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The History Behind Hydrocarbon Resin A chemical derivative of the petrochemical production process is hydrocarbon resin, which can be used as a tackifier for adhesives, rubbers and paints. The resin functions to plasticize polymers at higher temperatures, for instance in hot melt adhesives. Basically hydrocarbon resins increase the temperature at which the polymers would begin to transition from solid to liquid. It is significant enough that a majority of industries rely on the addition of this type of resin to various polymers to stay functional at useful temperatures, while they may have a small overall difference in the temperature change function. Brief History of Hydrocarbons Traditionally, naturally sourced resins like rosin derivatives or polyterpenes were the preferred additives to get the purposes of tackifying or thickening, but when natural resins were scarce, methods were developed to utilize hydrocarbon resins for many of the same uses. As the brittle or gummy product of the polymerization from rosin, coal tar, or petroleum, hydrocarbon resins were originally considered a by-product of other industrial processes. Stemming from a petroleum or feedstock base, hydrocarbons were made and refined with time to fill a number of industrial uses from paints and inks to adhesives and construction binding materials. As a byproduct of steel processing, for example, the resin products were once considered waste products, until methods were developed to process them in ways that would let them blend with various polymers to develop many beneficial uses. Offering a range of modern uses in industries that vary from plastics and rubbers to inks, paints and adhesives, hydrocarbon resin products are going to be found in many different items that are usually used in numerous industries for thickening, bonding and tackifying purposes. The Modern Uses In industrial applications from paints, varnishes, coatings, floor tile adhesives, and molded rubber products, hydrocarbon products have a wide range of modern uses. Hydrocarbon resins have found quite a few uses in industries, from road and highway paints, tapes and packaging adhesives, hot melt glue used in binding and footwear assembly, along with thickeners and tackifying agents in numerous inks. Used in rubber products from tires to shoes, hydrocarbons have a vital place in many modern products as a part of the formula that offers many products the flexibility and temperature control properties required by various industries. The resin selected for the specific purpose varies, based on the qualities required of the final product, with grades and ranges of color varying from yellow to dark brown, and the molecular weight and temperature sensitivity are important aspects in determining which hydrocarbon resin are going to be useful in the specific case. The two main kinds of resins are classified as C5 and C9, which refers to their chemical compound. The C5 resins or the aliphatic are the polymers of monomers that contain five carbon atoms, and will usually be lighter in color. The C9 resins or aromatic are normally polymers of aromatic feedstocks with 9 carbon aromatic monomers. These are normally in the darker color range, and will be used in adhesives, printing ink, paints and flooring adhesives, along with many other uses. Hydrocarbon resins are a key part of the glue that holds together much of the fabric of modern society, everything from roads to tires, shoes to floors, paints to inks plus much more, even though it is typically not seen by the modern consumer since BFB Enterprises, Inc

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The History Behind Hydrocarbon Resin resin products are one of the ingredients in a complex chemical compositions that create many consumer products. BFB Enterprises is the place you'll obtain superior hydrocarbon resin products, which are the main aspects for formulating adhesives. Go to http://www.bfbenterprises.com/ to find out more information regarding BFB Enterprises.

Document Tags: fully hydrogenated hydrocarbon resin, metallocene based resins, hydrogenated hydrocarbon resin http://www.bfbenterprises.com/

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The History Behind Hydrocarbon Resin