Page 1

works builtworks* TAYLOR

HOLLOWAY


contact CONTACT

email:

PORTFOLIO 2013

thollowa@gmail.com

tel: pdf:

+1 505 660 9332

www.issuu.com/taylorholloway


01

works

Architectural Portfolio 2013 pride and st. peters An Architectural Typology for Housing

02

abrazo

A Place to Learn Where You Live

03

en-rainbowed Educatorium in Downtown Chicago

04

holegrain

A Publishing House

05

meditations on drawing

Drawing Techniques


Pride& St.Peter

Fall 2012 Instructors: Sam Jacob and Jimenez Lai University of Illinois at Chicago

W

hat began as an interest in articulated interior space found within Saint Peter’s Basilica, became an effort to create a new housing typology that Chicago could call its own. Pride and St. Peter evokes 17th century French master planning, the English Picturesque Landscape, the curvature of Ustad Ahmad Lahauri’s mausoleum domes, and is faithful to the lineage of the Greek Ionic column. Yet, each element has been relayed through the filter of the original governing geometry found in the plan of Saint Peter’s Basilica. The result is an architecture of grandeur and idyllic vistas that no longer belongs to princes and deities, but to urbanites residing at the corner of West Harrison and Wells.

detail, final board 5.8’ x 4.3’


1.

2.

3.

1506 Plan of St. Peter’s Basilica, Donato Bramante 1995 Still: Pride and Prejudice, BBC Section of Michelangelo’s St. Peter’s Basilica, Etienne Duperac


4. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Distill Bramante’s plan into pattern variations using rules of symmetry Allow landscape to be equal player in creation of project narrative Create sectional qualities that assert articulation of void space & surfaces Use change in scale and repetition as tools to generate new plan geometry


ABRAZO Spring 2011 Instructors: Grant Gibson & Andrew Moddrell University of Illinois at Chicago

hug. [huhg] verb, hugged, hug-ing, noun -verb (used with object) 1. to clasp tightly in the arms, especially with affection; embrace. 2. to keep close to, as in sailing, walking or in moving along or alongside of; to hug the shore; to hug the road.

T

he courtyard building is infamous for hugging space or clinging desperately to air and sunlight. A courtyard building that hugs more than a void becomes an enlivened and purposeful courtyard. Abrazo is a mixed-use housing project that is endowed with a very specific purpose for a very specific resident: children. An elementary school occupies the entire ground floor and periodically punctures the courtyard throughout all floor levels. Both the programmed and un-programmed spaces are devoted to housing children in a way that allows for independence, safety, and adventure.


Unit Aggregation

(Tetris-like) +

Small Family

+

Larger Family

Teacher

Classroom


Unit Plans

First Floor

Second Floor

First Floor

Second Floor

Teacher Studio

Classroom

north section 1/16=1’0”


view of school pod within courtyard

a. Children’s circulation b. Mechanical systems c. Structural column planes d. Total systems e. Interior & exterior skins

a.

b.


view of interior courtyard

c.

d.

e.


ground floor plan Classrooms create plinth for Abrazo while Library, Indoor playground, Dining hall, and Teacher’s lounge are located on separate housing floors.

S

pace is a necessary condition for play. -Aldo Van Eyck


street view from southeast


en-rainbowed Fall 2010 Instructor: Sarah Dunn University of Illinois at Chicago At the end of the rainbow is ___________. 1. an urban mountain 2. a new type of urbanism 3. an educatorium

e

n-rainbowed is an urban educatorium connected to Chicago’s Union Station that accommodates the living, learning, and recreation requirements of a collegiate campus within one city block. The project proposes a solution to the sprawl of the Midwestern city, which can be equated to an inland sea. A sea of trains, streets, and cars that create islands out of diverse neighborhoods, languages, and cultures. In order for interaction and collaboration to occur, within the classroom or the city, the distance between people needs to diminish. en-rainbowed connects people and priorities through pure contiguity.


The use of Simply Maps served to provide demographic data on the various populations that live along the eight train lines of the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA). Population, income and ethnicity relay a combined trend that is telling of the residents and communities at the ends of the Blue Line versus Downtown Chicago. My interest in these differen’t trends led me to design en-rainbowed to serve as an icon of a more connected city; thereby attempting to bring Chicago’s many populations together. Clark/Lake White Non-Hispanic (%Total Pop.) - 62.79% Highest Income (Median HH) - $96,100

nt

mo

re

Ha O’

R

e os

lem

r

m

Cu

ark

d

an

rl be

Ha

P on

ers

ff Je

e

rk

os

ntr

Mo

ing

Pa

Irv

on

dis

Ad

t

on

lm

Be L

are qu a rni f li o ern Ca est ision n W Div me Da

nS

a og

go nd a ton ke Gr La ing rk/ sh Wa Cla e o nr Mo kson c Ja n rn rict ne lsted nton Salle i a ki c e t s t is Ra -Ha om s la Cli La Pu zie-H We cal D C UI d di Ke Me s i o Illin ica

Ch

rk in ark em ero t P Harl k Pa Aust Cic Oa

res

Fo

Irving Park White Non-Hispanic (%Total Pop.) - 97.06% Income (Median HH) - $52,000

Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) Blue Line Household Income & % White Non-Hispanic Population Total Population Income White Non-Hispanic


Existing urban condition

Existing Chicago grid

T

Circulation voids

Collapse West - East

Connect and influence

Collapse North - South

Propel by proximity.

he functions of the city can be reduced to a smaller area; increasing efficiency and freeing up green space. The model of an “Urban Mountain� isapplied to the educatorium to promote cross-programming and reduce the temporal, monetary and environmental costs associated with commuting.


Before.


After!


ground floor plan


A

dministration

Elev. 170ft

Elev. 350ft

S

ports & Wellness

Elev. 600ft

L

iving

Elev. 391ft

A

cademia

R

Elev. 175ft

ecreation


Eighth Floor Plan. This particular floor contains three programmatic functions: Sports and Wellness, Living, and Academia. The banded condition allows for integration of all aspects of campus activity and saves the student body time as the various campus programs aren’t subject to separate floors or buildings. Opposite: Programmatic Floor Plans


SECTION

adjacent

strata

puzzle

plan

adjacent

strata

puzzle

strata

puzzle

FACADE

PLAN

section

monolith

adjacent

Facade and Program Arrangement Study


north section


Interior scenario of Living, located within the yellow ‘band’ of the educatorium, adjacent to Sports & Wellness, characterized by the green ‘band’. Opposite: Interior model views of Living, Academia, and Recreation


holegrain

Spring 2010 Instructors: Penelope Dean, Andy Moddrell, Ryan Palider University of Illinois at Chicago

T

he shortest distance between two points is a straight line. Within a cube, the shortest distance between opposite corners is a diagonal line. Similarly, the most direct way to convey a message to a wide audience is also a line, a line of text. The efficiency of the diagonal line is what governs the circulation within holegrain, a mat building programmed as a publishing house. Large open areas and dense floor plates are separated by an expansive, diagonal circulation ramp; yet, this large ramp acts as an artery as it allows movement from the ground floor to the the rest of the model in a single act of ascension. Printing and production occurs on one half of the building that provides expansive, open areas. The writing and editing work for the publications all occurs on the opposite side of the building which is characterized by similar layouts and floor to ceiling glazing that allows for the infiltration of natural light. Here single floor transitional hallways enable proximity for offices and promote cohesion among the users occupying the five floors.


M

odel making techniques using pliable pvc, foam, paper, and metal wire, began as investigations of form and became studies of process, plan, section, and the diagram.


Plan and Section / Figure Ground Studies


Envelope Strategy & Circulation

Program & Structure

Technique

Technique, cont.


Final model photos: Site detail, South facade, & Diagonal circulation


West

East

South

North

Elevations highlighting structure Opposite: Sixth floor plan


Meditations on Drawing Fall 2009 Instructors: Paul Preissner, Laura Fehlberg, Julie Flor University of Illinois at Chicago

E

xplorations in curve geometry led to the generation of surfaces and complex volumes. My particular interest lent itself to the development of systems of repetition. Meditations on Drawings is a redux look at accumulative pattern compositions as well as investigations of incremental variation through experimentation that I developed in my coursework.


builtworks* 01

Architectural Portfolio 2013

no, you see me. now you don’t.

Academic Seminar Design

02

building blocks

Academic Seminar Design

03

pride & st. peter

(chair)

04 05

adornment Jewelry Design

Hands On Disaster Response

Not-for-profit Work


no, you see me. now you don’t.

An exercise in inferring narratives from a selection of descriptive geometries and movable props. Materials: Cast Acrylic & Poplar Technology: CNC & Laser Cutter

6"

12"


orientation A

orientation B


(building blocks)

These blocks serve as a first attempt to mediate the differnece between reduced geometric forms in architecture and the ever-evolving children’s toy. Materials: Birch plywood Technology: CNC & sandpaper


Pride & St. Peter (chair)

In lieu of an architectural model, this particular architectural studio included the creation of an architectural object that represented the intent of my design at midterm. The chair relates to my exploration of symmetry and 17th century French decor found at the Palace of Versailles. Materials: Reclaimed wood chairs, plywood, cotton batting, fabric.


jewelry design

Selection of recent necklace and bracelet designs.

Materials: Cast Acrylic, acorns, semi-precious stones, metal wire, ribbon, found objects, glass beads.


Hands On Disaster Response

During the summer of 2010 I participated in the Transitional Schools Program orchestrated by Hands On Disaster Response in Léogâne, Haiti. A total of twenty schools were built over 25 months; providing 3,000 students and 219 teachers with safe learning and working environments in their communities. The “disaster-resistant” schools that were constructed utilized a unique hand rendered concrete wall forming process. If an earthquake were to occur, the concrete walls of the school would create debris only the size of a chain-link fence diamond; virtually eliminating the possibility for injury and ensuring ruble removal without heavy machinery. While in Haiti I also developed a construction manual outling how to build these earthquake specific walls for Hands On Disaster Response’s future projects.


Works I Builtworks  

Architectural Portfolio

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you