Issuu on Google+

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S:

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT:

2006/07

www.tayside.police.uk


P2/3

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS The Force Objectives................................................................................................................P04 Convener’s Message ................................................................................................................P05 Tayside Joint Police Board.......................................................................................................P06 Force Executive ........................................................................................................................P07 Chief Constable’s Foreword.....................................................................................................P08 Statutory Performance Indicators ..........................................................................................P10 Central Division ........................................................................................................................P11 Eastern Division........................................................................................................................P18 Western Division ......................................................................................................................P22 A Glimpse At What We Do........................................................................................................P28 Headquarters Division .............................................................................................................P30 Headquarters Crime Management..........................................................................................P32 Road Policing Unit ....................................................................................................................P36 Search & Rescue ......................................................................................................................P39 Special Constabulary................................................................................................................P41 Tackling Antisocial Behaviour ..................................................................................................P42 Statistical Information .............................................................................................................P44 Statement of Corporate Governance ......................................................................................P53 Useful Contacts and Information ............................................................................................P54

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P4/5

THE FORCE OBJECTIVES Standards Of Service > We provide a prompt and effective response > We provide a response that meets individual needs > We keep you informed > Local Inspectors and their staff take direct responsibility for policing in your area > We work with others to provide better co-ordinated services > We make police stations welcoming and accessible to all > If we cannot help you, whenever possible, we tell you who can

Objective 1 TO REDUCE CRIME AND ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOUR WE WILL ACHIEVE THIS BY: > Targeting drug dealers and other active criminals > Tackling antisocial behaviour and alcohol-related disorder > Identifying emerging problems and trends and responding effectively > Working with others to find the best solutions

Objective 2 ENSURE THAT OUR COMMUNITIES ARE SAFE AND FEEL SAFE WE WILL ACHIEVE THIS BY: > Making visible and accessible policing our priority > Ensuring that our services meet local needs > Being available to discuss individual or community problems > Providing feedback and reassurance to the community > Working in partnership to reduce road casualties and the impact of crime, sex offending and antisocial behaviour > Ensuring we protect children and those who need our help most

Objective 3 TO BE RESPONSIVE TO CHANGE AND MAINTAIN HIGH STANDARDS OF SERVICE WE WILL ACHIEVE THIS BY: > Providing our critical services at all times > Ensuring staff know our priorities and supporting them to always deliver the best service > Providing clear direction, leadership and regularly assessing the quality of service each person delivers > Maintaining a well-trained and healthy workforce and encouraging personal development > Consulting with our staff to develop the organisation and address concerns jointly > Using technology to provide easy access to services and help staff to do their jobs > Continuously seeking to improve the service we provide

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


THE CONVENER’S MESSAGE

THE CONVENER’S MESSAGE At the end of my four year term as Convener, I would like to thank the members of Tayside Joint Police Board for their highly valuable input and support of Tayside Police. Many of the initiatives that have contributed to the excellent performance of the Force have been promoted by Joint Board members and reflect the willingness of Tayside Police to consider and embrace change. The performance of the Force continues to show improvements in many areas with no evidence of any areas that are a cause for concern. Communications and work with partner organisations now account for a great deal of police time, and demonstrate how Tayside Police is committed to engaging with our communities to ensure the very best service is available to all to our citizens. My thanks go to all Police Officers, Special Constables and Police Staff for their enthusiasm and dedication to their duties, and I am confident that they will address whatever challenges face them in the future. I wish the new Joint Board, and my successor, every success for the next four years and know that they will carry out their responsibilities as diligently and professionally as this Joint Board has done.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P6/7

TAYSIDE JOINT POLICE BOARD Tayside Joint Police Board shares responsibility for Tayside Police with the Chief Constable, who is responsible for operational matters, and with the Scottish Ministers. The current board comprises the following members appointed from the three Tayside area local authorities CONVENER Councillor Colin H Young .................................................................................................................................... Perth & Kinross Council VICE CONVENERS Councillor Ron Scrimgeour ................................................................................................................................................ Angus Council Depute Provost Charles D P Farquhar, OBE, JP, DL..................................................................................................Dundee City Council ANGUS COUNCIL MEMBERS Councillor Jack Gibb .......................................................................................................................................................... Angus Council Councillor Ian Mackintosh, JP ........................................................................................................................................... Angus Council Depute Provost Stewart McGlynn...................................................................................................................................... Angus Council Councillor Robert G Myles, JP ........................................................................................................................................... Angus Council DUNDEE CITY COUNCIL MEMBERS Councillor James Barrie, JP .....................................................................................................................................Dundee City Council Councillor Helen Dick, JP..........................................................................................................................................Dundee City Council Lord Provost John R Letford, JP...............................................................................................................................Dundee City Council Bailie Neil I C Powrie, JP..........................................................................................................................................Dundee City Council Councillor George Regan ..........................................................................................................................................Dundee City Council Councillor Christina Roberts, JP...............................................................................................................................Dundee City Council PERTH & KINROSS COUNCIL MEMBERS Councillor Alistair Barr ...................................................................................................................................... Perth & Kinross Council Councillor Ian Miller .......................................................................................................................................... Perth & Kinross Council Councillor David M Scott, JP.............................................................................................................................. Perth & Kinross Council Councillor Lewis D D Simpson ........................................................................................................................... Perth & Kinross Council Councillor Alexander J Stewart, JP................................................................................................................... Perth & Kinross Council The board meets four times a year, with meetings rotating annually between Dundee, Forfar and Perth. There are also Appointments, Complaints, Finance, Personnel and Audit sub-committees. Meetings, unless specifi ed are open to the public.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


THE FORCE EXECUTIVE

LEFT TO RIGHT: MOIRA DOCHERTY, KEVIN MATHIESON, IAIN MACLEOD, DOUG CROSS, JOHN VINE

THE FORCE EXECUTIVE • Chief Constable John Vine QPM BA MSc FCIPD

• Deputy Chief Constable Kevin Mathieson Professional Standards, Headquarters Division, Police Forensic Science Laboratory

• Assistant Chief Constable Iain MacLeod Central Division, Eastern Division, Western Division, HQ Crime Management, Operational Support

• Director of Corporate Services Doug Cross OBE FCMA Finance, IT & Communications, Legal Services, Property & Support Services

• Director of Human Resource Services Moira Docherty MCIPD Human Resource Services, Staff Development, Occupational Health

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P8/9

THE CHIEF CONSTABLE’S FOREWORD To the First Minister for Scotland, nd Tayside Joint Police Board, Board Sheriff Principal for Tayside, Fife and Central, and the Tayside Community we serve, it gives me great pleasure to present my sixth annual report as Chief Constable of Tayside Police. My annual report focuses on the achievements and successes of the Force during the last financial year. I am immensely proud of the officers and members of support staff who collectively work hard to make the communities of Tayside safe. Tayside Police staff can take great credit for improving our detection rate once again this year, as well as achieving a reduction in overall crime levels. We have kept our promise to the communities of Tayside to arrest drug dealers and reduce the availability of drugs. Over the course of the last year, through intelligence led policing, we have recovered record amounts of heroin, cannabis, cocaine, ecstasy, and amphetamine. We’ve also hit drug dealers hard by seizing cash, causing maximum disruption to those who think that they can come to Tayside to profit from the misery of others. Road safety continues to be a priority for the Force. In the last year, as a result of one road accident alone in Tayside, five people lost their lives. This tragic event emphasises the need to reinforce the road safety message at every opportunity and this message is central to a new Road Safety Strategy that is being developed by Tayside Police. As the current Chair of the ACPOS (Association of Chief Police Officers Scotland) Road Policing Business Area I’ve also opened up the debate on how we can ensure young drivers are getting the road safety message from the outset and whether or not there should be restrictions placed on new drivers. I would also like to see legal alcohol driving limits reduced so that they are in line with the European average limit, from 80mgs down to 50mgs, as well as the introduction of random breath testing.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07

Scottish policing is distinctive from the rest of the UK and we should continue to look at different ways of addressing the issues that affect us all. One of those issues is anti-social behaviour. Tayside Police has been a leading light in dealing with anti-social behaviour. The Scottish Executive selected the Force to pilot an innovative scheme to issue fixed penalty notices for anti-social behaviour. Officers found that issuing fixed penalty notices gave them a quick and effective way of dealing with low level offending and the scheme has now been successfully rolled out across other Scottish Police Forces. We’ve listened to your concerns about having a more visible police presence on the streets of Tayside and the introduction of high profile cycle patrols throughout the Force area has gone a long way in achieving this. I’ve always said that effective policing is not something that can be done on our own and we work hard with partners from a number of different agencies to achieve our aims and objectives. For example, this last year has seen the official opening of the Letham Community Access Office, where police officers work alongside Angus Council’s Community Safety team. This means that local people can access all the right services in one place. This is one programme of work that we are keen to develop further and there are already plans afoot to introduce a similar service in the Monifieth area. WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘Sincere thanks for his kind assistance as e, help, bravery and professionalism f i li att a very ttraum matic ti titime for myself in what were very trying circumstances.’’ – PH, Moray


CHIEF CONSTABLE’S FOREWORD

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘Theyy pperformed with unfailing ngg courtesy courtes and kindness and provided much-needed practica practical support when I was in a state of confusion and fear. Each member of your staff showed the same high standard of care and assistance.’’ – JR, Sutherland

Consultation is key and that is why I, along with officers across the Force area, will continue to hold regular police surgeries, listening to your concerns and dealing with the issues that you want to see us tackle. I’m greatly encouraged that our public consultation throughout the last year has shown that our officers are being seen in communities, that they have a positive attitude in going about their work in their respective communities, and that they display professionalism in their work. This is supported by the hundreds of letters of appreciation that the Force receives every year. The world that we live in at present demands that we must all be vigilant. Everyone in our community has a role to play in ensuring that terrorism and the fear of terrorism does not affect the way in which we live our lives. That is why Tayside Police is making every effort to work with all the communities in Tayside to ensure that everyone’s interests

and concerns are heard. By working together we can all play a part in ensuring the safety and security of everyone in Tayside. There are many new challenges ahead. We will be working with a new Police Board this year and will be able to demonstrate to them that there is no place for complacency within Tayside Police and we look forward to improving the quality of life for the communities we serve.

John Vine, QPM MSc FCIPD

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P10/11

TABLE OF STATUTORY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 2005/2006 RESULT

2006/2007 TARGET

2006/2007 RESULT

TARGET ACHIEVED

57.5%

52%

57.8%

YES

Serious Violent Crime - crimes made known

682

No Target

718

~

Serious Violent Crime - % cleared up

85%

88%

83.8%

NO

CATEGORY Crimes (Groups 1 to 5) % cleared up

Domestic Housebreaking - crimes made known

927

No Target

1001

~

28.7%

30%

31.8%

YES

255

260

322

YES

84.1%

85%

81.4%

NO

Car Crime - crimes made known

2238

No Target

1925

~

Car Crime - % cleared up

30.3%

29%

34.5%

YES

Roads Policing Unit - a) Number of people killed/seriously injured

299

305

328

NO

Roads Policing Unit - b) Number of children killed/seriously injured

41

39

36

YES

Roads Policing Unit - c) Number of slight casualties

1035

1138

970

YES

Sickness Absence ~ % working time lost - a) Police Officers

4.5%

4.2%

4.8%

NO

Sickness Absence ~ % working time lost - b) Support Staff

5.3%

5%

5.5%

NO

Complaints ~ per 100 Employees

14.3

14

17

NO

999 Calls

90.6%

90%

90.7%

YES

Reports sent to Procurator Fiscal within 28 days

64.9%

75%

72%

NO

Reports sent to The Children’s Reporter within 14 days

84.3%

80%

80.7%

YES

Domestic Housebreaking - % cleared up Drugs: Number of Crimes made known - supply, possession with intent etc.04/05 (Class A only) Racist Crime - % cleared up

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


CENTRAL DIVISION

CENTRAL DIVISION Central Division covers the Dundee City Council area – and whilst it is the smallest division in geographical terms of just 24 square miles, it has the largest population of the three divisions at approximately 145,000. Divisional HQ is in West Bell Street, Dundee, where the Command Team led by Chief Superintendent Colin McCashey is based. Colin is assisted by Superintendent Arron Duncan as Deputy Divisional Commander, as well as Chief Inspector Lorna Robbie who has operational responsibilities and Chief Inspector David Tonks who is responsible for support functions in Dundee. Detective Chief Inspector Ewen West heads the Dundee Criminal Investigation Department and the Divisional Road Policing Unit is led by Inspector Gordon Taylor. Dundee is divided into separate sections for policing purposes – Section 1

City Centre and West End

Section 2

Lochee, Charleston, Menzieshill, Fairmuir

Section 3

Downfi eld, Ardler, St Mary’s, Kirkton, Mill O’Mains, Fintry CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT COLIN MCCASHEY

Section 4

Maryfield, Stobswell, Hilltown

Section 5

Longhaugh, Whitfield, Mid Craigie, Linlathen, Douglas, Craigiebank, Broughty Ferry

CENTRAL DIVISION

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P12/13

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

“These officers worked and beh ehaved haved in a truly exceptional manner, and at all times were ppolite, courteous and friendly. manner They kept us well informed of the investigation from the very start and we were truly surprised at how efficiently and quickly the information was gathered.’’ – CM, Forfar

e h t o t g n i d n o p Res f o y t i l i b a t c i d e r p n u crime... A summer that incl c uded two murders and a number of armed robberies in Dundee tested police ro reso re sour urce ur c s to the maximum. ce De Described b Chieff Connst by stab able ab le John Vine as an ‘‘‘‘ex extr t aorddinar a y peri r odd of se seri riou ouss cr crim ime’’, arrests weree im subs bsequeently madee in rel e at a io ionn too the mur urdders rss aandd ffou ourr arrme m d robb b eries followin i g innteensivve de detect c ivee wo work rk.. It hig ighlighted ed thee volatility an a d un unpred edictability ty off innciide d nt n s wh whic ichh thee poliice are re ccalle ledd too dea eal wi w th. Keey to the h mur urdder en e quiries wass the work of sceenes off cri rime m and for oren ensi s c scienc n e staf a f in acqui u ringg DNA e idence,, wh ev w icch asssi s sted e in secuuri r ng con o viictio ti ns at th t e Highh CCouurt when the caases we weree calle led. RResoources fr f om m acr c os oss thhe Forc r e area – iinc n luding s archh teaams, detectives, searrch and sce se cenees of crime personneel, as well as uniform annd fire rearmss officeerss were inv n olved.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07

Comm mmen entting ng oonn thhe peeriod o ooff in od inte tennsee ac actitvi vity ty,, wh whic ich incl clud udeed the hese se crime mess Divvisi sionnal CCom mma m nder er Chi hief Suupe peri rint nten ende dent n Col olin i McC cCas ashe heyy sa said,, ‘‘‘Our offi officers cers weree in incred ncrredib dibblyy bu busyy wi with a num mbe ber er of seriouss and viol olent crim imess over w whhat w was a rel elat atively short space of time. Res esouurcces werre st s retcche h d at times and we w wer ere as a sisted by co colleaagues es ffrrom W stern, We n Eas a tern and n HQ Di D visi sion onss to eens nsur uree th that dema de m nd n s weeree met e on thhesse inveest stig igattions ns and other d y too day da ay operaatiions. ‘‘‘It was a very mu m ch a team effortt and it is testaame ment to e eryoonee tha ev h t ouur ultimaate prior o ity of arrres esting ng those responnsi s blee an and putting th t em bef e ore thhe coour urts tss was 100% 0% fullfifilled.’’ Deecember saw three e armed rob o beriies e car a ried edd oout in Dunde d e, which aga g in tested Cent ntra r l Di ra Divvision’ss operationa nall resilien e ce. On O ce more, witithh th thee assi sist s ance st of excellent nt forensiic workk, arrests we were re madde inn conn n ection withh all threee crimes.


CENTRAL DIVISION

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘We would like to thank the com ommunity mmunity liaison police officer and his team for all their good w work in the area. As a result of heightened and more effective policing and increased communication with the community we feel that things are slowly improving.’’ – IK, Dundee

Anti Social Behaviour Team A dedicated police team with the sole aim of tackling anti-social behaviour was introduced in Dundee in April 2006 in a concentrated effort to swiftly tackle problems wherever they arose in the city. The remit of the four-strong team is to drive down incidents of anti-social behaviour, make Dundee a safer place for everyone and in so doing improve people’s quality of life. This means tackling youths buying alcohol from licensed premises, youths causing annoyance, vandalism, littering, the illegal use of motorcycles and minimotos, noise nuisance, as well as drug dealing and abuse. The team’s work both complements and supplements the work of section police officers, police liaison officers, neighbourhood police officers and community safety wardens. Assistance for their focused intelligence-led activities was provided by Dundee City Council, the Dundee Partnership and the Scottish Executive, who provided funding until 2008. After just six weeks of action and intervention by the team, youth-related calls to Tayside Police dropped by more than 20%. In addition they confiscated large quantities of alcohol from young people, made a number of arrests and charged more than 30 people for a range of

offences. Warrants were also executed by the team against dozens of individuals. Furthermore, hundreds of checks, designed to prevent the activities of travelling criminals and detecting incidents where they occurred were carried out.

Amongst the many notable pieces of work by the Anti Social Behaviour Team in Dundee this past year, are –

The team worked hard to maintain these excellent initial results through the summer months and beyond.

• The recovery of more than £250,000 worth of Heroin

Sergeant David Blackhouse said,

• City centre drug dealers apprehended and convicted

‘‘The team has had a major impact on anti-social behaviour issues across Dundee and is making a positive difference. That is what we hear from people who see us at work in their local area and from our colleagues who we work with to uphold everyone’s rights to live their lives in relative peace and quiet. ‘‘The policing style we have adopted has achieved excellent results, whilst working alongside our colleagues in the local community. We will continue to develop strategies to improve our service delivery to the public.’’

• The seizure of more than 30 mini motos and motorcycles

• A prolific housebreaker being caught and jailed • A dozen cars, being driven whilst uninsured, confiscated The team has submitted almost 250 antisocial behaviour-related cases to the Procurator Fiscal, issued more than 100 fixed penalty notices, seized around 50 vehicles, more than 250 litres of alcohol and more than a quarter of a million pounds worth of illegal drugs. They have also carried out around 2000 checks in respect of vehicle-related crime.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P14/15

NEIGHBOURHOOD POLICE OFFICERS

KEEPING IT LOCAL WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘I would jjust like to sayy that both booth officers ce were very polite and helpful and their local know knowledge and assistance was very much appreciated.’’ – CM, Dingwall

Ther Th her ere re ar are e ei e gh ghtt Ne Neig ighb ig hbou hb ourh ou rhoo rh o d Po oo Poli Pol lice c Offi fficcer es er wo w orkin rrk kin ing g in in des esig igna ig nate na ted te d ar area eass off Dun ea unde de d ee. e Work Wo rkin inng al ing alon ongs gsid gs idee th id thei eiir coolll ea eagu g es gu e in Taays ysid i e, id e, the herre re iiss no notth thiinng in tthe h ir he u ifforrm oorr app un ppea eara ea ranc ra ncce th that at sset etss thheem et m aside side froom otthe si her comm coom mm mun unitityty-ba base ba sedd se unifi orrme un medd of offifice cers ce erss. Thhe NPPOs aree dded edic ed icat icat a ed ed to paatr trol oll alllloc occated aatted bea e ts witth thhe ai a m off ffor orgi or g ng mea eani ningfu ning ni ngfu ng f l re rela laattiioonnsh lati s ipps an andd tr trusst wi withhinn the h com ommu m ni mu nityy and re an and res esp spon ponndi dinngg to pe p opplee in tit mees of o nee e dd.. The h ir i rol olee iss iinn aadddiititioonn to ex exis isting ngg comm co mmun mm unnitity ity offfifice cer ce ers rs. In Aprriill 200 0 6, D Dun u de un dee’ e’ss Lo e’ L caal Co Comm mmun mm unnitityy Re Rege gene ge neeraatiionn For orum umss aw awar a ddeed ar ttw wo ye year year arss fu f nd ndin ing in ng too ccre reeat atee th thes e e po es post stss wi st with with thin in spe p ci cififificc ar area reaas ooff the he ccitiitty.y. Thiis foollllow owed ow e tthe ed hee Sco cottt ttis ishh Ex Exec ecut ec utiv ut ive’ iv e s ccrrea e’ eattion on ooff thhe Co Comm mmun uunnitty Reege g neera ration ionn Fuundd iinn 20 2004 04 too im mprrov ove Sc Scot ottla land nd’s nd ’ss mos ost de depr p ivvedd are pr r as by esta tabl blis ishi hiinngg hing fora, wh fora fo whic ichh coompri r se se com ommu muni mu nniity rrep epre ep reese rese sennt ntat ntat ativ ives iv e , pe es peop opple l frroom tthhe vo volu luunt ntar aryy s ct se ctor or aannd nd loccal a couunc n ili loors rs..

The de Th deci cissi ci sion ttoo sppen endd th thee mo mone neey on ded edic iccat ated edd neigh eiighhbo bour urhoood od pol olilic icing inng r soour re urce c s wa ce was ve was very ry mucch ddiict c at a ed e bbyy pu publ blic icc opi pini n on o looccal a lyy and n thee ccoommuunnittiees ha havee a siggni have nifififica cant ca nt saayy iinn ho nt how w th thei eirr NP ei N Os aare ree dep e lo l ye y d. d. The Th he ar a ea eas off Dun unde deee incl de inncl c uudded e iinn th this iss sch c em e e aarre St St Mar a y’ y s/ s/Ar Ardl Ar dler dl er/K er /Kir irkt kktton on,, Mennzieeshhililll (i( n pa Me p rt rt)/ ))//Ch Char a le ar lest est s onn/L /Loc ocche h e/ e/Be BBeeec eechw ecchw hwoo woo ood, d, Mililll O’ O’ Mai ains ns/F s/FFin intrry (i(inn pa part)/W Whittfifiel Whit Wh e d (iin pa el part rtt), Hililltlttow own/ n//Sttobbsw wel ell/ l/F l/ /Fa Fair irmu muir irr, annd Mi Midd Cra Craigi aigiie/ e L nllat Li athe hen//D he Dooug u la las. as. s. Loca Lo caal Au Auth t or th oritity Liai Liaiison Li soon Of O fice c r, Ser erge gean ge a t Jo an J hhnn Reeeeki k e said saaid id, d, ‘‘‘‘Th ‘‘Th Thes esee offi es offfice cers ers are re nnot o beh ot ehol olde ol den en to cal all-l-l-de -deeman mand ma nd aand nd can nd a no nott be be ttak aakkeenn awa way ay from fr o tthhe heir hei ir dedic eddic icat a eedd areea inn thee wayy tha at hatt othe otthe h r po poliice ce ooffi fficers rs co coul ulld fifind nndd theeiirr duutit es chang hanggedd oor be ha be red edep epplo loye yedd too ano ye noth ther th e par er art of of theeir ir divvissiioon. ‘‘Thheyy aree abl blee to foossteer cl closse liink nkss wi with th com ommu muuni m n ty ty reppreese s nt ntat a iv at ives ess aand n nd addr ad dres e s lo es loca call isssu suess to im mpr prov ovee coomm ov mmun munnitity ity sa safe fety fe ty aand nd red educ u e tthhe fe fear of crim cr imee in a rol olee thhat a iiss ve v ryy muc uchh dire dire di rect ect c ed by th thee co comm munnitity.y.’’’

Truancy In March, officers patrolled the streets of Dundee with City Council education welfare officers to tackle the issue of children playing truant from school. More than 70 pupils were found out of school with no valid reason in the space of one week. All were stopped and spoken to and those with no excuse for missing classes had their names taken and a letter sent home to make parents and carers aware of the situation. That said, a number of the children were in the company of their parents at the time. However, many responsible adults telephoned on receiving letters to thank the authorities for their intervention. There are possible links between truancy, antisocial behaviour and crime and operations such as this assist in addressing truancy issues and ultimately towards improving everyone’s quality of life – including that of the errant pupil.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


CENTRAL DIVISION

A e e d n u D for

Dundee played host to the biggest free concert in Europe when Radio 1’s Big Weekend rolled into Camperdown Park in May. A huge amount of planning and organisation was required for the event in what was a relatively short time between it being announced in February and staged just three months later.

Razorlight, Muse, Franz Ferdinand, The Sugababes & P!nk. Ten times that number had hoped to get a ticket for the concert.

Not least was how to manage the flow of people and traffic in and around Dundee before, during and after the event. It was testament to Radio 1, Dundee City Council, Tayside Police and all other agencies involved that the all-ticket event ran seamlessly.

Chief Inspector David Tonks, the event’s deputy tactical commander, said,

Over two days there were well over 33,000 people in the Camperdown arena (including those working at the event) to see the likes of Snow Patrol,

Only one arrest was made inside the event over the entire weekend.

‘‘It was a resounding success. Our officers found the atmosphere in the venue to be very friendly and they deserve credit for the big role they played in that. Police officers and stewards were happy to go out of their way and offer assistance where they could and were approachable throughout the weekend.’’

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P16/17

OPERATION CENTRESAFE In the lead up to the festive period, funding was provided by the Scottish Executive through the Dundee Community Safety Partnership which helped boost city centre foot patrols by Tayside Police officers. To date, the scheme has received Scottish Executive funding via the partnership of just under £40,000. Additional uniform officers – a sergeant and seven constables - were deployed at peak times between December 11 to December 30 and made 11 arrests, issued 31 fixed penalty notices, six conditional offers and 21 verbal warnings. They also confiscated and disposed of 50 litres of alcohol and undertook 42 street searches. Their work has since continued and in March, as part of Centresafe, a poster campaign bearing a series of hard-hitting messages aimed at reducing alcohol related incidents in the city was revealed. The themed posters – on display throughout pubs and clubs in the city - make clear how drinking alcohol to excess can adversely affect people’s behaviour. Travel Dundee’s fleet of buses are also carrying the message across Dundee. Operation Centresafe’s poster campaign is being underpinned by a focused policing effort, which involves the targeting of retailers who knowingly sell alcohol to children, high profile patrols to offer visible reassurance to the community and officers exercising all powers at their disposal to deal with alcohol-related crime and disorder. City Centre-based Sergeant Malcolm Harvey said, ‘‘Centresafe is a very focused operation undertaken at peak times – namely 7pm to 4am Friday into Saturday and Saturday into Sunday. Statistics clearly indicate the positive actions we have taken, but do not highlight the immeasurable feeling of wellbeing and safety experienced by members of the public, door staff, workers within licensed premises and, indeed, the police as a result of Centresafe. ‘‘Analysis has also indicated that serious assaults in Dundee city centre were reduced whilst Centresafe was in operation in comparison to the same timescales twelve months previously. This shows that the increased high profile police presence had a deterrent and reassuring effect at the same time as officers were detecting incidents of crime and anti-social behaviour.’’

OPERATION HIGHLIGHTS

From mid-December to March 31 (during the operational hours of Centresafe), officers have taken the following actions: • Issued 95 Anti-social Behaviour Fixed Penalty Notices (for urinating, drinking alcohol in public, breach of the peace and vandalism). • Made 45 arrests (for offences such as reckless conduct, police assault, resisting arrest and bail offences). • Confiscated 94 litres of alcohol. • Made 646 visits to licensed premises. • Undertaken 42 street searches of individuals. • Issued 72 warnings for minor incidents. • Detected one missing person. • Detected one drink driver. • Issued 15 conditional offers of fixed penalty (for various traffic offences). • Issued one vehicle defect rectification notice.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


CENTRAL DIVISION

Shocked, raw and close to tears. It’s not the sort of response that Tayside Police officers would normally choose to elicit from a large group of schoolchildren, but cold truth often hits hardest when lives are on the line. Road Safety Officer Kerry Noble recognised this when she first saw the Safe Drive Stay Alive Roadshow – which launched in Northern Ireland – and she was determined to bring it to a Dundee audience. In December, around 2000 fifth and sixth year pupils (the next generation of drivers) attended the road show, which is designed to encourage youngsters to make road safety their absolute priority when they get behind the wheel of a car. The message of the audio visual event, which was jointly funded by partner agencies and sponsored by local businesses, was simply that lives are saved by adopting safe driving attitudes instead of bad habits. There were also honest accounts from people who had their lives irrevocably changed by a serious collision – either through injury or the loss of a loved one. Impressed by the roadshow, Chief Constable John Vine, currently head of ACPOS Road Policing Business area, expressed a desire to see it return to all parts of Tayside in the near future. Superintendent Arron Duncan said,

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘(Your officer) is to be commen ended for his quick-thinking and courageous actions on that night, as without them the horrific death toll on Scotland’s roads that weekend would have been greater.’’ – Deputy Chief Fire Officer, Jimmy Campbell, Tayside Fire & Rescue

‘‘The Safe Drive Stay Alive initiative aims to make all those who attend Stop, Look, Listen and Learn. It is an intensive experience but, as partner agencies, we hope that young road users will work with us to reduce the risks and suffering that arise from an ill-thought out manoeuvre. ‘‘Most collisions are not accidents - they are caused by bad decisions. This initiative provides some understanding of what that really means and it will help to make the roads in Tayside safer for all.’’

FIRST STEPS TAKING GREAT STRIDES First Steps Citizenship, a course run by college lecturer Paula Ewen at Dundee College, is designed to give students the opportunity to interact within the community, sets them a real-life project and acknowledges their endeavours. Constable

Gavin Munro, a Crime Reduction Officer with Tayside Police, assists in helping to instil those citizenship skills in the students. They in turn attain points for fund-raising plans or problem solving ideas, as they work to increase their skills and experiences.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P18/19

EASTERN DIVISION Eastern Division covers the Angus Council area – covering some 842 square miles and a population of about 110,000. Divisional HQ is in Forfar’s West High Street, where the Command Team led by Chief Superintendentt Bill Harkins is based. Bill is assisted by Superintendent Fiona Clacher, who has day-to-day responsibility for operational policing matters and Chief Inspector Willie Clark, who is responsible for support functions in Angus. Detective Chief Inspector Bruce Kerr is the senior detective officer. The Divisional Road Policing Unit is led by Inspector Gordon Milne. Angus is divided in four separate sections for policing purposes – Section 1

Forfar and Kirriemuir

Section 2

Montrose and Brechin

Section 3

Arbroath

Section 4

Carnoustie, Monifieth and Muirhead CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT BILL HARKINS

EASTERN DIVISION

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


EASTERN DIVISION

SAY NO TO DOORSTEP CALLERS Protecting the more vulnerable residents in our community – the elderly among them – and improving their quality of life is the motivation behind Doorstoppers, a multi-faceted multi-agency strategy which was launched in Angus in April. Doorstoppers is designed to give reassurance, reduce the fear of crime, as well as reducing incidents of doorstep crime in Angus under the banner of Education, Empowerment, Enforcement – Make Your Doorstep a Barrier Not a Gateway.

Doorstep crime can be bogus callers, distraction theft, phoney tradesmen and aggressive selling. Doorstoppers offers a platform for people to speak about their experiences and engender confidence amongst older people to safely deal with such incidents.

The initiative is supported by Tayside Police, Angus Council and Help the Aged, who are concerned that many incidents go unreported and hope to encourage people to be vigilant and contact the authorities when they are suspicious of callers at their door or believe they have been a victim of doorstep crime.

Training information is also supplied to banks, post offices and building societies advising them to be vigilant in relation to any out of the ordinary or unexplained movement on older customers’ accounts. The Doorstoppers initiative also received valuable support from the Social Work Department, Tayside

Fire & Rescue Service, NHS Tayside and other statutory and voluntary organisations in Angus.

Chief Superintendent Bill Harkins said,

Furthermore, in June Angus became the first area in Scotland to establish No Cold Calling Zones and by the end of March there were well in excess of 100 zones in operation in the county in a determined effort to freeze out the cold caller. It is believed to be the largest number of No Cold Calling zones in the UK. Houses within such areas display window stickers and there are signs in the area, which all make clear that would-be door-to-door sellers are not welcome.

‘‘Doorstep crime often involves the elderly or vulnerable members of our community. Doorstoppers is a true partnership, with a number of other local partner agencies, organisations and the voluntary sector, aimed at raising awareness and reducing these types of incidents. ‘‘We work closely with Neighbourhood Watch and are delighted that their executive in Angus has embraced the concept of No Cold Calling Areas as part of the overall campaign to improve community safety in Angus.’’

WORKING TOGETHER TO PROVIDE THE BEST IN CHILD PROTECTION SERVICES In a report issued in February Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Education reported positively on services to protect children in Angus. The report was issued just 12 months after Bellevue House in Arbroath was formally opened to provide an important base for all agencies who are involved in child protection in Angus. Offering an integrated service to benefit and protect vulnerable children and their families, there is around 30 staff based at Bellevue. They comprise Tayside Police’s family protection unit (including domestic abuse experts), Angus Council’s specialist child protection team and NHS Tayside’s senior nurse in child protection. Social work staff are also ‘‘in-house’’ and have a responsibility to monitor children’s care plans and operating case conferences.

A joint approach to child protection work and training has long been the norm in all parts of Tayside, but Bellevue House brought further integration to the agencies concerned. The facility also provides a bespoke, comfortable environment for the professionals to work with often troubled and traumatised children and families. In its report HM Inspectorate recognised that at risk children in Angus received effective help, which improved their lives as a result. Effective relationships between local authority, police and health partners were acknowledged, as were inter-agency guidelines to direct and support staff. Also seen as a strength was the partnership working to raise public awareness of child protection and where people could report concerns.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P20/21

OPERATION DRY UP Tayside Police in Angus, as in other areas of the Force, have a continuous focus on tackling underage drinking. Operation Dry Up 2006 began on April 1 and d within i hi six i weeks k offi fficers had h d recovered more than 180 litres of alcohol from children and young people across the County. During that same period a licensee in Arbroath was reported twice for selling alcohol to people under the age of 18 years of age and adults in Montrose were reported for buying alcohol for children. In a five-week period covering the run up to Christmas and through to the New Year, officers

in Angus confiscated more than 100 litres of alcohol, including one single seizure of 25 litres of lager in Monifieth on New Year’s Day.

Divisional Commander Bill Harkins said,

‘‘Youngsters who drink, invariably to excess, very often become involved in antisocial and sometimes criminal behaviour. Perhaps this mirrors the behaviour of certain adults who over-indulge with alcohol. But I am also concerned that a drunken child is a vulnerable child and they are susceptible to the behaviour of others around them as well as to the harm they are doing themselves from a health perspective.

‘‘Angus is in no way unique when it comes to incidents of underage drinking, but that should not dull our senses to the obvious harm that such behaviour does to the individual and to the community.

‘‘Our efforts to tackle this problem will continue, but it is incumbent upon the adults in their households to take an interest in where these children are at any given time, who they are with and what they are doing.’’

Operation Dry Up endeavours to tackle the root causes of underage drinking as well as detecting the youngsters involved and the adults who are irresponsible enough to provide them with alcohol.

BEST BAR NONE

OPERATION SALMO

Pubs across Angus have been invited to join the Best Bar

As salmon fishing began on the rivers North and South

None Scheme, which was launched in March by the Focus

Esk in February, Tayside Police and the area’s water

on Alcohol Angus project. The awards scheme invited pub

bailiffs launched Operation Salmo in an effort to

and club owners to rate their premises on various factors,

combat salmon poaching in the area.

including prevention of crime and disorder and public safety. Tayside Police wildlife officers and bailiffs from the North and South Once assessed, all those who attain the desired standards are able to

Esk share intelligence in an effort to build as strong a case as

promote their success in the scheme. The scheme has been seen to make

possible against poachers to put a case before the area Procurator

an important contribution to reducing the risk of alcohol-related harm,

Fiscal. Additionally, the agencies combine to mount operations in

disorder and crime in areas where it already operates – including Dundee.

identified problem areas.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


EASTERN DIVISION

LETHAM POLICE STATION WORKING TOGETHER IN THE COMMUNITY Chief Constable Vine officially opened the new Letham Police and Community Access Office in Angus in January. The move came as a further example of the excellent partnership working that exists within Angus between Tayside Police and its partner agencies. The former Letham Police station and connected police house underwent a major refurbishment in 2006 to form new office premises that accommodate the police and Angus Council Community Safety Team staff. Community wardens are now based alongside police officers and will help tackle anti-social behaviour in parts of Angus identified by the safety team, Tayside Police and, of course, the public. This arrangement also ensures that there are opportunities for police officers and community wardens to patrol together in the community. Police support staff are also em employed at the new office to assist membeers of the public between 2pm and 6pm onn weekdays. Divisional Commander, Chief Superinntendent Bill Harkins said, ‘‘The w working relationship that we continue to deveelop with our partners at Angus Council is excellent and the new facility is anotther example of our joint approach aimed at tackling local problems. ‘‘I firm firmly believe that partnership working is the only way to achieve true success in the fight against anti-social behaviour.’’

That shared view is given further strength with the news that Monifieth, Friockheim and Muirhead are set to benefit from similar shared ventures. A report was submitted to Tayside Joint Police Board in January to advise them that agreement had been reached between the police and local authority to co-locate services at an ACCESS office in Monifieth High Street. This move will improve joint working and public access. To the same end police staff at existing police stations in Friockheim and Muirhead will be joined by council staff. Shared facilities, under the umbrella of the Angus Community Safety Partnership, are already firmly established elsewhere – including the Community Safety Team sharing with police officers and staff at Kirriemuir Police Station; the Bellevue House Child Protection Facility at Arbroath; and social work staff being based at Arbroath Police Station. As well as improved joint working and better public access, such arrangements also provide financial benefits for both sides.

‘Teeing’ Off Open Preparations in Carnoustie Whilst tee off at the 13 36t 6th Op pen e Cha hamp mpio ons n hi hip p at C Ca arnoustie fa all llss outw tw with th he ttiime m fra rame e of thiis An A nu nual a Report, prre epa aration ns fo forr th he ev even e t an and d the challe enge es it prres e en e tss T Tay ayyside aysi e Poli Po lice cce e and nd itss partn nd tner orrg ganisat atio ions ns h hav ave e be been en iin n fu full ll swi wing ng g ssin ince Jan nua u ry r 200 006. 6. TTaysid Tay ysid s e Poli o ce offi ffificers were at the he 20 2006 Open p at Hoyla Hoy ke andd esstab an and ttaablis aabblished lilis iisshed hedd aann on oongo nggoi gooi oingg wor worrkkiiinng rela elationsh nshhip wit withh th their couunte co n erpa rpa rp parrts rttss aatt Me M Merse erse rse rs seys yysi si side de and and an nd liliaison aison has co contiinue uedd withh Fiife Coon CCon onsta stabbul bul ulary ulary arry in re relat relat llaation ioo too the theei th eir ir i in involvem ment en in thhe 200 005 05 event ent aatt St S An AAnd nnddrews. rew wss.. Pllannni Pla nning ning ng sub sub-gr -group oup upps hav ave ve be been e for en form ormed med to t ad a dreesss str strat ate tegic egic g matter mat terss, ter s, seccur uriitty ty and an coont nt nge nti gency ge nc aar ncy arra rran ra gge gem emen ents and and nd a seri er eess of me meetin mee ting ings gs ha haavve esta have estabbli blishe blishe heed str tro roongg for orrmaall an a d info inforrma rmal maal c mun com munic unic icaattitio ion io ons ns bet betwee etwee w n the he ppar aartic tit ciipa ipatin ipatin tingg grou rooups oupss and and nd organi org ani n sattions ion ons. Taysid Ta Tay ayssid ide Pol oolil ce cee’s eve ce’ ven ven ent plan lannin annninng teeam eam coom mppprissess of of East asteern errnn Divis Div isssiioonn ooffi offffifice cers rs wh who wi who w lll ppr pri rim ri maarrilyy fo mar foccus uuss on tr t aaffi traf ffic man ffi maa age a eme ag men me m eennt

aand coommunit munity ty rela elatio ions. n M ns. Maany n bus busineesse sees in thee Car Carno Carnou noust stiee sti andd M Moonifiet eth areas a s haav avee been beeen vis v ite itedd to be be advi dvised se of trraffific arran ar angeme em nt and oth other her point poin intts of iinte nteres nt reestt surroun rro ndin dinng this prest pre stigio gioous us event. t Th s flow Thi w off in i fo for o mation on ha has ext x nnde xte deedd to ccom omm om mmuun mm uni nity ityy cou ounci unci nc lss and other an otther parts of thhe local oca cal comm comm mun unity uni tyy and and iiss aaim med ed aatt pr ed p ov ovi viiding ding din di clari cla rityy aand rit n rrea nd eaass ssu sura ran anncee to to res eside ddeent nnts ts t an and nd bu buusi si sinne nes eessses s . Tho TTh hossee vyi vyyingg for vy oorr th the he cove oovvetteed ed Cl Clar arett JJug are uugg wil will begi eggi gin their gin heeir prac hhei acctic tic ice rrouunds ro ndddss oonn tthhe Carnnou oousstie stie tiiee Ch Chaam am amp mppio ion oonnshi s p Cou sh shi Course urse ur se fr ffro rom om Sunnda nndday aay, yy,, Juuly Jul Ju ly 15 to Wedn Weeddnesd esday, sday, sd a July ly 18 18. 8. TThe eeven vennt coomm vent om mmen mm ences on enc on Thu TTh hhuursd rsda sday, aayy, y, Ju Julyy 19 19 aannd nd concl n luude udees on Sun und n aayy, y, Ju Julyy 22 22. 22.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P22/23

WESTERN DIVISION Western Division covers the Perth & Kinross Council area – taking in an area of almost 2,200 square miles and a population of around 135,000 people. Divisional HQ is in Barrack Street, Perth, where the Command Team led by Chief Superintendent Matt Hamilton is based. Matt is assisted by Superintendent Iain Bell, who is in charge of operational activity in the division and Chief Inspector Hamish Macpherson, who is responsible for support functions in Perth & Kinross. Detective Chief Inspector Roddy Ross is in charge of the Criminal Investigation Department. Inspector Ken Brown leads the Divisional Road Policing Unit. Perth & Kinross is divided into five separate sections for policing purposes – Section 1

Perth & Landward

Section 2

Blairgowrie

Section 3

Crieff

Section 4

Kinross Chief Superintendent Matt Hamilton

Section 5

Pitlochry

WESTERN DIVISION

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


WESTERN DIVISION

To gauge some idea of the growing success of T in the Park within the Tayside area, one need only look at the announcement by the event’s organisers that the 2007 event will see Balado become Scotland’s sixth largest city for a weekend. It is a huge event and one that is not just popular with lovers of music, it is also popular with the officers of Tayside Police who enjoy the annual festival and good-natured way in which it continues to thrive. Chief Superintendent Matt Hamilton was delighted to see The Who headline the event in 2006, more than 30 years after he last saw them live in Ayrshire at Auchlinleck Community Centre. He was even more delighted that the event was once again a success in respect of the policing operation. Arrests – 70 in total – were down on 2005. Custody cases were also significantly down from 30 to 16 which gave a strong indication that offences were generally of a more minor nature. The 2006 event was the fastest selling festival in the UK and it is now regarded as one of the most acclaimed music

events on the international festival circuit. Indeed, fans voted the 2006 event – the tenth at Balado - the Best Major Festival at the UK Festival Awards for the second year running. He said, ‘‘Once again it was a very successful, very good-spirited T in the Park, with the overwhelming majority of revellers enjoying what was a terrific event. With planning starting in September 2005, we worked more closely than ever before with the organisers and other agencies for what was the biggest event yet. ‘‘This year’s event will be bigger still and we look forward to the challenge that brings and are confident that the reputation of both the event and Tayside Police will be enhanced still further.’’ Planning the police operation for this year’s event began almost as soon as the last reveller packed up and left Balado in

2006. Attendance capacity has increased from 75,000 to 80,000 for Saturday and Sunday of this year’s event.

opportunity to demonstrate that we are the experts when it comes to policing major high profile events.’’

In all more than 180 artists will perform across 11 stages in the arena, which also houses fairground attractions and food and drink outlets.

Geoff Ellis, Managing Director of organisers DF Concerts said,

There will also be artists playing on the Friday evening for the first time for those who are camping at the event. The campsite capacity will also increase from 50,000 to 60,000. Clearly, policing numbers will increase accordingly, from the 300-plus that were on duty at last year’s event. Chief Superintendent Hamilton said, ‘‘With planning at an advanced stage for this year, it is clear that T in the Park 2007 will be the biggest and best attended yet. Rather than problems, I believe this presents Tayside Police and its partners with an exceptional

“T in the Park has an excellent safety record and is considered one of the best organised festivals in the world. This is in no small part due to the fantastic relationship between the organisers, Tayside Police and other local agencies. At T in the Park, there is a real team mentality and everyone works extremely hard to ensure that year on year we produce an event of exceptional quality that is also a fun, relaxed and safe environment for music fans. We look forward to working with Tayside Police once again in 2007 to deliver our biggest and best year yet.”

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P24/25 WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘Your ppolice constables ggave uss such ccourtesy, empathy and understanding beyond all expec expectations. Everyone should be proud of your Force.’’ – AG, Perth

Following widespread acclaim for previous successful initiatives, Operation Homesafe returned to the city centre streets of Perth and, indeed, to all parts of Perthshire and Kinross, where there was evidence of alcohol-related crime and antisocial behaviour.

OPERATION HOMESAFE The purpose of Homesafe is to address peak-time anti-social behaviour and criminality – predo predominantly between 10pm and 2am Thursday to Saturday. Chief Superintendent Matt H Hamilton said, ‘‘Homesafe is a success because it allows us to maximise our presence on the streets and reinforces our efforts in preventing and detecting crime. By analysing where incidents take place, we are able to t put our officers into the areas of greatest need. This provides the public with the reassurance of a visible policee presence and can nip disorder in the bud when it might otherwise grow into a more serious incident.” Through Homesafe, the police cann identify issues, particularly relating to the night time economy and then work with other partners, includinng the local authority and licensees to find ways of solving these problems. During three months of summer w when Homesafe was in operation, uniformed officers undertook focused patrols in identified areas and liaised with liicensees and their staff and stewards, as well as members of the public to offer safety and security advice and takke action when required. Over the festive season, targeted high-visibility patrols were deployed into areas that intelligennce indicated required the greatest attention. As a result of tthe patrols, violent crime was reduced by 30% and crimes oof dishonesty by 75%.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


FEATURE

WESTERN DIVISION

CLOSING THE DOOR ON BOGUS CALLERS The Perth & Kinross area is not alone when it comes to the nuisance of bogus callers, but Tayside Police and its partners were determined to make life as difficult as possible for anyone seeking to take advantage of residents for their own illegal gain. Twelve months ago Tayside Police hosted a seminar in Perth which attracted more than 100 delegates from public, private and voluntary sectors to seek ways of addressing an issue that very often hits the most vulnerable members of the community hardest. As well as raising the issue of bogus callers through crime prevention roadshows, and delivering information packs to thousands of addresses throughout Perth & Kinross, Tayside Police has also been targeting the mobile criminal with a series of road checks throughout the year. Such activity recognises that bogus callers are often from outwith the Force area and are ‘well-seasoned’ in their chosen illegal profession. In one crackdown last June, officers working alongside Customs and Excise and Department for Work staff stopped almost 100 suspect vehicles in Perthshire. Several

road traffic offences were detected and a number of benefits cheats were caught. Such activity also disrupts the otherwise free movement of travelling criminals through the area. Detective Chief Inspector Colin Mackay led the operation. He said, ‘‘Bogus caller crime has quite rightly been identified as a strategic priority at both national level and within Tayside. Although a number of these crimes can be attributed to travelling groups from outwith our area, it is well known and accepted that a large number of bogus callers and workmen also reside in and operate from Tayside. They commit crime here and in other parts of the country. ‘‘Road checks are successful in terms of what we detect on the day, but also in terms of the intelligence we gather. It is something that we do by way of focused operations, but also through everyday policing throughout the year.’’ In July, more than 100 Neighbourhood Watch Co-ordinators were invited to a seminar in Perth Concert Hall by Tayside Police and Trading Standards officers, to give them an overview of doorstep crime and bogus callers. Chief Superintendent Matt Hamilton and crime prevention officer Donald Campbell offered advice on how to help deal with bogus callers in what was a series of events aimed at raising people’s awareness of doorstep crime.

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘Your pprofessionalism,, but in a genuine genuinely sympathetic way was of enormous help to me me. As far as I am concerned we are fortunate in having you in our local Tayside Police.’’ – AT, Perthshire

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P26/27

December deluge in Perth & Kinross The phrase ‘It Never Rains But It Pours’ is one that rings true during particularly inclement times in Western Division, as heavy and persistent rainfall can sometimes result in some of our residents requiring the assistance of the emergency services. Such was the case in mid-December when high winds and torrential rain saw Milnathort and other parts of Perthshire & Kinross badly affected. Late into the night on December 13, a number of homes in Milnathort were evacuated by the emergency services, working alongside staff from Perth & Kinross Council. It was estimated that some residential properties were submerged by as much as two feet of water as the River Queich failed to cope with a high tide and increasing volume of water and burst its banks. Most residents found alternative overnight accommodation with friends and relatives elsewhere, but warmth and sustenance was laid on at Kinross High School – with support from the Red Cross and WRVS. Electricity supplies to many homes were also

cut for a time because of the dangers posed by the rising waters. As well as assisting those residents in need, Tayside Police was also responsible for closing routes affected by flooding and redirecting traffic. A number of major routes, as well as many minor roads, were affected – including the M90 for a time. Ten days previously, Perthshire was worst affected by the high winds and torrential rain that affected many parts of the country. Loch Tay burst its banks at Kenmore and five other flood warnings were issued for Perthshire. Flood gates on the River Tay at Perth were also closed at high tide on that Sunday. Fortunately, no one was reported to have been injured as a result of the atrocious December weather.

Neighbourhood Watch goes from strength to strength Perth & Kinross is presently home to no fewer than 177 Neighbourhood all N i hb h d Watch W t h schemes, h ll off which hi h are reported t d to be active and working to reduce crime and anti-social behaviour in their areas. Ten of the schemes have been set up in the last year. It is true to say there have been greater numbers of schemes in the past, but many were relatively inactive or lacking in support. Over the last year, Tayside Police has worked closely with local communities and the Association of Scottish Neighbourhood Watches to reinvigorate this valuable local service. The watches are very much community-led, but Tayside Police is proud of the supporting role it has played in encouraging schemes to strengthen local links through community councils, council and tenants’ associations and enhancing communications between Neighbourhood Watches and the police.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


WESTERN DIVISION

Promoting safe biking in perthshire The beauty of Perth & Kinross is a massive draw for tourists, with thousands of motorcyclists among the many people who make a bee-line for the heart of Scotland, particularly during the summer months. Evidence shows, however, that the increase in recreational motorcyclists on the roads network has also led to an increase in collisions involving motorcyclists. This led Tayside Police to mount a summer safety campaign in Western Division, making full use of high visibility road policing (marked police cars and motorcycles), mobile CCTV and mobile safety cameras. As well as aiming to reduce the numbers of casualties on the roads, police officers also detected a range of traffic offences, including excessive speed, driving without insurance and vehicle defects. There was also concern voiced locally about speeding motorcycles and excessive and anti-social noise caused by a minority of motorcyclists in relatively quiet rural areas. Inspector Ken Brown, Head of Road Policing in Western Division said,

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘…we had to contact ((the ppolic ice) ce) on numerous nu occasions and I can honestly say that on eevery such occasion all the officers concerned displayed a sympathetic, understanding and constructive attitude…’’ – JE, Perthshire

‘‘Geographically, Tayside offers a good roads network for leisure motorcyclists, but everyone should be able to enjoy the roads safely and sensibly. We spoke to hundreds of motorcyclists during the summer campaign to urge them to drive safely and have consideration for residents in the area. ‘‘As road policing officers we feel it is a job well done if we can get that road safety message across and steer someone clear of being involved in an avoidable death or serious injury on our roads.’’

MOBILE CCTV UNDER PEDAL POWER In November, Western Divison linked up with a Perth-based security technology firm to trial a digital CCTV system on the bikes of cycle patrol officers in the city. Provided by Scottish Communications Security Technology, the cameras were designed to provide patrol officers with the capability to record incidents and events in areas that are not covered by CCTV. As well as being used on regular cycle patrols, the cameras have also been deployed for public processions, football matches and will also make an appearance at T in the Park 2007.

Chief Superintendent Matt Hamilton said, ‘‘We’re an innovative force and our cycle patrol officers are working closely to develop this product. CCTV continues to be extremely valuable in providing evidence to detect crime and as a crime deterrent, all of which helps to lower crime and make our communities safer. I hope the CCTV bike patrols will enhance our capabilities in this area still further.’’

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


2 P28/29

24/7/365... 4 /365

AP R

M

T

W

T

F

APRIL

week

T

Six men from the Liverpool area were arrested in connection with the recovery of heroin, cannabis and cash in Dundee as drugs squad officers made the first of many significant seizures carried out through the course of the year.

14

S

T

M

W

F

30 31 29 incidents Doorstoppers, a multi-agency strategy aimed 28at reducing 7 2 6 2 13 ek of doorstep crime launched in Angus. Its aim is to improve life quality we for older people in the community who can find themselves victim to bogus callers, phoney tradesmen and aggressive 5 as well6as 7 2 3 4 sellers, 14

15 16 17

distraction theft. Under the scheme, the Angus Neighbourhood Watch Executive Committee worked to establish No Cold Calling Zones in certain residential areas of the county.

2

JUNE

JUN

3

2 2

4

22

M

T

T

F

28 29 30 31

1

2

Heroin with a street value of £80,000 was recovered during a planned operation in the Perth area and a local man was arrested in connection with the incident.

23

4

5

6

7

8

18

27 28 29 30 31

OC T 40

20

2

9

JUL

S M T W T Tayside Police in Dundee joined forces with other emergency

F

services and public utility organisations at Baluniefield Training Centre, to advise pupils from across the city how to be SafeTaysiders. In what is a firmly established annual event, pupils week participated in simulated scenarios designed to test their reactions and educate them about what to do when faced with challenging situations relating to safety.

32

6

8

9

7

4

10 11

Drugs Squad officers continued their disruption of illicit drug dealing with five, six and seven-figure recoveries in the space of ten days. One operation saw Tayside officers working closely with colleagues at Greater Manchester Police and Lancashire Constabulary to recover heroin, amphetamine, firearms and stolen vehicles.

33

13 14 15 16 17 18

34

20 21 22 23 24 25

35

27 28 29 30 31

Tayside Police Pipe Band maintained their fine form by securing second place in the Grade Two Section of the World Pipe Band Championships in Glasgow. 50,000 spectators were attracted to the event where well over 200 pipe bands drawn from across the globe were in competition. At the end of a Centenary year festooned with accolades and silverware, the Tayside pipers achieved ‘Premier League’ status with their promotion to Grade 1.

1

2

3

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07

4

5

3

4

5

7

8

9

7

10 11 12

14 15 16 17 18 19 4

26

F

3

27

1

2 4

1

F

6

M

T

W

9

29

16

30

SE P

14 10 11 12 13 2 17 18 19 20 0

T

Swizzlesticks and lollipops! Freshers at Dundee University Students Union who left their drinks unattended returned to find a personal safety message in their tipple – a swizzlestick with the slogan Next Time It Could Be Drugs. The scheme was a joint venture between Tayside Police Crime Reduction Unit and the Students’ Association week at the University. Meanwhile, in a joint venture with Angus Council and Angus Drug and Alcohol Action Team, police officers in Montrose were handing out free lollipops in a bid to counter late night noise and anti-social behaviour in town.

W

T

35

27 28 29 30 31

36

3

4

5

6

9

15 1

M

T

31

1

7

8

13 14 15

33 M

8

F

T

27 2 23 24 25 26 1 1 2 3

S

2

28 29 3

29 30 25 26 27 28 6 7 2 3 4 5

28

1

2

More than 100 Neighbourhood Watch Co-ordinators from across Perthshire and Kinross attended a seminar designed to give them a detailed view on doorstep crime and bogus callers from police and Trading Standards officers. It was one of a number of seminars held throughout the year by Tayside Police.

7

2

S

T

1 22 2

Eastern Division took a lead as Tayside Police implemented powers to seize vehicles being driven without insurance or a driving licence. In July, a month after the launch, the Force reveals that ek than 40 vehicles – including a horse transporter – were taken we more from their owners with the threat of being crushed if the correct documentation was not produced in the allotted time.

10 11 12 13 14 15 SEPTEMBER 3

2

Cocaine, ecstasy and amphetamine worth around £140,000 were recovered by officers during a search of a house in Dundee. Two men and a woman were arrested in connection with the incident.

9

2

1

22

25 26 27 28 29 30

1

30

M

0

28 29 30 31

26

30 31

F

22

18 19 20 21 22 23

31

T

21 22 23 24 25 26

25

AU G

W

21

11 12 13 14 15 16

AUGUST

T

Well over £300,000 worth of amphetamine and cannabis were recovered in a police operation that encompassed Perthshire and Dundee as the Force continued its offensive against drug dealers.

24

26

M

The biggest free concert in Europe – Radio 1s Big Weekend – rocked Dundee’s Camperdown Park for a weekend with more than 30,000 revellers over two days enjoying the event. Only one arrest was made within the venue. Among the many headliners included Razorlight, Snow Patrol, Pink and the Sugababes.

19

Doug Cross, Director of Corporate Services, was awarded the OBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List for services to the police.

week

S

5JULY

W

S

Police officers in Angus announced that they seized more than 180 litres of alcohol in the first six weeks of Operation Dry Up, an initiative which also saw police officers working closely with Angus Council, Angus Drugs and Alcohol Action Team, Angus Community Health Partnership, licensees, and undertaking visits to bars and week off-licences and known under-age drinking dens.

2

Emergency services, the railway authorities, NHS Tayside, Dundee City Council and other agencies participated in an emergency exercise at Dundee Railway Station. The event was aimed at testing the multi-agency approach to dealing with a serious rail incident. Sea Cadets, British Red Cross and St Andrews ambulance staff week played the roles of victims in the mock incident.

S

MA A Y 3

141

10 11 12 13 15 Another example of joint working came via a leaflet and poster campaign offering advice about discarded needles and syringes. 19Dundee20 7 1City8Council, The project involved Tayside 6Police,1Dundee 1 16 Community Safety Partnership, the DUNCAN scheme and Crimestoppers Scotland. 27 23 24 25 26 17 4 30 1 2 3 9

18

18

MA AY

S

MAY

13AP R

JUL

ek

S

7

F

1

21 22

78 28 29

The Force’s Road Safety team took the initiative in a bid to make parents aware of changes in child car seat and restraint legislation. The team undertook a series of roadshows across the region to make adults aware of the new laws.

37

10 11 12 13 14 15

38

17 18 19 20 21 22

39

24 25 26 27 28 29

Licensed premises in Tayside joined Tayside Police in a major initiative – under the Know The Score banner - to raise awareness in young people about the risks of taking cocaine. Twenty pubs and clubs across the region, along with Drugs Awareness Officers, took part in the weekend event, which was mirrored by similar activities in Strathclyde.

7

NO V week

44

S

M

T

29 30 31


28

T

1

3

4

W

3

T

OC T

JUN

S

Cocaine worth £50,000 was recovered and arrests made in Dundee days after the September Know the Score Cocaine Awareness Campaign.

S

M

T

W

40

1

2

41

8

9

42

3

4

T T

M

1

29 30 31

44

Cycle patrol officers in Perth achieve a Scottish first when they trial digital CCTV system mounted on their bikes. Perth-based company Scottish Communications Security Technology supplied the equipment to allow the officers to record events and incidents in areas where no CCTV is currently operating.

10 11 12 13 14

8

7

6

5

45

S

2

3

9

10

W

Guided by valuable information from the public as well as other intelligence, Tayside Police undertakes a four-week long campaign aimed at targeting low-level drug dealers. Following almost 100 separate raids as part of Operation Perdition, officers made a total of 44 arrests, recovered £46,000 worth of drugs and seized cash assets totalling £36,000. week

S

F

12 13 14 15 46 15 16 17 18 19 20 21Amstel – two-year-old German Shepherd from Holland – becomes

6 17

the first general purpose dog to be recruited into Tayside Police Dog Section from overseas.

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

47

19 20 21 22

44

29 30 31

48

26 27 28 2923

2

1

2

3

DECEMBER

3

26

About 2000 secondary school pupils in Dundee attend Safe Drive Stay Alive - a hard-hitting road show at the Whitehall Theatre, which is designed to make them think hard about road safety before they pass their driving tests and to make it a priority when they do. The event was jointly funded by Tayside Police and its partners.

DE C 48

S

M

T

W

F

T

26 27 28 29 30

1

7

8

W

Tayside Police Drugs Branch recovered heroin with an estimated week street value of £260,000 in an operation in Dundee. Cash is also seized and two men from the Liverpool area charged in connection with the incident.

1

2

Atrocious weather conditions lead to flooding in areas of Perth & Kinross. Emergency services, working with the local authority evacuated a number of residential properties in the worst affected areas, including Milnathort and Kinross. A number of roads are blocked as a result of the deluge and resulting floods.

8

9

49

3

4

5

6

4

25 26 27 28 29 30

JANUARY

JAN

S

M

T

W

T

F

1

1

2

3

4

5

6

2

8

9

week Angus-based officers also took delivery of a defibrillator machine – courtesy of a charitable donation from the Order of St John. The machine is used to administer assistance to heart attack victims and – whilst the hope is that it will never be required – it could offer life-saving early intervention in the event that someone suffers a heart attack.

10 11 12 13

3

15 16 17 18 19 20

10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22

4

51

22 23 24 25 26 27

52

24 25 26 27 28 29

5

29 30 31

FEB

A record breaking month for the Force as Drugs Branch officers recover cocaine with an estimated street value of £300,000 in Dundee and then, within two weeks seize heroin with a street value of £500,000 in Perth. Both represent the largest single seizures in the Force’s history and, allied to arrests and cash seizures, week send a clear message to drugs dealers that Tayside Police will do everything within its power to disrupt the trafficking of drugs.

5

S

1

2

3

7

8

MARCH

37

In another groundbreaking move, Tayside Police became the first Scottish force to seek the assistance of a popular internet website in efforts to trace a missing person. Adam McTavish has been missing from his Perthshire home since 1999 and on what marked his 46th Birthday, detectives renewed their appeal and set up a site on MySpace.com to try and gain fresh information on Adam.

W

T

F

MAR

29 30 31

1

2

3

26 27 28 1 2 3 9 week Funds raised through the sale of 3000 commemorative tie-pins

5

8

M

T

S

M

T

featuring the G8 and Tayside Police logos to police staff – throughout the UK - reach £6000 and are handed to the Children’s Hospice Association Scotland (CHAS) and the Northern Police Convalescent Home in Auchterarder.

The Scottish Executive announce that, following a successful pilot project in Tayside, new powers to impose fixed penalty notices for anti-social behaviour will be rolled out across Scotland. Around 7000 fixed penalty notices have been issued in Tayside for offences such as breach of the peace, urinating in a public place and drinking in public places where it is banned, since the pilot began.

Drugs branch officers seize heroin with a street value of £60,000 in Dundee.

7

8

9

6

7

9

10

12 13 14 15 16 17

5

10

6

7

9

8

109

19 20 21 22 23 24

12

19 20 21 22 23 24

26 27 28

13

26 27 28 29 30 31

3

W

T

F

S

DE C

1

2

3

4

week

48

S

M

T

W

T

26 27 28 29 30

2 9

2 23

12 13 14 15 16 17

2

S

5 16

11

1

1

F

T

W

On Valentine’s Day, Tayside Police four-legged force ‘‘volunteered’’ their services to help save the lives of canine casualties and poorly pups by registering as blood donors They joined other Scottish police dogs to help tackle a national shortage of blood supplies.

6

24

The new Letham Police and Community Access Office opens in the Angus village. It is a joint venture between the police and Angus Council, which sees police officers and community wardens sharing facilities and working more closely than ever before.

50

5 16 1 FEBRUARY

9 30 3

W

43

1

2 23 2

T

NO V

6 7

5

Chief Constable John Vine accompanied deserving recipients from the region at Edinburgh Castle where their public-spirited behaviour was recognised at the First Minister’s Reception. In all seven people from Tayside were honoured, including 14-year-old Megan Hassett, who provided crucial assistance to police in Forfar when she spotted a robbery in progress at shop premises. As a result of her alertness, three men were arrested and thousands of pounds worth of property recovered.

1

S M NOVEMBER

F S

T

Tayside Police, Angus Council and Tayside Fire & Rescue Service teamed up to present a seminar on safety and security for week the Angus farming and rural communities. Issues such as fire prevention, the Doorstoppers initiative – aimed at discouraging bogus callers and unscrupulous salespeople and wildlife crime were all on the agenda as well as other problems specific to the rural Angus communities.

10

30 31

F

OCTOBER

23 24

1

1

...A .A A Glimpse p at What We Do

16 17

T

26 27 28 29 30 31

13

24/7/365

2

9

2

30

F

S

1

2

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P30/31

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION Headquarters Division is based in Dundee. The division provides corporate functions on behalf of the Force covering many areas of service provision, development and improvement. Departments within HQ Division include – Airwave, Corporate Communications & Planning, Business Change & Improvement, Media Services & Web Development, Performance Management, Executive Support, Firearms Licensing, Police Forensics Science Laboratory, and Special Projects. The Command team is led by Chief Superintendent Clive Murray. He is assisted by Superintendent Gavin Robertson, and Chief Inspectors Colin MacKay, Kevin Lynch, Hugh Robson and Alison Kennedy.

CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT CLIVE MURRAY

CHARTER MARK LANDMARK Tayside Police was accredited the Charter Mark Award for the fifth time in succession in 2006, becoming only the second Force to attain five successive awards, having first attained its Charter Mark status in 1993. The accolade, which applies for three years, demonstrates a high standard of service by its recipient in actively engaging with customers, partners and staff; being fair and accessible to everyone and promoting choice; continuous improvement and development; effective and imaginative use of resources; contributing to improving opportunities and quality of life in the community; and setting standards and performing well. Tayside Police recognises that, as well as tackling crime, it has a significant role to play in helping to address quality of life issues, including nuisance, vandalism and other anti-social behaviour. The Charter Mark assessor commended

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07

Tayside Police on its partnership and community working, as well as its efforts, with other agencies, to acquire additional funding. The Charter Mark report also acknowledged the Force’s use of new technology and its call handling systems. The Force has embraced the principles of Best Value and Community Planning – as required by the Local Government in Scotland Act 2003 – and has made significant advances into clearly showing how Tayside Police aims to continually improve our service through a comprehensive programme of engagement, consultation, performance monitoring and evaluation. This wealth of evidence helps to direct planning for the future of the police service in Tayside.

The police service is subject to continuous change, both internally and externally and is subject to greater scrutiny than ever before. Tayside Police has a duty to ensure that its policies and procedures receive constant review and improvement to meet existing and future challenges. Somewhat ironically, this rigorous assessment and evaluation process has resulted in Tayside Police choosing not to seek a sixth successive Charter Mark Award. This is due to the significant demand that collating information places upon staff, who are invariably involved in assisting other internal and statutory external inspection processes.


HEADQUARTERS DIVISION

HER MAJESTY’S INSPECTORATE OF CONSTABULARY HAILS TAYSIDE’S PROGRESS

A review inspection by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC), published in June, acknowledged the advances Tayside Police had made in response to earlier recommendations by the Inspectorate on the Force’s activities. Amongst the report’s key findings was praise that the Force had made particular efforts to improve the way it engages with communities; and undertaken a significant review of custody facilities so as to improve accommodation for prisoners. HMIC also reported that Tayside Police had demonstrated strong new approaches to change management and tackling anti-social behaviour. The Inspectorate also examined Tayside Police’s arrangements for the G8 World Leader’s Summit in 2005 and praised the Force for meeting their objectives and gaining recognition from within the UK and from overseas.

A FORCE FOR ALL Tayside Police is proud to serve a diverse, multi ethnic and culturally rich region and strives to ensure that all the community’s diversities are recognised and respected when it comes to delivering a service for everyone. Diversity is not only about race or religion. Indeed there are six equally important areas of diversity, which are – Age, Disability (physical, mental and sensory), gender, race, religion/belief, sexual orientation. In January of this year Tayside Police invited all interested parties to have a say in the consultation process leading to the publication in June of the Force’s Gender Equality Scheme. Public sessions were held in venues in the Force’s three divisional areas at the start of the year, with Diversity Adviser Nasreen Mohammed inviting further comment via a questionnaire on the Tayside Police Website. This follows hard on the heels of the first Tayside Police Disability Equality Scheme which was published at the end of 2006, following a period of public consultation, which included people with disabilities, carers and those with an interest in disability issues.

In his report, Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Constabulary, Andrew Brown said; ‘‘I was pleased to see that all the recommendations which were made in HMIC’s primary inspection of Tayside Police (in 2002) could be discharged, confirming the Force’s commitment to continuous improvement. ‘‘The Force had a challenging year in 2005 with its responsibilities for policing the G8 Summit and the fact that so many areas of development have been tackled while dealing with that challenge is a credit to the Chief Constable and all his staff.’’

AN INTERNET HIT People want to know about Tayside Police and what the Force is doing – that is the clear evidence given by the Force website, which shows that visits to the site are up 50% from the start of this year. Tayside.police.uk has received over 200,000 visits in the last 12 months, comprising an impressive ten and a half million hits on its pages. At present the site gets an average of about 800 visits a day. Operated by the Web Development Unit, which sounds extravagant but actually amounts to two dedicated members of staff, the website and its internal sister site (or intranet) are updated frequently throughout the day to ensure that the information they carry are current and relevant. The web team operates from the media services office to ensure that all latest news and appeals for information hit the information superhighway at the same time as they reach the Press. Users can subscribe to RSS News Feeds so they are alerted when any new items are posted to the site and traffic and travel information can be updated throughout the day and night in the event of serious incidents and extreme weather.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P32/33

HEADQUARTERS CRIME MANAGEMENT Headquarters Crime Management is based in Dundee and comprises a number of specialist departments, which support the Force by providing expert knowledge and resources, especially in the investigation of complex or serious crime. HQ Crime Management leads on the co-ordination of crime investigations within and beyond the Force boundaries. Head of HQ Crime Management is Detective Chief Superintendent Angela Wilson. She is supported by Detective Superintendents Jim Cameron and Alan Campbell. Specialist departments within Crime Management include the Drugs Branch, Analyst Unit, Family Protection Unit, Financial Investigation Unit, Force Intelligence Bureau, Fraud Branch, Holmes Unit, Identification Branch, Police Mortuary and Special Branch

DETECTIVE CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT ANGELA WILSON

HITTING CRIMINALS WHERE IT HURTS The Proceeds of Crime Act 20 2002 has proved extremely valuabl valuable in holding criminals to account by seizing cash and assets that would otherwise be used to fund a life of crime. Between April 2006 and March 2007, Tayside Police’s financial investigators worked on a number of drugs trafficking cases and restrained assets of more than £455,000, which will be subject of a confiscation hearing. Asset confiscation cases are time and resource intensive – sometimes taking up to three years to reach conclusion. But ultimately they can take away a criminal’s means of investing in any future criminal enterprises. During the same period, Tayside Police’s Financial Intelligence Unit dealt with almost 30 cash seizures, totalling almost £110,000. This is cash that is either the proceeds of crime or intended for use in criminal activities. Cash and liquefied assets are remitted to the Consolidated Fund of the Scottish Executive and are not held by individual police forces.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


HEADQUARTERS CRIME MANAGEMENT

Targeting the Drugs Dealers Tayside Police’s Drugs Branch Officers, working ever more closely with colleagues across the Force area have achieved some remarkable results in terms of recoveries and arrests during the last financial year. These have come by way of intelligence-led operations and thorough day-to-day policing. Clearly such success is greeted with a great deal of satisfaction, but that is tempered with the knowledge that illicit drugs are more widely available throughout the UK – including our region – than ever before. Furthermore, the number of deaths by drugs overdose rose sharply in the 12 months of this report and that figure too would have been more than doubled but for medical intervention. Drug dealing and drug addiction are complicit in affecting other areas of crime. In Tayside there was an increase in robbery and attempted robbery resulting from users’ desperation for funds to feed their habit. It is reassuring then to know that detection rates for this type of crime remains particularly high, not least because of the forensic opportunities they afford. During 2006-2007 a staggering 10,000-plus pieces of drugs intelligence were logged by the Force – which is testament in no small way to the assistance that the public provides in helping to weed out the dealers in their community. In February the weight of drugs recovered by Tayside officers – just over 9.5kg significantly exceeded the total for the entire previous financial year (8.6kg). This was for the most part thanks to the recovery of 4.5kg of heroin in one single swoop by Drugs Branch officers and Central Division’s Antisocial Behaviour team who recovered cocaine with a street value of more than £250,000 in a single incident. Both were record recoveries for the Tayside area. In 12 months Tayside Police has seized around 20kg of Class A Drugs from dealers. Tayside Police works closely with police forces in other parts of the UK – notably this year Merseyside, Greater Manchester and Lancashire – to act against major drugs dealers who are looking to peddle drugs in the Tayside area. In August heroin and amphetamine with an estimated street value of £1,250,000 was recovered by Tayside Drugs Branch officers in an operation in Wigan. This followed significant drugs recoveries and arrests days earlier in Dundee. Firearms and stolen vehicles were also uncovered in the Wigan operation. In May, more than 30kgs of amphetamine (then a Class B Drug) and a kilogram of cannabis worth a combined £300,000 were recovered after a car was stopped by Drugs Branch officers on the outskirts of Perth following a surveillance operation. A 45-year-old Dundee man was subsequently jailed for five years. Tayside Police is acutely aware that ‘‘lower level’’ street dealers have a major impact on the community and have targeted offensives in this direction too.

enforcement aimed at local dealers resulted in 44 arrests, the recovery of almost £50,000 of drugs and seizure of cash assets worth almost £40,000. Whilst led by the Drugs Branch, the initiative heavily involved officers from across Angus, Dundee and Perth & Kinross as almost 100 raids at home addresses were carried out. Detective Sergeant Dave Barclay, who co-ordinated the operation said, ‘‘It was undoubtedly one of the most intensive periods of drugs enforcement mounted in Tayside. I have no doubt that we disrupted the activities of a significant number of dealers and it is something that we will continue to do, with assistance and information from the law-abiding public.’’ The scourge of drugs cannot be addressed by enforcement alone and Tayside Police is also committed, with its partner agencies, to trying to solve drugs related issues through harm reduction measures and education. Force Drugs Co-ordinator, Inspector Wendy Symington has publicly voiced Tayside Police’s concerns about the increasing number of drugs-related deaths on numerous occasions in the past year, which is significantly in excess of the previous 12-months’ figure. In 2006-07 there were 37 confirmed or suspected drugs deaths across Tayside as compared to 29 in 2005-06. She said, ‘‘The figures are deeply concerning and we must all remember that – whatever strongly held views we have for those involved in drug abuse – the loss of any life is a tragedy, whatever the circumstances. Users are playing a game of chance every time they take drugs because they quite simply do not know what they are taking or in what purity. ‘‘Heroin purity has increased from about 15% to as much as 70% in the last 20 years or so, which presents its own risks. But as to what the remainder is can be anyone’s guess apart from the dealer who cares for nothing but cash. ‘‘I would appeal to anyone who is with someone who is having an overdose to do the right thing and call 999 immediately. But for the expertise of medical staff in Tayside there would have been many, many more grieving families over the past year.’’

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘I appreciate pp their pprompt p actioonn which led to a quick arrest. The interaction with these two oofficers has left a good impression of Tayside Police with all involved.’’ – JB, Broughty Ferry

Operation Perdition – a four-week intensive intelligence-led campaign of

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P34/35

SPECIAL BRANCH COMMUNITY CONTACT UNIT

BY DETECTIVE CONSTABLE BRIAN YOUNG

Everyone in our community has a right to be heard. Everyone, whatever their ethnic or religious background, should have an expectation that their police service will listen to their voice and work together to ensure that all our communities are safe. That is why my role and that of my colleague – Detective Constable Mark Charnley – as the two officers of the Special Branch Community Contact Unit is so relevant to us all.

in July 2005. Subsequently it was found that there were signs in the communities that attacks were being planned, but these indicators were at a level which did not reach the police intelligence radar. Intelligence and information does not always relate to a crime or an offence. It can relate to small, seemingly insignificant, incidents, or changes in behaviour that can become apparent when pieced together.

The unit, initiated first as a pilot project and then permanently established in 2006, aims to create channels of communication with minority communities where previously none existed, or where they were not as strong as they might have been.

Our aim is to provide reassurance through community contact whilst at the same time improving intelligence gathering opportunities. We seek to establish a two-way dialogue with people of all faiths and cultures through increased police-community contact, whether as individuals, at the local shop, places of worship, or seats of learning.

Our work enhances that of our community liaison colleagues across the Tayside area, whether in Dundee City Centre or Kinloch Rannoch.

We do not seek to influence anyone’s religious beliefs. Nor do we ‘‘spy on’’ or monitor the politically active individuals or lawful political or single issue groups.

The catalyst for the community contact unit’s formation was the terrorist attacks in London

We would be poor spies to publicise the work we do in such an open way. We are

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07

attached to Special Branch, but Special Branch does not mean Secret Branch and we have been steadfastly open about our aims and intentions. Our work is always rewarding and at times very challenging. The vast majority of people who we have had contact with over the past year or so have been positive about our role and appreciate the need for improving contact between the police and minority communities. A small minority have been suspicious and I would urge them to speak with us and work with us to understand the purpose of the community contact unit. To work for the Tayside community is rewarding and we enjoy engaging with a varied cross-section of our society, often with people from different faiths and backgrounds. Listening to them ensures that we as police officers and as a police service can have an ever-increasing understanding of the diverse and multi-cultural community that we live in.


HEADQUARTERS CRIME MANAGEMENT

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘((the communityy ppolice officer) r)) has made ma a huge difference to our local community already and I have every faith that he will continue to try to do so for the people of this area. He genuinely seems to want to help.’’ – JS, Perth

Protecting Children in Tayside... In 2006, Tayside Police carried out an evaluation of its processes in respect of child protection. Entitled – Safe and Sound? the report gathered information from the police’s own data banks and from Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of education’s inspection of child protection service in Angus to establish how effective Tayside Police are at protecting children and ensuring their needs are met. The report is designed to build upon Tayside Police’s long-standing commitment and significant successes in this area to ensure continuous improvement and development in child protection. It states that the force has become more proactive in identifying where there are concerns for children and acting to protect them, rather than merely investigating an incident after it has happened. Work in this area is ongoing to ensure early intervention where circumstances dictate it is necessary. To this end an awareness package, which is also being utilised at the Scottish Police College, is currently being delivered across the Force. A pilot project aimed at improving information gathering, recording, management and sharing has also been extremely worthwhile and is set to be rolled out force wide to ensure that information is handled correctly and consistently.

With two co-located specialist child protection units in Tayside (Seymour Lodge, Dundee and Bellevue House, Arbroath), in addition to contributing to a wealth of partnership fora and initiatives the report was in no doubt about Tayside Police’s investment in multi-agency working. It also recognised the immense amount of work being carried out in the Tayside communities, with several initiatives through which the police interact with children and young people. There is also a section on the Tayside Police website that is dedicated to child protection. Tayside Police – working closely with the University of Dundee - is investing heavily in specialist staff development in relation to carrying out investigative interviews of children. Although they are local initiatives, they also have relevance to developments at a national level. Safe and Sound? recognises the priority that Tayside Police gives child protection issues from the highest level and throughout the workforce. This has resulted in the Force being at the forefront of various initiatives – co-located units and national pilot projects among them. Sergeant Doug Gray has been instrumental in the development of Tayside Police’s comprehensive approach to child protection. He first became involved with Child Protection in 1991 having joined the Force in 1980, after working as a Medical Laboratory Scientific Officer at Ninewells Hospital.

He was the first male officer to become a member of the Child and Female Specialist Enquiry Section. After a spell in uniform and CID, Doug returned to the sphere of child protection in 1996 and was based with the Family Protection Unit for four years when he moved to Crime Management and took on responsibility for child protection strategy and training. In the time since, Doug has firmly established himself as one of the leading authorities in his field. He undertook a two-year secondment as a Teaching Fellow to the University of Dundee’s Department of Child Care and Protection, a role that extended his teaching duties Scotland-wide. He also attained a post-graduate diploma in child protection studies with distinction and a Master of Philosophy degree in child protection studies. Furthermore, Doug has been a member of an international faculty delivering child forensic interview training to police officers, social workers and psychologists from Scotland, Ireland and Scandinavia. Earlier this year, he was joined by his children David and Lorna as Chief Constable Vine presented him with a Certificate of Merit in recognition of his services to child protection. Doug has now taken up the post of Assistant Child Protection Co-ordinator with Dundee City Council and leaves his friends and colleagues at Tayside Police with a legacy of expertise that will ensure that this Force continues to be at the fore of the Scottish child protection system.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P36/37

Road Policing Unit Tayside Police have a specific objective to reduce road safety casualties and increase safety on our roads. Whilst every officer has a part to play in this, the Road Policing Unit has a particular responsibility. The Road Policing is headed by Chief Inspector Sandy Bowman who has overall responsibility and co-ordinates road policing activities across the Force area. Each division has a road policing unit in their area. The officers in these undertake patrol duties providing 24 hour cover on the entire roads network.

‘FIT’ FOR THE ROAD WORDS OF APPRECIATION

Tayside Police Road Safety Officers again took their Older Road Users information events throughout the Force area in 2006. The aim of the events is to highlight some of the dangers that face adults as they grow older. Participants are given the opportunity to check that their eyesight is up to the necessary standard to drive by reading a number plate from the required distance. Furthermore, older drivers are given the chance to test their reactions on the computerised brake reaction tester and take part in a short Highway Code quiz.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07

‘‘Myy car left the road,, finallyy cooming ming to rest on its roof in a ditch and your officers officers prompt arrival a after members of the public had phoned in to report the accident was a great relief to me.’’ – AS, Kirriemuir


ROAD POLICING UNIT

Promoting Safer Biking in Tayside It’s a startling fact of life that over 28,000 motorcyclists are killed or seriously injured in the UK each year. As a result, in April 2006 Tayside Police invited motorcyclists in the Tayside area to become safer bikers by taking part in the Bike Safe programme.

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘I have frequently seen policee vehicle ppatrolling the area and incidents of speeding, in particular, appear tto have fallen. It seems only fair that if residents complain about a nuisance, we should be prepared to say ‘well done’ for a good job too.’’ – GM, Montrose

Bike Safe is an initiative run by police forces throughout the United Kingdom who work with the whole of the biking world to help lower the number of motorcycle rider casualties. The course involved participants attending a classroom theory session where they picked up safer riding tips, advice about riding in groups, and learnt about basic roadside first aid. The course finished with an on the road ride-out session with a police motorcyclist.

In-Car Child Safety in the Spotlight Tayside Police road safety officers held a series of special child car seat clinics throughout the last year, to ensure that seats were correctly fitted in vehicles. The road safety team welcomed a large number of drivers, who regularly carry child passengers in their vehicles, at the free check-ups.

Junior Road Safety Officers Appointed A scheme designed to increase children’s road safety awareness when at school and in the wider community was again rolled out across the Force area in 2006. With guidance from Tayside Police’s Road Safety Officer, primary school pupils from Angus, Dundee, and Perthshire learn how to highlight issues that affect them locally and raise awareness of road safety matters within their school and the wider community. The campaign offers a platform for children to voice their opinions to adults about what they feel their priorities are in terms of road safety education. The national Junior Road Safety Officer Scheme was developed by Road Safety Scotland and is supported by the Standard Life Assurance Company. Junior Road Safety Officers receive support from local Road Safety Officers and adult helpers to plan assemblies, notice boards and other road safety related activities throughout the year in office. They also have access, through the Junior Road Safety Officer website, to information about local initiatives taking place around Scotland.

During checks by Tayside Police in 2005, only 15% of the child car seats were fitted correctly, 64% of seats checked required some adjustment, 16% were incompatible for the child or the vehicle and 5% were condemned because they were too old, damaged, incomplete, or did not meet the European standard. Marian Scott, Road Safety Co-ordinator for the Force said, ‘‘As those who have taken advantage of the clinics will testify, we were not looking to catch people out. We want to give drivers the right advice and information about how best to ensure the safety of their young passengers. It amazes us that people spend thousands of pounds on buying a car, but don’t spend any time ensuring that the car seat they use for their child actually fits correctly.’’

No Insurance? No Licence? No Car! In July 2006 Tayside Police implemented powers to seize vehicles being driven without insurance or a driving licence. Within just one month officers seized 42 vehicles from drivers. Chief Inspector Sandy Bowman, Head of Road Policing in Tayside said, ‘‘Without the use of these powers, some of these vehicles would still have been on our roads. As well as being used without statutory documents the majority of them had questionable maintenance histories. By seizing them we have removed the immediate risk posed to other road users.’’

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P38/39

CONTINUING TO TACKLE ROAD CRIME Worldwide, 1.2 million people are killed on roads every year, almost a quarter of Scotland’s population. Tayside Police aim to promote Road Safety and contribute to the lowering of casualty figures by highlighting and dealing with a number of issues which contribute to accidents, such as drink/ drug driving, speeding, seat belts and mobile phone offences. Of particular concern are collisions involving young drivers. The second biggest cause of death among young people under 25 is as a result of road accidents. Since 2003, there have been 138 people killed on roads in Tayside, and of those, 38 (27.5%) were aged between 17 and 25 years of age. Of the 38 fatalities, 24 (63.2%) were male and 14 (36.8%) were female. Of those who were driving, 15 (88.2%) were male and 2 (11.8%) were female. The remaining 12 young females were in cars driven by young males. Additionally, since 2003, there have been 4180 injury collisions on roads in the Tayside Police area of which 1235 (29.5%) have involved young people in the 17-25 years age group. The cost of those accidents, both emotionally and financially to families, can be enormous. Road safety campaigns run by Tayside Police throughout 2006 are crucial in promoting the road safety message. Figures from 2005, for example, put the cost of a single fatality on the roads at £1.6 million. Despite campaign activity, some drivers chose to ignore the publicity, advice and common sense and continued to take risks such as drinking and driving, speeding, failing to wear a seat belt or using a mobile phone while driving. • A man who had been disqualified three times previously was amongst 84 drivers stopped for speeding by Tayside Police during a 24hour national initiative in April 2006 aimed at detecting speeding and seatbelt offences. The 24-hour period also saw 66 people detected having not buckled up on their journey. Alarmingly, 65 of the speeding offences were

detected in built up areas. One driver was caught travelling in excess off 60mph in a 30mph zone near Ninewells Hospital. • As the temperatures soared in August 2006, so too did the number of people caught drink driving on Tayside’s roads. Despite repeated warnings 46 motorists provided a positive breath test at the roadside. This is a major increase of 81% when compared with the same period in 2005. • One woman in Dundee found the pressure of negotiating stationary vehicles too much for her whilst a patrol car was waiting patiently behind her. She managed to reverse, lose control and collide with a fence. She was later found to be almost twice the legal drink drive limit. • A man was detected speeding at 45mph through a Perthshire village and was found to be three and a half times over the drink drive limit. He had his two children travelling with him in the car. • A man driving in Perthshire travelling through a built-up area was also found to be three and a half times over the limit…..driving a JCB digger. Tayside Police Chief Constable, John Vine, Chairman of the ACPOS Road Policing business area said, ‘‘These examples are just a snap-shot of some of the incidents we come across during campaign activity that we have taken part in throughout the last year. ‘‘Speeding and failing to wear a seatbelt are both inherently dangerous choices to make. In the event of a collision, they cost lives. No one can fail to be aware of the dangers associated with speeding, especially in built up areas. ‘‘For this reason, it is important that we make every effort to remind everyone of their responsibilities when on the road. Tayside Police officers will be on the look out to ensure that road safety legislation is being adhered to every

day of the year. Like all Police Forces across the country, we are committed to achieving casualty reduction targets set by the Government and years of hard work and commitment towards this has contributed towards a downward trend in the number of those injured on our roads.’’ The tragic consequences of a fatal or serious road accident are not only dealt with by Tayside Police officers but also by our partners in Accident and Emergency and Tayside Fire and Rescue Service. Brodie Paterson, a Consultant with Tayside Trauma Team, based at Ninewells Hospital added, ‘‘We see the effects of inappropriate speed. Whether 30mph in a housing estate or 90mph on a country road, the effects are not random and are predictable. We see unnecessary crashes in the evenings, weekends and during adverse weather. The cost to people, families and society is vast. Road accidents are a hidden carnage, yet the daily death toll on the roads appears to have little effect on society in general.’’ Scott Bricknal, Tayside Fire and Rescue Service’s Community Fire Safety Officer said that speed played a significant factor in the trauma experienced by any casualty involved in a road traffic accident. He said, ‘‘At an incident, firefighters not only have to consider the visible effects of the scene, but must assume that casualties have been involved in three collisions. They are the impact of the vehicles involved in the incident, the impact of the casualty’s body colliding with the vehicle’s interior, and the casualty’s internal organs colliding with the rib cage. ‘‘Seatbelts are a vital life-saving means of restraint that significantly enhance the chances of survival in the event of a road traffic collision. In conjunction with other safety mechanisms in the car, a seatbelt restrains the driver or passenger in a safer position and lessens the chances of being trapped should a collision occur.’’

Champion Life Savers Tayside Police Life Saving Section claimed two major awards at the Police National Life Saving Championships in London during the summer. The men’s team – comprising Sergeant Jim Leslie and Constables Chris Warmer, Steve Ritchie, Euan Stewart and Detective Constable Graeme Wishart pipped 15 other Forces to win first place in the overall competition and earn the coveted Police Baton. The team also won the prestigious Sir John Evans Trophy as the highest placed team in

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07

the combined land and water based incidents. Furthermore, Euan Stewart came third in a field of more than 100 competitors in the men’s individual competition. Superintendent Ken Sinclair, a former captain of the men’s team in Tayside and current National Secretary and Treasurer for Police Life Saving in the UK said, ‘‘This is the first time that a Scottish Force has won these major awards in the 55 year history of the event and to take on and beat the larger forces demonstrates that with the right support, ability and commitment forces like Tayside can compete among the best.’’

Life saving raisess and tests key skills to protect and save lives – the core functionn of all police staff. Acquired skills with water based emergencies are also used in land based incidents, whether they occur cur in the street or as a result of a vehicle collision or other accident.


SEARCH & RESCUE

RIVER DEEP MOUNTAIN HIGH During 2006, Tayside Police Search & Rescue Unit was involved in more than 30 incidents relating to mountain and low level rescues in Tayside. A dozen of those operations took place in mountainous terrain, the remainder on lower ground.

recruiit’s readiness comes by way of a four-dday exercise in which they must walk many m miles dealing with set scenaarios en route, camp each night and ddemonstrate their endurance and self-ssufficiency. Taysidde Police Search & Rescue persoonnel were called upon more than twice t a month during 2006, with helicoopters from the Aeronautical Rescue Co-ordination Centre (ARCC) based at RAF Kinloss called out on ten of thoose occasions.

The 24-strong 24 strong unit is made up of men and women volunteers (all of whom have had at least two years in the police service. They are on-call throughout the year, day and night, whatever the conditions. Before joining, recruits have displayed an interest in the basic skills required for the post – gained traditionally through hill walking as a pastime for example. The unit then builds upon those skills via a five-month training programme to broaden members’ abilities still further. This includes technical skills that are involved with rock-climbing, stretcher lowering, abseiling and rock-climbing. They also acquire additional skills that must be practised regularly such as offroad driving, boat handling, swift-water rescue, first aid and line searching. A final assessment regarding a new

Durinng that time, the S&R Unit dealt with 14 fatalities. Four of those people weree hill walkers and involved incidents in moountainous areas. Of the others – six wer were suicides and four were involved in fishing/drowning incidents.

require additional and continuous training for specialisms within the unit. This is another great incentive for them to do it. ‘‘The Search & Rescue Unit are regularly called upon to provide an emergency response. It takes a committed person to be a part of the unit.’’ The Tayside Mountain Rescue Team trained with the unit on two occasions in 2006 and assisted the unit on nine incidents. Unit personnel also trained with a helicopter supplied by ARCC twice in 2006.

In November 2006, the S&R Unit was involved with two other teams in a large scale exercise at Glen Clova. Tayside Mountain Rescue Team and RAF Leuchars Team took part in a planned search operation where a helicopter was also put to use. All officers are subject to continuous training and the unit now boasts eight officers trained as search managers and four as trackers. Trackers’ skills are extremely effective and their expertise and early deployment can bring a swift conclusion in missing person scenarios.

In other incidents – two hill walkers were seriously injured and one other sustained minor injuries. Team leader Constable Jim Tait, who has been a part of the unit for 24 years said, ‘‘All our officers are committed hill walkers before they join the unit. They know what is involved in operating in these conditions. The aims of Mountain Rescue in general are to provide a rescue service, no matter where, when and whatever the weather. ‘‘Mountaineers and hill walkers can appreciate what this entails and I believe that officers in the unit want to give something back to their sport or hobby. However, it is not that simple. All officers

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P40/41

THE WILDMAN OF TAYSIDE POLICE Wildlife and Environment Officer Alan Stewart has devoted many years to tackling wildlife crime and – just as important – to raising other people’s awareness about wildlife and the environment in Scotland. Accordingly, it came as no surprise to anyone (the unpretentious Alan apart) when he was awarded an exceptional World Wildlife Fund Special Lifetime Achievement Award at the 18th Annual UK Police and Customs Wildlife Enforcement Conference in Northampton in September. A previous winner of the Wildlife Enforcer of the Year award, the panel noted that Alan had shown commitment and dedication of the highest order and that he has made a huge difference, not only to police enforcement activity, but also to raising awareness amongst young children and the wider community in Scotland. Alan is the driving force behind the annual Tayside primary schools Wildlife Crime Project, which over the last ten years has blossomed from two small primary classes taking part in 1997 to almost 2000 school pupils taking part this year.

Alan has been a leading light in his field for decades. Indeed as a probationary constable in 1966 ( a year after joining the police service) he stopped a minivan in Dunblane, containing more than 40 salmon which had been caught on the River Deveron, not by net or line but by explosives! His life-long interest in countryside affairs and wildlife crime saw him appointed Force Wildlife Crime Officer, whilst an Inspector in 1993. He retired as a police officer three years later but has continued in his role in a civilian capacity ever since. Alan was made an MBE in 2000 in recognition of his work. He has investigated a wide range of crimes. Amongst them hare coursing, poaching, the destruction of a sand martin colony, the shooting of a common seal, the unregistered keeping of a golden eagle and the sale of an egg collection, as well as the unlawful digging up of snow drops. As arguably Scotland’s leading authority in his field Alan’s expertise is in great demand for police officer training and school education. He also played a key role in developing a DVD and CD Rom training package for those involved in wildlife crime enforcement. The training tool has now been replicated in England and Wales.

Commenting on his Lifetime Achieveme Achievement Award, Rhona Brankin, former Deputy Minister for Environment and Rural Development said, ‘‘Whether tackling international egg thieves or dealing with illegal traps and poisons, Alan’s passion and tireless dedication to his work has helped demonstrate the central importance of addressing wildlife crime. ‘‘This award is also a tremendous accolade for Alan’s employers, Tayside Police. I look forward to seeing Tayside Police break new ground in the policing of wildlife and environmental crime.’’ Alan has committed 40 years of wildlife crimes tales and tribulations to print in his book Wildlife Detective, which launches in Spring 2007.

BBC Scotland have been ‘tracking’ Alan since

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘Thanks to the ppolice officer who whho turne turned up at my door at 6am on Sunday morning to tell me the window of my car was open, nothing missing, but the inside of my car was filling up with snow.’’ – EP, Dundee

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘I received a confused call forr help from fro my 90-year-old mother who had collapsed collapsed…Consequently, Co I asked Tayside Police for some long-distance help…I am advised that my mother would not have survived were it not for the swift response of your officers.’’ – GM, Cambridgeshire

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘I felt safe and reassured byy their thheir pres presence and their actions.’’ – SJ, actions SJ Carnoustie

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07

2005 for a seriess the Wildlife Detecctives which is due to be brooadcast shortly and involvees Alan and otthers investigating a varieety of wildlifee and environnmental crime.

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘I was veryy impressed p with the hee efficien cient and confident manner with which your staff ddealt with the situation and would like to extend our thanks to them for dealing expertly with what was a very traumatic situation’’ – FB, Dundee

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘These two officers pplainlyy exce ceeded eeded my m expectations by their fairness and kindness in ttheir treatment of everyone involved, their skills in gathering the road information by measurement and photography, and in managing the heavy traffic situation with the minimum of fuss.’’ – IF, Dundee

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘Theyy were so understandingg and a prof professional – a real credit to themselves and the uniform uniform. Thank you.’’ – SG, Dundee


A VERY ‘SPECIAL’ ROLE

FEATURE

A Very Special Role Members of the Tayside Police Special Constabulary provide an invaluable service to the Force and moreover the community. At present the Force’s Special Constabulary complement is in good health with 172 people donning police uniform on a voluntary part-time basis in Tayside. All are fully sworn police officers and turn out in support of full-time front-line operational colleagues in tackling a whole range of incidents. The Special Constabulary are drawn from the variety of backgrounds and professions. All are committed towards helping the community by dealing with local issues and helping to maintain law and order and enhance residents’ safety and feeling of safety. In and around the village of Stanley in Perthshire, Tayside Police Special Constables were to the fore in tackling antisocial behaviour and youths causing annoyance in a clear example of how the work of the volunteers closely mirrors that of their full-time counterparts. Between December and January, Special Constables in pairs carried out hi h gh g visibility foot pat a rols in problem areas to deal

with such issues and provide an increased presence following a rise in building construction site related thefts and crime. Special Constables also carried out high profile road checks and monitored local schools, other buildings and premises that had previously suffered from criminal activity. Residents commented positively about the initiative, with elderly householders saying they felt safer and more reassured by the additional police presence. During this time, 20 litres of alcohol was confiscated from underage drinkers in Stanley and Luncarty and a number of road traffic offences were detected. The work of the Special Constabulary also enabled local officers to dedicate additional time to investigate other crimes. It is expected that similar initiatives will be undertaken in the near future in the Methven and Bridge of Earn areas in Western Division.

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘This certainlyy exceeded myy expe pectations and left my family with a very positive impression of our local police…I have had little need to call the police in the past and when contact is so infrequent first impressions are created quickly and are hard to change. You should be pleased and proud at the example being set by officers in your force.’’ – RS, Blairgowrie

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P42/43

WORDS OF APPRECIATION

‘‘Your officers acted in a pprofes essional ssional manner m and dealt with the problem quickly and efficien efficiently. This put the complainer very much at ease and it reassured her should she need to contact police in the future.’’ – Anti-social Noise Officer, Perth & Kinross Council

TACKLING ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOUR Tayside Police has shown the way in Scotland when it comes to using all available measures to tackle antisocial behaviour, whether through fixed penalty notices for more minor offences, seizing vehicles that are being driven illegally, or working with other agencies to have disruptive neighbours put out of their homes.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


TACKLING ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

Antisocial behaviour is not something that can be addressed by the police alone and Tayside Police’s work in attempting to do so is inextricably linked with the three local authorities, other professional bodies and community groups. Many examples are mentioned throughout this report. Multi-agency antisocial behaviour strategies have been developed and implemented in Angus, Dundee and Perth & Kinross to both tackle and reduce incidents of this type. Furthermore, local, bespoke and flexible action plans are directed at addressing particular problems, and include strategies such as deploying extra high profile patrols into an area where youths are causing annoyance. In February, the Scottish Police Service received new powers to impose fixed penalty notices for anti-social behaviour after a successful year-long pilot project undertaken by Tayside Police. The fixed penalty notice (FPN) is issued for offences including breach of the peace, urinating in public and drinking alcohol in a public place, where it is banned. Offenders are issued with a notice giving 28 days to pay a £40 fine, or request a court hearing. If it is not paid in time and is not challenged, the fine rises to £60. In February, independent evaluators hailed the pilot a success and recommended national rollout of the scheme, with all forces using FPNs by the end of 2007 Chief Constable John Vine said, ‘‘We were confident that Fixed Penalty Notices would have a positive impact on policing anti-social behaviour. In the event, their value exceeded our own high expectations, as they proved to be an extremely quick and effective way for police officers to deal with low level offending.” ‘‘The process is quick, straightforward and has made a difference in reducing bureaucracy for the police and our criminal justice partners. Tayside Police actively works with its partners to deal with anti-social behaviour and we will continue to use every tool at our disposal to do so.’’

towns and villages across the area. These include Perth’s Operation Homesafe and Dundee’s Operation Centresafe, as well as the Best Bar None scheme, which has operated in Dundee for more than a year and was launched in Angus in March. Dundee-based Best Bar None participants were rewarded for raising the standards at an inaugural awards ceremony in August. Gold Award winners of the multi-agency scheme – introduced to build on the successes of the DUNCAN (Dundee Co-ordinated Anti Crime Network) initiative – was the Dundee University Students’ Association. Following concerns about underage drinking and antisocial behaviour in Aberfeldy, licensees and police launched an initiative built upon the Pubwatch concept – which operates in other parts of the division and promotes high standards within premises to make them safer for staff and customers. Launched in December, the multi-agency Aberfeldy model helps to create an environment where anyone who uses threatening or violent behaviour, causes damage or vandalism, is involved in drugs, or in any way displays unacceptable or antisocial behaviour can be barred from all licensed premises in the village, including off-sales. To date, one person has been barred and the scheme has been judged a success.

‘‘We were confident that Fixed Penalty Notices would have a positive impact on policing antisocial behaviour. In the event, their value exceeded our own high expectations, as they proved to be an extremely quick and effective way for police officers to deal with low level offending.”

The independent evaluation – the University of Abertay, Dundee – found that; • 3327 FPNs were issued – predominantly for breach of the peace (49%), urinating or defecating in circumstances causing annoyance to others (28%), and consuming alcohol in a public place (12%). • 80% of FPNs were issued on the street and 96% within three days of the offence. • 63% of fines were paid within the statutory period of 28 days and, in the Dundee District Court area, 78% had been paid six months after the pilot • There was some evidence of net-widening (the issuing of FPNs where previously a warning would have been given) but little evidence of repeat offending. • Nearly three-quarters (73%) of police officers agreed that FPNs saved them time. • The importance of time saving was considerable, with police in Tayside estimated to have saved 1300 hours over the year. Alcohol is often the common denominator in antisocial behaviour incidents – notably at weekends in and around city and town centre pubs and clubs and at times on local streets where children who are underage are under the influence of alcohol. Targeted police and multi-agency action plans aimed at tackling the issues of under-18s obtaining and drinking alcohol are undertaken across the Force area.

Funding from Perth & Kinross Council secured around a dozen walkie-talkies to allow Pubwatch members to alert one another and the local police to any suspicious activity. There is an array of work going on across the three Tayside Police Divisions to tackle anti-social behaviour and its effects on the community. Closure orders – where a council tenant is barred from their home for a period of time are regarded as a final step to curb persistent antisocial behaviour. It is a measure that Tayside Police and local authority partners have not shied away from when it was necessary.

In February, for example, Tayside Police was granted a two-month closure order on a council-owned address in Douglas, Dundee, under the terms of the Antisocial Behaviour Act 2004. Concerns had been raised about loud music, disturbances, youths congregating in the area and antisocial and aggressive behaviour associated with the address. The action was necessary in the best interests of other residents after all other possible solutions had failed through close consultation with Dundee City Council and other agencies. Tayside Police will uphold the community’s rights to live in relative peace and quiet, without threat or fear. Closure orders are a last resort and highlight where a tenant and their associates have failed to respect the rights of other residents and halt their antisocial behaviour. Antisocial use of vehicles – whether cars or motorcycles, on or off-road is not tolerated by the police in Tayside who will seize vehicles with powers given to them by road traffic and antisocial behaviour legislation. A person whose vehicle is seized must, in order to re-claim the vehicle, provide proof of ownership and pay a fee of £105, plus £12 a day storage fees. In Dundee, local section officers and the Antisocial Behaviour Team have seized dozens of motorcycles under the same legislation through the last year. Many have subsequently been dismantled or crushed. Following ongoing concerns about the illegal and often reckless use of motorcycles and mini-motos, Dundee officers predominantly in the north of the city are running Operation Challenge, which also has the support of local housing officers and the community warden service.

Similarly all divisions are involved in initiatives with partner organisations and local businesses to tackle alcohol-related crime and antisocial behaviour in cities,

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P44/45

Statistical Information the measurement of our success...

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


STATISTICS

BREAKDOWN OF 2006/2007 DEVOLVED BUDGET: HOW POLICING IS FUNDED IN TAYSIDE

CRIME SUPPORT HQ DIVISION CENTRAL

7% 3%

OPERATIONS

22% 7%

PENSIONS

15% 13%

17% CORPORATE SUPPORT

EASTERN

16% WESTERN

Tayside Joint Police Board approved a net budget of £81.944 million for the financial year 2006/2007. After making adjustments for non-Grant Aided Expenditure (GAE) items the budget was in line with the GAE settlement for the force. Most of this money comes from central government by way of specific police grant paid directly to the Board and from revenue support grant paid to the constituent councils. Certain categories of costs within the budget are non-grant earning and these costs are met in full from the council tax. These however form only a small part of the budget. Included within the budget of £81.944 million was 100% grant funding provided by the Scottish Executive of £306,000 for specific additional Police Officers posts, including ports policing. The approved budget for 2007/2008 is £83.663 million. The Board also approved a capital investment programme of £2.801 million for 2006/2007. This programme included provision to purchase vehicles, IT equipment, Airwave Communications System and to carry out building work throughout the force area.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P46/47

POLICE RANK PROFILE (as at 31 March 2007)

RANK Chief Constable Deputy Chief Constable Assistant Chief Constable Chief Superintendent Superintendent Chief Inspector Inspector Sergeant Constable

TOTAL 1 1 1 5 9 18 54 160 925

% 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.43 0.77 1.53 4.60 13.63 78.79

FEMALE 0 0 0 2 0 4 6 16 259

% 0.00 0.00 0.00 40.00 0.00 22.22 11.11 10.00 28.00

MALE 1 1 1 3 9 14 48 144 666

% 100.00 100.00 100.00 60.00 100.00 77.78 88.89 90.00 72.00

TOTAL MINORITY ETHNIC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

% 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.76

FEMALE MINORITY ETHNIC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

% 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.11

MALE MINORITY ETHNIC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

% 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.65

TOTALS

1174

100.00

287

24.45

887

75.55

7

0.60

1

0.09

6

0.51

Promoted Posts

249

100.00

28

11.24

221

88.76

0

0.00

0

0

0

0

Officers working Part-Time

38

100.00

37

97.37

1

2.63

0

0.00

0

0

0

0

Special Constables

173

100.00

56

32.37

117

67.63

5

2.89

1

0.58

4

2.31

COMMENTS: The above figures, for the purposes of Equal Opportunities monitoring include police officers who are on secondments or career breaks and also include: 1 Temporary DCC (Male) & 1 Temporary ACC (Male) 1 Temporary Chief Superintendent (Female) 1 Temporary Superintendent (Male) 2 Temporary Inspectors (Males) 7 Temporary Sergeants (2 Females & 5 Males) Since March 2006, the number of minority ethnic police officers has increased by 2 to 7 (0.6%), with 1 female and 6 male officers. For the purposes of this report, the figure is based upon visible minority ethnic police officers. Since March 2006, the total number of female officers has increased by 8 to 287 (24.5%), whilst the total number of male officers has decreased by 11 to 887 (75.5%). The number of promoted posts held by women has increased by 4 to 28 (11.2%), whilst the number of promoted posts held by men decreased by 4 to 221 (88.8%). The total number of police officers who work on a part-time basis within the force is 38 (3.2%). Since March 2006, the number of minority ethnic special constables has decreased by 1 to 5 (2.9%), with 1 female special constable and 4 male special constables. 2 male special constables joined the force as regular police officers. For the purposes of this report, the figure is based upon visible minority ethnic special constables. Since March 2006, the total number of special constables has increased by 15 to 173. The total number of female special constables has increased by 6 to 56 (32.4%), whilst the total number of male special constables has increased by 9 to 117 (67.6%).

SUPPORT STAFF PROFILE (as at 31 March 2007)

GRADE Chief Officers (CO) Professional (PO) Technical (TE) Administrative (AP) Clerical (GS) Other TOTALS

TOTAL 3 67 77 274 223 82

FEMALE 1 29 34 198 149 56

% 33.33 43.28 44.16 72.26 66.82 68.29

MALE 2 38 43 76 74 26

% 66.67 56.72 55.84 27.74 33.18 31.71

TOTAL MINORITY ETHNIC 0 1 1 2 2 2

% 0.00 1.49 1.30 0.73 0.90 2.44

726

467

64.33

259

35.67

8

1.10

COMMENTS: Since March 2006, the number of minority ethnic support staff has increased by 2 to 8 (1.1%). For the purposes of this report, the figure is based upon visible minority ethnic support staff. Since March 2006 the ratio of female and male support staff has seen a 1.2% reduction to 64.3% for female support staff and 1.2% increase to 35.7% male support staff. A total of 29.5% of support staff work on a job-share or part-time basis. This has increased by 4% since March 2006.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


STATISTICS

Police Annual Statistical Tables 2006-2007 Group 1 Classification of Crimes and Offences

Group 1 – Non Sex Cr. Of Violence or Imp. Violence against the person Murder Attempted Murder Culpable Homicide Serious Assault Robbery (incl attempts) Child Cruelty/Neglect Others Table 1

CENTRAL Cases Made Known Apr 05Mar 06 3 41 2 147 107 37 37 374

Apr 06Mar07 3 33 0 125 134 36 55 386

CENTRAL Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Mar 06 3 39 2 123 48 37 35 287

Apr 06Mar07 3 28 1 100 75 34 49 290

EASTERN Cases Made Known Apr 05Mar 06 2 9 0 45 7 19 15 97

Apr 06Mar07 0 16 0 51 22 30 19 138

EASTERN Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Mar 06 2 9 0 41 5 20 13 90

Apr 06Mar07 0 16 0 49 16 30 17 128

WESTERN Cases Made Known Apr 05Mar 06 0 13 0 55 20 8 9 105

Apr 06Mar07 1 18 0 65 31 11 12 138

WESTERN Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Mar 06 0 13 0 51 14 8 9 95

Apr 06Mar07 1 17 0 57 21 12 12 120

FORCE Cases Made Known Apr 05Mar 06 5 63 2 247 134 64 61 576

Apr 06Mar07 4 67 0 241 187 77 86 662

FORCE Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Mar 06 5 61 2 215 67 65 57 472

Apr 06Mar07 4 61 1 206 112 76 78 538

It can be seen from the table that there has been a decrease in murder statistics over the previous year. Thankfully these crimes are still very rare in the Tayside area. The number of attempted murders are on a par with the previous year. There has been a marked increase in the number of robbery offences, although the actual numbers are still relatively low overall. The force has responded proactively to the increase in offences, implementing a wide ranging action plan.

Group 2 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 2– Crimes Involving Indecency Rape Assault with intent to Rape Indecent Assault Lewd and Libidinous Practices Indecent Exposure Others Table 2

CENTRAL Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 43 30 8 3 68 66 107 77 19 22 51 28 296 226

CENTRAL Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 46 30 8 4 59 58 116 78 9 12 52 23 290 205

EASTERN Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 22 13 4 1 22 24 29 75 12 11 8 15 97 139

EASTERN Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 23 19 3 2 18 19 34 106 12 7 10 12 100 165

WESTERN Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 25 15 4 6 38 35 42 36 8 10 13 15 130 117

WESTERN Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 24 14 4 6 33 30 45 41 5 5 11 20 122 116

FORCE Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 90 58 16 10 128 125 178 188 39 43 72 58 523 482

FORCE Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05- Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 93 63 15 12 110 107 195 225 26 24 73 55 512 486

There have been decreases in most crimes in this group, with the exception of slight increases in lewd and libidinous practices and indecent exposure. This may be due in part to better reporting in these areas. It is of particular note that rape offences are significantly lower than last year.

Group 3 CENTRAL Cases Made Known Group 3– Crimes Involving Dishonesty Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 Th. HB, w.i. & att – Domestic Dwelling 662 724 Th. HB, w.i. & att – Domestic Non-Dwelling 219 197 Th. HB, w.i. & att – Commercial 286 280 Theft by O.L.P. etc. 342 386 Theft by O.L.P. to a Motor Vehicle etc. 696 490 Theft/Att Theft of M.V. (inc TADA) 522 449 Sec 57/Vagrancy Act etc. 139 126 Theft 4236 4184 Theft from Motor Vehicle 245 175 Reset 63 63 Embezzlement 11 14 Fraud 507 506 Others 129 116 Table 3 8,057 7,710 Classification of Crimes and Offences

CENTRAL Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 150 202 55 37 74 74 176 222 100 87 189 195 132 105 2333 2331 51 21 63 61 8 11 468 423 92 56 3,891 3,825

EASTERN Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 110 104 122 99 95 131 103 122 101 83 123 128 34 31 1546 1546 122 80 18 27 5 5 167 157 20 41 2,566 2,554

EASTERN Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 61 56 53 40 37 58 60 67 39 28 69 86 28 31 841 851 49 33 18 26 3 4 140 109 13 31 1,411 1,420

WESTERN Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 155 173 74 65 150 151 138 244 141 186 181 194 64 65 2066 1984 107 140 29 16 8 4 267 249 40 60 3,420 3,531

WESTERN Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 55 60 21 19 73 64 45 149 41 64 104 123 55 52 1032 1038 36 27 30 15 7 6 220 175 24 29 1,743 1,821

FORCE Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 927 1001 415 361 531 562 583 752 938 759 826 771 237 222 7848 7714 474 395 110 106 24 23 941 912 189 217 14,043 13,795

FORCE Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05- Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 266 318 129 96 184 196 281 738 180 179 362 404 215 188 4206 4220 136 81 111 102 18 21 828 707 129 116 7,045 7,066

The number of offences in this category have reduced overall this year. Although the number of theft HB – dwelling offences has risen compared to last year, this is set against a marked decrease in these offences the previous year. Theft OLP has also shown a significant increase over the previous year. It is believed that this type of crime is linked to illegal controlled drugs market and the force is targeting this area of crime as a priority.

Group 4 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 4– Fireraising, Malicious and Reckless Conduct Fireraising Malicious Damage/Vandalism Others Table 4

CENTRAL Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 137 121 3491 3551 107 135 3,735 3,807

CENTRAL Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 57 51 949 906 79 85 1,085 1,042

EASTERN Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 65 71 1784 1831 55 56 1,904 1,958

EASTERN Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 36 31 632 639 47 50 715 720

WESTERN Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 95 68 2311 1942 74 52 2,480 2,062

WESTERN Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 55 26 775 693 55 38 885 757

FORCE Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 297 260 7586 7324 236 243 8119 7,827

FORCE Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05- Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 148 108 2356 2238 181 173 2,685 2,519

Fire raising offences and those of vandalism, which are of a particular concern to the public, have shown a marked decrease this year. There has been a great deal of police and partnership activity to address these problems this year.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P48/49

Group 5 CENTRAL Cases Made Known Group 5– Other Crimes Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 Public Mischief/Wasting Police Time 163 178 Escape and Rescue 23 26 Resisting Arrest & Obstructing Constable 207 277 General Attempts to Pervert 83 94 Sex Offenders 0 1 Bail – Fail to keep Conditions 832 1085 *Offensive Weapons etc 186 190 Drugs – Supply, Possession w.i. etc. 297 325 Drugs – Possession 1275 1107 Drugs - Others 10 13 Others 55 87 Table 5 3,131 3,383 Classification of Crimes and Offences

CENTRAL Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 163 175 23 23 210 273 81 90 0 1 848 1079 184 187 301 284 1277 1071 10 13 53 84 3,150 3,280

EASTERN Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 80 67 33 9 138 131 47 44 0 0 177 302 74 72 176 166 497 482 5 10 10 27 1,237 1,310

EASTERN Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 80 67 33 9 138 129 47 42 0 0 177 301 74 71 178 163 494 475 5 9 10 26 1,236 1,292

WESTERN Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 56 54 41 52 213 194 39 65 0 0 317 298 75 84 279 289 772 723 12 9 19 18 1,823 1,786

WESTERN Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 66 53 41 50 213 187 38 64 0 0 314 297 75 83 283 266 773 699 12 8 19 17 1,834 1,724

FORCE Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 299 299 97 87 558 602 169 203 0 1 1326 1685 335 346 752 780 2544 2312 27 32 84 132 6191 6,479

FORCE Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05- Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 309 295 97 82 561 589 166 196 0 1 1339 1677 333 341 762 713 2544 2245 27 30 82 127 6,220 6,296

This category of crime is often an indication of the level of police pro activity. It can be seen that there are marked increases in bail offences and drugs supply. These are two areas where the police have been particularly pro active and successful this year.

Groups 1 – 5 TOTALS CENTRAL Cases Made Known Group 3– Crimes Involving Dishonesty Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 Group 1 374 386 Group 2 296 226 Group 3 8057 7710 Group 4 3735 3807 Group 5 3131 3383 TOTALS 15,593 15,512 Classification of Crimes and Offences

CENTRAL Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 287 290 290 205 3891 3825 1085 1042 3150 3280 8,703 8,642

EASTERN Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 97 138 97 139 2566 2554 1904 1958 1237 1310 5,901 6,099

EASTERN Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 90 128 100 165 1411 1420 715 720 1236 1292 3,552 3,725

WESTERN Cases Made Known Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 105 138 130 117 3420 3531 2480 2062 1823 1786 7,958 7,634

WESTERN Cases with Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 95 120 122 116 1743 1821 885 757 1834 1724 4679 4,538

FORCE FORCE Cases Made Cases with Known Persons Traced Apr 05Apr 06Apr 05- Apr 06Mar 06 Mar07 Mar 06 Mar07 576 662 472 53 523 482 512 486 14043 13795 7045 7066 8119 7827 2685 2519 6191 6479 6220 6296 29,452 29,245 16,934 16,905

Groups 1 to 5: In last year’s annual report comment was made on the reduction in numbers of crime recorded and the improvement in the percentage of crimes detected when compared to the previous year. 2006/2007 saw a further drop of 0.7% (207 fewer crimes) in the number of crimes recorded. The percentage of crimes detected also improved again from 57.5% last year to 57.8% at the end of 2006/2007. These two further improvements are evidence of Tayside Police’s continued adherence to the Tayside Policing Style, the National Intelligence Model and Partnership Working through Community Planning.

Complaints against the police – numbers and disposal Number of complaint cases received during the year Number of complaint cases outstanding from the previous year Total number of complaint cases to be processed

2005/2006 291 52 343

2006/2007 352 60 412

6 8 24 157 140 0 2 2

4 5 2 239 109 2 4 3

339

368

14 21 1 0 26

19 12 2 3 15

62

51

Complaint allegations disposed of during the year as follows: Withdrawn by complainer Abandoned due to non co-operation of the complainer Found to be unsubstantiated Resolved by explanation to the complainer Reported to the Procurator Fiscal and leading to ‘No Proceedings’ decision Reported to the Procurator Fiscal and leading to criminal proceedings Resulting in action in terms of misconduct regulations Resulting in Corrective Advice Total Number of complaint cases outstanding as at 31st March as follows: Reporting to and pending the decision of the Procurator Fiscal Still under enquiry by the Investigating Officer Pending Court proceedings Pending Disciplinary Proceedings Otherwise Pending Total

The figure for 2006/07 of 352 sees an increase of 21% from 291 in 2005/06. Of the 368 allegations disposed of during the year 65% (239) were resolved by explanation to the complainer, 30% (109) were reported to the Area Procurator Fiscal leading to a decision not to instigate criminal proceedings and 0.5% (2) have led to criminal proceedings.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


STATISTICS

Number of Working Days lost 2005/2006 Central Eastern Western Headquarters Total Percentage

2006/2007

Police 5955 2135 2967 813

Support 1027 542 871 5768

Police 6111 2972 3030 636

Support 716 558 1274 6299

11870 4.5%

8208 5.3%

12749 4.8%

8847 5.5%

The figures show an increase in working days lost for police officers of 879 days compared to 2005/6. This is the first reported increase since 2001 and is due to an increase in the number of short-term absences and a small number of absences of a longer duration. Support staff absence has increased by 639 days compared with the previous year. This is mainly attributable to an increase in the number of staff with serious long term illnesses within Western and Headquarters divisions. The figure is the third lowest percentage working days lost since 2001.

Authorisation of officers and issue of firearms As at 31 March 2007 Number of officers authorised by Chief Constable as firearms users Number of operations against persons known or believed to be armed in which firearms were issued Number of occasions on which firearms were issued for protection purposes Number of persons who received specific armed protection during the year Number of times firearms were issued to destroy crazed animals Number of incidents where firearms were discharged by the police

65 12 6 8 1 1

Racist Incident reports

Central Eastern Western Total

Incidents Reported 2005/2006 242 69 95 406

2006/2007 242 56 79 377

Number of cases where persons apprehended, reported or warned 2005/2006 2006/2007 187 175 64 50 75 69 326 294

Breakdown of Types of Incidents

Abuse/Br. of the Peace Vandalism Assault Others Total

2005/2006 326 31 42 7 406

2006/2007 315 19 37 6 377

CENTRAL DIVISION During the year there were 242 racist incidents reported to the police in Dundee, which was the same number as in the previous year. Of these reported incidents, 72.3% resulted in the perpetrator being identified and action taken. This was a reduction on the detection figures of the previous year when 77.3% of reported incidents resulted in action being taken. Whilst this is disappointing, in 20% of the cases which were undetected, a suspect was identified but there was insufficient evidence to support further action. The trend of previous years continues with the majority of reports relating to verbal abuse. EASTERN DIVISION Eastern Division continue to prioritise racist incidents. This has seen 50 of the 56 reported incidents being detected. There remains a concern that many of the incidents are of a verbally abusive nature committed by people under the influence of alcohol thus presenting a more complex challenge in our efforts to prevent such incidents occurring.

WESTERN DIVISION During the past year racist incident reporting has shown a decrease of 17% within Western Division with a detection rate of 87%. Racist incidents remain a priority within the Division and are on the agenda at daily and fortnightly tasking meetings. During the year the Divisional Command team hosted meetings with members of the Muslim community and this was very worthwhile and well received. Representatives from the Division play an active role on the Perth and Kinross Racist Incidents Multi-Agency Panel and it is hoped that in the coming year up to 32 schools throughout Division will be able to participate in the Show Racism the Red Card Campaign.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P50/51

Table of comparisons – Road Collisions and Casualties 2005/2006

2006/2007

Increase/Decrease

% Change

Central Division – Dundee District Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

1533 7 62 286 355

1497 1 77 298 376

-36 -6 15 12 21

-2.3% -85.7% 24.2% 4.2% 5.9%

Eastern Division – Angus District Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

1250 7 75 348 430

1123 14 76 281 371

-127 7 1 -67 -59

-10.2% 100% 1.3% -19.3% -13.7%

Western Division – Perth & Kinross Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

1697 13 135 401 549

1799 19 141 391 551

102 6 6 -10 2

6.0% 46.2% 4.4% -2.5% 0.4%

Tayside Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

4480 27 272 1035 1334

4419 34 294 970 1298

-61 7 22 -65 -36

-1.4% 25.9% 8.1% -6.3% -2.7%

Table of Comparisons – Road Collisions and Casualties There has been an overall reduction (1.4%) in the total number of collisions and a reduction (2.7%) in the total number of persons killed and injured from the previous year. However, tragically, 34 persons lost their lives on Tayside roads as compared with 27 persons in the previous year. Central and Eastern Divisions showed decreases in the number of collisions whereas Western Division showed an increase. Within Central Division there was a significant reduction in the number of persons killed from the previous year which reflected the experience of preceding years in this urban division. Unfortunately all other casualty classes increased. Eastern and Western Divisions showed an increase in the number of persons killed: Eastern Division showed an increase of one additional person seriously injured and a significant reduction in persons slightly injured. Western Division showed an increase of six additional persons seriously injured and a small reduction in persons slightly injured. Tayside Police continues to work in close liaison with local authorities and the Scottish Executive to examine and analyse collision history to consider possible engineering solutions. Education and encouragement along with targeted enforcement activities seek to influence road user behaviour and attitudes, thereby enhancing road safety awareness. By comparison with previous years, 2006/7 has seen the lowest ever number of collisions (4419) with a slight increase in the number of injury collisions (997) which is the third lowest across the force since 1990. Whilst there has been a very slight increase in the number of persons killed and seriously injured in general terms the force is maintaining the overall trend to achieve the National Targets set for casualty reduction by 2010.

Table of road users killed and injured Killed 2005/2006 2006/2007 Central Division – Dundee District Pedestrians 3 1 Pedal Cyclists 0 0 0 0 Motor Cyclists 0 0 Motor Cycle Passengers 3 0 Drivers Passengers 1 0 7 1 Totals Eastern Division – Angus District Pedestrians Pedal Cyclists Motor Cyclists Motor Cycle Passengers Drivers Passengers Totals

Injured 2005/2006 2006/2007

Totals 2005/2006

2006/2007

103 21 20 0 128 76 348

102 26 16 1 136 94 375

106 21 20 0 131 77 355

103 26 16 1 136 94 376

1 1 1 0 3 1 7

1 0 1 1 8 3 14

36 17 17 1 214 138 423

43 21 19 1 171 102 357

37 18 18 1 217 139 430

44 21 20 2 179 105 371

Western Division – Perth & Kinross Pedestrians 1 Pedal Cyclists 1 5 Motor Cyclists Motor Cycle Passengers 0 Drivers 6 Passengers 0 Totals 13

3 0 3 0 7 6 19

45 19 47 9 254 162 536

47 16 54 3 263 149 532

46 20 52 9 260 162 549

50 16 57 3 270 155 551

Tayside Pedestrians Pedal Cyclists Motor Cyclists Motor Cycle Passengers Drivers Passengers Totals

5 0 4 1 15 9 34

184 57 84 10 596 376 1307

192 63 89 5 570 345 1264

189 59 90 10 608 378 1334

197 63 93 6 585 354 1298

5 2 6 0 12 2 27

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


STATISTICS

Table of road users killed and injured Regrettably there have been increases in the number of drivers, passengers and motor cycle passengers killed alongwith increases in the number of pedestrians pedal cyclists and motor cyclists injured. Tragically during the year there was a collision in Western Division involving two vehicles which resulted in 5 fatalities and 1 serious injury. Again in Western Division there was a collision involving two vehicles which resulted in 2 fatalities and 2 serious injuries. In Eastern Division there was a collision involving two vehicles which resulted in 2 fatalities and 2 slight injuries. The number of motor cycle related casualties has remained at approximately the same level however it should be recognised that recreational motor cycling continues to expand and many of the rural roads within the force are extremely popular amongst this fraternity. Educational and enforcement activities are carried out in conjunction with our neighbouring forces to influence rider behaviour and to encourage riders and their passengers to use our roads in safety. The “Bikesafe” initiative continues to be supported by Tayside Police and the motor cyclists from the Road Policing Unit engage with riders to enhance their overall awareness and hazard perception. Each participant is offered an on road assessment by specialist motor cycle officers with the aim of improving their general riding skills. Every encouragement is given to riders to seek advanced training to further develop their skills. Tayside Police Road Safety Officers, in conjunction with other personnel, are continuously engaged with local authorities, schools and the National Health Service Tayside to provide education, training and publicity to a wide range of road users. The strategy for Road Safety Education seeks to deliver life long skills to road users at relevant times. This includes the provision of advice and guidance to new parents regarding child in car safety and the vital importance of having appropriate and correctly fitted child safety restraints. Thereafter a series of educational presentations are delivered as children progress through infancy to secondary school to enhance their awareness and develop safe behaviour as they gain greater independence from their parents and unsupervised access to the roads. Children’s Traffic Club Scotland is the principal resource provided to all pre school educators to assist in the delivery of road safety education. In addition parents receive further information when their children progress from nursery to primary school. There is a continuous high level of participation within the Tayside area. The Tayside Police Cycle Training Scheme and the “Walkwise” child pedestrian training programme is offered to every Primary School. These programmes provide both classroom theory and practical on-road training for pupils during important stages of their personal development. Every school has copies of the Road Safety Scotland resource “Streetsense” which allows individual teachers to incorporate specific road safety lessons into curriculum projects. Theatre in Education incorporating road safety messages are offered on a rotational basis to Primary and Secondary Schools. These productions reinforce the various road safety messages the children learn in the classroom and vitally the important role parents have in encouraging safe road behaviour. The interactive teaching resource “Crash Magnets” is utilised in Secondary Schools and Colleges. This active learning package is directed at pre/young drivers and is intended to support other road safety initiatives targeting this vulnerable age group by influencing their attitude and behaviour to encourage safe road practices prior to commencing their driving career. In December 2006 “Safe Drive Stay Alive” was piloted in Dundee. This emotional live theatre presentation which is directed at senior secondary pupils utilises all of the emergency services, road casualty victims and relatives. These people relate their involvement in the aftermath of a collision involving a young person and explain how they cope in dealing with such an unnecessary tragedy. Following on from the success of this event plans are being developed to expand this initiative into both Angus and Perth and Kinross. Whilst the majority of education targets school age pupils other groups are also catered for. Throughout the year opportunities are taken to offer advice and practical demonstrations to various organisations and age groups and every opportunity is taken to publicise and encourage safe road practices. Tayside Safety Camera Partnership continues to influence driver behaviour by publicising locations and routes which have an identified collision and speed related history. Educational material is distributed to target groups and intelligence led enforcement activity is carried out by fixed and mobile cameras. Preliminary data indicates that at sites where cameras are used significant road safety benefits have been achieved.

Collision Pattern 1990 - 2006/07

Fatal Collision Pattern - 1990 - 2006/7

Number of Injury Collisions

Number of Fatal Collisions 60

2000 53

36 30

40

1488 1267

36

34

31 25

20

1569

1388 1368 1369

40 26

30

29 29

29

1335

1249 1283 1221

1000 27

1146

1208 1157 994

1047

2004/05

1500

44

40

2003/04

50

987

997

28

22 500

10

2006/07

2005/06

2002/03

2001/02

2000/01

1999/00

1998/99

1997/98

1996/97

1994

1995/96

1993

1992

Number of Collisions

Number of Fatal Casualties 80

8000 7000

70

60

6000

27

2006/07

2005/06

2004/05

2003/04

2006/07

2005/06

2004/05

2003/04

2002/03

2001/02

2000/01

1999/00

1998/99

1997/98

1996/97

1995/96

1994

1993

1992

1991

0

1990

1000

0

2002/03

2000

10

2001/02

25

2000/01

30

4480 4419

3000

1999/00

28

34

33

1998/99

25

34

4714 4826

1997/98

36

37

1996/97

38

20

5232 5261

4000

1995/96

30

45

45

1994

42

1993

40

6111 5933 5948 5857 5890 5859

5000

50

1992

51

1991

50

6883 6773 6574 6517 6390

1990

70

1991

0 1990

2006/07

2005/06

2004/05

2003/04

2002/03

2001/02

2000/01

1999/00

1998/99

1997/98

1996/97

1994

1995/96

1993

1992

1991

1990

0

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P52/53

Breakdown of 2007/2008 Devolved Budget: Central Division Eastern Division Western Division Sub-total

£’000 “18,639” “11,074” “13,371” “43,084”

22.28 13.24 15.98 51

Crime Management HQ Division Operational Support Sub-total

“5,042” “1,714” “5,933” “55,773”

6.03 2.05 7.09 67

Pensions Sub-total

“13,865” “69,638”

16.57 83

Corporate Support (Balance) Total

“14,025” “83,663”

16.76 100

Approved net revenue budget

“83,663”

100%

Crime Support: Crime Management (Summary) Forensic Lab DNA Lab Records & Stats Data Input Bureau

4467 0 0 182 393

Total

5042

Operations: Operational Co-Ordinator Force Control Room Airwave HQ RPU

1442 3425 500 566

Total

5933

HQ Division: HQ Division GPA IT Business Support Inspection Unit Corporate Planning Performance Management Data Protection Disclosure Executive Support Firearms Admin.

174 1 250 157 405 78 181 -46 365 149

Total

1714

Pensions: “Monthly, Comms, Ill Health Comms” Contributions

18131 -4266

Total

13865

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07

Tayside Joint Police Board approved a net budget of £83.663 million for the financial year 2007/2008. After making adjustments for non-Grant Aided Expenditure (GAE) items the budget was in line with the GAE settlement for the force. Most of this money comes from central government by way of specific police grant paid directly to the Board and from revenue support grant paid to the constituent councils. Certain categories of costs within the budget are non-grant earning and these costs are met in full from the council tax. These however form only a small part of the budget. Included within the budget of £83.663 million is 100% grant funding provided by the Scottish Executive of £306,000 for specific additional Police Officers posts, including ports policing. The Board has approved a capital investment programme of £2.425 million for 2007/2008. This programme includes provision to purchase vehicles, IT equipment, IT & Communications Systems and to carry out building work throughout the force area.


STATEMENT OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

STATEMENT OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE I am responsible for the development, implementation and management of the Code on behalf of the Board and part of this responsibility extends to reviewing and reporting annually on compliance and effectiveness in practice of the Code. In addition, the Chief Internal Auditor is required independently to review our corporate governance arrangements and report each year to the Board. A schedule has been produced which demonstrates how the Force discharges the principles of the Code across its divisions and departments under each of the five dimensions: • Community Focus • Service Delivery Arrangements • Structure and Processes • Risk Management and Internal Controls • Standards of Conduct The Force has underlined its commitment to corporate governance in a number of ways, most notably by: • Setting and publishing challenging performance targets in pursuit of improved service delivery and meeting or performing well in each of those areas.

• Maintaining robust finance monitoring arrangements. • Review the Board’s Standing Orders and Financial Regulations • Developing a Corporate Risk Register and improve the business continuity processes • Addressing risks/improvements arising from internal and external audits and inspections. • Monitoring standards of conduct and reporting to the Board as appropriate. Accepting that further work will be undertaken in 2007-2008, I am satisfied, based on statements and reports prepared by the Chief Officers of the Force and Chief Internal Auditor that our corporate governance arrangements are adequate and operating effectively.

• Engaging with our communities and other stakeholders on a regular basis. • Monitoring performance against Force targets and objectives and ensuring performance management remains a priority. • Underpinning our best value programme by deploying service improvement plans for each division and department.

John Vine, QPM MSc FCIPD Chief Constable

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


P54/55

useful contact numbers and information TAYSIDE POLICE HEADQUARTERS

DRUGS HOTLINE

PO Box 59

To provide information about drugs related incidents of activities in your area call 01382 201444

West Bell Street Dundee DD1 9JU

TAYSIDE HARM REDUCTION SERVICE 01382 424533

Telephone 01382 223200 Fax 01382 200449

SPECIAL BRANCH COMMUNITY CONTACT UNIT

IN AN EMERGENCY DIAL 999

Detective Constables Mark Charnley and Brian Young on 01382 596338

mail@tayside.pnn.police.uk www.tayside.police.uk

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION OFFICER TEXTPHONE - Helpline for users who are deaf or speech impaired – 01382 204500

Tayside Police Headquarters PO Box 59 West Bell Street Dundee

DIVISIONAL HEADQUARTERS

DD1 9JU

Dundee (Central Division HQ) – Dundee 01382 223200

01382 596169

Angus (Eastern Division HQ) – Forfar 01307 302200

e-mail: information@tayside.pnn.police.uk

Perth & Kinross (Western Division HQ) – Perth 01738 621141 CRIME PREVENTION OFFICERS: LOST & FOUND PROPERTY

Dundee – 01382 591937

Dundee – 01382 591591

Angus – 01037 303937

Forfar – 01738 303571

Perth & Kinross – 01738 892937

Perth – 01738 892590

Force Crime Prevention Officer – 01382 596820, fax: 01382 596529

FIREARMS ADMINISTRATION 01382 596858 RECRUITMENT 01382 596212 Email: recruitment@tayside.pnn.police.uk CRIMESTOPPERS To provide anonymous information concerning any crime or incidents in your area call 0800 555 111.

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07

IF YOU REQUIRE A COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT IN A COMMUNITY LANGUAGE OR LARGE PRINT, PLEASE TELEPHONE: (01382) 596742


CHIEF CONSTABLE’S: ANNUAL PEFORMANCE REPORT: 2006/07


Police Annual Statistical Tables 2006-2007 Group 1 CENTRAL Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 1 – Non Sex Cr. Of Violence or Imp. Violence against the Person Murder Attempted Murder Culpable Homicide Serious Assault Robbery (incl attempts) Child Cruelty/Neglect Others Table 1

CENTRAL

Cases Known

Made

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

3 41 2 147 107 37 37 374

3 33 0 125 134 36 55 386

3 39 2 123 48 37 35 287

EASTERN

EASTERN

Cases Known

Made

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

3 28 1 100 75 34 49 290

2 9 0 45 7 19 15 97

0 16 0 51 22 30 19 138

2 9 0 41 5 20 13 90

WESTERN

WESTERN

Cases Known

Made

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

0 16 0 49 16 30 17 128

0 13 0 55 20 8 9 105

1 18 0 65 31 11 12 138

0 13 0 51 14 8 9 95

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Known

Made

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

1 17 0 57 21 12 12 120

5 63 2 247 134 64 61 576

4 67 0 241 187 77 86 662

5 61 2 215 67 65 57 472

4 61 1 206 112 76 78 538

It can be seen from the table that there has been a decrease in murder over the previous year. Thankfully these crimes are still very rare in the Tayside area. The number of attempted murders is on a par with the previous year. There has been a marked increase in the number of robbery offences, although the actual numbers are still relatively low overall. The force has responded proactively to the increase in offences, implementing a wide ranging action plan.

Group 2 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 2– Crimes Involving Indecency Rape Assault with intent to Rape Indecent Assault Lewd and Libidinous Practices Indecent Exposure Others Table 2

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

43 8 68 107 19 51 296

30 3 66 77 22 28 226

46 8 59 116 9 52 290

30 4 58 78 12 23 205

22 4 22 29 12 8 97

13 1 24 75 11 15 139

23 3 18 34 12 10 100

19 2 19 106 7 12 165

25 4 38 42 8 13 130

15 6 35 36 10 15 117

24 4 33 45 5 11 122

14 6 30 41 5 20 116

90 16 128 178 39 72 523

58 10 125 188 43 58 482

93 15 110 195 26 73 512

63 12 107 225 24 55 486

There have been decreases in most crimes in this group, with the exception of slight increases in lewd and libidinous practices and indecent exposure. This may be due in part to better reporting in these areas. It is of particular note that rape offences are significantly lower than last year.


Group 3 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 3– Crimes Involving Dishonesty Th. HB, w.i. & att – Domestic Dwelling Th. HB, w.i. & att – Domestic Non-Dwelling Th. HB, w.i. & att – Commercial Theft by O.L.P. etc. Theft by O.L.P. to a Motor Vehicle etc. Theft/Att Theft of M.V. (inc TADA) Sec 57/Vagrancy Act etc. Theft Theft from Motor Vehicle Reset Embezzlement Fraud Others Table 3

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

662 219 286 342 696 522 139 4236 245 63 11 507 129 8,057

724 197 280 386 490 449 126 4184 175 63 14 506 116 7,710

150 55 74 176 100 189 132 2333 51 63 8 468 92 3,891

202 37 74 222 87 195 105 2331 21 61 11 423 56 3,825

110 122 95 103 101 123 34 1546 122 18 5 167 20 2,566

104 99 131 122 83 128 31 1546 80 27 5 157 41 2,554

61 53 37 60 39 69 28 841 49 18 3 140 13 1,411

56 40 58 67 28 86 31 851 33 26 4 109 31 1,420

155 74 150 138 141 181 64 2066 107 29 8 267 40 3,420

173 65 151 244 186 194 65 1984 140 16 4 249 60 3,531

55 21 73 45 41 104 55 1032 36 30 7 220 24 1,743

60 19 64 149 64 123 52 1038 27 15 6 175 29 1,821

927 415 531 583 938 826 237 7848 474 110 24 941 189 14,043

1001 361 562 752 759 771 222 7714 395 106 23 912 217 13,795

266 129 184 281 180 362 215 4206 136 111 18 828 129 7,045

318 96 196 738 179 404 188 4220 81 102 21 707 116 7,066

The number of offences in this category has reduced overall this year. Although the number of theft HB – dwelling offences have risen compared to last year, this is set against a marked decrease in these offences the previous year. Theft OLP has also shown a significant increase over the previous year. It is believed that this type of crime is linked to illegal controlled drugs market and the force is targeting this area of crime as a priority.

Group 4 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 4– Fireraising, Malicious and Reckless Conduct Fireraising Malicious Damage/Vandalism Others Table 4

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

137 3491 107 3,735

121 3551 135 3,807

57 949 79 1,085

51 906 85 1,042

65 1784 55 1,904

71 1831 56 1,958

36 632 47 715

31 639 50 720

95 2311 74 2,480

68 1942 52 2,062

55 775 55 885

26 693 38 757

297 7586 236 8119

260 7324 243 7,827

148 2356 181 2,685

108 2238 173 2,519

Fire raising offences and those of vandalism, which are of a particular concern to the public, have shown a marked decrease this year. There has been a great deal of police and partnership activity to address these problems this year.


Group 5 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 5– Other Crimes Public Mischief/Wasting Police Time Escape and Rescue Resisting Arrest & Obstructing Constable General Attempts to Pervert Sex Offenders Bail – Fail to keep Conditions *Offensive Weapons etc Drugs – Supply, Possession w.i. etc. Drugs – Possession Drugs - Others Others Table 5

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

163 23 207 83 0 832 186 297 1275 10 55 3,131

178 26 277 94 1 1085 190 325 1107 13 87 3,383

163 23 210 81 0 848 184 301 1277 10 53 3,150

175 23 273 90 1 1079 187 284 1071 13 84 3,280

80 33 138 47 0 177 74 176 497 5 10 1,237

67 9 131 44 0 302 72 166 482 10 27 1,310

80 33 138 47 0 177 74 178 494 5 10 1,236

67 9 129 42 0 301 71 163 475 9 26 1,292

56 41 213 39 0 317 75 279 772 12 19 1,823

54 52 194 65 0 298 84 289 723 9 18 1,786

66 41 213 38 0 314 75 283 773 12 19 1,834

53 50 187 64 0 297 83 266 699 8 17 1,724

299 97 558 169 0 1326 335 752 2544 27 84 6191

299 87 602 203 1 1685 346 780 2312 32 132 6,479

309 97 561 166 0 1339 333 762 2544 27 82 6,220

295 82 589 196 1 1677 341 713 2245 30 127 6,296

This category of crime is often an indication of the level of police pro activity. It can be seen that there are marked increases in bail offences and drugs supply. These are two areas where the police have been particularly pro active and successful this year.

Groups 1 – 5 TOTALS Classification of Crimes and Offences

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Group 1

374

386

287

290

97

138

90

128

105

138

95

120

576

662

472

538

Group 2

296

226

290

205

97

139

100

165

130

117

122

116

523

482

512

486

Group 3

8057

7710

3891

3825

2566

2554

1411

1420

3420

3531

1743

1821

14043

13795

7045

7066

Group 4

3735

3807

1085

1042

1904

1958

715

720

2480

2062

885

757

8119

7827

2685

2519

Group 5

3131

3383

3150

3280

1237

1310

1236

1292

1823

1786

1834

1724

6191

6479

6220

6296

TOTALS

15,593

15,512

8,703

8,642

5,901

6,099

3,552

3,725

7958

7,634

4679

4,538

29,452

29,245

16,934

16,905

Groups 1 to 5: In last year’s annual report comment was made on the reduction in numbers of crime recorded and the percentage of crimes recorded when compared to the previous year. 2006/2007 saw a further drop of 0.7% (207 fewer crimes) in the number of crimes recorded. The percentage of crimes detected also improved from 57.5% last year to 57.8% at the end of 2006/2007. These two further improvements are evidence of Tayside Police’s continued adherence to the Tayside Policing Style, the National Intelligence Model and Partnership Working through Community Planning.


Group 6 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 6– Other Offences Betting, Gaming and Lotteries Petty Assault Breach of the Peace Racially Agg. Harassment/Conduct False Calls and Bomb Hoaxes Brokers Children and Young Persons Act Cruelty to Animals (except Dogs) Offences involving Animals and Birds Dogs Act and Orders Explosives and Firearms Fishery Laws Game Laws Deer (S) Act Offences Liquor Laws - Drunkenness Liquor Laws - Licensees Liquor Laws – Other Offences Civic Govt. (S) Act and Similar Provs. Public Health Bicycle Offences Obstruction on Roads and Bridges Trespass Acts, etc Other Group 6 Offences Table 6

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

0 2,151 3,243 197 5 0 2 0 1 29 27 0 0 0 714 10 46 33 150 41 11 2 753 7,415

0 2752 3,371 176 13 0 4 0 2 24 19 0 0 0 661 10 34 13 106 16 1 0 935 8,137

0 1,625 3,243 165 5 0 2 0 1 29 27 0 0 0 714 10 46 33 150 41 11 2 753 6,857

0 2,013 3,371 135 13 0 4 0 2 24 19 0 0 0 661 10 34 13 106 16 1 0 935 7,357

0 1,109 1,585 61 1 0 8 1 2 41 13 2 2 0 124 13 34 2 42 35 2 21 311 3,409

0 1,358 1,683 44 1 0 1 2 2 65 12 0 0 0 127 11 25 10 31 40 3 9 342 3,766

0 1,012 1,585 54 1 0 8 1 1 41 13 2 2 0 124 13 34 2 42 35 2 21 311 3,304

0 1,144 1,683 39 1 0 1 2 1 65 12 0 0 0 127 11 25 10 31 40 3 9 342 3,546

0 1,281 2,022 76 3 0 2 3 1 36 29 1 4 0 295 9 20 10 34 3 2 3 265 4,099

0 1,451 1,646 54 5 0 2 2 3 24 15 1 3 0 281 1 17 4 29 3 3 0 282 3,826

0 1,060 2,022 62 3 0 2 3 1 36 29 1 4 0 295 9 20 10 34 3 2 3 265 3,864

0 1,165 1,646 49 5 0 2 2 2 24 15 1 3 0 281 1 17 4 29 3 3 0 282 3,534

0 4,541 6,850 334 9 0 12 4 4 106 69 3 6 0 1,133 32 100 45 226 79 15 26 1,329 14,923

0 5,561 6,700 274 19 0 7 4 7 113 46 1 3 0 1,069 22 76 27 166 59 7 9 1,559 15,729

0 3,697 6,850 281 9 0 12 4 3 106 69 3 6 0 1,133 32 100 45 226 79 15 26 1,329 14,025

0 4,322 6,700 223 19 0 7 4 5 113 46 1 3 0 1,069 22 76 27 166 59 7 9 1,559 14,437

This category covers a range of offences. Of particular note is the rise in petty assault. This is an area where there has been much police activity this year and this will continue in an effort to reduce this type of offending which is often associated with the over consumption of alcohol in a domestic or street setting.

Group 7 CENTRAL Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 7– Offences Relating to Motor Vehicles Dangerous and Careless Driving Road Traffic Act 1988, Section 4 Road Traffic Act 1988, Section 5 *Vehicle Excise Act Offences *Speeding in Built-up Areas *Speeding outwith Built-up Areas *Other Motor Vehicle Offences Table 7 *Including Conditional Offers

CENTRAL

Cases Known

Made

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

359 35 286 671 4,687 478 7,760 14,276

334 34 271 535 4,215 581 8,275 14,245

359 35 286 671 4,687 478 7,760 14,276

EASTERN

EASTERN

Cases Known

Made

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

334 34 271 535 4,215 581 8,275 14,245

406 37 213 320 436 4,407 5,222 11,041

339 21 208 255 495 3,557 4,639 9,514

406 37 213 320 436 4,407 5,222 11,041

WESTERN

WESTERN

Cases Known

Made

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

339 21 208 255 495 3,557 4,639 9,514

299 23 230 262 856 11,515 5,814 18,999

269 16 246 248 570 12,583 5,695 19,627

299 23 230 262 856 11,515 5,814 18,999

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Known

Made

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 06Mar 07

269 16 246 248 570 12,583 5,695 19,627

1,064 95 729 1253 5,979 16,400 18,796 44,316

942 71 725 1038 5,280 16,721 18,609 43,386

1,064 95 729 1253 5,979 16,400 18,796 44,316

942 71 725 1038 5,280 16,721 18,609 43,386


Complaints Against the Police 2005/2006 291

2006/2007 352

52

60

343

412

Withdrawn by complainer

6

4

Abandoned due to non co-operation of the complainer

8

5

24

2

Resolved by explanation to the complainer

157

239

Reported to the Procurator Fiscal and leading to ‘No Proceedings’ decision Reported to the Procurator Fiscal and leading to criminal proceedings Resulting in action in terms of misconduct regulations Resulting in Corrective Advice

140 0 2 2

109 2 4 3

339

368

14 21 1 0 26

19 12 2 3 15

62

51

Complaints against the police – numbers and disposal Number of complaint cases received during the year Number of complaint cases outstanding from the previous year Total number of complaint cases to be processed Complaint allegations disposed of during the year as follows:

Found to be unsubstantiated

Total Number of complaint cases outstanding as at 31st March as follows: Reporting to and pending the decision of the Procurator Fiscal Still under enquiry by the Investigating Officer Pending Court proceedings Pending Disciplinary Proceedings Otherwise Pending Total

The figure for 2006/07 of 352 sees an increase of 21% from 291 in 2005/06. Of the 368 allegations disposed of during the year 65% (239) were resolved by explanation to the complainer, 30% (109) were reported to the Area Procurator Fiscal leading to a decision not to instigate criminal proceedings and 0.5% (2) have led to criminal proceedings.


Number of Working Days Lost

Central Eastern Western Headquarters Total Percentage

2005/2006 Police Support 5955 1027 2135 542 2967 871 813 5768 11870 4.5%

8208 5.3%

2006/2007 Police Support 6111 716 2972 558 3030 1274 636 6299 12749 4.8%

8847 5.5%

The figures show an increase in working days lost for police officers of 879 days compared to 2005/6. This is the first reported increase since 2001 and is due to an increase in the number of short-term absences and a small number of absences of a longer duration. Support staff absence has increased by 639 days compared with the previous year. This is mainly attributable to an increase in the number of staff with serious long term illnesses within Western and Headquarters divisions. The figure is the third lowest percentage working days lost since 2001.

Authorisation of Officers and Issue of Firearms As at 31 March 2007 Number of officers authorised by Chief Constable as firearms users Number of operations against persons known or believed to be armed in which firearms were issued Number of occasions on which firearms were issued for protection purposes Number of persons who received specific armed protection during the year Number of times firearms were issued to destroy crazed animals Number of incidents where firearms were discharged by the police

65 12 6 8 1 1


Racist Incident Reports Incidents Reported Central Eastern Western Total

2005/2006 242 69 95 406

2006/2007 242 56 79 377

2005/2006 326 31 42 7 406

2006/2007 315 19 37 6 377

Number of cases where persons apprehended, reported or warned 2005/2006 2006/2007 187 175 64 50 75 69 326 294

Breakdown of Types of Incidents

Abuse/Br. of the Peace Vandalism Assault Others Total

CENTRAL DIVISION During the year there were 242 racist incidents reported to the police in Dundee, which was the same number as in the previous year. Of these reported incidents, 72.3% resulted in the perpetrator being identified and action taken. This was a reduction on the detection figures of the previous year when 77.3% of reported incidents resulted in action being taken. Whilst this is disappointing, in 20% of the cases which were undetected, a suspect was identified but there was insufficient evidence to support further action. The trend of previous years continues with the majority of reports relating to verbal abuse, as does reports in relation to country of origin which continue to increase."

EASTERN DIVISION Eastern Division continue to prioritise racist incidents. This has seen 50 of the 56 reported incidents being detected. There remains a concern that many of the incidents are of a verbally abusive nature committed by people under the influence of alcohol thus presenting a more complex challenge in our efforts to prevent such incidents occurring.

WESTERN DIVISION During the past year racist incident reporting has shown a decrease of 17% within Western Division with a detection rate of 87%. Racist incidents remain a priority within the Division and are on the agenda at daily and fortnightly tasking meetings. During the year the Divisional Command team hosted meetings with members of the Muslim community and this was very worthwhile and well received. Representatives from the Division play an active role on the Perth and Kinross Racist Incidents Multi-Agency Panel and it is hoped that in the coming year up to 32 schools throughout Division will be able to participate in the Show Racism the Red Card Campaign.


Table of comparisons – Road Collisions and Casualties 2005/2006

2006/2007

Increase/Decrease

% Change

Central Division – Dundee District Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

1533 7 62 286 355

1497 1 77 298 376

-36 -6 15 12 21

-2.3% -85.7% 24.2% 4.2% 5.9%

1250 7 75 348 430

1123 14 76 281 371

-127 7 1 -67 -59

-10.2% 100% 1.3% -19.3% -13.7%

1697 13 135 401 549

1799 19 141 391 551

102 6 6 -10 2

6.0% 46.2% 4.4% -2.5% 0.4%

4480 27 272 1035 1334

4419 34 294 970 1298

-61 7 22 -65 -36

-1.4% 25.9% 8.1% -6.3% -2.7%

Eastern Division – Angus District Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

Western Division – Perth & Kinross Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

Tayside Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

There has been an overall reduction (1.4%) in the total number of collisions and a reduction (2.7%) in the total number of persons killed and injured from the previous year. However, tragically, 34 persons lost their lives on Tayside roads as compared with 27 persons in the previous year. Central and Eastern Divisions showed decreases in the number of collisions whereas Western Division showed an increase. Within Central Division there was a significant reduction in the number of persons killed from the previous year which reflected the experience of preceding years in this urban division. Unfortunately all other casualty classes increased. Eastern and Western Divisions showed an increase in the number of persons killed. Eastern Division showed an increase of one additional person seriously injured and a significant reduction in persons slightly injured. Western Division showed an increase of six additional persons seriously injured and a small reduction in persons slightly injured. Tayside Police continues to work in close liaison with local authorities and the Scottish Executive to examine and analyse collision history to consider possible engineering solutions. Education and encouragement along with targeted enforcement activities seek to influence road user behaviour and attitudes, thereby enhancing road safety awareness. By comparison with previous years, 2006/7 has seen the lowest ever number of collisions (4419) with a slight increase in the number of injury collisions (997) which is the third lowest across the force since 1990. Whilst there has been a very slight increase in the number of persons killed and seriously injured in general terms the force is maintaining the overall trend to achieve the National Targets set for casualty reduction by 2010.


Table of road users killed and injured Killed 2005/2006

Injured 2006/2007

2005/2006

Totals

2006/2007

2005/2006

2006/2007

Central Division – Dundee District Pedestrians

3

1

103

102

106

103

Pedal Cyclists

0

0

21

26

21

26

Motor Cyclists

0

0

20

16

20

16

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

0

0

1

0

1

Drivers

3

0

128

136

131

136

Passengers

1

0

76

94

77

94

Totals

7

1

348

375

355

376

Pedestrians

1

1

36

43

37

44

Pedal Cyclists

1

0

17

21

18

21

Motor Cyclists

1

1

17

19

18

20

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

1

1

1

1

2

Drivers

3

8

214

171

217

179

Passengers

1

3

138

102

139

105

Totals

7

14

423

357

430

371

Pedestrians

1

3

45

47

46

50

Pedal Cyclists

1

0

19

16

20

16

Motor Cyclists

5

3

47

54

52

57

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

0

9

3

9

3

Drivers Passengers

6 0

7 6

254 162

263 149

260 162

270 155

13

19

536

532

549

551

Pedestrians

5

5

184

192

189

197

Pedal Cyclists

2

0

57

63

59

63

Motor Cyclists

6

4

84

89

90

93

Eastern Division – Angus District

Western Division – Perth & Kinross

Totals Tayside

Motor Cycle Passengers Drivers Passengers

Totals

0

1

10

5

10

6

12

15

596

570

608

585

2

9

376

345

378

354

27

34

1307

1264

1334

1298


Regrettably there have been increases in the number of drivers, passengers and motor cycle passengers killed along with increases in the number of pedestrians pedal cyclists and motor cyclists injured. Tragically during the year there was a collision in Western Division involving two vehicles which resulted in 5 fatalities and 1 serious injury. Again in Western Division there was a collision involving two vehicles which resulted in 2 fatalities and 2 serious injuries. In Eastern Division there was a collision involving two vehicles which resulted in 2 fatalities and 2 slight injuries. The number of motor cycle related casualties has remained at approximately the same level however it should be recognised that recreational motor cycling continues to expand and many of the rural roads within the force are extremely popular amongst this fraternity. Educational and enforcement activities are carried out in conjunction with our neighbouring forces to influence rider behaviour and to encourage riders and their passengers to use our roads in safety. The "Bikesafe" initiative continues to be supported by Tayside Police and the motor cyclists from the Road Policing Unit engage with riders to enhance their overall awareness and hazard perception. Each participant is offered an on road assessment by specialist motor cycle officers with the aim of improving their general riding skills. Every encouragement is given to riders to seek advanced training to further develop their skills. Tayside Police Road Safety Officers, in conjunction with other personnel, are continuously engaged with local authorities, schools and the National Health Service Tayside to provide education, training and publicity to a wide range of road users. The strategy for Road Safety Education seeks to deliver life long skills to road users at relevant times. This includes the provision of advice and guidance to new parents regarding child in car safety and the vital importance of having appropriate and correctly fitted child safety restraints. Thereafter a series of educational presentations are delivered as children progress through infancy to secondary school to enhance their awareness and develop safe behaviour as they gain greater independence from their parents and unsupervised access to the roads. Children’s Traffic Club Scotland is the principal resource provided to all pre school educators to assist in the delivery of road safety education. In addition parents receive further information when their children progress from nursery to primary school. There is a continuous high level of participation within the Tayside area. The Tayside Police Cycle Training Scheme and the “Walkwise” child pedestrian training programme is offered to every Primary School. These programmes provide both classroom theory and practical on-road training for pupils during important stages of their personal development. Every school has copies of the Road Safety Scotland resource "Streetsense" which allows individual teachers to incorporate specific road safety lessons into curriculum projects. Theatre in Education incorporating road safety messages are offered on a rotational basis to Primary and Secondary Schools. These productions reinforce the various road safety messages the children learn in the classroom and vitally the important role parents have in encouraging safe road behaviour. The interactive teaching resource "Crash Magnets" is utilised in Secondary Schools and Colleges. This active learning package is directed at pre/young drivers and is intended to support other road safety initiatives targeting this vulnerable age group by influencing their attitude and behaviour to encourage safe road practices prior to commencing their driving career. In December 2006 “Safe Drive Stay Alive” was piloted in Dundee. This emotional live theatre presentation which is directed at senior secondary pupils utilises all of the emergency services, road casualty victims and relatives. These people relate their involvement in the aftermath of a collision involving a young person and explain how they cope in dealing with such an unnecessary tragedy. Following on from the success of this event plans are being developed to expand this initiative into both Angus and Perth and Kinross. Whilst the majority of education targets school age pupils other groups are also catered for. Throughout the year opportunities are taken to offer advice and practical demonstrations to various organisations and age groups and every opportunity is taken to publicise and encourage safe road practices. Tayside Safety Camera Partnership continues to influence driver behaviour by publicising locations and routes which have an identified collision and speed related history. Educational material is distributed to target groups and intelligence led enforcement activity is carried out by fixed and mobile cameras. Preliminary data indicates that at sites where cameras are used significant road safety benefits have been achieved.


Fatal Collision Pattern ~ 1990 – 2006/2007 Number of Fatal Collisions 60 50 40 30 53 44

20

36

40

40

36

34

31 25

10

26

29

30

29

29

27

28

22

0

Number of Fatal Casualties

80 70 60 50 40 70

30 51

20 10 0

50 42

45

45 38

36 25

28

34

37 30

25

34

33 27


Collision Pattern 1990 – 2006/07 Number of Injury Collisions 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800

1569

1488

1388

1368

1369

600

1267

1335

1249

1283

1221

1146

1208

1157 994

1047

4714

4826

987

997

4480

4419

400 200 0

Number of Collisions

8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 6883 3000

6773

6574

6517

6390

6111

5933

5948

5857

5890

5859 5232

2000 1000 0

5261


Table of road users killed and injured Killed Under 16

Injured

16 and Over

Under 16

16 and Over

Central Division – Dundee District Pedestrians

0

1

47

55

Pedal Cyclists

0

0

7

19

Motor Cyclists

0

0

1

15

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

0

1

0

Drivers

0

0

0

136

Passengers

0

0

14

80

Totals

0

1

70

305

0

1

24

19

Pedal Cyclists

0

0

11

10

Motor Cyclists

0

1

0

19

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

1

0

1

Drivers

0

8

0

171

Passengers

1

2

21

81

Totals

1

13

56

301

Pedestrians

1

2

16

31

Pedal Cyclists

0

0

3

13

Eastern Division – Angus District Pedestrians

Western Division – Perth & Kinross

Motor Cyclists

0

3

0

54

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

0

0

3

Drivers

0

7

0

263

Passengers

0

6

21

128

Totals

1

18

40

492

Pedestrians

1

4

87

105

Pedal Cyclists

0

0

21

42

Tayside

Motor Cyclists

0

4

1

88

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

1

1

4

Drivers

0

15

0

570

Passengers

1

8

56

289

Totals

2

32

166

1098


Misuse of Drugs Seizures Drug

Weight

05 – 06

06 – 07

Heroin

380

409

Cocaine

191

174

MDMA (Ecstasy)

LSD

108

05 – 06

Psilocybin

9

06 – 07 15838.37

7784

05 – 06

06 – 07

1,299,956

2,645,008

52,261

737,156

871

12285.93

10310

34123.5 tabs 18.833g

30,930

102,370 282

73

805.52

219

2,417

13 4

Approx. Value (£)

NIL

NIL

NIL

Amphetamine 956

56834.62

6565

NIL

168,563

14728.52

692

5714.03

26

141

7

12

MST

7

Temazepam

Powder

107

140

Tablets

5

NIL

Resin

1294

722

Herbal

124

136

Plants

26

Morphine

14,396

568,346

19,686

NIL

482,089

42,124

1978

16,342

1423

24,657

249,025

23.1

191

6

31,897

2

112

38

3857

190.00

7

10

108

82

108

82.00

Dihydrocodeine

32

41

1136

2066

568

1033

Steroids

Nil

NIL

Nil

NIL

Nil

NIL

Viagra

Nil

3

Nil

83

Nil

664.00

Temgesic

Nil

2

Nil

1

Nil

2.54

Cannabis

Pharmaceuticals


Dipipanone

Nil

NIL

Nil

12

Nil

96.00

Diazepam

147

194

61,732

20591.61

61,732

20,592

Nitrazepam

Nil

3

Nil

50

Nil

50.00

Detromoramide

Nil

NIL

Nil

NIL

Nil

NIL

Distigesic

Nil

NIL

Nil

NIL

Nil

NIL

Codeine

Nil

NIL

Nil

3

Nil

1.50

Zopiclone

Nil

NIL

Nil

NIL

Nil

NIL

Unknown

Nil

NIL

Nil

NIL

Nil

NIL

7

409mls

151 mls

Methadone Linctus

30.00

Methadone Tablets Total Seizures

2439

1903

Total Value Detected drugs offences

4,417,708 05-06

3,333

06-07

2,988


Table of Statutory Performance Indicators Category

Crimes (Groups 1 to 5) % cleared up Serious Violent Crime ~ crimes made known Serious Violent Crime ~ % cleared up Domestic Housebreaking ~ crimes made known Domestic Housebreaking ~ % cleared up Drugs: Number of Crimes made known ~ supply, possession with intent etc.04/05 Class A only) Racist Crime ~ % cleared up Car Crime ~ crimes made known Car Crime ~ % cleared up Roads Policing Unit ~ a) Number of people killed/seriously injured Roads Policing Unit ~ b) Number of children killed/seriously injured Roads Policing Unit ~ c) Number of slight casualties Sickness Absence ~ % working time lost - a) Police Officers Sickness Absence ~ % working time lost - b) Support Staff Complaints ~ per 100 Employees 999 Calls Reports sent to Procurator Fiscal within 28 days Reports sent to The Children’s Reporter within 10 days

2005/2006 Result 57.5% 682 85% 927 28.7% 255

2006/2007 Target 52% No Target 88% No Target 30% 260

2006/2007 Result 57.8% 718 83.8% 1001 31.8%

Target Achieved YES ~ NO ~ YES YES

84.1% 2238 30.3% 299

85% No Target 29% 305

81.4% 1925 34.5% 328

NO ~ YES NO

42

39

36

YES

1033 4.5% 5.3% 14.3 90.6% 64.9% 84.3%

1138 4.2% 5% 14 90% 75% 80%

970 4.8% 5.5% 17 90.7% 72% 80.7%

YES NO NO NO YES NO YES


CHIEF CONSTABLE'S ANNUAL REPORT POLICE RANK PROFILE (as at 31 March 2007) RANK

TOTAL 1 1 1 5 9 18 54 160 925

% 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.43 0.77 1.53 4.60 13.63 78.79

FEMALE 0 0 0 2 0 4 6 16 259

% 0.00 0.00 0.00 40.00 0.00 22.22 11.11 10.00 28.00

MALE 1 1 1 3 9 14 48 144 666

% 100.00 100.00 100.00 60.00 100.00 77.78 88.89 90.00 72.00

TOTALS

1174

100.00

287

24.45

887

Promoted Posts

249

100.00

28

11.24

Officers working Part-Time

38

100.00

37

Special Constables

173

100.00

56

Chief Constable Deputy Chief Constable Assistant Chief Constable Chief Superintendent Superintendent Chief Inspector Inspector Sergeant Constable

TOTAL MINORITY ETHNIC

FEMALE MINORITY ETHNIC

%

MALE MINORITY ETHNIC

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.11

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

% 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.65

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

% 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.76

75.55

7

0.60

1

0.09

6

0.51

221

88.76

0

0.00

0

0

0

0

97.37

1

2.63

0

0.00

0

0

0

0

32.37

117

67.63

5

2.89

1

0.58

4

2.31

COMMENTS: The above figures, for the purposes of Equal Opportunities monitoring include police officers who are on secondments or career breaks and also include: 1 Temporary DCC (Male) & 1 Temporary ACC (Male) 1 Temporary Chief Superintendent (Female) 1 Temporary Superintendent (Male) 2 Temporary Inspectors (Males) 7 Temporary Sergeants (2 Females & 5 Males) Since March 2006, the number of minority ethnic police officers has increased by 2 to 7 (0.6%), with 1 female and 6 male officers. For the purposes of this report, the figure is based upon visible minority ethnic police officers. Since March 2006, the total number of female officers has increased by 8 to 287 (24.5%), whilst the total number of male officers has decreased by 11 to 887 (75.5%). The number of promoted posts held by women has increased by 4 to 28 (11.2%), whilst the number of promoted posts held by men decreased by 4 to 221 (88.8%). The total number of police officers who work on a part-time basis within the force is 38 (3.2%). Since March 2006, the number of minority ethnic special constables has decreased by 1 to 5 (2.9%), with 1 female special constable and 4 male special constables. 2 male special constables joined the force as regular police officers. For the purposes of this report, the figure is based upon visible minority ethnic special constables. Since March 2006, the total number of special constables has increased by 15 to 173. The total number of female special constables has increased by 6 to 56 (32.4%), whilst the total number of male special constables has increased by 9 to 117 (67.6%).


CHIEF CONSTABLE'S ANNUAL REPORT SUPPORT STAFF PROFILE (as at 31 March 2007) TOTAL MINORITY

GRADE Chief Officers (CO) Professional (PO) Technical (TE) Administrative (AP) Clerical (GS) Other TOTALS

TOTAL 3 67 77 274 223 82

FEMALE 1 29 34 198 149 56

% 33.33 43.28 44.16 72.26 66.82 68.29

MALE 2 38 43 76 74 26

% 66.67 56.72 55.84 27.74 33.18 31.71

ETHNIC

0 1 1 2 2 2

% 0.00 1.49 1.30 0.73 0.90 2.44

726

467

64.33

259

35.67

8

1.10

COMMENTS: Since March 2006, the number of minority ethnic support staff has increased by 2 to 8 (1.1%). For the purposes of this report, the figure is based upon visible minority ethnic support staff. Since March 2006 the ratio of female and male support staff has seen a 1.2% reduction to 64.3% for female support staff and 1.2% increase to 35.7% male support staff. A total of 29.5% of support staff work on a job-share or part-time basis. This has increased by 4% since March 2006.


CHIEF CONSTABLE'S ANNUAL REPORT POLICE PROMOTIONS (April 2006 to March 2007)

RANK Constable to Sergeant Constable to Temporary Sergeant Temporary Sergeant to Sergeant Sergeant to Inspector Sergeant to Temporary Inspector Temporary Inspector to Inspector Inspector to Chief Inspector Inspector to Temporary Chief Inspector Temporary Chief Inspector to Chief Inspector Chief Inspector to Superintendent Chief Inspector to Temporary Superintendent Temporary Superintendent to Superintendent Superintendent to Chief Superintendent Superintendent to Temporary Chief Superintendent Temporary Chief Superintendent to Chief Superintendent Chief Superintendent to Temporary ACC Chief Superintendent to ACC ACC to Temporary DCC TOTALS

TOTAL 6 7 0 5 2 1 2 0 1 0 2 2 1 1 0 1 0 1

FEMALE 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

% 33.33 14.29 0.00 20.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 100.00 100.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

MALE 4 6 0 4 2 1 2 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 1

% 66.67 85.71 0.00 80.00 100.00 100.00 0.00 0.00 100.00 0.00 100.00 100.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 100.00 0.00 100.00

32

6

18.75

26

81.25

TOTAL MINORITY ETHNIC

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

%

FEMALE MINORITY ETHNIC

%

MALE MINORITY ETHNIC

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

% 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

COMMENTS: Between April 2006 and March 2007, 32 police officers were promoted, 6 female officers (18.8%) and 26 male officers (81.2%). Of the police officers promoted 14 (43.8%) were on a temporary basis (2 females, 12 males). There were no minority ethnic officers who were eligible to apply for promotion during this period. For the purposes of this report, the figure is based upon visible minority ethnic police officers. Officers who are interested in promotion and who meet the criteria, must make a formal application and go through an assessment process to check competence for the next rank.


CHIEF CONSTABLE'S ANNUAL REPORT SUPPORT STAFF PROMOTIONS (April 2006 to March 2007)

TOTAL

FEMALE

%

MALE

%

TOTAL MINORITY ETHNIC

Sub-Total

0 0

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

PO Grades Temporary PO5 P04 PO3 Temporary PO2 PO1 Sub-Total

1 1 1 1 1 5

0 1 0 0 0 1

0.00 100.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 20.00

1 0 1 1 1 4

100.00 0.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 80.00

0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

TE Grades TE2-TE3 TE1-4 Sub-Total

1 1 2

0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00

1 1 2

100.00 100.00 100.00

0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00

AP Grades AP3-AP4 Temporary AP3-AP4 AP3 Temporary GS1-AP4 AP2 Temporary AP2 AP1-AP2 AP1 Temporary AP1 Sub-Total

1 1 1 1 2 1 1 5 1 14

1 1 1 1 2 0 1 4 1 12

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 0.00 100.00 80.00 100.00 85.71

0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 100.00 0.00 20.00 0.00 14.29

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

Sub-Total

0 0

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

TOTALS

21

13

61.90

8

38.10

0

0.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

GRADE Chief Officers Grades

%

FEMALE MINORITY ETHNIC

%

MALE MINORITY ETHNIC

%

GS Grades


COMMENTS: Between April 2006 and March 2007, 21 Support Staff were promoted, 13 females and 8 males. 28.6% of those promoted during this period, were promoted on a temporary basis. There were no minority ethnic support staff promoted into higher graded posts during this period. For the purposes of this report, the figure is based upon visible minority ethnic support staff. Support Staff can apply for a higher graded advertised post within the organisation. This involves going through the same recruitment and selection process as any other applicant who does not currently work for Tayside Police.


CHIEF CONSTABLE'S ANNUAL REPORT POLICE OFFICER LEAVERS (April 2006 to March 2007) REASON FOR LEAVING

DEATH IN SERVICE DISMISSALS RESIGNATIONS RETIRALS TRANSFERS TOTALS

% TOTAL

FEMALE

1 0 16 28 2 47

0 0 5 2 0 7

% MALE

0.00 0.00 31.25 7.14 0.00 14.89

1 0 11 26 2 40

FEMALE MINORITY

MALE MINORITY

ETHNIC

%

ETHNIC

%

0.00 0.00 68.75 92.86 100.00 85.11

0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

%

FEMALE MINORITY

SUPPORT STAFF LEAVERS (April 2006 to March 2007) REASON FOR LEAVING

DISMISSALS END OF TEMPORARY CONTRACT RESIGNATIONS RETIRALS TRANSFERS OTHER TOTALS

% TOTAL

FEMALE

2 5 34 16 1 1 59

2 4 25 10 1 1 43

MALE 100.00 80.00 73.53 62.50 100.00 100.00 72.88

0 1 9 6 0 0 16

MALE MINORITY

ETHNIC

%

ETHNIC

%

0.00 20.00 26.47 37.50 0.00 0.00 27.12

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 1 0 0 0 1

0.00 0.00 2.94 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.69

%

FEMALE MINORITY

SPECIAL CONSTABLE LEAVERS (April 2006 to March 2007) REASON FOR LEAVING

APPOINTED TO REGULARS RESIGNATIONS TRANSFERS TOTALS

% TOTAL

FEMALE

8 15 2 25

3 8 1 12

MALE 37.50 53.33 50.00 48.00

5 7 1 13

62.50 46.67 50.00 52.00

MALE MINORITY

ETHNIC

%

ETHNIC

%

0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

2 0 0 2

25.00 0.00 0.00 8.00

COMMENTS: Between April 2006 to March 2007, a total of 47 police officers left the force (7 females, 40 males). Between April 2006 to March 2007, a total of 59 support staff left the force (43 females, 16 males). 1 minority ethnic male resigned from the force. Between April 2006 to March 2007, a total of 25 special constables left the force (12 females, 13 males). 2 minority ethnic male Special Constables joined the force as Police Officers during this period. For the purposes of this report, the minority ethnic figures are based upon visible minority ethnic staff.


CHIEF CONSTABLE'S ANNUAL REPORT RECRUITMENT (From April 2006 to March 2007) FEMALE MINORITY

POLICE OFFICER Application Forms Received Recruited

TOTAL FEMALE 9 3 44 13

% 33.33 29.55

MALE 6 31

% 66.67 70.45

SPECIAL CONSTABLE Application Forms Received Recruited

TOTAL FEMALE % 162 64 39.51 40 18 45.00

MALE 98 22

% 60.49 55.00

SUPPORT STAFF Application Forms Received Recruited

TOTAL FEMALE % 3588 2247 62.63 105 69 65.71

MALE 1332 36

% 37.12 34.29

MALE MINORITY

ETHNIC

%

ETHNIC

0 0

0.00 0.00

1 2

FEMALE MINORITY ETHNIC

1 0

MALE MINORITY

% 0.62 0.00

FEMALE MINORITY ETHNIC

38 1

% 11.11 4.55

ETHNIC

10 1

% 6.17 2.50

MALE MINORITY

% 1.06 0.95

ETHNIC

66 0

FEMALE

% 1.84 0.00

GJIS

26 0.00

MALE

% 0.72 0.00

GJIS

42 0

% 1.17 0.00

COMMENTS: Tayside Police is currently implementing the recommendations stemming from the recruitment review which was completed in 2006. In relation to police officer recruitment the recommendations will allow a faster processing of applications whilst ensuring the process itself remains robust and meets the requirements for the post. Already the implementation of better relationship management has begun to bear fruit with four minority ethnic applicants to the Accelerated Promotion Scheme for Graduates compared with none in recent years. Although none were successful all have successfully completed Tayside Police's recruitment process for the Regulars and will be joining during 2007. The impact of the review will also ensure that the level of knowledge of those involved in recruitment will be maintained and increased through the updating of the Recruitment and Selection Guidance and regular updates via the intranet. A Service Level Agreement is also being developed for recruitment to ensure everyone is aware of their responsibilities. Police Officers During this period, Tayside Police were not accepting applications as we already had sufficient candidates in the recruitment process. The majority of officers recruited during this reporting period had applied to the Force before April 2006. Although there have been no applications received for police officers during 2006 except for Accelerated Promotion Scheme for Graduates, interest in joining Tayside Police remains extremely high with a great deal of interest being shown at careers events and through contact by telephone or e-mail. Recruitment is set to resume in mid 2007 and it is unlikely that there will be a need for widescale advertising although more targeted advertising towards under-represented groups will take place. The anticipated quicker processing of applications will hopefully alleviate any concerns amongst individual that the process is too long. 9 Accelerated Promotion Scheme for Graduates applications were received from 33.3% females and 66.7% males. 11.1% of these applications received were from minority ethnic applicants. Of those applicants who were successful in joining the force, 29.6% of new recruits during the period April 2006 - March 2007 were female and 4.5% of new recruits were from a minority ethnic background.


COMMENTS:

Special Constables There has been a significant increase in interest from students during 2006 to become Special Constables. This has been partly from the push by Universities and colleges to get students to undertake voluntary work to assist their CVs and an increased interest in using the Specials as a stepping stone into the regulars. Better contact is therefore being made with the further education establishments to foster this interest. The Special Constabulary is also continuing to prove a valuable tool in gaining interest in the police service from under-represented groups.

162 applications were received from applicants expressing an interest in joining Tayside Police as a Special Constable. 39.5% of applications were from females and 60.5% were from males. 6.8% of applications were received from applicants from minority ethnic backgrounds. Of those applicants who were successful in joining the force, 45% of those joining as a Special Constable during the period April 2005 -March 2006 were female and 2.5% of new Special Constables were from a minority ethnic background. Support Staff Of the 3588 applications received between April 2006 and March 2007, 105 individuals were recruited. 1 minority ethnic applicant was recruited during this time. The Recruitment Team are currently looking at ways to increase applications from minority ethnic applicants and applicants with disabilities. Out of the large number of applications received, 9 applicants did not specify their gender and 9 applicants chose not to specify their ethnic origin on the Equal Opportunities Monitoring form.


CHIEF CONSTABLE'S ANNUAL REPORT POLICE AGE PROFILE (as at 31 March 2007) AGE GROUP 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ TOTALS

TOTAL 33 376 465 296 4 0

% 2.81 32.03 39.61 25.21 0.34 0.00

FEMALE 12 146 104 25 0 0

% 36.36 38.83 22.37 8.45 0.00 0.00

MALE 21 230 361 271 4 0

% 63.64 61.17 77.63 91.55 100.00 0.00

1174

100.00

287

24.45

887

75.55

TOTAL MINORITY ETHNIC

%

0 4 2 1 0 0

0.00 1.06 0.43 0.34 0.00 0.00

7

0.60

SUPPORT STAFF AGE PROFILE (as at 31 March 2007) AGE GROUP 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ TOTALS

TOTAL 32 168 221 191 111 3

% 4.41 23.14 30.44 26.31 15.29 0.41

FEMALE 25 113 156 124 47 2

% 78.13 67.26 70.59 64.92 42.34 66.67

MALE 7 55 65 67 64 1

% 21.88 32.74 29.41 35.08 57.66 33.33

726

100.00

467

64.33

259

35.67

TOTAL MINORITY ETHNIC

%

2 3 2 1 0 0

6.25 1.79 0.90 0.52 0.00 0.00

8

1.10

SPECIAL CONSTABLE AGE PROFILE (as at 31 March 2007) AGE GROUP 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ TOTALS

TOTAL 47 51 39 25 11 0

% 27.17 29.48 22.54 14.45 6.36 0.00

FEMALE 20 20 12 4 0 0

% 42.55 39.22 30.77 16.00 0.00 0.00

MALE 27 31 27 21 11 0

% 57.45 60.78 69.23 84.00 100.00 0.00

173

100.00

56

32.37

117

67.63

TOTAL MINORITY ETHNIC

%

3 0 1 1 0 0

6.38 0.00 2.56 4.00 0.00 0.00

5

2.89


Tayside Police Annual Report 2006-2007