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1 1908 "HACK"

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PRICE BY MAIL $1.75 Address, L. E. ROTHROCK, Hackettstown, N. J.

GRIST. SCOTT & PARSHALL. COOPERSTOWN. N . Y.


leks arp b n i r ~ snf past; lJhep sppak tn t l p e ~hhn hieh to ~ P U . l J 1 ~ ~arc g t h pirturpb ~ momdrips 3Rbirll bring hietant pher mar. lJhpy UP tl~pmirrors hhirh r e k t Q t rlprtratters of thnsp hhn furitp.

a l p g are thp guibe posts lpabing on 3rnm s k a b ~ bb d l ~ gto t h lyeiglp. ~

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@n our highly esteemed PRECEPTRESS

whose g r e a t l o v e and devotion to our school will a l w a y s be a f f e c t i o n a t e l y treasured---this

book

is most respectfully

b ~ b i r a t ~ b


1907

September 25 Fall Term Opens 31 Hallowe'en and Salamander CeleOctober bration December 20 Fall Term Closes.

1908

r

January tj Winter Term Opens. January 30 Day of Prayer for Schools. February 29 Indoor Athletic Meet. 20 Winter Term Closes. March

J--vaB%w*

WINTER March April May

F

May June June

SPRING

June June June

30 Spring Term Opens. 10 Diokosophian-Whitney Lyceum Anniversary. 22 Boys' Preliminary Oratorical Contest. 29 Girls' Preliminary Elocution Contest. 5 Annual Musicale. 7 Baccalaureate and Annual Sermons. 8 Oratorical and Elocution Contest. 9 Class Day-President's Reception. 10 Commencement.


H ON . G EORGE J . F ERRY , President J AMES W. J ACKSON, Secretary H ON . E DWARD L. D OBBINS , Treasurer

REV. C HARLES M. A NDERSON , Jersey City, N. J. REV. C HARLES S. R YMAN , D. D., Passaic, N. J. B ISHOP H ENRY S PELLMEYER, D. D., LL. D., Cincinnati, Ohio R EV. A LEXANDER A. T UTTLE , D. D., Summit, N. J. REV. L OUIS C. M ULLER , D. D., Paterson, N. J. REV. D AVID L. D OWNEY , D. D., Brooklyn, N. Y. R EV. W ILLIAM F. A NDERSON, PH. D., New York City REV. W ALLACE MCMULLEN,D. D., New York City REV. H ENRY A. BUTTZ, D. D., LL. D., Madison, N. J. R EV. G EORGE H . W HITNEY , D. D., Plainfield, N. J.

B EN J AMIN H. W HITEHEAD , Newark, N. J. H ON . G EORGE J. F ERRY , New York City M ILTON E. B LANCHARD, Newark, N. J. OSCAR S. T EALE , New York City W ALTER M. MCGEE, New York City J AMES W. J ACKSON, New York City C OL . E DWARD L. D OBBINS , Morristown, N. J. G ORDON D U N N , Passaic, N. J. J. W. P EARSALL, Ridgewood, N. J . B ENJ AMIN MOORE, Montclair, N. J.


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REV. EUGENE ALLEN NOBLE, S. T. D.. L. H. D.


REV. G EORGE H ENRY W HITNEY , D. D., President Emeritus,

Plainfield, N. J.

REV. E UGENE A LLEN NOBLE, S. T. D., L. H. D., President, Hackettstown, N. J.

English Bible Centenary Collegiate Institute, 1886. Wesleyan University, 1890. Garrett Biblical Institute (Theological Department, Northwestern University). Ordained as Minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church. Pastor of charges in Bridgeport, Conn., and in Brooklyn, N. Y. Superintendent of Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y.. President Centenary Collegiate Institute, 1902.

R EV. ALBERT OVERTONH AMMOND , A. M.,

Hackettstown, N. J.

4ncient Languages, Greek and Roman

History

A. M. Wesleyan University, 1855. Centenary

Collegiate Institute, 1878.


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T H E HACK

G EORGE E DWARD DENMAN,A. B., Auburn, N. Y. House Master, Athletic Director, Elementary Latin A. B., Williams College, 1898. Instructor Riverview Military Academy, 1899. Post Graduate Work, Columbia. Physical Director, Professor of French, and Assistant Professor of Latin at Kentucky Central University. Athletic Director at Michigan Agricultural College. Centenary Collegiate Institute, 1903.

C LIF F ORD W ATSON H ALL , A. B., New Canaan, Conn. English Department A. B., Wesleyan University, 1904. Waban School for Boys, 1905. Centenary Collegiate Institute, 1906.

FREDERIC A. METS, New York, N. Y.

Department of Music Post Graduate Guillmant Organ School, 1905. Centenary Collegiate Institute, 1907.


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PRANK V AN HAAG Brooklyn, N. Y.

Department of Science A. B., Wesleyan University, 1903. Post Graduate Work Wesleyan University. Columbia University, Summer Session, 1905. Centenary Collegiate Institute, 1904.

L EIGH PAGE, P H . B.,

New York, N. Y. Department of Science and Mathematics Ph. B., Sheffleld Scientific School of Yale University, 1904. Post Graduate Work 1906. Centenary Collegiate Institute. 1908.

C HARLES W ILLIAM HYDE, Corning, N. Y.

Modern Languages Cornell University 1904. Fessenden School, 1905. Wellesley School, 1906. Harvard Summer School, 1907. Centenary Collegiate Insti-


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H A R R Y G ARF IE L D S NAVELY, B. S., Enhaut, Pa. Department of Mathematics Central State Normal School, 1900. Enhaut, Pa., Public Schools, 1900-1903. Supervising Principal of same 1902-1903. Bucknell University, B. S., 1907. Instructor Latin and School Management, Shippensburg State Normal School, Spring 1907. Centenary Collegiate Institute, 1908.

C H ARLO TTE

HOAG, Preceptress Hackettstown, N. J. J OS EPHI N E

Modern Languages

. . . . . . . ..Painting and Drawing E LIZABETH T ORREY , Canandaigua, N. Y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Elocution K ATHARINE L. REYNOLDS, St. Augustine, Fla. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Piano A NNA MAY M IRTEENES, Hackettstown, N. J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Academic Studies M ONA DOWNS, New York City .................................Vocal Music M ARY B ELLE C OCHRAN , Baltimore, Md.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Assistant in English

MARY G RAY , Edgewood Park, Alleghany Co., Pa.

A ~ A M I EE. G UNTER , Philadelphia, Pa.

Department

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Accountant F LORENCE MCCANN,Washington, N. J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..OfJice Assistant E MMA L. MARSDEN,Hackettstown, N. J. ............................Matron MRS. L. R. C ARLETON , Hackettstown, N. J. ................Assistant Matron A LBERT E. MAY, Hackettstown, N. J.

/

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Commercial


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The lives of the Greeks and Romans inspired the works of Plutarch; it took a Gibbon to portray the "Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire;" but it would take a Plutarch, Gibbon and others to properly describe the history of the class of 1908. We entered C. C. I. awkward and innocent, with a lot to learn of the ways of life. Each one

An infant crying for the light, And with no language but a cry." At first we humbly remained with the crowd that curiously and nervously waiting to find out what was to become of us all. After we had been registered and assigned to our rooms in the dormitories we soon became used to the atmosphere of C. C. I. life, and rapidly responded to the call of school duty. We soon learned that the event of the week was the Friday evening social. Acquaintances sprung up, which added to our pleasure and enjoyment. By the end of the Spring term we were fully initiated, and left school delighted with the prospect of becoming upper classmen. On our returning after the summer vacation we entered a new unmolested life. We had outgrown our period of infancy, and a s young hopefuls always do, doubtless showed by our important air the opinion we held in regards to our elevated position in C. C. I. life. It was noticed that our love for C. C. I, had increased. There was a closer bond of school spirit between us, arid a more active participation was taken in school affairs. This year we experienced no trouble in "making breakfast" after the 7:15 bell had rung. W e really became quite skilled in the art. When we were novices a t this accomplishment, there were always vain scramblings about the room, a few impatient quotations in blank verse about a n unruly collar button and then a rush for the dining room, only to Rnd the door fast closed, while the merry voices of those more fortunate and the savory smell of breakfast greeted us through the key hole. By our Junior year we were fairly well developed. This year was a hard 2 one a s far a s studies went, but we successfully passed our examinations. Our

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men showed up to great advantage in all lines of athletics. After a little practice a team was organized that defeated the Seniors in base-ball. The girls of the class helped out by moral support, and also by their singing. Our victory gave us the much coveted privilege of putting our numerals on the back-stop. Following this there came the spread which we gave the Seniors to bid them farewell and future happiness. To indicate their ability to strut and crow, on Class Day we presented the Senior class with a large white rooster. Their class colors were blue and white, so by means of blue dye we changed the original white feathers of the rooster's tail to a brilliant blue. We received in return another rooster with a beautiful bow of gold and white ribbon adorning his proud neck. Our last year having begun we set hard to work. We struggled on, completing the last lap of our course, which ended in joy in the form of the much coveted Senior privileges. The Senior girls won the championship in the girls inter-class basketball contests. We have made friendships which we hope may never cease. We have had the victories and defeats, that happen in all lives. Spiritually we have helped the school, humble though we may have been. We have had representatives in all branches of athletics, including the captains of both the football and track teams. Our members have appeared on both editorial boards, and also on the platform. Our achievements in scholarship and music have been of the best. The thing we now hope and will strive for, is that our path in the future may be trodden bravely and with confidence. And now the Senior class says farewell to her beloved C. C. I., whose standard she has ever striven to hold aloft.

Mlam Mnlnr~:6alb nnb IlQif~.

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Razzle Dazzle, Never Frazzle, Not a thread but wool, All together, All together, That's the way we pull, Hobble Gobble, Squibble Squabble, Never slow nor late, C. C. I., C. C. I., Class of Noughty-eight.


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"Sober, steadfast, and demure." R UTH E VELYN BARNITT Peithosophian Phillipsburg, N. J .

"We join with thee, calm Peace and Quiet." Peithosophian Bartley, N. J.

Treasurer of Missionary Society (4).

"He is a scholar, and a ripe and good one." R AYMOND VOORHEES B ROKAW Whitney Lyceum Plainfield, N. J. Varsity Track Team ( 1 , 2 ) .


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"Her eyes twinkled in her head aright As do the stars of a frosty night."

C AROLINE REHORNBURLING White Plains, N. Y. Diokoiophian Alpha Epsilon; N. C.; President Current Topic Club (3); Anniversary Usher (4).

"A life that moves to gracious ends."

VIOLA ROMANA B URT Diokosophian Zurich, Switzerland Vice President Y. W. C. A. (4) ; Hackettstonian Board (4); Captain ~ u n i o rBasketball Team; Senior Basketball Team.

"Fleet of limb and in judgment sound."

HARRISON HITCHCOCK C AMP Alpha Phi Waterbury, Conn. Spook and Spectre; Varsity Football Team (3, 4) ; Track Team (3, 4,) ; Captain Track Team (4); President C. C. I. A. A. (4) ; Secretary, Fact and Fiction Club (4) ; Treasurer, Y. M. C. A. (3); Hack Board (3, 4) ; Winter Term Vice-President ( 4 ) . ;/


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"His only books Are woman's looks."

C HARLES MALCOLM C ANEDY New Rochelle, N. Y. Alphi Phi AAU; Manager Hackettstonian (3); Editor 1907 Hack (3) ; Treasurer Junior Class (3) ; Hack Board (4) ; Winter Term Secretary (4).

"Gentle, courteous, meek, and free."

M ARY D ENNISON C OOPER Peithosophian Chester, N. J

"The joy of youth and health his eves displayed, And ease of heart nls every IOOK conveyed."

MORRISH AROLD C OMPTON Whitney Lyceum Newburgh N. Y. Hackettstonian Staff (4) ; Hack Board (4) ; Anniversary Usher (4).


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"Exceeding manfulness

And pure nobility of temperament."

CLOYDCUMMINS Whitney Lyceum Vienna, N. J. First Prize, Botany (3); Anniversary Editor (4).

"How pure in heart and sound in head."

LESTER C UMMINS Whitnev Lvceum Vienna, N. J.

ad

mttg took she most care, m t heEd.""


T H E

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in heart, and ready in hand."

GLENDALE DUNLAP Diokosophian Arlington, N. J. I I A A ; Secretary Y. W. C. A. (3); Secretary French Club ( 3 ) .

"Rare compound of frolic and fun."

E D N A A. ELDREDGE Peithosophian Freeport, L. I. Junior Basketball Team; Senior Basketball Team.

"Happy, care-free, wild, and young He laughed and played and talked and sung." ROBERT CUMMING FERGUSON New York City. Spook and Spectre.


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THE

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And a rose her mouth."

A MELIA T ITUS GIBSON Peithosophian

Ridgewood, N. J.

Secretary King's Daughters (1) ; Vice President King's Daughters ( 2 ) ; Vice President Current Topic Club (3); French Club ( 3 ); Winter Term President (4) ; Anniversary Usher (4).

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CEF~TIW~~;E &UBIEL GBIERN Di&wqhian Rwhjng, L. I. Alpha Epllaxs; Knik, Fork a d Spaon; Hachctea&n: Staff (4) ; Vim P~w24wf Curreat Tapic Club (4) ; Tremasurer, Aags Dte~bterug 42, 3); $ @ ~ n R d ~ WB~ow, tian (3): n ~ ~ i ~S~L:FP~W m v (4).


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"Ease was in her mind, and sweetness in her face."

C ARRIE KAY HULSE Peithosophian Port Morris, N. J. Secretary Y. W. C. A. (4); Hackettstonian Staff (4) ; President King's Daughters (3) ; Junior Basketball Team; French Club ( 3 ) ; Senior Basketball Team; Winter Term Secretary ( 4 ) .

"Her voice was ever soft, gentle, and low, an excellent thing in woman."

Diokosophian

New York City

Alpha Epsilon; N. C.; Anniversary Usher

(3); Anniversary 2nd Vice President (4).

~agnificentspectacle of human happiness."

ESTHER M ELBOURNE HAY Diokosophian Brooklyn, N. Y. IIAA; President Missionary Society (4) ; Hackettstonian Staff (4); President King's Daughters ' ( 3 ) ; Secretary of Bible Work (3, 4) ; Junior Basketball Team; Senior Basketball Sam; Anniversary President (4).


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"Thou hast been diligent in all things."

H UBERT D ARRELL J ONES Whitney Lyceum, West Orange, N. J. Spook and Spectre; Editor-in-Chizf Hackettstonian (3) ; Hack Board ( 3 ) ; Prize Review and Criticism, Keppel Lecture (3); Junior Class Representative; Editor-inChief 1908 Hack (4) ; Vice President Y. M. C. A. (4) ; Fire Orator, 'Salamander Celebration (4) ; Leader Bible Study Class (4) ; Vice President Fact and Fiction Club ( 4 ) ; Anniversary President ( 4 ) .

"We doubt not that for one so true, There's other nobler work to do."

V IRGINIA K ENT K ING Peithosophian New Rochelle, N. Y. IIAA; Secretary King's Daughters (3) ; French Club (3) ; Vice President Junior Class; Hackettstonian Staff (4) ; President, Y. W. C. A. (4) ; Winter Term Vice President ( 4 ) .

"0 thou art fairer than the evening air Clad in the beauty of a thousand stars."

E FFIE C OYKENDALL L AWRENCE

2

Diokosophian Sussex, N. J. Alpha Epsilon; Knife, E'ork and Spoon; Vice President, Kings Daughters (3) ; Secretary, Junior Class; Secretary Missionary Society (4) ; Vestal Virgin, Salamander Celebration (4) ; Anniversary Editor ( 4 ) .


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"And thus he bore the grand old name of gentleman."

Alpha Phi

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F RED E. LINDER Williamsbridge, N. Y.

Spook and Spectre; Varsity Football ~ e a m 4) ; varsity Track Varsity Baseball 'I 'earn (

"Skit spks, and all her wode, more! or lms Sounding in virtue, and E e pentl@ns@."'

"Sha b m d m hcgivlness, Bat rnifih, and &y, ~.ndall g l a d n ~ . ~ '

Peitbthowghian

Fmepart, L. I.

Janhs B.arsketbsl1 Team; Sadm Bwketball Team.

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"None but himself can be his parallel"

C ARL NEWTON MORE Whitney Lyceum

Batavia, Ill.

"I am the very pink of courtes

MABEL E LIZABETH NEIS Peithosophian Madison, N. J. Secretary King's Daughters (3, 4) ; Treasurer King's Daughters ( 4 ) .

"For of good name and manner He hath enough, and of gentleness."

RHYS H ARROWER NORTH Alpha Phi Montclair, N. J. Haclc h a r d (4) ; Hackettstonian StaW (4)

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T R I P FIVE

"I am not only witty myself, but the cause of wit in other men."

ERNEST EDWARD P RINGLE New York City Spook and Spectre; Hack Board (3).

"Rich in saving common sense."

E ARL

JACOB R OSEBERRY

Whitney Lyceum

deliberation sat." L AWRENCE E LWOOD ROTHROCK Whitney Lyceum Hackettstown, N. J. Assistant Manager Hackettstonian ( Second Prize in Oratory (3) ; President's P for Rhetoricals ( 3 ) ; Manager 1908 Hack Treasurer Y. M. C. A. (4) ; Anniversary Vice President (4).

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Washington, N. J.


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"An open hearted maiden, true and pure."

EDITH M AY R YMAN Diokosophian Ridgewood, N. J. Alpha Epsilon; Treasurer Y. W. C. A. (4).

"When she had passed it was like the ceasing of exquisite music." L ENORE BOWER S MITH Diokosophian Bloomingdale, N. Y. Secretary Current Topic Club ( 4 ) .

"Young, strong, right, virtuous, and wise, And well beloved, and holden in great prize."

E DNA Diokosophian

L

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JANE

T HOMPSON Hackettstown, N. J.


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"Sang in tones of deep emotion, Songs of love and songs of longing." L ILA W ARD

Diokosophian

President ,

Vice-President .

Secretary .

Treasurer .

Corresponding Secretary

Secretary-at-Arms .

Jersey City, N. J.


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GOOD,F LORENCE .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..E. . Orange, N. J. HALSEY, R U T H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brooklyn, N. Y. H ANFORD , E. J.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Mamaroneck, . N. Y. . N. J. H ANNA , E D I T H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Arlington, HOYT, E. E ARLE .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ridgefield, Cosn. H UGHES , F RANK R.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P a a i c , N. J. H UNTER , W. F.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hackettstown, N. J. I RVING , A RTHUR B.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N e w York Cit$3..is? I<&? : z3 J ACOBSON , J O H N V.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .New Haven, Connt:-;~4; z:c*4d KAYE, NITA M U R I E L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Brooklyn, N. Yf -@+$ -!: K IP , E LSIE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paterson, .. N. J ~ i ~ 7 : 5 ' L OGAN , WESLEY T.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Morristown, . N. J. . Argyl, Pa. M ARTIN , E VA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pen . Paq;.~:~~:d M ERVINE , M ARGARET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Phila., M ILLER , I LA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elizabeth, N. ~&zir.:) NEWKIRK,G RACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Paterson, N. J. . Conn. O LMSTEAD , N INA M.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Ridgefield, P ALMER , L LEWELLYN D.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Port Chester, N. Y. READ, M ARIETTA .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Flanders, N. J. S EARLES , M ILDRED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chester, N. J. SIMPSON,'S. M A R I A N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Walden, . N. Y. S NEDEKER , I VA M A Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E Orange, N. J. S PARNON , R AYMOND .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Paterson, N. J. S PEAR , H. L OUISE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paterson, N. J. S TIEHLER , E DWARD R.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Richmond Hill, L. I. TALMAGE, B ESSIE .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .N.a z a r e t h , Pa.

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ADAMSON,P AUL M ANSFIELD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Philadelphia, Pa. ALBERTSON, M ARIE E.. .......................................Delaware, N. J AYERS, H ARRIET .............................................Andover, N. J. A YERS, WINIFRED M... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Metuchen, N. J. B ARNES , R UDOLPH .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..York, . Pa. . N. J. B ARTLEY, META . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bartley, BARTO,E ARL B.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .N e w York, N. Y. BASCOM, H E L E N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bound . Brook, N. J. BILBY, E LLEN E.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Hackettstown, N. J. B ODINE , S TANLEY W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gladstone, . N. J. B OUGHTON , G RACE E.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Philadelphia, . Pa. BOYD, C AROLYN .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P.e e k s k i , N. Y. BRAGG, B ARBARA K.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Hacketttown, . N. J. BROOKS, J OHN L EE .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Paterson, . N. J. BROWN, C. M ERRILL .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Matawan, . N. J. B UCKLEY , G EORGE A LFRED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Great .. Meadows, N. J. B URR , L YDIA .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Morristown, N. J. . Pa. B URT , W ILLIAM H.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Stroudsburg, C AMPBELL , C HARLES B.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Roscoe, N. Y. C ARPENTER , C. R U T H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...Port Richmond, S. I., N. Y. C ARPENTER , M ARGARET W.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Rockville Centre, N. Y. C HENEY , G RACE G.. ................................... .New Rochelle, N. Y. CREGAR, W ILBUR L.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H a c k e t t o w n N. J. C UMMINS , M ARY .. .......................................Washington, N. J. CUSTARD, S. F R A N K L I N . . ....................................Pen Argyl, Pa. RX,,: :; B%-- 4.'-. ;DAVIS, H ARRY W.. ......................................... L a n f o d , Pa. .DAYISON, G EORGE M.. ..................................... .Brooklyn, N. Y. $-.-. 1 ~.'=',DEBLOIS, .,.; H OLLIS H.. .....................................New York, N. Y.

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ROBABLY the most revered, of the ancient mystical forms of worship, and the one whose secrets have been most carefully guarded are the Eleusinian Mysteries, certain sacred rites connected with the Greek religion, celebrated late in September and early in October in the ancient town of Eleusis in Attica. So far as can be ascertained the candidate who was considered worthy of admission, was escorted through a series of dark and confused passages, beset by terrifying sights and sounds but was led at last into the light. Then, by a most solemn oath they promised not to divulge what they had seen or heard. After this they enjoyed the knowledge of "those who know and see." Our four Societies are in striking contrast with these Mysteries. Our initiatory services also occur early in October and, while not in exact conformity with these ancient rites, nevertheless, it is understood that the candidate passes through the most mysterious ceremonies, consisting of spectacular symbols and solemn rites, designed to impress the trembling victim with the tortuous path of life, with its many perils, trials and disturbing elements through which one may go and come out safely into the light and joy of a happy fellowship of dear companions, who will assist in striving after the high ideal and true standard of a successful life. We too are bound by most stringent oaths to maintain in absolute secrecy all that may transpire in our initation work and meetings. Of the four present Literary Societies, two were founded shortly after the opening of the school in 1874. These were the Dioksophian, an organization for the young ladies, and Whitney Lyceum, formed by the young men. 'Six years after, on account of the increased number of students in the school, and in order to secure better results, it was considered advisable to form two more societies to correspond to the two already existing. Therefore, in 1880, the Peithosophian Society, among the young ladies, and the Philomathean Fraternity, among the young men, were established. The Philomathean, however, later became the Zeta Chapter of the Alpha Phi Fraternity. These organizations stand strongly for the highest and noblest sentiments, for the development of executive ability, for the advantages of public speaking and literary pursuits, and weld their members in an indissoluble bond of love and fellowship. They are now in a prosperous condition. All have delightful and well equipped halls in which to hold their meetings. The fondest recollections of students leaving the school are these assemblies, where so many happy and profitable hours are spent.


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Bnrnr~sin Z r h ~ MRS. F. A. G OELLER , MISS M. ASHLEY, '02 DR. G. A LLEN , '84 MISS H. VOORHEES, '96 MRS. H ORNER , MISS M. P. A LLEN , '89 MISS M. WADE, '03 MISS R. O WEN , MISS M. S TYKER , MISS E. J. K ENNEDY , '05 MISS M. Y OUNG, '01 MISS A. C URTIS , '77 MISS A. LAMPSON, MISS I. O SMUN , '06 MISSJ. C. VOORHEES, '00 MISS E. LITTLE, '04 MISS S. A SHLEY , '04 MRS. M. S HIELDS , MISS B. S MITH , MISS G RACE DARNELL, '95 MISS C. DELL, '03 MISS L. M ARTIN , '05 MISS D. B ELL , MISS L. NEIGHBOR, '81 MISS E. C REGAR, MRS. S. J. LAMPSON,'76 MISS A. Fox, '03 MISS W. T. RICHARDS, '06 '03 MISS E. LAMPSON, MRS. C. O SMUN , MISS S. KLOTZ, '02 MRS. P. L. S MITH , '99 MISS 0. M ARTIN , MISS E. Y. O WEN , '07 MISS B. MOORE, MRS. E. A. NOBLE, '87 MISS M. KLOTZ'07 MISS E. O PDYKE , '00 MISS M. M ERRILL, '02 MISS L. A CKLEY, '07 MISS T. S MITH , MRS. A. H. AYRES, MISS A. S HIELDS , MRS. B. F. LESLIE, -

Bpnirrrs C AROLINE R. BURLING E STHER MELBOURN H AY VIOLA R OMANA B URT J. C LAIRE H ARRIS GLENDALERAMSBY DUNLAPE FFIE C. L AWRENCE E DITH G ERTRUDE M URIEL G RIFFIN

L ENORE B OWER S MITH E DNA J ANE T HOMPSON L ILA W ARD MAE R YMAN

lluninrs R EGINA M ARIE B AKER E THEL M AUDE BEERS G ERTRUDE B UELL C HRISTINA C LOCK

M ARY E MILY DUNLAP F LORENCE M URIEL GOOD E DITH ADELE H ANNA N ITA M URIEL K AYE

I LA C ARMICHAEL M ILLER N INA M AE OLMSTEAD I VA MAE S NEDEKER BESSIE M AE T ALMAGE

@Ilfpr Bfubnfs G RACE E. BOUGHTON H ATTIE M ARIE H EIGHT ;/ H ELEN LOUISE L ISTER P ORTIA B ELMARE LISTER ELSIE J. MITTAG

H ELEN L ITTLE RICHARDS L ILLIAN P HOEBE ROBERTS MAYBELLE COE STILLSON H ELEN S. T RUMBOWER LOISW ARD

IDA M AE W HITTIMORE K ATHARINE M. W ILLIAMS G ERTRUDE H. H ANFORD B ARBARA KLOTZ BRAGG G RACE G. C HENEY


42

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Established 1874


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SPOOK A N D SPECTRE. PRINGLE CAMP CLARK

WOOLLEY

IRVING FERGUSON

FELLOWS LINDER AINSWORTH

JONES


Organized 1904


ALPHA EPSILON. MRS. MISS GRIFFIN MISS HAGCRTY Ml88 HEIGHT

P. LOUIS SMITH

MISS HARRIS MISS WARD

MISS OLMSTEAD MISS BURLING

MISS LAWRENCE


TRIP FIVE

53


T R I P FIVE

Organized 1904

MISS CHARLOTTE H OWARD

Mtss K ATHERINE L. R EYNOLDS

55


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Let Blair Hall's royal Blu- and White Be ever fair to see, And may we cheer our rivals bold With songs so glad and free. Our hearts are with the Blue and Black, And may we never sever The tie that binds our hearts to thee, Dear C. C. I. forever.

Oh may the boys of other schools Throw out a mighty cheer, But song and yell that rise from us Must ever be more clear, Our hearts are with the Blue and Black, And may our great endeavor Raise high the glorious Blue and Black And C. C. I. forever.


.

.

President Vice President Secretary-Treasurer

The Director of Athletics, the President and Secretary-Treasurer of the Athletic Association.

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PROFESSOR G EORGE E. DENMAN . Director of Athletics H. H. C AMP , '08 . President of A. A. and Capt. Track Team C. D. F ULLER , '08 . Vice President of A. A. and Capt Football Team W. H. B ACHELER , '08 . . Secretary-Treasurer, A. A. B. H. DE MOTT, '08 . . Capt. Baseball Team H UBERT D. J ONES , '08 . . Editor, 1908 Hack R. H. NORTH, '08 . , Assistant Editor, 1908 Hack . Manager, 1908 Hack L. E. R OTHROCK, '08 . W. P. GILLIES, '09 . . Assistant Manager, 1908 Hack


LTHOUGH it hasn't the greatest number of victories to its credit, Captain Fuller's 1907 team was sthe best football representation that C. C. I. has had since the fire in 1899. The team started out with rather poor prospects. Because of the non-appearance of Capt. Urner it was necessary to choose another to fill the vacancy. Fuller, right tackle of the '06 team, was selected for the position and men were soon forthcoming from the scrubs and new men to fill the ranks, that were thinned by the graduation of some of our best players and the inability to return on the part of others upon whom we had counted greatly. The team started in with a defeat at the hands of the Lafayette Sophomores but retrieved this by an easy victory over the Lafayette Freshmen. Two defeats were administered by Erasmus Hall and Princeton Prep. respectively. Following this our eleven greatly improved in form CAPT. FULLER. and speed; several valuable men, who had been out of the game on account of injuries rejoined the team and victory again fell to cur lot. The High School of Commerce succumbed to defeat; Bethlehem Prep., although outplayed in every stage of the game tied us. Peddie Institute wadtthe next victim to fall before our victorious eleven. The final game of the season was with our friendly rivals, Blair Hall. Our team went to Blairstown, played them to a standstill, upset their cal-

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culations of an easy victory, and for the first time since '99 prevented them from scoring against us. In consideration of the fact that Blair Hall since that time had always triumphed over us by a large margin we can justly say, that the 1907 eleven was superior to all of its predecessors. The outiook for the 1908 team under the captaincy of A. R. Crane seems to be very bright, as few positions are vacated by graduation. The '07 team extends its best wishes to the '08 aggregation, realizing that under the matchless leadership and instruction of our esteemed coach, Professor Denman, it cannot fail to hold aloft the banners of the Blue and Black.


MASS PLAY.

ON-SIDE

KICK.

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END RUN.


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TRIP FIVE

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October October October October October November November November November

C. D. F ULLER (Capt.) '08

5, at Hackettstown, Lafayette '10 4; C. C. I. 9, at Hackettstown, Lafayette, '1 1 0; C. C. I. 12, at Hackettstown, Erasmus Hall 24; C. C. I. 19, at Princetown, Princeton Prep. 26; C. C. I. 26, at Hackettstown, H. S. Commerce 0; C.C.I. 2, at Hackettstown, Bethlehem Prep 5; C.C.I. 9, at Hightstown, Peddie Institute 6; C.C.I. at Blairstown, Blair Hall 0; C.C.I. 23, at Hackettstown, Fordham Prep. (:cancelled.)

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SECOND TEAM. WADE AINSWORTH

NORTH LEIGH

SULLIVAN COMPTON GEROW DONCOURT LEWIS VAN HOUTEN (CAPT.) FCROUSON FELLOWS

COACH DENMAN

B~snrho f @am~i October 5 At Washington, N. October 16 At Hackettstown, N. November 9 At Hackettstown, N. November 13 At Hackettstown, N.

J. J. J. J.

Washington High School Hackettstown High School Washington High School Dover High School

24 0 6 0

Scrubs 0 Scrubs 0 Scrubs 5 Scrubs 49


H E baseball team of 1907 undoubtedly would have made just as good a showing as its predecessor, had it not happened that two of the regular players were forced to leave the team before the season was completed. However the work done by the substitutes was satisfactory to our coach, who by his untiring and valuable instruction made possible, even under these difficulties, such a good showing. The loss of Valden and W. De Mott is most keenly felt at C. C. I for these two men were easily the life of the team. Valden as a catcher is widely known. His batting was always of the highest order, and a man who can fill his position as well will be hard to find. De Mott had the highest batting average of the year, and, the number of stolen bases to his credit more than double those of his nearest competitor. He made a most creditable showing at first base, although 1907 was his first year at that position. Such valuable men as Goodell, Osborn, Simmons, Urner, Skllenwerf and Coddington are greatly missed and surely desewe very honorable mention. The men who returned to us of' the 1907 team were Irving, Brewster and H. De Mott. All have had considerCAPT. DEMOTT. able experience and all are pitchers of no mean ability. Irving and Brewster are also good in-fielders, fast base-runners and average batters. H. De Mott has been on the team four years and is without a peer among preparatory school pitchers. His pitching always recelhes wide attention and most favorable newspaper comment. He is furthermore a good batter and out-fielder.


TRIP FIVE

B. H. DE MOTT, '08 (Capt) p. & 1. f. D. H. VALDEN, '09, C. J. R. S IMMONS , '07, p. & r. f. W. F. DE MOTT, '07, 1 b A. B. I RVING , '09, 2b

April April April April April April May May May May May May May May June June June

R. L. K. C. R.

67

M. BREWSTER, '09, r. f. B. U RNER , '09, 3b C. STELLEN.WERF, '09, 1. f. '09, C. f. L. GOODELL, C. OSBORN, '08, s. s.

6, At Hackettstown

Easton High School 1;C.C.I. Erasmus Hall 0 ; C.C.I. 17, At Hackettstown Fordham College Scrubs 6; C. C. I. 20, At Hackettstown Peddie Institute 0; C.C.I. 24, At Hackettstown Lafayette College Scrubs 5; C. C. I. 27, At Brooklyn Brooklyn Boys'High School 1 ; C. C. I. 1, At Hackettstown Columbia, '10 3; C. C. I. 8, At Hackettstown Lafayette, '10 2 ; C. C. I. 1 I , At Hackettstown Bethlehem Prep. 4; C.C. I. 15, At Hackettstown Lafayette, '09 7; C. C. I. 18, At Blairstown Blair Hall 1 ; C. C. I. 22, At Hackettstown East Orange High School 1 ; C. C. I. 25, At Middletown, Conn. Wesleyan, '10 6 ; C.C.I. 30, At Hackettstown High School of Commerce 7; C. C. I. 4; C.C.I. 1, At Garden City, L. I. St. Paul's School 6, At Hackettstown St. Frances Xavier Prep. 7; C. C. I. 8, At Hackettstown Newark High School 3 ; C.C.I. 13, At Hackettstown

IXDIVIDUAL BATTING.

Name R. W . DeMott ......ir H. DeMott ...... 5 Osborn ............17 Coddington...... 2 Valden............. 1R Brewster..........I7 StellenwerP...... H Goodell............. 7 Urnor.............. 11,ving.............. 17 Simmons ..........17

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INDIVIDUAL FIELDING.

5 0 10 1 4 4

10 4 0 12 6 6 8

10 3 6 0


READY TO LINE IT OUT. A T A CRITICAL TIME. THE GRANDSTAND. " N O W FOR A PRETTY ONE, 'HISSEN.' "

CAPT. DEMOTT '08.

"ONE STRIKE."


RACK athletics since its first introduction into C. C . I. in 1904, has had a remarkable career. Great credit is due to the members of the 1906-07 team for maintaining so well such a proud record. The relay team on January 25, 1907, easily secured first place in the Preparatory School Relay Race a t the Columbia University Indoor Games. Again in April it ran in the National Relay Championships for Preparatory Schools a t Philadelphia, winning second place to Hill School, in almost a dead heat. The track team which consisted in nearly every case of about six men, including the members of the relay team, made its first appearance a t the Poly Prep. Games in Brooklyn, N. Y. First place was denied to us, however on account of a n accident to Captain Faraday's foot. In the New York University games o u r loss was practically caused by the unfortunate arrangement of events in which our men were entered. Coming a s they did, the events did not permit our representatives to do justice to themselves. At the Columbia Games w e were decisively beaten by Newark Academy. At the Pingry meet we again secured a =APT. FARADAY. second place. The last meet of the season, and the one on which o u r efforts were focused, we won. This was the Wesleyan meet. Two new Interscholastic Records were made in this meet, a s well a s two new school records, which were made by Faraday and Camp, the former covering the 440 yds run in 51 seconds and the latter accomplishing the half mile in 4 min. 4 4-5 sec. An additional school record was made in the 220 yard hurdles by Kilpatrick, time 27 4-5 sec. If we s t o to ~ consider the large number of entries which other schools made in the' meets in comparison with the few who represented the Blue and the Black, the greatest credit i s due to o u r men for winning the laurels that they did; and thereby giving C. C. I. a high ranking in Track Athletics.


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CAMP

ATCHASON

F A R A W

Place

UaLG

COACH DeNMAN

Points

1907 Spring Term April April May May May

20 27 11 18 25

New York University

U. of P. National Prep. School Race Columbia University Pingry School Wesleyan University

Second Second Second Second First

26 Time-3 min, 39 sec 21 18 27

1908 Winter Term Barnard School Feb. 8 Feb. 8 ;,Barnard Prep. School Relay 8-12 mi. Feb. 15 Poly Prep Tied for Feb. 15 C o l ~ ~ m b iUniversity a Relay

Fourth 8 Second Time 2 m. 25 sec. Third Place 10 Second Time 3 m. 39 sec.


P l J V l N G THE SHOT. ROUNDING THE CURVE. THE START.

THROWING THE HAMMER. DOWN THE STRAIGHTAWAY. CAPT. CAMP '08.


MONG the numerous sports at C. C. I. that it has been the habit to grow enthusiastic over, tennis was practically omitted prior to the year 1905. In the spring of that year a tournament was held, resulting in Harold Sloan securing the first medal with Finlay and Benjamin following close behind. In the spring of 1906 the game was indulged in to a certain extent, but no regular tournaments were arranged. The next year Professor Tressler, a graduate of Syracuse University and R member of her tennis team, volunteered to coach our fellows, and to pick the four best men to play against Blair Hall. The team consisting of Hughes, Cutler, Hildreth and Flower met the Blairstown representatives on the 27th of April on our home courts. The Academy team proved the stronger, securing all three singles and the two doubles. On the first of June our team, changed by the withdrawal of Hughes and the substitution of Ferry, played a return tournament at Blairstown, and although we did not win, we made a much better showing and probably would have changed the tide of battle if our best man, Frank Hughes, had not been ill and unable to play. In the beginning of the year 1908 two more tournaments were arranged with Blair Hall, but owing to the fact that the "Hack" went to press before the teams met one another we are unable to record the result. Our courts are made of sand, are carefully graded, and as a result are very fast. We think that C. C. I. has cause to feel elated since tennis has assumed a place in the list of her athletic activities. 2


Event 100 Yard Dash . 220 Yard Dash . 440 Yard Dash . 880 Yard Run . 1 Mile Run . . 120 Yard Hurdle . 220 Yard Hurdle . Running High Jump . Running Broad Jump Discus Throw . . 12 Ib. Shot Put . . 12 lb. Hammer Throw Pole Vault . . . "1 Mile Relay . .

Record

. 10 1-5 seconds . . 22 2-5 seconds .

. . . .

.

. . . . .

. .

Holder

. . .

H. W. Faraday, '07

. H. W. Faraday, '07 . H. W. Faraday, '07 . H. H. Camp, '08 . E. B. Grey, '04

51 seconds . 2 min. 5 4-5 seconds 4 min. 50 3-5 seconds 16 4-5 seconds . . . H. L. Bryant, '05 27 4-5 seconds . . . T. J. Kilpatrick, '09 5 feet 4 inches . . . A. B. Boynton, '06 20 feet 6 inches . . J. C. Day, '04 97 feet 8 1-2 inches . G. A. Palmer, '06 41 feet 4 inches . . B. H. DeMott, '08 123 feet 8 inches . . A. B. Garrison, '04 9 feet 7 inches . . G. B. Frickie, '99 3 min. 30 1-5 seconds . G. W. Sutton, '06 W. H. Bacheler, '08 R. W. Bacon, '06 H. W. Faraday, '07

*Record'for United States Preparatoly Schools.


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AWARDED TO T H E PERSON SHOWING ? ' H E GREATEST ABILITY IN FOOTBALI., BASEEALL AND TRACK ATHLETICS.

D. HARVEY VALDEN W I NN E R 1907

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JOHN C. DAY . GERALD A. PALMER A R T H U R B. BOYNTON

,

.

W I N N E R 1904 " 1905 " 1906


TRIP FIVE

79

A RTICLE I. Name. â&#x20AC;˘ The name of this Association shall be called the "Centenary Collegiate Institute Athletic Association." A RTICLE 11. Object. The object of the Association shall be to advance and control all athletic interests of the school. A RTICLE 111. Membership. All male students of the Centenary Collegiate Institute may be members of the Association. A RTICLE IV. Officers-Their Duties. SEC. I. The officers of the Association shall be a president, a vicepresident, and a secretary-treasurer. The Athletic Director shall be honorary president. S EC . 11. The president, vice-president and secretary-treasurer shall be elected at the regular meeting in May, office to be assumed in the fall of the ensuing school year, and the president and the vice-president must be members of the Senior or Junior class when ofice is assumed. S EC. 111. The president shall preside at all meetings of the Association and shall perform all duties pertaining to his office. The Vice President shall perform all duties of the president in the latter's absence. The secretary-treasurer shall keep the minutes of each meeting of the Association, and shall handle and keep account of all funds passing through his hands, shall pay all bills when authorized by the Association, financial reports to be made at each regular meeting. The books at the end of the term to be audited by the Executive Committee. S EC . IV. Any vacancies occurring among the offices shall be filled by a majority vote of the Association from candidates nominated by the Association, and shall be subject to provisions of Art. 4, Sec. 2. Notice of the meeting must be posted at least one week in advance. A RTICLE V. Divisions. S EC . I. The Association shall consist of four (4) divisions, viz: a football division, a baseball division, a track division, and minor sports. The support of all minor divisions to be subject â&#x201A;Ź6 the discretion of the Athletic Association. SEC. 11. The Athletic Director shall I?e manager of all teams.


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A RTICLE VI. Executive Committee. SEC. I. The authority and responsibility of the Association shall be vested in an Executive Committee of three (3) members: the Director of Athletics, the president, and secretary-treasurer of the Association. SEC. 11. It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee to decide all questions referred to it by the Association; to enforce all rules a s set down by this constitution and by-laws; and to promote the general athletic interests of the school. A RTICLE VII. Advisory Council. S EC. I. An Advisory Council shall be composed of the Director of Athletics, the officers of the Athletic Association, the captains of the football, baseball, and track teams, and the Editor, Assistant Editor, Manager and Assistant Manager of the "Hack." SEC. 11. The Advisory Council shall perform the duties a s provided in Article VIII of the Constitution and Article 111, Sections IV, V and Article VIII, Section 11 of the By-Laws. In general, it shall act in an advisory capacity, whenever occasion shall exist. A RTICLE VIII. Amendments. Amendments to this constitution and by-laws may be made by a two-thirds vote of the Association after the proposed amendment has been sanctioned by the Advisory Council. ARTICLE IX. Captains. S EC. I. Captains of the respective teams shall be elected by the members of said teams who have won their monogram during the current school year. SEC. 11. Captains of the scrub teams shall be elected by those playing in the first game of the respective season, and only those connected with the school for one year or more shall be eligible to a captaincy.

BY-LAWS. A RTICLE I. Eligibility. No student shall be allowed to represent the school in any athletic contest unless he is regularly enrolled a s a member on the books of the school and is pursuing studies requiring at least twelve (12) periods class room work, per week, not including laboratory periods. A RTICLE TI. Uniforms of Teams. S EC. I. The football and baseball teams shall wear the regulation school uniforms, jerseys, with arms striped peacock blue and black, stockings, striped peacock blue and black. SEC. 11. The track uniform shall consist of white running-pants, trimmed with half-inch black on one and a quarter-inch peacock


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blue ribbon at the sides, and one and a quarter-inch peacock blue border on the bottom; and white running shirt with two-inch peacock blue sash from right to left. No one shall wear a regulation track suit who has not been selected to represent the school in a meet with other institutions. SEC. 111. The tennis uniform shall consist of white trousers, white shirt and white shoes. A RTICLE 111. Awarding of School Monograms. SEC. I. Football monograms shall be awarded to all men who play in either the Princeton Preparatory or Blair Hall games. S EC. 11. Baseball monograms shall be awarded to all men who play in either the Blair Hall or Princeton Preparatory games. SEC. 111. Track monograms shall be awarded, ( 1 ) to any point winner in an interscholastic meet held by a college; (2) to any one securing 8 points in a standard senior event, at the Polytechnic Preparatory School meet, not including any novice or relay event; (3) to any one winning the greatest number of points in the Annual Field Day; (4) to any one running on a relay team that secures first place in a relay race given by a college. S EC. IV. A Tennis Insignia consisting of two crossed tennis rackets with the three (3) letters H. T. T. shall be awarded to those participating in a tournament approved by the Advisory Council. Sec. V. The Advisory Council shall have the power of withdrawing the right to wear the monogram awarded in sections one, two, three and the insignia in Section four. SEC. VI. NO monogram or insignia shall be worn by any one unless awarded according to sections one, two, three and four. SEC. VII. NO official school sweater or stocking shall be worn by any one unless he has been awarded a school monogram according to sections one, two, and three. A RTICLE IV. The Monograms. S EC. I. The football emblem shall be the regular eight-inch C. C. I. monogram. SEC. 11. The baseball emblem shall be the regular six-inch C. C. I. monogram. S EC. 111. The track emblem shall be the regular four-inch C. C. I. monogram. A RTICLE V. Meetings. S EC. I. The regular monthly meeting of the Association shall be held the first Tuesday after the first Monday of each month. S ~ C .11. Special meetings may be called at the request of three (3) members.


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A RTICLE VI. Dues. SEC. I. The annual dues of the Association shall be one dollar ($1) payable before the regular monthly meeting of November, for which a card will be issued entitling the recipient to all the privileges of the Association. SEC. 11. NO member whose dues a r e unpaid shall be entitled to vote in any meeting of the Association. A RTICLE VII. The Hack. S EC . I. Under the auspices of the Athletic Association there shall be published annually, "The Hack." SEC. 11. The members of the board shall be elected by the retiring staff, the elections to occur during the first week in June. S EC . 111. The Editor shall be the supervising officer of the entire board, and the Business Manager shall render a report of the financial condition of the Publication to the Executive Committee. whenever requested to do so, by it. SEC. IV. All proceeds derived shall be expended in the support of the Track Team, and indebtedness, if any, shall be borne by the Association. A RTICLE VIII. Order Committee. SEC. I. An order committee shall have supervision of the Boy's Parlor, shall attend to the proper care of order therein, shall exclude any person guilty of indecorum, and shall see that proper taxation shall be made upon the person committing any damage. SEC. 11. The Committee shall consist of seven members, four Seniors, two Juniors, and one Underclassman all of whom shall be recommended by the Advisory Council and shall be elected by the Association at the regular election of officers in May. H UBERT D. J ONES 1 R AYMOND V. BROKAW ) Committee. A RTHUR B. I RVING J


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woung lompn's Qristinn Assnrinfittinn Meeting Every Sunday Morning at 8:30 o'clock

. President Vice President . Secretary . Treasurer

Meeting Every Sunday Morning at 9:00 o'clock

. President Vice President . Secretary Treasurer


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ESTHER M ELBOURNE H AY . M ILDRED FLOWER . E FFIE C OYKENDALL L AWRENCE MARY A. BARTLEY .

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,

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. President Vice President . Secretary Treasurer

. President Vice President . Secretary Treasurer


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For the Young Ladies. Meets Every Tuesday Evening, Previous to Chapel Service, to Consider the Current Events of the Week. Speaker

.

President

. Vice President

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Secretary Treasurer

For the Young Men. Meets Every Thursday Evening, Previous to Chapel Service, to Review the Weekly Occurrences. Speaker

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President Vice President . Secretary Treasurer


LOGAN

CUSTARD GEROW

LEIGH 6ROSS

FELLOWS JACOBSON

WINTERS HOYT JUNG SPARNON

(DIRECTOR)

BART0

FIRST VIOLIN SECOND VIOLIN C HARLES H. J U N G , ' 1 1 E ARL E. HOYT, '09 R A YM O N D C. S PARNON , '10 G EORGE W INTERS , ' 1 1 E ARL B. BARTO, '1 I CORNET S TEWARD F. CUSTARD, '10 W ILBUR T. L EIGH , ' I I FLUTE

MANDOLIN L EONARD H. G EROW , '09 W ARREN B. GROSS, '10 PIANO

WESLEY T. LOGAN, '09 2

HAROLD H. FELLOWS, '09

DIRECTOR J OHN V. JACOBSON, '09


THE

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6 ~ n ~ r Alumni al Assntintion MR. C ARL F. P RICE . MISS A NNA KLOTZ M RS. E. A. N OBLE . . M R . P. LOUISS MITH

President Vice President . Secretary . Treasurer

Alumni Mlubs,

Ni-Inmon's Olnllpgo o f '?62altimnroAlumni Ollub H ELEN M. W RIGHT . . M ARY L OUISE C OLLIS ;/ K ATHARINE A. S CRANTON M ARION F. S CRANTON .

.

. President Vice President . Treasurer Secretary


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Published Monthly Under the Auspices of the Four School Societies.

A RTHUR B. I RVING , Editor-in Chief .MORRIS H. C OMPTON, Assistant Editor G ERTRUDE M. GRIFFIN, Assistant Editor CARRIEK. HULSE, School Notes E STHER M. H AY , Alumni Notes R UTH HALSEY, Exchanges

W ESLEY T. LOGAN,

Manager

RHYSH. N ORTH , Assistant Manager


CAMP

IRVING JONES

GlLLlES CANEDY

LOGAN NORTH

AINSWORTH

ROTHROCK COMPTON


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Published Annually Under the Auspices of the Athletic Association.

Editor-in-Chief Assistant-Editor Societies Athletics . Events . Slams Slams Literary

. Manager . Asst. Manager


T H E HACK

95

1901-1902

A. NEWMAN LASBY OSCAR GEORGE B AUMAN (Resigned) 1 RAYMOND SCHOFIELD CURTICE ROBERT G ARFIELD B ANCKER G ERALD A NDRUS P ALMER (Resigned) G EORGE W ILLIAM S UTTON , J R . H UBERT D ARRELL J O N E S ARTHUR B LANEY I R V I N G (

1903-'904

1904- 1905 1905-1906 1906- 1907 1907- 1908


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MAY 1 1 ~ ~ . Whitney Lyceum Entertainment . , MISSG AY Z ENOLA MACLAREN MAY 2 4 ~ ~ The Wonders of the Yellowstone . DR. J. R. J OY

Ball iZIprrn 19n7 OCTOBER 2 5 ~ ~ "Cranks, Fanatics and Lunatics" . DR. J AMES M. BUCKLEY NOVEMBER ST The Guns of Sumter . M R. W. W. E LLSWORTH N OVEMBER 2 2 ~ ~ Alpha Phi Entertainment . . P ROF . L IVINGSTON BARBOUR D ECEMBER 6TH . . "An Evening with Dickens" . . MR. E. S. W ILLIAMSON

J ANUARY ~ O T H Hack Entertainment J ANUARY 3 1 s ~ Whitney Lyceum Entertainment . . MISSG AY Z ENOLA MACLAREN F EBRUARY ~ T H The Vicissitudes of a Pedestrian . . MR. E. PAYSON WESTON F EBRUARY ~ Q T H The English Lakes and Their Poets . . P ROF. C. T. WINCHESTER F EBRUARY 2 8 ~ ~ "A Trip through Africa" BISHOPW ILLIAM B URT

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Saturday, May 12, 1907.

PRESIDENT'S GREETING . R ANDALL W. C ONKLIN VIOLIN SOLO . E ARL HOYT ESSAY-"Russell A. Alger," . W. F. H UNTER IMPROMPTU SPEECH-"Edward Everett Hale" . H. P. SHEARMAN 5, QUARTETTE . MESSRS. F ERRY, W OOLLEY, U RNER A N D JACOBSON 6. DEBATE-"Resolved, That no President should have a third term of ofice." Affirmative ' Negative L. B RENT FOSTER THOMAS J. DODD H AROLD G. ANDERSON K ENNETH HILDREDTH 7. VOCAL SOLO . F REDERICK R ODNEY 8. RECITATION . CLOYDC U M M I N ~ 9. "THE LANCET" . J. WESLEY L OGAN 10. W. L. S ONG 1. 2. 3, 4.

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PRESIDENT FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT SECRETARY EDITOR

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R ANDALL W. C ONKLIN ROBERT E. FERRY ADOLFOJ. H ERNANDEZ P ERRY C ODDINGTON J. WESLEY LOGAN

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.


N the 31st day of May, 1907, the Senior Class introduced a new idea in our school, in the form of the May Day Exercises. The affair was a most pronounced success, and afforded great pleasure to both those who participated and to those who were fortunate enough to be spectators. Early in the morning a pole had been placed on the girls' campus in front of the school. From it were suspended various colored ribbons, the Blue and White of the Senior Class being most prominent. All of the student body had been invited to attend the ceremonies. The day was particularly adapted to such an affair. The air was calm and quiet; not a branch swayed nor a leaf stirred. Old Buck Hill reared its lazy head in the sunshine; the white clouds hovered caressingly over Schooley's Mountains; the birds sung and twittered in the trees; and gayety and happiness reigned supreme. At a given signal the Seniors began their stately procession which was headed by the Queen, Miss Beryl Norton, beautifully attired in a white gown; and Mr. Robert Ferry as King. Upon the completion of the march different booths were opened where candies and other refreshments were placed on sale. Potato, sack, foot and relay races added much to rhe interest and pleasure of the day. Another interesting part of the program was the very pleasing address made by Professor Denman, in which he told of the origin of May Day and described the ceremonies of its observance. After the program was ended the students retired to the dormitories everybody enthusiastic in the opinion that they had had a most enjoyable time.


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Friday Evening, June 7, 1907-Wednesday Noon, June 12, 1907.

.

F RIDAY E VENING , J U N E 7, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK-Annual Recital of the Musical Department, in the Chapel. S AT URDAY A FTERNOON , J U N E 8, AT THREE-FORTY-FIVE O'CLOCK-Baseball game with Newark High School, on Athletic Field. S U N D A Y M ORNING , J U N E 9, A T T E N - T HIRTY O'CLOCK-Commencement Sermon, by the Rev. Gardner Eldridge, D. D., in the M. E. Church. S U N D A Y E VENING , J U N E 9, AT SEVEN-FORTY-FIVE O'CLOCK-Annual Sermon by the Rev. Wm. Ingraham Haven, D. D., in the Presbyterian Church. M ONDAY A N D T u ~ s ~ ~ ~ - E x h i b i t iof o nArt Students' Work, in the Studio. M ONDAY A FTERNOON , J U N E 10, AT THREE O'CLOCK-Field Day Event On Athletic Field. MONDAY E VENING , J U N E 10, AT E IG HT O'CLOCK-Final Contests for Prizes in Elocution and Oratory, in the Chapel. T UESDAY M ORNING , J U N E 11, A T TEN O'CLOCK-J~nior-Senior Baseball game. T UESDAY A FTERNOON , J U N E 11, A T TWO O'CLOCK-Class-Day Exercises of the Class of 1907, on Front Campus. T UESDAY A FTERNOON , J U N E 1 1, A T F I V E O'CLOCK-Class Reunions and Alumni Meeting in the Parlors of the School. T UESDAY E VENING , J U N E 11, AT EI G HT O'CLOCK-President's Reception, in the Parlors of the School. W EDNESDAY M ORNING , J U N E 12, A T N I N E O'CLOCK-Annual Commencement Exercises in the C. C. I. Chapel. W EDNESDAY N OON, J U N E 12-Annual Luncheon, in the School Dining Room.


Friday Evening, June 7, 1907. Part I. FANTASIA (with second piano by Grieg) . MISS AYRESA N D MISS SEARLES S C E N E DE MARRIAGE (Romeo et Juliette) . MISS RANKIN MR. WOOLLEY MISS W ARD M R. R ODNEY KOCTURNE Mrss HARRIET AYERS " HER EYES" M R. M ALCOM WOOLLEY SONATA, "PATHETIQUE" (Rrst movement) . MISS M ILDRED S EARLES "TRAUME" . MISS M ILDRED F LOWER BALLADE AND POLANAISE (Violin) . MISS LENORBB. S MITH

Mozart

.

Gounod Chopin

,

Mildenberg Beethoven Wagner Vieuxtempe

Part 11. "HEAR YE ISRAEL" (Elijah) . MISS E DNA S. G ARRISON PASTORALE (Piano and Organ) MISS F LOWER A N D MISS R A N K I N "AH! MON FILS" (Le Prophete) . MISS L ILA W ARD SONATA (Minuet and Finale) . MISS E LIZABETH MASON "THY BEAMING EYES" M R. J. R AYMOND S IMMONS CONCERT VALSE .. MISS E FFIE L AWRENCE S C E N E FROM " HANSEL AND GRETEL" . . ;F?3cMrss E LFRIDA MITTAG,MISS A MELIA B LAKE .rb:-b+-,, &-x P ,y %73' . +%.=, MISS L ILA W ARD

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'bTm~ --c't

8

Mendelssohn Guilmant Meyerbeer Grieg MacDowell Wieniawski Hurnperdinck


103

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For the Jackson Prizes Monday Evening, June 10, 1907. Piano Solo-"Gondoliers~'

Liszt

MISS META BARTLEY "The Set of Turquoise"

..

"The Call of the Wild"

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"The Pilot's Story" "Hindoo Song"

Thomas B. Aldrich Jack London

MR. L AWRENCE E. R OTHROCK

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MISS E DNA T HOMPSON

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MISSM ILDRED FLOWER "For Dear Old Yale"

.

MISS N INA KLOTZ

.

Wm. Dean Howells

. .

Bemberg

James Langston

MR. H UBERT D. J ONES

. W. W. Story MISS G ERTRUDE G RIFFIN "Spartacus to the Roman Gladiators" Elijah Kellogg MR. J. R AYMOND S IMMONS "Good Night" . Fitzhugh M ALE Q UARTETTE. "The Encircling Good" . . Alice Morse Kingsley MISS F LORENCE HIGHT Selections from "The Rubaiyat" . . Omar Khayyam MR. H ARRY W. F ARADAY Piano Solo-"Festival March" . Gade MISS E DITH R YMAN A N D MISS E DNA D ERRY "Sombre"

First Prize in Elocution

,

.

Second Prize in Elocution First Prize in Oratory Second Prize i n Oratory

2

,

. MISS M INA KLOTZ MISS G ERTRUDE G R I F F I N MISS F LORENCE H I G HT M R J. R AYMOND S IMM O N S M R . L AW RENC E E. ROTHROCK


E

D

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Monday Evening, J u n e 10, 1907. O n e of the most pleasant features of o u r school year was the Junior Spread which was held on Monday evening, J u n e 10th. This farewell to the Senior Class was held in the large room adjoining the art department. T h e Blue and White of the Seniors, and Gold and White of the Class of '08 claimed a prominent place in the scheme of decoration and college pennants, school flags, and cozy corners lent a pleasant spirit to the occasion.

"THE 'SENIORS" "ATHLETICS O F '07 AND '08" . "WHAT C. C. I. HAS MEANT TO 1907" "THE JUNIORS" .

.

. ABRAHAM L. FRETZ . HARRY W. FARADAY . ESTELLE L. RANKIN . RANDALL W. C ONKLIN

(The Junior class officers were announced as follows:) PRESIDENT . B. H. DEMOTT VICE-PRESIDENT . V IRGINIA K. K ING SECRETARY . . EFFIE C. L AWRENCE TREASURER . . C. MALCOMC ANEDY SERGEANT-AT-AkMS . . R ICHARD R. GOOD REPRESENTATIVE FOR CLASS DAY . . H UBERT D. J ONES


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School Campus, Tuesday Afternoon, June 11, 1907.

.

MISTRESS OF CEREMONIES INVOCATION . WELCOME . TRIO

.

CLASS HISTORY CLASS POEM . QUARTETTE

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. B ERTHA W ENDLER REV. EUGENEA LLEN NOBLE, L. H. D. . H. P ERCY SHEARMAN E DNA S. G ARRISON ESTELLE RANKIN R UTH L ANCLOIS A BRAHAM L INCOLN F RETZ . B EULAH M. S ANFORD 1 .I. R AYMOND S IMMONS

I

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CLASS PROPHECY

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ADVICE TO JUNIORS . RESPONSE FROM JUNIORS PIANO SOLO MEMENTOES

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PRESENTATION ACCEPTANCE

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H ARRY W. F ARADAY H UBERT D. J ONES H ARRIET V. AYRES L ILLIAN M. NOE J. R AYMOND S IMMONS J ULIET V. N. S CHWENCER

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Wednesday Morning, June 12, 1907. MARCH from the "Ariane Symphony" MISSMASON A N D MISS T RIMMER PRAYER SALUTARY AND ESSAY "Little Nell and Maggie Tulliver." M INA C. KLOTZ PIANO SOLO-"Polanaise in E. major" . . Liszt F REDERIC A. METS. ESSAY-"The Equity of an Income Tax" J. R AYMOND S IMMONS ESSAY-"The Significance of the Jamestown Exposition." L ILLIAN M. NOE VOCAL SOLO-"Lascia Ch'io Pianga" F. G. Handel LILAW ARD ESSAY-"The Negro Problem." B ENJ AMIN M. D ENNISTON ESSAY-"The Metaphysical School of Poets." C AROLYN E MMA C ADY. VIOLIN SOLO-?Concerto" . Paganini MISS C LARA F ARRINGTON ESSAY-"A Statement of Socialism" H ARRY W. F ARADAY ESSAY-"Women's Influence in National Life." F LORENCE C. H ICHT VOCAL CHORUS-"Fairy's Slumber Song" . . Bartlett OBLIGATO S U N G BY MISS J. C LAIRE H ARRIS VALEDICTORY AND ESSAY-"Inborn Tendencies versus Environment." T HOMAS J. DODD A WARD .OF P RIZES A NNOUNCEMENTS , P RESENTATION OF D IPLOMAS ADDRESS TO THE STUDENTS P RESIDENT E UGENE A. N OBLE BENEDICTION T H E J O H N J. B ELL P RIZE FOR C OMMENCEMENT ORATION A WARDED TO H ARRY W ILLET FARADAY.


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BELL PRIZE FOR COMMENCEMENT ORATION H ARRY W ILLETT F ARADAY PRESIDENT'S PRIZE FOR RHETORICALS L AWRENCE E. ROTHROCK JACKSON PRIZES FOR ELOCUTION F IRST P RIZE

.

. MISS M INA C. KLOTZ j MISS G ERTRUDE G RIFFIN '1 MISS FLORENCE HICHT

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S ECOND P RIZE

JACKSON PRIZES FOR ORATORY FIRST PRIZE S ECOND P RIZE

. . HERBARIUM PRIZE ALFRED RUSSELL F LOWER

. J. R AYMOND S IMMONS L AWRENCE E. R OTHROCK


BLBBhAVI ON. A Plpr.rebay Eb~ning,(9)rtob~r3 1, 19D7. N the 31st day of October the "All Hallowe'en1' and Salamander Celebration in commemoration of the burning of the old C. C. I. buildings, eight years ago, was held. The boys' "gym" was very appropriately decorated with cornstalks, autumn leaves, and pumpkins. The masquers arranged themselves in pairs and marched around until the judges had made their decisions. A vocal solo by Miss Lila Ward accompanied by Mr. Roy Brewster was very well rendered. Following this was a very inspiring address by Rev. Mr. Mooney of the class of '85. The indoor program was terminated by the school chorus singing "My old Kentucky Home." The students then adjourned to the back campus for the Salamander Celebration. The Seniors headed the procession, followed by the Juniors and Underclassmen. Then came the Vestal Virgin, Miss Efie C. Lawrence, and the Fire Orator, Mr. Hubert D. Jones. Dr. Noble, Rev. Mr. Mooney and the members of the faculty brought up the rear. The Fire Orator gave an interesting talk on the old and new C. C. I. The Vestal Virgin gave a pleasing address after which she applied the torch to the model of the old C. C. I. While the fire was burning, the students sang songs and gave the good old school yells after which they retired to the dormitory greatly impressed by the "All Hallowe'en and Salamander Celebration."

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Saturday Evening, November 9, 1907 WELCOME . PIANO SOLO . RECITATION . VOCAL SOLO (Violin Obligato) ESSAY . PIANO SOLO . VOCAL SOLO . "SCROLL" . .

PRESIDENT . VICE PRESIDENT SECRETARY . EDITOR . TREASURER .

109


THE HACK

110

Friday Evening, January 10, 1908. Selection

C. C. I. ORCHESTRA. Vocal Solo, "May Day"

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R. H . Walthew

MISS A UGUSTA V ANATTA

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Piano, Fantasie Impromptu

Chopin

PROP. F. A. METS. Violin Solo, "Cavatina"

.

Raff MISS L ENORE S MITH .

Scene from "The Mouse Trap" . . W. D: Howells MISSESM INA KLOTZ, ELSIE MITTAG, MARY B ARTLEY, A MELIA B LAKE, E DITH H ANNA S OPHIA H AGERTY, LOIS W ARD, MR. H. D. J ONES Organ, Fantasie

Lemmens PROF. F. A. METS

Vocal Solo, "Hindoo Song"

H . Bemberg MISS AUGUSTA V ANATTA

Recitation, "The Soul of the Violin LOIS W ARD Selection

.

Margaret M. Merrill


March 7-9th, 1908. New York and New Jersey Territorial Committee of the National Board of the YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS

Saturday p. m.

5.00

a. m. 7.45-8.00 8.45-9.05 9.05-9.30 3.30 p. m. 4.30 7.30-9.00

Address of Welcome. Rev. Eugene Allen Noble, D. D. Introductions and Appointment of Conference Committees Address. Miss Louise S. Holmquist, Executive Secretary for New York and New Jersey Open Conference and Discussion. Led by Miss Helen M. Greene, Student Secretary for New York and New Jersey The Importance of having Definite Policies for Our Year's Work. Miss Heled M. Creene Bible Study and Mission Study. Miss Alice 0. Draper, member of the Territorial Committee for New York and New Jersey Finance Work. Miss Helen M. Greene Religious Meetings. Miss Alice 0. Draper The Social Work. Miss Helen M. Creene The QualiRcations of Association OWcers, Miss Louise S. Holmquist Social Hour. Sunday Prayer Hour. Miss Alice 0. Draper Bible Hour. Miss Helen M. Creene Silver Bay. Miss Louise W. Brooks, Student Secretary for the N,ational Bo-ard Address. The Personal Responsibility of Association Members. Miss Louise W. Brooks Meeting of Advisory Officers Chapel Service and Closing Session


April 10, 1907.

MARCH-"Pomp and Circumstance" . MISS R YMAN , Organ MISSES S MITH A N D KAYE, Piano INVOCATION

.

.

REV. E UGENE A LLEN NOBLE, D. D., L. H. D.

AIR DE SALOME-'+Herodiade7' . MISS J . C LAIRE H ARRIS WELCOME

.

Elgar

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Massenet

MISS E STHER M ELBOURNE H AY

AIRS V A R I ~ S(No. 6 A Op. 12) . . Ch. de Beriot MISS L ENORE B OWER S MITH ORATION-"Danton the Revolutionist". . . H UBERT D ARRELL J ONES ARIA-"Mitrane"

Francesco Rossi MISS L ILA W ARD

"SCROLL" AND "LANCET" MISS E FFIE COYKENDALL L AWRENCE , C LOYD C UMMINS PRELUDE to "Die Meistersinger" (two Pianos) . MISSES LAWRENCE, H ARRIS , R YMAN A N D C LOCK .

.

Wagner


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Scenes from "The Rivals" By Richard Brinsley Sheridan

CAST OF CHARACTERS Sir Anthony Absolute-Father of Captain Absolute L AWRENCE E LWOOD R OTHROCK Captaln Absolute-Known to Lydia as "Beverley" MORRIS H AROLD COMPTON Bob Acres-Friend of Captain Absolute, but rival of supposed "Beverley" H UBERT D ARRELL J ONES Sir Lucius O'Trigger-The suitor of "Delia" . . . C HARLES H ENRY J UNG Fag-Servant of Captain Absolute David-Servant of Bob Acres

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P AUL B URT

E ARL BRIGGS BARTO

Faulkland-The "second" of Captain Absolute in the duel scene F RANK RUSSELL H UGHES Mrs. Malaprop-Aunt of Lydia Languish . . N INA MAE OLMSTEAD Lydia Languish-The object of the rivalry Lucy-Maid

.

G ERTRUDE M URIEL G RIFFIN

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. part

LOIS W ARD

Taljrpp

Story of Bethlehem-(Sacred Cantata) John C. West Soloists MR. MALCOLM E ARL WOOLLEY MISS J. C LAIRE H ARRIS MR. W ILLIAM H ENRY B ACHELER MISS S OPHIA N IECE H AGERTY MR. J OHN VICTOR JACOBSON MISS NITA M URIEL KAYE MISS L ENORE BOWER S MITH , (Violin) MISS L ILA WARD MR. WESLEY T AYLOR LOGAN, (Flute) MISS ESTHER M ELBOURNE H AY Accompanists MISS E DITH MAY R YMAN, (Organ) MISS EFFIE C OYKENDALL L AWRENCE, (Piano)


THIRTY-THIRD ANNIVERSARY OFFICERS. CLOYD CUMMINS. W. H. BACHELER.

C . D. FULLER, MISS HARRIS. 2 D VICE-PRESIDENT.

EDITOR.

SECRETARY.

ZD VICE-PRESIDENT.

MISS LAWRENCE. EDITOR.

MISS GRIFFIN. SECRETARY.

H. D. JONES.

MISS HAY,

PRESIDENT.

PRESIDENT.

L. E. ROTHROCK, I S T VICE-PRESIDENT.

MISS WARD. 1ST VICE-PRESIDENT.

C A S T I N "THE RIVALS" M. H. COMPTON MlSS GRIFFIN

P. BURT MISS WARD C. H. JUNG F. R. HUGHES E. B. BART0 H. D. JONES L. I?. ROTHROCK MlSS OLMSTEAD


If

in these pages you should find

A knock or two at you, dear friend, Pray do not think that we're unkind; 'Tis not our purpose to offend. Just scan the jokes, and you will see That others quite as you have fared. Jo- in the laughter heartily: Nor e'er betray that you have cared.


THAT IS NEWS. --

Vol. I.

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HACKETTSTOWN, N. J., JUNE 1908 ---

1:zt:

NEW PHYSICAL DIRECTOR For 23rd S t . Y.

M. C. A.

New York City. J u n e 1, 1908.The 23rd St. Y . M. C. A. connratulate themselves upon having secured the valuable services of Mr. Malcolm E. Woolley of Detroit, Mich.. a s P h v s i ~ u l nil.ector.

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~

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~

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1

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1 De here given. lt w0bid be lnter- I

' A l BROADWAY & ~ O ~SPECTACLE. ~ ~ " ,

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esting to-see iklr. Wooliey accomplish the remlunder of his stunt. College Man Home for Holidays. A second dispatch since writing the above, brings to us the pleas(Special to Gab and Gossip.) Ing information that Mr. \Voolley, after hangiug by his hands and New York City, June 1, 1908.toes for two hours, h i t the floor with a tremendous thud, which all Pedestrians near Broadway and ~ u drowned t the applause of the Fourteenth St. were yesterday enraptured spectators. afternoon treated to a n unusual sight of a young "sport" of the kind who generally go by the RISKS LIFE FOR CAT. name of "Chappie." Dressed in elaborate clothes, patent-leather Cold Reception. shoes, holding in his right hand F a ~ ~ ~ ~ f ~ b a chain ~ * to ~which ~ was attached a the new city hall, a cat was oerched for Bve hours. refusina i l l entreaties to come ddwn. NOD; of tho workmen dared venture out upon the beam which had not yet been made' secure, despite large rewards offered by the owner of the animal. But "Sailor Jake." who haonened to pass that way, offered -t'o rescue the cat, which others so cruelly had left to its fate. So, f a r out i~ponthis lofty perch Jake crawled 011 his stomach. and when his nose was wlthin two inches of the cat's face, he made a cautious reach forward whereupon the ungrateful cat ianded a left hook on Jake's proboscis, which left a feline trade-mark on t h a t protuberance. And not satisfied with chis demonstration, she pounced upon his head, and begall to spit, sputter claw and scratch ; and it was' with exceeding difficulty that J a k e retained his feelings unruffled and also his presence of mind. which enabled him to descend ingloriously to the grounu with t h e cat upon his lacerated head, amid the jeers and hoots of the flckle multitude. poodle, one eye paiufully holding a round glass, oblivious alike to stare and comment, he toddled jauntily along, evidently with but PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT one object in view, i. r. to meet PLEASED. "her" a t the appointed hour. I t Washington, D. C., J u n e 2, is worthy of note, however, t h a t 1908.-President Roosevelt has his plaid clothes spoke so loud announced that he h a s found a man a f t e r his own heart in the that the newspaper reporter could person of Bishop Hunter, who, he hardly hear the remarks yelled h a s learned, is quite as r??dy a;s into his ear, t h a t i t was "Dolly" I himself to call a man a Liar, Jones Prom Wesleyan. and with just a s much energy.

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Mr. Woolley performs on the l~orizontal bar to the admiration of all his classes. BAR WORK is his strong point and the accompanying snap-shot shows the gymnast in the first stage of circl-

No. 41144,

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THE GAB AND :GOSSIP. . -.----- -

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RUFFIANS ATTACK OLD MAN.

RESTORATION OF THE DRAMA.

Daring Rescue Agalnst Odds.Hoodlums Wounded or P u t t o Flight. -

New tmpetus Given t o Tragedy.

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Cincinnati, Ohio June 1 1908. -One of our most) promin&t citii zens made a gallant rescue of an old gentleman from the clutches of a crowd of hoodlums a t a late hour last night. The results of the fray a r e a grateful old man. a number of broken heads, and the rescuer somewhat of a hero. The facts a r e these: Hearing cries for help and the scurrying of feet, our brawny, long-limbed and generaly modest citizen, rushed to the scene of action, and plunged into the fight. Grasping the nearest of these robbers by the neck he threw h ~ m heavily to the paveAent ; a second was tr pped up and sent sprawling into the gutter, from whence he failed to arise having cracked his head on th$ sharp curb ; and the others fearing to encounter a similar fate, took to their heels. Meantime the hero of the hour escorted the old gentleman home. I t has been ascertained in a quiet manner (probably through our honored citizen's wife) that the old man was beholden for his rescue to A. Ross Crane, who in explanation of his remarkable exploit afKrms that he learned the trick' while a student a t C. C. I., in what he laconically termed "rough-housing."

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mony was in progress. Round about a solitary figure standing high above their heads, were the dusky villagers, who were bowing, scraeinz and licking the dust in aeoarent obedience- to the one si+ding on the platform. Drawing near I discovered to my surprise that the commanding person was a white man, and probably a n American. He stood with arms folded, legs braced apart, and with lowered head and knotted eyebrows he lowered fiercely about him, whfie they shouted and danced, calling him ruler, benefactor, king (so I later learned their gibberish meant) and having thus satisfied

Hackettstown, N. J., June 1, 1908.-Few actors of the 20th Century have done more to restore the drama than Mr. Waldo Gilles, whoso clever interpretations place him in the foremost rank of his pr~fession. IIe is now starring in Mors Cesnris" a t the Olyntbian Theatre. and plays

PROMISING TRACK CANDIDATE. the dimcult part of Cinna, the poet, one of Shakespeare's famous At Half-Moon A. A.-Superb Form characters. At the most crucial moment, when Mr. Gilles is being of Lily. torn to pieces by the enraged I his arrogance, a t a wave of his mob the audience make it some- i hand, the multitude sank to the Squeedunk P a June 2. 1908.what more realistic by bombard- duzt. One of the h o s t ' promising track I ascertained that men of the Half-Moon A. A. is ing him with epithets, jeers cat- tho Afterwards, person in question was a calls, cabbages, eggs, cat; and "White-haired Lily" Camp, a track man of some renown. From dogs, etc., etc. After the pros- missionary, by the name of Rothtrato form of the heroic actor rock, who bad been sent out to is pulled from under the rilbbage. convert the natives, but had not one of the audience sheds a adopted this plan to gain pleasure t e a r ; about which, however, Mr. and minister to his desire to be Gilles has no concern, beitlg con- ruler even over the ebony-hued soled by the fact that he can savages. a t least pack the house with a The ex- I MOTORMAN ARRESTED FOR sympathetic audience. cellent likeness here printed, I GROSS NEGLECT. shows Mr. Gilles just before the storm descends. ! Lizzie in Difficulty.

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the photograph we here print, a faint i d e ~ can be had of his magnificent form. Camp has a habit of hanging his tongue out, and by great good fortune that member can plainly be seen in this photograph. Whether or not this accounts for his he nominal ' records. i t is not known. but i t . I feared by his trainer that some y he will get his tongue tangled up with his feet, and, falling, I step all over his face.

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New York City, May 30, 1908A REMARKABLE MISSIONARY A motorman an the 14th St. OF INTERIOR I~UZON. line was arrested for not heeding signals of a pros~ectivepassenger Controls Natives Perftrtly. who stood on the corner fran-tically wringing his hands and Manilla L u z m May 30 1908. crying, "Mercy! Why don't that ---One of 'the prihcipal paiters of stupid man stop." With the aid this city, "The Reeublic." re- of a little newsboy. Bray fincently published a n -articlq fur- ally succeeded in stopping a car. nished by its correspondent In the but lodged a protest against the interior, of which the following motorman who had slighted him. is an extract: The Woman's Suffrage Associa"When I came to a certain Hot- tion has threatened to take up the tentot village, a peculiar cere- case.

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and pains? And can we not even now produce internal and external evidence .of u e bumps which still decorate our PUBLISHED YEARLY. c o ~ o r a tenera? I t is therefore without com-- - -- - punction that we would hail the Enbred a t Post Omce a s fb%b destruction this time-honored ...- -.- -.-- of class junk. relic of barbarous ages, whose . . -- only claim upon life is that it has so f a r resisted the ravages ufflcers withhold uanies to avoid of time and nvhose only virtue suit8 for 1ibe.l. is its hose resemblance to that place "over the hill to the poorhouse." Hail to the new, modern, up-to-date gymnasium !

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EDITORIALS.

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' There once was a hsther

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maiden named

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, And close t6 my heart I once

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pressed But the rat Got caught And now I am

her. in her hair on my chair, sad I caressed her.

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THE GAB AND GOSSIP.

L O C A L NEWS.

There once was a young man named Rhys, And he dropped on his best coat some grease; S O he scrubbed all the day, Till the coat wore away, And he had to put in a new piece. N. B. Will the author please clalm these poetical effusions, and receive a munitlcient reward for the same.-Editor.

The Gab and Gossip makes this lts numble bow to whac i~ "Si" Smith can recite glibly trusts is an appreciative and in- this W O R L D NEWS. trite saying "The ,,way of dulgent masd oi readers, and tho transgressor is hard. I while modest and reluctant, it Is fully decermined still to adhere 1 London. Inn.. May 30. 1908Lo the settied [tclicy of the paper, Ferguson conte?$s that all Literary circles .have-been startled namely: to expose the fd~osyn- roads lead to the Coup." I by the remarkable poems from crasies oi friends : to laud the I the pen of Mr. Charles Fuller, the poetaster. These productions, I L. E. Rothrock may consent some claim compare favorably I leyan to register a s a freshman a t Wes- with any oi the writers of the in fall of 1908. I Lake District. to cheer the comPortless : but to make i t uncomfortable .for the After toiling many months over wicked: to wioe the tear from "Hack,': "Dolly" announces the eves of the sorrowihe: to his just as he was about to bring -tears to t h e eyes 'him I sthat. t e ~ in . and take a ride. the hot who carries a haughty look; to a i r and gas arising from the proclaim the right (when we get Slams denartment ignited bv able flrm has caused consternapaid enough) : to denounce the spontaneoui coinbustion- and blew tion in Wall Street. I t is rumored wrong (when there is no chance the whole affair. "Dolly" that high living and loud clothes of being hit). Hence it is with up barely had time to escape with contributed to their downfall. much temerity that we take up the key to the strong box. the task of fulfilling this policy, which is absolutely law to us. Heightstown Eng. May 30 As a result of our rigorous enOn the 23rd instant, J. V. 1908-A pecuiiar bo6k has bee; forcement of the above principles, Jacobson in company with his put on the market, the title of numerous search warrants a r e orchestra, were seen in full re- whlch is "How to Prevent Blushfloating about only waiting an treat towards some tall trees. ing," the author's name is "Hisopportunity to alight, should we sen" DeMott. His formula is to show our heads but being obtake three sips of water look Last Thursday M. E. Woolley steadily upward a t the deiling scure newspaper' editdrs, have so was seen still smiling over a wiggle the ears, and count twenty-' far avoided all suits for libel. All correspondence must be ad- joke ( ? ) which he had told the three aloud. This is guaranteed dressed to Gab and Gossip, a t the Monday before. to make one forget the occasion Sign of the Two Women Talkof disturbance. ing over a Fence. Rumor has it that a certain instltution is to be started a s a Berlin, Germany, June 1, 1908 girls' school. On the strength -The Emperor has awarded a Not to conform with custom, of which Brokaw has already prize to the one who could claim but animated by a lurking en- applied fAr position of bell-boy, that he had the larnest head of mity it is that we make an an- and is industriously studying hair and had worn same without nuai stab a t the "unlucky gym," Robert's Rules of Order. trimmine for the ereatest inneth and trust that this will prove its of time.- In pr&enring t h e &&a< death blow. The Editor of the "Slams ' the Emperor congratulated Mr. We would gladly speak a kindly found a bomb beneath his bed. Sullivan, and remarked casudly word for our would-he friend, but This infernal machine was dis- that he had won by more than all generous feelings a r e swamped covered a s the Editor was about a hair's breadth. by an inrush of vivid recollec- / to begin his nightly devotions. 1 tions of the tortures endured I Warm Sorines. Poland. Mav within those stern brick walls. I What of the hours spent wrestlinq with the unfeeling dumb-bells Do we not remember the futile attempts to circle the obstinate bar? Shall we not be recomsumed to the amount, of $100,pensed for the any times we I 000.00. Mr. Winters personal The Pollowing little jingles effects also perished, among which have chased o u r g v e s about the insides of this monster in a n were found under the door by the were some ancient fabrics which endless chain? How about those Editor yesterday. I he prized very highly.

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THE CAB AND GOSSIP.

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THE SIMPLE LIFB ON TRIAL. How One Man Works It.

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Squashtown N. J . June 1 , 1908-A familiar slghi a t all the hase-ball games played in this place is E. J. Hanford, who has come to he a necessary adjunct to these occasions, appearing as he does accoutered with all his little aids to comfort; his wellworn camp-stool, handy umbrella and broad-brimmed hat to ward on the rays of the scorching sun. The usual number of street ur-

CHAIR IN SCIENCE OP FUSSOLOGY 4

Established in Syracuse. 4

Syracuse, N. Y., June 1, 1908. -Considerable Dress comment Dra and r.on has h&en ocrasionnd .-.. .... -..- -bv the recent action of the colleg authorities here a t Syracuse in endowing a Chair in Fussology. As to the wisdom of this step. this article ventures nothing. but deems the question worthy 07note inasmuch as the person who has been secured to All so diWcult a position is R. V. Brokaw. His qualiRcation for the place is beyond question, as the students who are now adding this course to their studies have increased to such a number that the trustees hut recently ' made Professor Brokaw an offer to secure for him an assistant. But, the Professor vehemently protested. conAdentlv assertine that In his vears -of exnerieiice in t g i ai l ip~iic;,ar s-;ien;-; he had never found two chairs necessary lor practical purposes, and he would, therefore, advlse the trustees not to establish another chair in the course a s it would only be in the wa;, and an added expense to the institution. -

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:o produce any change in the young man, hut conclude that habits formed while a student In prep. school make i t impossible tor him to conform with the rules of tho Universitv. The accompanying c i t gives a :lear idea of the situation when he dining-room doors have been dosed upon poor Maxwell, and will servo as Iwarning t o those r h o are afflicted as this young nan is. CAN DODGE A TROLLEY.

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But Not His Shadow.

hadow. Upon being asked to lescribe his shadow he repded hat i t was a dimcult task. about rs dimcult as to describe the :hadow of a doubt. The good 3ishop does not wish to be w n iidered a doubt, or Wood, whom le tries to dodge, to be thought

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FRESHMAN GOES WITHOUT BREAKFAST.

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~ r o c r a s t l n a t l o nHis Downfall. Phila., Pa.. June 1, 1908-An chins following from the town unfortunate under-classman of the to the ball-ground make him the Unlv. of Penn. is obliged to go more conspicious on the way out. without his ~riorning meal, beThese, however, he scatters upon cause of his inability to get ta his arrival for should he have .he dining hall a t the proper time. a minute 'to ;pare before the Phis has come to the attention game commences, forth from a ~f the college authorities, who spacious pocket is drawn the lat- however, express their inability est number of "The Outlook," and seating himself on his portable stool, he soon becomes absorbed in digesting thls, his daily fond. J a y is an exponent of the "Simple Life" to the third power, and he is leading the eminent writer of the same a long chase.

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Phila., Pa., May 30, 1008-At a meeting of the party leaders belonging to the "gang," John Lee Brooks was the speaker of the evening. His jokes were not very well received, and it was not until afterwards that Mr. Brooks remembered that he had d the same list of jokes to ony, J a y Hanford, who had addressed the same crowd two nights before.

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the shadow of doubt. But, sure it is, whatever "Bish" would like to do ; so would Wood; whatever "Bish" does, so does Wood ; wherever "Bish" goes, goes Wood. Does "Bish" laugh? rhen laughs Wood. In fact, to mention all the things which Wood does because "Bish" does, ,r which Wood thinks "Bish" would d o ; or which Wood thinks "Bish" would like Wood to d o ; Dl' which "Bish" wishes Wood would not d o : would take more space than we would like to give to Wood.


THE GAB AND GOSSIP. METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART.

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Accepts Famous Artist's Work. New York City, June 2, 1908.The Metropolitan Museum of Art are charging special rates on Tuesday and Thursday of each week, on which days they have on exhibition some rare drawings of Mr. Harold Fellows, which have attracted the attention of masters and a r t students of this and foreign countries, which ensure their author a prominent place among modern artists.

The drawings in question are those which Mr. Fellows made for "Tho 1908 Hack," published by the students of Centenary Collegiate Institute and i t has been only after mucli expense and negotiation that the Museum secured thesu remarkable productions. Mr. Fellows is extremely jealous of his works, and objects to having them copied or even photographed, and we, therefore conslder ourselves very fortunLte in that we are able to show to our readers minute and exact reproductions of Mr. Fellows' drawings a s they were printed in the "Hack." being photographs of the originals themselves.

GREAT LITERARY CRITIC'S ADVICE TO YOUNG AUTHORS.

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Princeton, N. J., May 30 1908 -The "Great Cham" of ~ n ~ l i Literature Professor Joseph Cooke lpitts, recently published a n a r ticle in one of -the monthly reviews giving special instructions to adventurers in the fleld of literature. We here give a s much of this article as we think can be assimilated a t one reading. Among other things Professor J . C. Fitts' hints: "Momentary reflections upon any of the ancient writers a r e permissible ; a!ter prefixing such preambles as, conformins to the idionlatic hieroglyphics of the Hebrews ;' or as , the qlassical Greek would say : or quotin! from that fanlous Roman o r a t o r ; or 'that maqterfu! German scholar well states. or the coufteous Frenchman ' woul? put it ; and even reference might be made, to English literature beginning, ex-

pressed in the profane language of the hnglish speaking race; then, quote afler each, the apt ~llustration in its original char-

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Prof. Fitts further s a y s : "In promulgating esoteric cogitations, do n o t allow your cere5rum ta interchange reminiscences with the cerebellum, whereby the superflcial sentimeutalities would bewilder the mental capacity 01 the peruser of such a conglomeration of grayish matter. "Beware of insipidities ; 01 circuitous expatiatlonn upon t r u t h ; of occult and insidioux castigations of explanatory r a m ifications on the nart of contemporaneons authors. "Finally, let your statements possess coalesant consistency, concentrated cogency, illuminating simplicity, and well-rounded conclusiveness."

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Plays to

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Boston, Mass., June 2, 1908.The musical concert given last evening in the auditorium has been pronounced by the critics to have been the loudest ever heard in Boston. The seating capacity and also the standing room of the spacious building were taxed to the utmost, and most of the seats were occupied long before the Axed time for commencement. The reputation which John V. Jacobson's Symphony Orchestra has gained in Baltimore. Philadelphia New York and lately in ~ h l c a g d , has been tremendously augmented by his last performance in this city. Bouquets Of cabbage-heads, eggs, etc., greeted his appearance, and a s he was bowing, was struck in the eye with an ancient e g g ; so, that, much to the egret of the audlsh ence, he was unable to complete the affair of the evening.

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REVISION OF PENAL CODE.

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New Measure Before t h e Assembly. Albany, N. Y., June 1. 1908.A bill h a s been introduced into the Assembly by Mr. Edward Stiehler which Drovides for Dunishment of a l l ' crimes shore of felony. This measure is being bitterly opposed by a number of Assemblymen under the leadership of T. Cook as it provides for a mode of pbnishment which is entirely new namely that one convicted unde: the ne; law will be compelled to write fllty-thousand numbers (60,000 NUMBhRS) every day of imprisonment. They say that Mr. Stiehler's own experience with the manner of punlshment under consideration renders his arguments cloubly eRective.

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PHENOMINAL RUN At t h e Olymplan of "Early Morning Reveries."

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BuRalo. N. Y.. June 1, 1908."Early Morning Reveries" a t the Olympian is the most popular ~ i a yof the season. and h-asashad a continuous run .of two nights without intermission. Its phenominal success is due chiefly to the remarkably realistic reproductlon by the leading man, Mr.

SENATOR FROM OHIO EXPECTS RE-ELECTION.

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Canton, 0.. June 2, 1908-Another statesman in Ohio's list of illustrious men is the Hon. W. H. Bachelor, whose massive brow and eagle eye has come to be an unwelcome sight in the Senate where he so nobly misrepresents this state. He is confidently looking forward to re-election because of his firm stand in defense of the canteen.

Carl N. More, a n actor of considerable repute, who is beginning to appear more and more before the theatrical world. Some say, indeed, that the flfth act, whlch is a n early morning scene, a t fifteen minutes past seven, is so exquisitely played by Mr. More, that the audience experience considerable dlWculty in keeping awake.



1908 Hack yearbook