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TAYLORS a community plan

2016


Taylors

community plan Greenville County Planning Department 301 University Ridge, Suite 3800 Greenville, SC 29601

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contents Acknowledgments Introduction Taylors History Taylors Today Plan Implementation Identification & Branding Parks, Greenways, & Beautification Commercial Opportunities Plates Future Land Use

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3 5 6 7 14 16 18 22 37


Acknowledgments GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

GREENVILLE COUNTY PLANNING and CODE COMPLIANCE STAFF

Bob Taylor, Chairman Butch Kirven, Vice Chair Joe Baldwin Lynn Ballard Jim Burns Sid Cates Joe Dill Lottie Gibson Willis Meadows Xanthene Norris Fred Payne Liz Seman

Paula Gucker, Assistant County Administrator Eric Vinson, Director Scott Park, Development Services Manager Tom Meeks, Planning Manager Tyler Stone Suzanne Terry Patrea St. John Jonathan Hanna Andrew Ratchford

ADDITIONAL STAKEHOLDERS

GREENVILLE COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION

Taylor Town Square Alex Reynolds, President Chip Bentley, Vice President Sue Manwaring Mark Owens Doug Young Roger Whitehead with the support of Taylors First Baptist Church

Milton Shockley, Chairman Metz Looper, Vice Chair Steven Bichel Chris Harrison Nick Hollingshad Katherine Howard Fred Moore Jay Rogers Dave Stevenson

Taylors Fire and Sewer District Strange Brothers Construction Arnett Muldrow Associates

Clemson University a.LINE.ment studio Mary Beth McCubbin, Professor Nicole Cary John Lawson Good Brandon S. Green Nick Hernandez Hannah Job Evan Lawson Gunnar Lowe Patrick Petron Emily Petz Coker Plowden Benjamin Chad Smith Matthew Smith

Keep Greenville County Beautiful (KGCB) Lowe's Home Improvement, Store #1718 Greenville County Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Ty Houck Colin Young TreesGreenville

The School District of Greenville County Brook Glenn Elementary School Bernice Jackson, Principal Brushy Creek Elementary School Charles Davis, Jr., Principal Taylors Elementary School Rhonda Rhodes, Principal Greenville County Library, Taylors Branch Beth Atwood, Branch Manager

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An Introduction to the plan

A Brief History

new church served as a gathering place, and Taylor’s Station increasingly resembled a town. In addition to its spiritual functions, the church governed community decorum and created a sense of civic accountability among its members.

of taylors

The Taylors Community Plan was initiated by Greenville County Council in July 2013 to lend assistance to a grassroots effort beginning in the area. Taylors Town Square (TTS), a local organization of residents and businesses began meeting in October 2012 and by that May, they were engaged in setting community priorities. The first formal interaction between TTS and Greenville County was on July 16, when TTS invited the Greenville County Planning Staff who presented a planning strategy that led to a formal community plan process.

The area enjoyed continued commercial growth and an influx of new residents, during the early part of the nineteenth century. Taylor’s Station became Taylors in 1904. The town’s improving infrastructure created greater connectivity with surrounding areas, serving as a route for motorists traveling between Roanoke, Virginia and Atlanta, Georgia.

The settlement of present-day Taylors, South Carolina predated the American Revolution. During the late 1700’s, South Carolina’s General Assembly established land grants on the head branches of Lick Creek of the Enoree River, an area called Chick Springs.

Greenville’s expansive textile industry did not reach Taylors until 1924. The opening of The Southern Bleachery spurred the development of a mill village complete with affordable, attractive housing, a school, and a new church. During World War II, the Bleachery produced cloth for uniforms, bedding and tents. The mill resumed normal operations at the close of the war and served as a community fixture until operation ceased in July of 1965.

In 1840, Dr. Burwell Chick’s purchase of these tracts of land and development of a resort ushered in a new period of economic prosperity for the area. The destination’s minerals springs attracted wealthy patrons seeking to harness its purported healing effects, until its destruction during the Civil War. During Reconstruction, Chick Springs struggled to recover economic stability. In 1870, the prospect of a new rail line prompted sawmill owner Alfred Taylor to acquire the land that would become Taylors, South Carolina.

The objective of this community plan is to help ensure future prosperity by recommending strategic land use decisions. With the help of community residents and stakeholders, this plan focuses on the heart of Taylors, specifically Taylors Mill, Main Street, Wade Hampton Boulevard, and greenways to connect recreational opportunities.

The community unanimously voted in favor of the Atlanta and Richmond Air Line Road, which commenced freight and passenger service in 1873. Known today as the Southern Railway, the line reinvigorated the community, and the center of economic activity shifted to the depot at Taylor’s Station. From its founding, Taylors heavily emphasized religion. A congregation of seventeen members founded Chick Springs Church in 1864. After the addition of the railroad, the church moved to Taylor’s Station and became Taylors First Baptist Church. The

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Historic Chick Springs Hotel

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Taylors Today

rebound and grow at a rate comparable to the rest of Greenville County as a whole. Both public and private investment and revitalization of the region’s historic business district and 100 year-old textile mill, will continue to affect the community’s growth and appeal. The Taylors Community lost more than 4.5 percent of its total population between 2000 and 2010, reflecting trends, which saw losses in similarly situated in-town areas, as well as the effects of the late 2000’s recession. However, the total population of the Taylors Community is once again on the rise, with an estimated population of 1,231 in 2015, up 4.3 percent since 2010.

The Taylors Community can be considered a suburban residential area that has an identifiable main street that provides important quality of life opportunities for education, recreation, and religious purposes. There are some commercial and service opportunities along Main Street as well. The more intense, highwayoriented commercial development is found along Wade Hampton Boulevard.

Demographics Summary Population Households Families Average Household Size Owner Occupied Housing Units Renter Occupied Housing Units Median Age

Taylors can be defined geographically in many ways. The Taylors zip code encompasses 18 square miles, but this planning effort focused on the areas that were of primary interest to the citizens of the Taylors Community. In general, Taylors is characterized mostly as a suburban residential area located between the cities of Greenville and Greer. Specifically for this plan, the focus area was Wade Hampton Boulevard east to the Taylors Mill (plate 2).

1,231 514 327 2.39 314 201 35.4 Source: ESRI, 2016

Average Annual Growth Rate by decade Taylors Greenville County South Carolina

After reviewing citizen input through surveys and community meetings, the primary issues that were identified as needed to be addressed in this planning effort led to the identification of a study area. This area includes Main Street, the Taylors Mill, the Enoree River, the Chicks Spring Resort, and associated commercial development along Wade Hampton Boulevard.

2000-2010 2010-2020 -0.45% 1.02% 1.89% 1.42% 1.53% 0.97% Source: ESRI, 2016

Population by Age

250

232

200 161

150

164

119

100

104 86

88 67

70

64

50

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After several years of population decline, the Taylors Community, highlighted in Plate 14, is expected to

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Source: ESRI, 2016

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4 -8 75

4 -7 65

4 -6 55

4 -5 45

4 -5 35

4 -3 25

4 -2 20

9 -1 15

4 -1 10

9 5-

As mentioned above, numerous surveys were conducted prior to and during the planning process. The Taylors Town Square conducted a survey to establish a baseline perspective of their meeting attendees while other

TAYLORS DEMOGRAPHICS

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SURVEY AND RESULTS

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35 surveys were directed at answering specific questions on priorities and branding. The following discussion describes the results of these surveys.

What we like best: Taylors is

Priorities in Taylors

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INITIAL SURVEY

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It’s not every day when you make the decision to invest in rebuilding your own neighborhood. That idea was the objective of an exercise titled “If I spent $100 in Taylors,” which showed a dramatic focus towards quality of life issues like parks, identity, and beautification. However, a significant number of residents and their dollars were dedicated to infrastructure matters such as redevelopment, commercial uses, and sidewalks.

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The initial survey of this process was compiled by Taylors Town Square prior to the county involvement, and was important step in identifying the overall perspective of the community. The results of the survey are represented partially in the adjacent graphic.

Figure 1: "If I Spent $100 in Taylors" exercise results (votes counted) 37.5

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Figure 2: "If I Spent $100 in Taylors" exercise results (values calculated)

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The results of this survey (Figs. 1, 2) steered the planning focus into three categories: community identification & branding; parks, greenways, & beautification (including sidewalks, codes, safety, and history); and commercial opportunities (including redevelopment and infrastructure). These three core issues were then studied by workgroups to explore development options. The workgroups collaborated with a team of students from Clemson’s a.LINE.ment Studio, who created various development scenarios based upon the workgroup priorities.

Priorities in Taylors - Spending

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Plan Implementation & methodology

Iconic Main Street lanterns.

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Identification & Branding Figure 3: Taylors branding designed by Arnett Muldrow and Associates.

Figure 4: Taylors Town Square branding.

Taylors Mill Taylors Library Chick Springs Park

Historic Main Street

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MyTaylors.org

Figure 5: Sample wayfinding applications demonstrating the new

Figure 6: Sample advertisement demonstrating the new

Taylors branding designed by Arnett Muldrow and Associates.

Taylors branding designed by Arnett Muldrow and Associates.

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One of the top priorities among the Taylors residents was to better identify the area by establishing a brand. To address this issue quickly, an additional activity was added with help from both in-house County staff in cooperation with Taylors Town Square and a private planning firm. This public/non-profit/private partnership resulted in a robust range of options for Taylors’ organizations to freely use and incorporate into their own outreach strategy.

future while establishing solidarity around a powerful shared potential and sense of direction.

Since expertise existed in-house among County staff, a series of exercises were fashioned to drill down to a series of options in line with residents’ likes. The feedback was compiled into a consolidated branding proposal back to the community (for example, Fig. 7). In addition, Arnett Muldrow and Associates (AMA) further refined and applied a brand to bumper stickers and t-shirts for Taylors Town Square fundraising (Figs. 3,4).

The results of the AMA exercise were based on the lights atop masonry columns flanking the entrance of the Taylors Mill. The focus on their public meetings resulted in a perspective to present a simple, clean, but bold and easy to understand logo. The deliberate colors related to the copper materials and craftsmanship of the lights.

Utilizing the parameters from the survey results, staff could establish guidelines for the design. These guidelines incorporated the following traits: • an original typeface in script style • traditional, yet progressive design • a contemporary or traditional context • potentially including an illustrated element, but capable of standing alone • opportunity to work with historical/contextual notes • a versatile and ageless design To see an example of a potential implementation, see Figure 6.

As a result of these exercises, residents, businesses, and other organizations in the area have full access to a wide variety of branding options.

The first branding exercise began with a visual preference survey which gathered general information on tastes. Together, with a questionnaire, staff compiled details on residents’ desired goals and community focus (objectives). These objectives included fostering a sense of common identity and community pride. This community identity could be established by developing a bridge between Taylors’ rich heritage and its promising

Figure 7: Taylors prototype branding designed by Greenville County staff.

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Parks, Greenways, & Beautification

Community Branding & Identification Goal: To identify branding design options and applications Objectives: • Develop community brand

Time Frame: • Completed

• Identify how community brand can be incorporated throughout community • Establish wayfinding signage/street signage

• Short to Medium

• Establish community entrance signs • identify locations and sign orientation • coordinate with local sign regulations regarding size, location, and placement

• Medium

• Medium/Partially Completed

Resources: • Arnett Muldrow Associates, local printers and designers, planning staff • Local printers and designers, local businesses • Greenville County, SCDOT, local sign companies, artists, KGCB, Lowe's, Strange Brothers • SCDOT, property owners, business/ corporate sponsors

Goal: Establish neighborhood not-for-profit Objectives: • Develop Taylors Town Square as a nonprofit organization

Time Frame: • Completed

Resources: • Citizens, stakeholders, planning staff

The importance of the area's history, proximity to natural resources, as well as the general property maintenance and safe living were key objectives for this workgroup. The County completed some minor maintenance issues including demolition of two derelict structures on Main Street. With the help of the Clemson a.LINE.ment studio, some longerterm objectives were captured through a range of scenarios showing potential trail connections among Corey Burns Park, Taylors Mill, and future Chick Springs Park.

Enoree River. Three possible destinations were identified: Corey Burns Park, Taylors Mill, and the future Chick Springs Historic Park. The long term goal is to eventually connect the Enoree River greenway trail to the existing GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail. Strange Brothers Grading owns a potential link, and have indicated a trail would be welcome in the future. Another significant objective was to gain better signage to Corey Burns Park. Especially with a significant trail connection, this park will attract significant additional traffic. Currently, the only access to the site is by car through a single-family neighborhood. No signage currently exists except for the entrance which is nested within the neighborhood.

The future Chick Springs Park preservation and designation as a County park has been a focus since the beginning of the planning process. At the writing of this plan, preliminary discussions regarding maintenance of the site by the County was favorable. Two additional projects, completed in September 2014, centered on installing directional signage and the development of a disc golf course, both at Taylors Mill. Both projects were a result of grants and partnership among local businesses, churches, individuals and Taylors Town Square.

GREENWAYS The main goal of this workgroup was connecting community recreational opportunities along the

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Exploring a potential Enoree River Trail route.

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Commercial Opportunities

Parks, Greenways, & Beautification Goal: Establish additional parks in the Taylors area Objectives: • Create the Chick Springs Park

Time Frame: • Medium

Objectives: • Create the Taylors Mill Park

Time Frame: • Medium/Partially Completed

Resources: • Greenville County Recreation, Taylors Town Square Resources: • Taylors Mill, TreesGreenville, planning staff

Goal: To create a greenway network for the Taylors community along the Enoree River Objectives: Time Frame: • Identify alternative routes and affected • Short (completed) properties • Begin discussions with property owners to • Short to Medium determine the feasibility of accessing their (ongoing) property from the Chick Springs property to the Taylors Mill • Begin preliminary discussions with property • Medium to Long owners from Taylors Mill to Corey Burns Park

Resources: • Taylors Town Square, Greenville County Recreation • Taylors Town Square, Greenville County Recreation, Renewable Water Resources (ReWa) • Taylors Town Square, Greenville County Recreation

Goal: To coordinate and identify a location for connection with the City of Greer's trail system Objectives: Time Frame: • To begin initial discussions with the City of • Short (ongoing) Greer • To identify potential connections between greenway systems • To select the best route(s) and identify affected properties

• Short to Medium (preliminary discussions) • Long

Resources: • City of Greer Recreation, Greenville County Recreation, Taylors Town Square • City of Greer Recreation, Greenville County Recreation, Taylors Town Square • City of Greer Recreation, Greenville County Recreation, Taylors Town Square

Goal: Beautify Wade Hampton Boulevard and Main Street, Taylors Objectives: • Establish plantings within medians and along roadways

Time Frame: • Medium to Long

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Resources: • SCDOT, Trees Greenville, Taylors Town Square, planning staff

As identified in the various community surveys and in the community meetings, the need to redevelop and develop commercial shopping opportunities was an important issue to the Taylors Community. An overall desire was to have a walkable retail area that allowed for residential and workplace opportunities.

include commercial retail in addition to residential. Some of the details with a favorable response from residents was a rendering by the a.LINE.ment Studio showing a fourth leg of the signalized intersection with parking behind a row of mixed-use buildings that incorporate existing structures (Plates 5,6). This orientation of buildings and associated amenities including sidewalks, signage, parking, and may require amendments to the Zoning Ordinance to accomplish. Setbacks, on-street parking, and signage standard may be addressed in a text amendment proposal.

MAIN STREET

Further details of the future condition of Main Street included additional development and preservation of the existing single-family neighborhoods. Most areas are planned for low and medium density residential development, while the plan calls for preserving the existing Mill community housing (Plate 6).

Main Street is the main artery through the downtown area. Its 2.3 miles traverses a mixture of land uses that include single-family residential, small businesses, an instution of higher learning, places of worship and fellowship, personal services, branch library, and recreation. This Main Street Area has the basic fabric to provide a walkable, enjoyable, sense of place. Survey results indicated that more opportunities were needed for passive recreation, common open space, and better pedestrian access. As mentioned above, the Clemson students provided several concepts that provided more medium density development to help create a demand for goods and services in the Main Street area. The focus of this study was the southern half (1.5 miles) of this two-lane, State-maintained road. The overall goal for Main Street was to develop a mixed-use, walkable, downtown-like development at the intersection with Mills Street. Existing buildings are historical commercial, one an iconic gas station. A significant land owner of the intersection is interested in the redevelopment potential. This redevelopment would complement the development of the mill and

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TAYLORS MILL

shopping opportunities, but are dismayed with vacant buildings. To the south, the City of Greenville recently landscaped significant road frontage within their municipal boundaries, while the City of Greer has annexed significant commercial areas to the north. Among these municipalities exists a diverse, organized, and approachable Taylors community.

Taylors Mill, with its more than 75 acres of riverfront property and over 800,000 sq ft of floor space, has spurred revitalization for the community that began with rezoning the property in 2011 to a Planned Development (PD). The intention of the Taylors Mill PD would transform the mill for a wide variety of uses including commercial, restaurant, office, and residential.

Clemson University's a.LINE.ment studio helped channel ideas into different scenarios, this workgroup directed different scales of development in these identified areas. On Wade Hampton Boulevard, the long term vision was to add a Transit Oriented Development, or TOD, that would combine many uses with significant bus service facility, all located strategically between downtown Greenville, downtown Greer and the GSP Airport. Such a transit serviced commercial hub would be located at an intersection with significant development or redevelopment potential and include high density residential mixed with retail and office development.

The Taylors Mill has shown the greatest development activity during the past three years. It’s an everchanging mix of manufacturing, studios, retail, and service which is now attracting larger tenants such as breweries, a farmers’ market, and event spaces. The long-term economic potential should be positive, and the near-term results a benefit to the community.

WADE HAMPTON BOULEVARD Residents characterize the Wade Hampton Boulevard corridor with a full spectrum of descriptions. They are delighted with new and renovated buildings and

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Commercial Development Opportunities: Main Street Goal: To create a more walkable, pedestrian-friendly environment in the Main Street area Objectives: • Conduct an inventory of the existing pedestrian infrastructure • Identify locations where the Main Street existing network can be connected and expanded • Identify costs associated with needed sidewalk network improvements and potential funding sources

Time Frame: • Short to Medium

Resources: • Greenville County Planning

• Medium to Long

• Greenville County Roads and Bridges

• Medium to Long

• Greenville County Roads and Bridges, Greenville County Planning, grants, foundations, LRTP project

Goal: To create a Main Street Taylors Development District Objectives: Time Frame: • Identify what factors need to be addressed, • Short i.e. mixed-use, signage, landscaping/ streetscaping, lighting, connectivity, etc. • Draft an ordinance to address the identified • Short to Medium factors • Adopt the ordinance as an amendment to • Medium to Long the County's Zoning Ordinance

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Resources: • Greenville County Planning • Citizens, stakeholders, planning staff • Planning Commission, County Council


Plates Commercial Development Opportunities: Taylors Mill Goal: Establish the Mill as a commercial center for Taylors Objectives: Time Frame: • Maintain appropriate permitting and • Short/Partially master planning for the Planned Completed Development to meet the needs of new and expanding businesses • Establish/Maintain appropriate directional • Short/Partially signage for visitors to and within the site Completed • Establish a Taylors Mill presence at • Short Chambers of Commerce

maps, concepts, scenarios, & schematics

Resources: • Taylors Mill, businesses, planning staff • Taylors Mill, planning staff • Taylors Mill, Taylors Town Square

Commercial Development Opportunities: Wade Hampton Boulevard Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Goal: To locate a transit oriented development along Wade Hampton Boulevard Objectives: • Create a TOD Land Use Regulation • Identify a strategic location for a TOD • Develop an incentive package to market/ develop a TOD

Time Frame: • Short to Medium • Medium • Medium

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Resources: • Greenville County Government • GTA, Greenlink, Greenville County • Grants, foundations, State of South Carolina, Greenville County, Taylors Fire and Sewer

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23 24 Plate 2: Taylors Area points of interest

Plate 1: General Proximity of Taylors Area


25 26 Plate 4: Example Clemson a.LINE.ments studio concept

Plate 3: Example Clemson a.LINE.ments studio concept


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Plate 7: Hillside Dr/Wade Hampton Blvd Intersection Scenario

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31 L RD

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Plate 10: Hillside Dr/Wade Hampton Blvd Intersection Schematic

Plate 9: Main Street Schematic

MAIN ST

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32

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ON T P

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HILLSID

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Mixed-Use

Mixed-Use

High Density Residential

Medium Density Residential

High Density Residential

Medium Density Residential

Mixed-Use

High Density Residential

Medium Density Residential


ST M A RK RD

33 Plate 13: Proposed Pedestrian Amenities

ST

Plate 11: St. Mark Rd/Wade Hampton Blvd Intersection Schematic

WA

AM

H DE

LVD

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Mixed-Use

High Density Residential

Medium Density Residential


Future Land Use

The next step of the planning process was to convert these concepts into development scenarios (Plates 5-8). The goal of this presentation was to highlight the possible future build-out condition. Staff compiled these scenarios and included building types, footprints, as well as proposing updated and new roadways. This presentation has more detail than any future land use map, the ultimate product of this plan; but provides an expression of the most intense use. In essence, these presentations allowed the public to offer feedback on the appropriateness to these proposed uses. Much of the discussion and feedback on these scenarios were positive; however, significant feedback showed support for new and updated roadways, preference for TOD to be located closer to public amenities (Plate 10) over a location further from Main Street (Plate 11), and the

Plate 14: Proposed Future Land Use Map

The Taylors Community Plan is a vision of the Taylors Community in the future. It represents the efforts of many citizens, businesses, and stakeholders who have worked hard to identify what they want the Taylors Community to be in the next ten to twenty years. The previous sections identified many action strategies that will need to be accomplished and those organizations who can help implement them to create this vision. Many of the plan’s recommendations can also be graphically displayed in a Future Land Use Map.

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The planning process and the creation of planning tools utilized to help direct land use is often difficult to conceptualize. The following procedure created scenarios of varying details with the hope to establish a better comfort among residents with the potential volume of future development. The process included a series of three separate exercises that refined residents’ brainstorming to be applied to Future Land Use categories. The first iteration leveraged help from students from the Clemson University’s a.LINE.ment studios (Plates 3, 4) . This group served as the first step to translate brainstorming ideas from the public meetings onto paper. These wide ranging ideas often included examples from elsewhere around the world to provide concrete examples of development.

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preservation of single-family residential mill housing on Mill Street (Plate 6) compared to redevelopment of multi family residential (Plate 5).

The Future Land Use Map is the community's preferred land use development strategy. The Future Land Use Map identifies Land Use Categories that describe the type of development (i.e. residential, commercial, mixed use, etc.) that the plan is advocating and a general location of where this development could occur (Plate 14).

The final step on the scenario planning was to incorporate feedback from the detailed plans towards a more general schematic that would better mimic the Future Land Use map. This stage provided for additional public comment and confirmation for potential future development (Plates 9-11). For instance, Plate 9 shows a high density residential use proposed on Mill Street; but the Future Land Use Map (Plate 14) was ultimately changed to maintain the existing density. However, the higher density residential was favored as a buffer to the proposed Mixed Commercial designation at the intersection of Mill Street and Main Street. Overall, the preferred alternative between the proposed TOD development was at the intersection of Wade Hampton Boulevard and Hillside Drive. The proximity to established businesses, services, and public amenities made this the best location for this type of development.

This plan will serve as a guide for Planning Commission and County Council as they consider development proposals and rezoning requests. Having an adopted community plan is also important when applying for grants for particular purposes. It also sends a very positive message to builders and developers that the community is working toward a common goal and is fully supportive of the plan. These Future Land Use categories are identified and defined in the following text. Additionally, it assists the County Council and Planning Commission with growth development issues that may come before them.

Table 1. Taylors Future Land Use Future Land Use Category

Office/Commercial Density

Residential Density

Potential Zoning

TOD: Commercial/Residential

high

high/multi-family

PD, POD, FRD

Mixed Use: Business/Pedestrian

high

medium/multi-family

PD, POD, NC, FRD

Commercial

variable

high

C-1, C-2, C-3

Residential: Low Density

none

single-family

R-R1, R-5

Residential: Medium Density

none

single-family

R-15, R-10, R-7.5

Residential: High Density

none

multi-family

R-M5 through R-20

variable none

none none

S-1 I-1, I-2

Service Industrial

The Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary on Main Street.

Table 1 identifies these land use categories and also identifies the most appropriate zoning classifications that permit those land uses to occur in their zoning district. The possibility exists that new types of zoning districts may need to be created to allow some uses and conditions mentioned in the plan, which County staff are ready to help develop.

Residential Land Use 1 This land use classification represents areas intended for agricultural, open space and large-lot residential uses (1 acre minimum). Recommended zoning: R-R1.

Residential Land Use 2

FUTURE LAND USE CATEGORIES:

This land use classification represents typical single family residential suburban growth and infill areas allowing a housing density of 4-6 units/ acre. Recommended zoning: R-12, R-10, R-7.5, R-6.

Rural Land Use 1 This land use classification represents areas intended for agricultural, open space and large-lot residential uses (1 acre minimum). Recommended zoning: R-R1.

Residential Land Use 2 This land use classification represents typical multifamily residential suburban growth areas typically within walking distance to amenities such as shopping and transit. This category would focus on providing housing density of at least 6 units/ acre. Recommended zoning: R-M6 through R-M20.

Rural Land Use 2

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The intent of this classification is to provide for low density, (large lot) single family residential development, as well as agricultural and forestry related land uses. These areas are generally rural agricultural in character (3 acre minimum). Recommended zoning: R-R3.

Public Facility The intent of this classification is to allow prominent facilities that benefit the public. These facilities

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contribute to the general welfare of the community.

office uses. This use is appropriate for transitional areas located between higher intensity commercial centers and lower density single family residential areas. Residential densities of 4-6 units per acre are typical while offices should not exceed 5,000 sq. ft. in size. Recommended zoning: POD, OD, PD, NC, and FRD.

Office & Neighborhood Commercial This land use allows for limited retail, personal service, and professional office uses. This land use is appropriate for arterial roads and major thoroughfares and typically serves as a transitional use between residential areas and high intensity commercial areas. Maximum square footage of retail uses should not exceed 15,000 sq. ft. Recommended zoning: POD, OD, FRD.

Commercial Retail Community commercial design within the planned commercial centers will be subject to specific design standards applied through the use of overlay districts. Recommended zoning: NC, C-1, C-3, FRD.

Employment Center: Warehousing/Industrial This category is mainly to encompass the most significant concentration of employment in the area. For that reason, it is important to prioritize new and expand available services while allowing for appropriate, complementary land uses. Recommended zoning: I-1, I-2, S-1, FRD.

Commercial and Residential Mixed Use, Transit Oriented Development This category requires a combination of relatively high intense uses that include at least three of the following categories: residential, commercial retail, professional office, and/or employment center. The close proximity among complementary uses facilitates less reliance on the automobile as the primary transportation option. Recommended zoning: POD, PD, NC and FRD.

Mixed Commercial, Oriented Setting

Pedestrian

The intent of this category is to allow for a mixture of transitional residential uses such as attached single family townhouses and/or small scale professional

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Greenville County Planning Dept 301 University Ridge Suite 3800 Greenville, SC 29601 www.GCPlanning.org

Taylors Community Plan  
Taylors Community Plan  
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