ‘after dark’. The ‘after dark’ result represented a significant improvement compared to the 57% reported the previous year. A minority, 5%, stated that a fear of crime prevented them from taking part in their everyday activities. This represented a minimal one percentage point reduction compared to 2009. Three quarters of those questioned agreed that the police, council and other partner agencies, such as NHS and Fire and Rescue, were dealing with antisocial behaviour and crime issues that were important to local neighbourhoods. Community Policing In relation to community policing, 18% of respondents confirmed that they saw a police officer patrolling in their neighbourhood on foot or cycling at least once a week. Divisionally, Central division residents, 27%, compared to 14% in Western, were most likely to state that they saw an officer patrolling at least once a week in their area. In terms of vehicle patrols, 51% of respondents stated that they saw officers driving around their neighbourhoods in police vehicles at least once a week. 10% agreed that this was a daily occurrence. Three out of ten respondents agreed that a more visible police presence in their neighbourhood increased their confidence in their local police. 9% of residents confirmed that they knew their community officer by sight and 4% could identify the officer by name. 7% had spoken to the community officer responsible for their area and 27% knew how to contact their officer should the need

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PUBLIC PERCEPTION/CONSULTATION UPDATE arise. Residents within Western division, 36% compared to 18% in Central, were most likely to know how to contact their community officers. Of those respondents who offered an opinion, 51% felt ‘fairly’ or ‘very’ confident that community officers understood the issues that affected local neighbourhoods. Service Delivery 99% of respondents felt it ‘very’ or ‘fairly’ important that officers respond to emerging issues in their area and 92% were of the opinion that Tayside officers performed ‘very’ or ‘fairly’ well in this regard. Similarly, 99% of residents agreed that dealing with antisocial behaviour was an important priority for officers to undertake and 61% agreed that officers dealt ‘very’ or ‘fairly’ well with this issue. In terms of providing a visible presence, 95% of respondents felt this was an important aspect of police service delivery. Only slightly under half of all respondents, 48%, agreed that Tayside officers did this well. Communication and Information When asked how they felt the public should be consulted about the way the police identify and tackle community issues in their area, the overwhelming response from respondents was ‘local meetings attended by officers’. This was followed by ’through community council representatives’ and ’police surgeries’. Public preferences in terms of how they wanted to be kept informed about crime/police related issues in their area were through ‘local newspapers’, ‘local factsheets/newsletters’ or by the provision of ‘information at local shops or supermarkets’. The main source of police information for the public over the past year was through articles in ‘newspapers’. Taking everything into account, 92% of respondents agreed that Tayside Police was doing a ‘good’ or ‘very good’ job.

vey work between Tayside Police and Dundee City Council Antisocial Behaviour Team. A Police Visibility/Perception survey is to commence shortly in Western division to ascertain the impact of the Tayside Police Community Task Force following its four month deployment in the north Perth area. The Partnership survey will commence distribution at the beginning of September to establish partners’ perceptions as to how effective they feel Tayside Police works with partner organisations at all levels. Representatives from a wide range of agencies and organisations will be targeted during this project, including government departments, health trusts and alarm companies. An in-house consultation is currently ongoing with police staff members in the Force Communication Centre, to ascertain their views on working practices since the introduction of a new variable shift arrangement designed to provide a more efficient service to meet demand in relation to calls from the public. Quarterly Community Engagement Update During July, notification was received of 13 community meetings due to take place within the Tayside policing area, 7 in Central, 2 in Eastern and 4 in Western division. Of these meetings, 3 were attended by officers (1 in Eastern and 2 in Western). It should be noted that the summer months always see a reduced number of community meetings due to the extensive holiday period between June and August. At these meetings, officers delivered key messages in relation to ongoing initiatives, local developments, performance information etc and in turn listened to and documented community concerns and tensions raised which were subsequently fed back to divisions. The main issues highlighted in July were dangerous driving (including the use of mobile telephones) and speeding in Western division. Detailed Community Engagement information pertaining to the month of July features on the following page.

Other Consultation Activity Two residents surveys are currently active within the Longtown Road and Linlathen areas of Dundee as part of a joint partnership approach to surNOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Tayside Police Community Officers meet with the public at local community meetings in order to deliver key messages in relation to ongoing initiatives, local developments, performance information etc. In turn, officers document any community concerns raised at these meetings which are then fed back to the relevant division. The following table provides a flavour of the key messages communicated by officers to meeting attendees during July 2010.

KEY MESSAGES FOR JULY

Eastern Division

Bogus workmen: Tayside Police officers stressed the need for householders in Angus to be on their guard against cold callers and bogus workmen offering services such as gardening work, hedge trimming, removal of rubbish, general tidy up or other services due to their high-pressure sales techniques and the poor standard of workmanship which may result if employed. Fair weather crime: A reminder was communicated to householders not to let the warm weather conditions blind them to the importance of home security.

Summer Safety Driving Campaign: Tayside Police, along with Scotland’s other police forces, embarked upon the twoweek annual Summer Safety Driving Campaign from 5th July, which targeted people who chose to drive after drinking or taking drugs. During last year’s campaign, 31 drivers were arrested for drink or drug driving in Tayside (24 men and 6 women). A third of those were under 25 years of age with the further two thirds, between 26 and 55 years old.

Western Division

The public have been extremely supportive of previous campaigns. Indeed, around half of all those arrested by the police are as a result of a call from a member of the public. The overwhelming majority of people recognise the obvious dangers of this type of behaviour and can be assured that Tayside Police has a constant focus on drink/ drug drivers throughout the year. Further information on this campaign can be found on page 30. Migrant Worker Roadshows: Community officers have been visiting local farms, holding seminars advising migrant workers of the laws in relation to buying alcohol, use of motor vehicles etc.

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MAIN ISSUES RAISED WITHIN DIVISIONS The table below highlights the main issues raised by the public at meetings for July 2010. July 2010

Previous Period – June 2010 Underage drinking (Western)

Dangerous driving incl use of mobile telephones (Western) Speeding (Western)

Vandalism/graffiti (Central) Parking issues (Central) Motorcycle nuisance (Eastern)

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON INITIATIVES AND PROJECTS ONGOING OR PLANNED WITHIN DIVISIONS

This table provides information on initiatives/projects currently ongoing or planned within divisions (as communicated at time of publication)

Central Division

The Community Engagement Team remained in the City Centre and Hilltown Multis area during July with a remit to deal with crime/drug misuse and antisocial behaviour in the City Centre.

Eastern Division

Communities against Vandalism: This initiative is an awareness raising campaign designed to encourage Angus residents to report to police when they have witnessed an act of vandalism.

Angling for Youth Development (AYFD) Fishing Project: Taking youngsters fishing as an alternative to getting into trouble. Youngsters are taught all about the sport of fishing including the law and conservation.

Western Division

Army Cadet Force Association (ACFA) Outreach Youth Diversion Project: Partnership of police, army cadet force and education department targeting youngsters in last year of primary school and developing citizenship and team building skills into first year of secondary school. The project runs a discovery day and residential offering challenging activities with a reunion stage planned in September before a new project starts. Tayside Police Community Task Force remained deployed in the north Perth area during July in order to combat crime and antisocial behaviour issues in the area.

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TELEPHONE RESPONSE TIMES Tayside Police has consistently answered over 90% of all 999 emergency calls within 10 seconds for almost two years now. The cumulative result at the end of July of 92.5% exceeded the national target by 2.5 percentage points. 90.5% of all non-emergency calls were answered within 40 seconds, exceeding the National Target of 90%. Consistent results were achieved throughout 09-10 and those results were improved upon in the current year. Results of the Tayside Police Service Satisfac-

tion Survey for the period April to July 2010 indicated that 97% of respondents were satisfied with the time taken to answer their 999 call and 91% were satisfied with the time taken to answer their non-emergency call. A spokesperson for the Force Contact Centre advised that a recent recruitment campaign and training programme had impacted positively upon performance. Source: Force Contact Centre

CLASS A DRUGS Western division recorded 12 crimes for supplying class A drugs during July. Two of the major seizures made during the month of July took place at T in the Park, as 630 ecstasy tablets and 76 grams of cocaine were found. This seizure would have amounted to a street value of £4690. Dealing in Class A

25.6 grams of Heroin were seized in Eastern division during July worth £2560. A total of 3 crimes were recorded for supplying class A drugs, bringing the cumulative total to 20 crimes so far in 2010/11, just 5 less than the 25 recorded at the same time last year.

Drugs can lead to life in prison, a fine, or both!

A further 30.9 grams of heroin were seized within Central division during July worth £3000. This was the result of just two crimes recorded for supplying class A drugs, bringing the cumulative total to 27 crimes made known so far in 2010/11.

Source: Tayside Police Crime Recording System ~ Unifi

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PROCEEDS OF CRIME Between April and the end of July 2010 Tayside Police seized £58,846.91 in cash and £96,852.59 in assets. The comparative figures to the end of July 2009 were £53,282.74 in cash and £106,626.00 in assets.

Crime cash to fund culture scheme Thousands more Scottish youngsters are to benefit from new opportunities to access the arts under the Scottish Government's CashBack for Communities programme. In 2008 Culture Minister Linda Fabiani and Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill launched the initiative along with Taggart actors Alex Norton and Colin McCredie. As part of a wider £1.8 million culture fund drawing money seized from the ill-gotten gains of convicted criminals, £600,000 will go to the CashBack for Communities Arts and Business Match Fund to support increased cultural activities for vulnerable youngsters.

The project, a partnership with Arts and Business Scotland (A&BS), is the first culture scheme supported by the Proceeds of Crime Act. A&BS will encourage Scottish businesses to match every £1 of government investment, thereby doubling the money and releasing a minimum of £1,200,000 by 2010. The funds will then be used to promote social inclusion through the arts for looked after young people between the ages of 10 and 19 years. At the launch of the initiative on 15th May 2008 Mr MacAskill said "Criminals don't contribute to our communities they live off them and that harms our economy as well as sapping self-confidence and ambition, especially among our young people. "We need to let our young people be all they can be. There is more to life than drink or drugs. Arts, sports or leisure must not be a luxury and drugs and drink not a right. This latest strand of our CashBack for Communities scheme will help open access to arts activities for young people throughout Scotland, diverting them from crime and helping expand their horizons." Sources: Tayside Police FIB www.scotland.gov.uk/News/Releases/2008/05

Crimestoppers update . . . . . .

Scotland Scotland Crimestoppers is dedicated to fighting crime across Scotland.

Did you know . . . .?

It helps to promote the charity in communities across the region, to let people know that Crimestoppers is there for them as an anonymous route to pass on information about crime.

Crimestoppers received almost 10,000 pieces of actionable (useful) information about crime in Scotland last year

In Tayside

. . . Between the 1st April and the 31st July Crimestoppers received 264 calls relating to Tayside. 189 of these calls concerned drugs, 36 drink and disqualified driving and 10 assault and robbery. 65% of the calls related to the Dundee area, 17% to Perth and 18% to Angus. Source: crimestoppers-uk.org NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED

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CRIME PREVENTION EASTERN DIVISION LEAFLET TRANSLATION

COLD CALLING

Eastern division has been utilising a leaflet detailing information on Crimestoppers in several foreign languages including Polish, Portuguese, Russian and Bulgarian. These leaflets are being displayed in the places where Migrant workers can go for advice, including the Polish shop in Montrose. They will also be available at public events throughout Angus. Contact has also been made with the International Communities Officer within Angus Council who holds a supply of the leaflets.

Eastern division have been working closely with Trading Standards in order to achieve compliance with the Code of Practice energy companies have signed to prevent them entering No Cold Calling Areas. In order for the Companies to comply with the Code of Practice they require a list of all streets which are in No Cold Calling Areas. The Crime Prevention Officer in Eastern division is arranging for the compilation of the list.

CENTRAL DIVISION LANDLORDS’ FAYRE

SCHOOL SECURITY LEAFLET

The Central division Crime Prevention Officer manned the Crime Prevention stall at the Landlords’ Fayre at the Marryat Hall, Dundee in June. Crime prevention advice was made available to students, many of whom were from overseas, private landlords who perhaps have only 1 or 2 properties and letting agencies who do not always take into consideration the security of the properties they let. Student safety continues to be an important consideration for Central division as Dundee has a high student population.

Working in partnership with Dundee City Council Education Department and Dundee Community Safety Partnership, schools were identified which were traditional hot spots for vandalism etc over summer holidays. In particular, those where any works were to be carried out over the holiday which may have left them more vulnerable were highlighted. A leaflet was prepared requesting the assistance of the public living near to those schools to "keep an eye on them." These leaflets were distributed by Community Police Officers and Community Safety Wardens as well as being made available in local public buildings.

WESTERN DIVISION DOORSTEP CRIME SEMINAR Earlier in the year, a Bogus Workmen/Doorstep Crime seminar took place at the A K Bell Library Theatre in Perth. This was designed for an invited audience of professionals, representatives of neighbourhood watch schemes and other people who have regular contact with or visit elderly and vulnerable peoples’ homes. A keynote presentation was delivered by Tayside Police. . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . following on from this successful project in Perth, meetings have taken place between the Police, NHS, Trading Standards and other organisations in the field of care and protection of the elderly in Dundee. Examples of good practice and sharing of information have taken place on the subject. A seminar has been arranged for October to which all organisations involved in the field of caring for the elderly will be invited. Representatives of these organisation will be given a pre prepared input into the issues involved. The afternoon session of the seminar will be open to the public. Source: Crime Prevention Departments, Tayside Police

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PARTNERSHIP WORKING LAUNCH OF TAYSIDE PARTNERSHIP AGAINST WILDLIFE CRIME Minister for the Environment Roseanna Cunningham MSP made a special trip to Montrose Basin Visitor Centre on 11 August 2010 to officially launch the local Tayside Partnership Against Wildlife Crime group. Niamh Jenkins - prizewinner , Dundee Schools Drawing Competition 09-10

The Partnership for Action Against Wildlife Crime is a multi-agency body comprising representatives of the organisations involved in wildlife law enforcement in the UK. It provides opportunities for statutory and non-Government organisations to work together to combat wildlife crime. Its main objective is to promote the enforcement of wildlife conservation legislation, particularly through supporting the networks of Police Wildlife Crime Officers, HM Revenue and Customs and UK Border Agency officers.

Roseanna Cunningham said, “I’m greatly encouraged by the launch of the Tayside Partnership Against Wildlife Crime and hope it will create a safer environment for all of our plants and animals. The partnership is a vital tool in enforcing wildlife crime legislation and will also build on the good work already done in the area through Operation Countrywatch.” Superintendent Ewen West, Deputy Divisional Commander in Angus, said, ‘‘Tayside Police is committed to working with all agencies across the wide range of wildlife, environmental and countryside interests. ‘’Wildlife crime can involve anything from poisoning a golden eagle to cracking open freshwater pearl mussels. Rare species are put at risk, more familiar animals and birds suffer cruel torture and death. Wildlife crime threatens a far greater range of creatures and plants than people imagine, even damaging the environment on which they depend. “

EDUCATION IN SCHOOLS Schools Wildlife Crime Project Tayside Police wildlife crime officers ran their schools project in 2009-2010 with primary pupils in Tayside schools for the 12th consecutive year. 1500 pupils from 57 classes in 35 schools took part, with a welcome increase in schools from Dundee.

Ellie Ovenstone - prizewinner , Angus A drawing, in colour, of an animal, bird, plant or insect found in the wild in Scotland Schools Wildlife Poster A short story, ‘A day in the life of a police wildlife crime officer’ Competition A coloured poster drawing attention to the disgrace of continuing poisoning of birds 09-10

The projects for the pupils were:   

of prey in Scotland 

A wildlife law quiz.

Alan Stewart, Tayside Police Wildlife and Environmental Crime Officer said: ‘The standard of drawings in 2009-2010 is as high as I have seen it since the beginning of the project. It’s clear that pupils have taken a lot of time over their work and have produced some stunning drawings. However, I appreciate that not everyone is artistic, which is why the projects are varied.’ The next project is in the planning stage and due to commence in September. Erin Wilkinson prizewinner , For the full report and more information on Wildlife Crime and the Schools Project Perth & Kinross please visit the Wildlife Crime site on the Tayside Police Website at Schools Drawing Competition 09-10 www.tayside.police.uk/Wildlife Crime/P.A.W. and /Schools Project NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED

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PUBLIC SAFETY This section focuses on crime, the detection of crime and bringing offenders to justice. Public safety covers our quality of service in preventing crime, providing a visible presence, tackling anti-social behaviour, policing public events, reducing the number of casualties on the roads of Tayside and increasing the knowledge of road users.

MEASURES

Groups 1 to 4 Crimes





Violent Crime





Robbery



Vandalism Domestic Housebreaking



Road Casualties









Road Safety Alcohol related Crime & Disorder

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KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS GROUPS 1 to 4 Tayside Police ~ after increases of crime recorded in May and June the July result levelled out at 1680 crimes. 6339 crimes recorded represented a fall of 3% when compared to the same period last year (6546). At the end of July the cumulative detection rate was 43.5%. Central division recorded 3476 crimes cumulatively to the end of July, a result which achieved target despite being slightly higher than at the same time last year. 42.5% of crime had been detected by the end of July. In Eastern division, with the exception of June, all monthly results to date this year have been lower than the commensurate results last year. Cumulatively, the 1359 crimes recorded at the end of July represented a 7.5% reduction on the 1469 recorded at the same time last year. 46.5% of all crime was detected. In Western division 1504 crimes had been recorded between April and the end of July ~ a 14.5% reduction on the 1755 recorded at the end of July 2009. Crime to date this year has followed a very similar pattern to last year albeit at lower levels each month, as illustrated on the graph below. The detection rate finalised at 43.5% at the end of July. Western Division

2009-10 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Averge

Groups 1-4 Recorded Crime 700

2010-11 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

Central division recorded 98 crimes to the end of July which was within target. The detection rate at the end of July finalised at 71.5%. Eastern division recorded 37 crimes cumulatively to the end of July in comparison to 52 last year ~ a 29% reduction. The detection rate remained buoyant and at 97.5% represented a 22.5 percentage point improvement on the 75% recorded at the end of July 2009. Western division recorded 64 crimes cumulatively to the end of July, 2 more than at the same time last year. The detection rate of 94%, was 4 percentage points above the target of 90%. ROBBERY Tayside Police recorded 13 crimes both in June & July and a within-target result was maintained at the end of July. The cumulative detection rate of 71% was 8 percentage points above target. In Central division the 30 crimes recorded since April was within target. A detection rate of 56.5% was recorded at the end of July. Eastern division only recorded 2 crimes to the end of July, exactly the same as last year. Both the crimes were detected (100%). Western division recorded 16 crimes to the end of July. The 94% detection rate was 21 percentage points above the 2010-11 target of 73%.

600 500 400 300 200 100 0 Apr

May

Jun

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Western Division ~ Groups 1 to 4

Mar

VIOLENT CRIME Tayside Police ~ despite 9 more crimes having been committed during the first four months of this year than last year, the 199 crimes recorded did not exceed target. Similarly, the 2010 detection rate at the end of July (83.5%) was above the target.

VANDALISM By the end of July Tayside Police had reduced vandalism by 13% when compared to the same period last year. This translated into 265 fewer victims of crime across the force area in the first four months of the year. At the same time, the detection rate improved from 31% recorded at the end of July 2009 to 34% by the end of July 2010. In Central division in June high levels of vandalism were recorded, many of which were attributable to one accused who was responsible for defacing walls and other surfaces with graffiti. This perpetrator was apprehended and lower levels of crime were recorded in July. Cumulatively, to the end of July, 965 crimes had been recorded, a result which was within target. 31.5% of crime had been detected; a much improved result

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KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS when compared to the end of July last year (23.5%). Eastern division continued to achieve target both for recorded crime and detections. The 432 crimes recorded was 30% lower than at the same time last year and the detection rate of 38.5% represented a 7 percentage point improvement on the 31.5% recorded at the end of July 2009. The ‘Communities against Vandalism’ initiative currently deployed in the division concentrates upon this type of unacceptable behaviour and the current results reflect its success. This is illustrated on the graph below.

rate of 53.5% was, however, a 13 percentage point improvement on the result at the same time last year. The division responded swiftly to the rise in crime in recent months by developing a Housebreaking Strategy and the improved July results reflect the impact of this action, illustrated clearly on the graph below. Western recorded 57 crimes between April and July 2010, 11 more than the previous year. 28% of crime was detected. Eastern Division

2009-10 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Averge

Domestic Housebreaking Recorded Crime 20

2010-11 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

18

Western division also evidenced a reduction in recorded crime (21.5%) reducing the 524 crimes recorded at the end of July 2009 to 412 this year.

16 14 12 10

Eastern Division

2009-10 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Averge

Vandalism Recorded 250

2010-11 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

8 6 4 2

200

0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

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Mar

150

Eastern Division ~ Domestic Housebreaking 100

50

0 Apr

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Aug

Sep

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Eastern Division ~ Vandalism The cumulative detection rate at the end of July was 35.5%. DOMESTIC HOUSEBREAKING Tayside Police recorded 352 crimes at the end of July. The end of July 2010 detection rate was 26% Central division evidenced an increase in recorded crime ~ from 158 at the end of July 2009 to 252 this year. This result was combined with a lower detection rate of 20.5%, 5 percentage points below the 25.5% recorded at the same time last year. Domestic housebreaking has now been escalated to a very high priority for the division. In Eastern division the high level of crime recorded in the month of June was tempered in July bringing the cumulative result to 43, 16 more than at the same time last year. The detection

Source: Tayside Police Crime Recording System ~ Unifi and Management Information System ~ proMIS

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ROAD CASUALTIES Between April and the end of July, 4 adults were killed on the roads of Tayside (no child fatalities). There were also 49 people seriously injured (including 4 children). 188 adults and 18 children were slightly injured as a result of being involved in a road traffic collision. Note: because of the special nature of this category, all results are subject to change due to reassessment of the severity of injuries in the days/weeks following a road collision. Source: proMIS (Tayside Police Management Information System

ROAD SAFETY ACPOS SUMMER DRINK DRUGS DRIVING CAMPAIGN

ACPOS National Campaigns Working Group (NCWG) National Days of Action

This national campaign was held this year between 5th and 19th July. Throughout Tayside, 14 people were arrested for drink/drug driving ~ 11 males and 3 females. This is a 55% reduction on the 31 people arrested last year. Of the 14 people arrested, 4 were under the age of 25 and 10 were between the ages of 26 and 55. A warrant for seizure of one vehicle was granted by the Court, the vehicle taken possession of and disposal is pending. All offences were drink related.

In Tayside, during the 24 hour period of the Seatbelt/Mobile Phone Day of Action, from 7am on 21st June to 7am on 22nd June, 46 drivers were found to be not wearing a seatbelt and 7 drivers were caught driving whilst using a hand-held mobile phone. All the offenders were drivers of cars and there were no offences relating to drivers of vans or LGVs. However, during this day of action, one driver was detected speeding at 103 mph.

During the first week of the campaign, 49 drivers were caught not wearing their seatbelt and a further 36 were caught during the second week. In addition, a bus driver was charged with using a mobile phone whilst driving the vehicle with passengers on board. SCOTLAND’S ROADS SAFEST FOR 60 YEARS Scotland's roads are the safest for 60 years, according to statistics released in June 2010. The reported number of deaths on Scotland's roads fell last year by a fifth to 216 and the total number of casualties fell by four per cent to 15,013 - the lowest since 1949. Responding to the 2009 Reported Road Casualty statistics, Transport Minister Stewart Stevenson said: "This is a welcome drop to the lowest number of casualties for 60 years, continuing the downward trend witnessed in recent years. "While progress in cutting casualties is evident and we have again exceeded the GB targets to reduce deaths and serious injuries, we continue to do everything we can to improve road safety.

A further national day of action is planned for 23rd August when the focus will be speeding and seatbelt offences in the vicinity of schools. Results of this day will be published in the next edition of this publication. Source: Tayside Police HQ Roads Policing unit

"The number of deaths, and in particular those of children, fell last year. This is an area on which we have particularly focused over the last three years and we'll continue to work with schools, councils and the police and other partners to minimise the number of children and young people involved in road accidents. "We have a vision of no road deaths and, working with road safety professionals, see no reason why that ultimately cannot happen." The Road Safety Framework sets distinct and challenging targets for reductions in road casualties in Scotland over the decade from 2011, after the end of the current GB targets. These are the first ever Scottish road safety targets - for a 40 per cent reduction in fatalities; 55 per cent reduction in serious injuries; a 50 per cent reduction in children killed and 65 per cent reduction in children seriously injured based on the 2004-2008 average. Source: www.scotland.gov.uk/News/Releases/2010/6/21

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SAFETY CAMERAS Plans are in place to start switching off safety cameras in Oxfordshire as part of council plans to cut £13m from its budget. All 72 fixed and 89 mobile camera sites cameras will be switched off from 1 August after £600,000 was axed from the road safety budget. The money had been earmarked for the Thames Valley Road Safety Partnership, which operates the cameras. Officials backed the cuts at a full council meeting on 27 July. While cameras generate revenue from fines, the road safety partnership said any money went back to central government through the courts. In July last year, Swindon Borough Council became the first English local authority to abandon speed cameras, but Wiltshire Police vowed to continue using mobile cameras. Source: www.bbc.co.uk/news/ukengland-oxfordshire

‘DRIVING AMBITION’ EVENT The aim of the ‘Driving Ambition’ event is to offer young car users the opportunity to talk directly to road safety professionals. This event supports class work that has been undertaken with Guidance Staff using the S3-S6 road safety teaching resource, ‘Crash Magnets’, and is further supported by these same pupils attending the ‘Safe Drive Stay Alive’ event later in S5/6. The event is primarily offered to S5 pupils, but will be opened up to S6 pupils on request from schools. By offering a balanced road safety message through a variety of media, it is hoped that there will be a reduction in the number of young people being killed or seriously injured in road traffic collisions. ‘Driving Ambition’ takes place in Eastern and Western Divisions, although in different formats. It is anticipated that ‘Driving Ambition’ will be rolled out into Central Division during the academic year 2010/11. ~~~~~~~~ The following is a report on the Western Division event. ‘Driving Ambition’ is organised by the Divisional Road Safety Officer after consultation and liaison with Perth and Kinross Education and Children’s Services department. It is a partnership event and utilises the services of both public and private organisations. In Western Division strong partnership working relationships have been formed and the event, having completed its third year in June 2010, is fully supported by: Tayside Police Tayside Fire & Rescue

Driving Standards Agency Perth & District Motorschools’ Assoc. Tayside Safety Camera Partnership Traffic & Road Safety, Perth & Kinross Council Sustainable Transport, Perth & Kinross Council AVIVA Institute of Advanced Motorists Youth Services, Perth & Kinross Council Chartered Institute of Insurance 2010 saw the event being opened up further and invitations to attend were extended to private schools, Perth and Kinross Skill Seekers, Careers Scotland, YMCA, Youth Services, Perth College and International students. Annual evaluation of the events shows that the students attending like the format of the event, the majority rate the organisations’ stands as good or excellent and highly rate the topics covered. Teacher evaluations shows that they felt the timing of the event was appropriate and they liked the informal style of the event. The teachers who attended felt the event delivers a strong road safety message and report receiving positive feedback from students and staff with particular emphasis on the interactive activities provided by the event. ‘Driving Ambition’ is just one element of road safety education utilised for this vulnerable group and fits with the curriculum for excellence and also with the national resource ‘Crash Magnets’. Source: Tayside Police Road Safety Co-ordinator

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ALCOHOL RELATED CRIME AND DISORDER ALCOHOL RELATED VIOLENT CRIME Throughout Tayside between April and the end of July 2010, in 90 of the 199 Violent Crimes recorded either the victim, the perpetrator or both were under the influence (45%). By comparison, at the same time last year of the 190 violent crimes recorded alcohol was present in only 81 of them (43%) Ta yside Police Force

Crime 2009-10

Crime 2010-11

A lcohol Related V iolent Crime 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 A pr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

In Central division out of the 98 violent crimes recorded 33 involved alcohol (34%) whereas last year at the same time the corresponding figures were 76 crimes of violence recorded and 29% of those (22) were alcohol related. In Eastern division the number of violent crimes recorded fell from 52 last year to 37 this year. However the number of alcohol related crimes rose slightly from 20 last year to 22 this year to the end of July. Western division was the only area where the numbers of crimes with an alcoholic element fell this year from 39 at the end of July 2009 to 35 this year. The level of all violent crime remained fairly level with 64 being recorded between April and the end of July this year and 62 at July 2009.

Tayside Police ~ Alcohol-related Violent Crime During the month of July alone 23 alcohol related crimes were recorded both last year and this year, illustrated on the graph above ALCOHOL RELATED MINOR ASSAULT At the end of July 2010 there was a 2% increase in the number of crimes of Petty Assault recorded by Tayside Police. During the same period, the number of Minor Assaults where alcohol was a contributory factor fell by 7.5% from 732 last year to 678 this year.

All three divisions recorded lower levels of alcohol related minor assault with reductions ranging from 2% in Central division, 9% in Western division to 16% in Eastern division.

Minimum Pricing to tackle Problem Drinking On 20 January 2010, Nicola Sturgeon, Scottish Government Health Secretary said: **“Minimum pricing is part of our Alcohol Bill currently in Parliament. It's proved controversial for the supermarkets and multinational drinks giants, but has been strongly backed by the four Chief Medical Officers of the UK, doctors, nurses, the police and publicans. Practically everyone in Scotland drinks - myself included - and alcohol features in many social occasions. But in Scotland we also have a growing problem with excessive alcohol consumption and the enormous knock-on effects on our public services and economy from ill health, crime and lost productivity. Economists at York University have put this cost at a mid-range estimate of £3.56bn - £900 for every adult in Scotland. Sceptics can quibble with the figures, but the inconvenient truth for those who deride government action as 'nanny statism' is that alcohol abuse by a sizeable minority is costing every one of us, every day.”

Source: Extract from media statement at www.scotland.gov.uk/News/This-Week/Ministers-in-The-Media

**NB: these views do not necessarily reflect those of other political parties or those of Tayside Police NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED

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PUBLIC PROTECTION This aspect of policing is to ensure that the public are safe from harm and feel safe from harm. Much of this aspect of policing is not always frontline and has a focus on public reassurance, protection of the vulnerable, targeting offenders and supporting victims. This section will be developed in future publications. Domestic Abuse is featured on the following page.

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DOMESTIC ABUSE Tayside Police 2010-11 Between April and the end of July 2010 1607 Domestic abuse incidents were recorded across Tayside. This represented a 9% increase on the 1470 reported at the same time last year. Divisionally, Central rose from 801 incidents at the end of July 2009 to 874 this year, an increase of 9%. Eastern division increased from 333 last year to 352 at the end of July 2010, a 6% increase. Western division increased the number of incidents recorded by 13% from 336 last year to 381 this year. The number of incidents involving a ‘repeat victim’ is about one third with results ranging from 30% in Eastern division to 35% in Central. Force-wide the figure is 33%

mate partners or family members, regardless of gender or sexuality" The impact of domestic abuse on the operation of the criminal justice system is significant. The joint protocol between the Association of Chief Police Officers in Scotland (ACPOS) and Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service (COPFS) , commits the police to treating all incidents of domestic abuse as high priority. Some key facts:

Domestic abuse (as gender-based abuse), can be perpetrated by partners or ex-partners and can include physical assault (assault and physical attack involving a range of behaviour), sexual abuse (acts which degrade and humiliate women and are perpetrated against their will, including rape) and mental and emotional abuse (such as threats, verbal abuse, racial abuse, withholding money and other types of controlling behaviours such as isolation from family and friends).

World Health Organisations Mu lt i- Co unt r y st ud y int o women's health and domestic violence against women found that between 1 in 2 and 1 in 10 women will experience some form of violence at some point in their lives. One in 4 women will experience domestic abuse from a partner in her lifetime. There were 49,655 incidents of domestic abuse in Scotland recorded in 2007/08 (an increase of just under 2% on the previous year). 54% of cases reported to the police in 2007/08 involved repeat victimisation. Women were the victims in 85% of the reported incidents of domestic abuse in Scotland in 2007/08.

Domestic abuse can have a profound impact on someone's health including physical injuries, anxiety, depression and sadly, we know it is one of the biggest reasons for suicide

Nicola Sturgeon, Scottish Government Health Minister July 2010

The UK Government: has defined domestic violence as: "Any incident of threatening behaviour, violence or abuse (psychological, physical, sexual, financial or emotional) between adults who are or have been inti-

Source: extracts from— www.scotland.gov.uk/publications/2008/10 www. scotland.gov.uk /topics/people/equality/violence-women

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EFFICIENT & EFFECTIVE FORCE This section contains information relating to areas which, although not directly attributable to Public Confidence, Safety and Protection ~ the main focus of this publication ~ do have an impact and contribute to Tayside Police’s performance and service delivery This section will be further developed in future publications.

MEASURES

Sickness Absence



Reports to the Procurator Fiscal



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REPORTS TO THE PROCURATOR FISCAL Between the beginning of April and the end of July, 5734 reports were sent from Tayside Police to the Procurator Fiscal. 5294 of these reports were received by the Procurator Fiscal within 28 days of caution and charge. This represented 92.5% of all reports against a national target of 80%. The table below illustrates this year’s results compared to last year’s results at the same time and also provides divisional information. Lower results last year were adversely influenced by a technical problem which was discovered in Western division but was rectified in time for the overall force result to achieve target at the end of the year. Green coloured results achieve target and gold coloured results indicate a result which is better than any previous recorded year-end result.

Reports sent to Procurator Fiscal Force Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar 2010-11 85.0% 89.0% 91.5% 92.5% 2009-10 78.5% 79.0% 78.5% 79.0% 80.0% 80.0% 78.5% 79.0% 79.5% 79.0% 80.0% 80.0% Central Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar 2010-11 84.0% 88.0% 90.5% 91.0% 2009-10 81.5% 83.0% 83.5% 83.5% 84.0% 83.5% 81.5% 81.0% 81.0% 80.5% 81.5% 81.5% Eastern Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar 2010-11 84.5% 89.0% 91.5% 92.5% 2009-10 83.5% 82.0% 82.0% 81.5% 82.5% 82.0% 80.5% 81.0% 81.0% 80.5% 81.0% 81.5% Western Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar 2010-11 87.0% 90.5% 93.0% 93.5% 2009-10 71.0% 72.0% 69.5% 71.5% 73.5% 75.0% 74.0% 75.0% 76.0% 76.5% 77.0% 78.0%

Source: Tayside Police Standard Police Report Management Report Transfer system (SMART)

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SICKNESS ABSENCE POLICE OFFICERS

POLICE STAFF

Tayside Police

Tayside Police

The cumulative sickness absence rate at the end of July of 3.9% was exactly the same as at 31st July 2009.

4.8% of available working days were lost through sickness absence between April and the end of July.

There were 891 days lost through sickness absence during the month of July for Police Officers bringing the cumulative number of days lost since April to 3318 which equated to an average of 0.7 working days per officer.

This most recent result was slightly higher than the 4.6% recorded at the same time last year and equated to 2186 days lost. Tayside Police STAFF

09-10 WDL

Working Days Lost/Sickness Absence 800.0

Central Division 3.7% of days were lost through sickness absence cumulatively to the end of July, a 1 percentage point improvement on the 4.7% recorded at the same time last year. In real terms, this equated to 284 less days lost through sickness absence. Central Division OFFICERS

09-10 WDL

Working Days Lost/Sickness Absence 450

10-11 WDL

700.0 600.0 500.0 400.0 300.0 200.0 100.0

10-11 WDL

0.0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

400 350

The graph above illustrates the monthly levels of sickness absence (police staff) for Tayside Police.

300 250 200

Central Division

150

A sickness absence rate of 4.7% at the end of July 2009 had been improved upon by 1 percentage point by the end of July 2010. The 3.7% recorded represented 195 working days lost compared to 261 at the same time last year.

100 50 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

The graph above illustrates the monthly levels of sickness absence (police officers) in Central Division. Eastern Division Sickness absence accounted for 5.3% of all working days available at the end of July 2010. At the end of July 2009 the commensurate figure was 3.0%. Western Division There was also an increase in the number of days lost through sickness absence this year when compared to the same time in 2009. Of the 21529 working days available, between April and the end of July, 973 were lost through sickness absence (4.5%). At the end of July last year sickness absence accounted for 3.6% of all available days.

Eastern Division 12 more working days were lost through sickness absence this year than between April and July 2009. The result of this was a slight increase in the percentage of working days lost, from 4.5% last year to 4.6% this year. Western Division Sickness absence increased slightly from 6.4% at the end of July 2009 to 6.7% this year. This result equated to an average of 1.1 days lost through sickness absence per member of police staff.

Source: Tayside Police Personnel & Development Department

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED

37


This document is available on the force intranet and web site. It can be viewed there in large print by increasing the magnification on screen. If you require further information about this report please use the contact below. Ongoing improvement depends on feedback from contributors and users and we would welcome your views.

WHO TO CONTACT

Performance and Planning Unit 01382 59 6701 / 6710 / 6711 / 6713 or email performanceandplanning@tayside.pnn.police.uk

www.tayside.police.uk


July 2010 - Monthly Performance Report  

Tayside Police Monthly Performance Report for July 2010

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