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Chick-fil-a continued from page 1

development due diligence,” Pharr said. “McDonald’s would never do this.” Students eating Chick-fil-A at the Atrium Monday weren’t sure if they would make it to Cameron Village. Danny Ocean, a junior in political science and business entrepreneurship, said he eats Chick-fil-A most days. “I probably won’t go over [to Cameron Village] because I live on Vanderbilt,” Ocean said. Chelsea Brown and Kather-

“We might go there once a week instead of four times a week. I definitely see the potential for it becoming a hangout spot.” Katherine Atkinson, freshman in middle school math education

ine Atkinson, a freshman in design studies and an freshman in middle school math education, respectively, said they and their friends eat Chick-fil-A on campus at least four times a week. “We will probably go over and check it out,” Brown said. They said transportation

and money would be issues because they didn’t have cars and Cameron Village wouldn’t take meal plans. “We might go there once a week instead of four times a week,” Atkinson said. “I definitely see the potential for it becoming a hangout spot.”

tuesday, october 25, 2011 • Page 3

Chick-fil-a Quick facts:

car on the way to the driver side window.

Two stories: A first for Chick-fil-A, the Cameron store will have two floors. A winding staircase and and elevator will be included. To get food upstairs, a dumbwaiter will be available. Windowless drive-through The store will feature two drive-throughs, called reverse drive-throughs. Since Regency, Cameron Village’s managing company, didn’t want a visible drive-through, a conveyor system will carry food out to drivers. Food will travel over the

Outdoor seating: The fountains and landscape will surround outdoor seating on the ground level while new upperlevel outdoor seating will feature views of downtown. Historic downtown feel: The building isn’t like normal stucco Chick-fil-A’s. It is all brick made to look like a historic North Carolina downtown. Large, curved windows will be on the upper level, in keeping with that style. Lot’s of chicken: The Cameron Village store will

have the largest kitchen ever for the chain. Both floors will be around 8500 square feet whereas normal Chick-fil-A’s have half that--and only one floor. The upper level will be almost completely seating with no kitchen. Location: 2000 Cameron Street, across from K&W and Rite Aid Opening date: February 2, 2012 (Groundhog Day)

Source: John Pharr & Chick-fil-A at Cameron Village Facebook page

Megan Farrell/Technician

Tyler Andrews/Technician

Graduate students in forest biomaterials Carlos Aizpurua, Li Xiao and Jesse Daystar examine biofuel materials in the Pulp and Paper Labs, Monday.

biofuel

grant and associate dean for research in the College of Natural Resources, said the college has consistently been a worldwide leader in sustainable forestry and the production of industrial utilization of wood. He said the grant is a chance for N.C. State to continue its leadership in the area of biofuels research, and also to power forward and make a bigger impact on a regional and national basis. “What the USDA recognized in our proposal was not only a Tyler Andrews/Technician series of good ideas that made Jesse Daystar, graduate student in forest biomaterials, examines sense, but a series of educators a hydrolysis experiment in the Pulp and Paper Labs on Monday that had excellent capabilities Oct. 24. to plan this work and carry it of greenhouse gas emissions out successfully,” Robison said. according to researchers. Hasan Jameel, a professor in would not see the heaviest Overall, researchers on the grant were not concerned forest biomaterials, said it has impact. The greatest issues alwith deforestation, given that the potential to help national leviated by utilizing biofuels produced for transportation in these systems, harvested for- security. “When we find ways to cre- in the United States, he said, ests are regenerated. ate biofuel in are imported oil and national A lso, givt he Un ited security. en that the While several professors States, we are majorit y of also creating have been chosen to conduct North Carojobs in the the research, students at the lina’s land is United States. graduate and undergraduate forest, pro[In addition,] levels also have opportunities. viding ample “In ever aspect of this projwhenever we opportunity c a n m a k e ect, there will be students into ma ke a Dan Robison, associate dean b i o f u e l i n volved,” Robison said. “Prigo o d s t a r t for research in the College of t he Un ited marily graduate students will on research, Natural Resources States, we are be working on the detailed researchscience, engineering and the decreasing ers were not bothered that tree growth is a a national security issue be- public outreach, but there slower process than some agri- cause we will not have to rely will also be opportunities for on foreign countries for our undergraduates to conduct recultural biomass. search and for fieldwork public The grant has implications oil,” Jameel said. However, Kelley said levels outreach.” far beyond North Carolina,

“In every aspect of this project, there will be students involved.”

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education to the general public in addition to promoting the University by association. “The State Fair has a very long and close connection to N.C. State....The State Fair really began as an exhibition for agriculture, and N.C. State has a long history of agriculture,” Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Thomas Stafford said. Stafford added that with a location so close to campus and with people coming from all over the state to visit, many may decide to come over and visit campus.  Since the State Fair is one of the top attractions in North Carolina, it is a great opportunity for students, faculty and staff to interact with the general public on a level they may not have access to normally. “So they come to ride the rides, but maybe they’re walking around the agricultural booths...or they see the fact

Sugar

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FAIR

Rows of specialty cupcakes sit on display at Sugarland, a locally-owned bakery on historic Franklin Street in Chapel Hill.

“The State Fair has a very long and close connection to N.C. State.... The State Fair really began as an exhibition for agriculture, and N.C. State has a long history of agriculture.” Thomas Stafford, vice chancellor of Student Affairs

that our food science people are the ones judging contests, and just little different things that any time you can put your name out there the better because that audience is not necessarily looking for N.C. State or looking for any university in general,” Wood said, “and just kind of ‘Oh that’s who does this and that’s who does that. Oh, and they’re just down the street. Let’s drive through and see what it looks like.’” Held during the State Fair every year, NCSU’s Open House on Oct. 15 brought in more than 8,000 visitors, according to Stacy Fair, director of the E. Carroll Joyner Visitor Center,

although she says the date has more to do with convenience, application deadlines and high school fall breaks than the presence of the State Fair. “Open House, because it’s for prospective students, we always want to have it at a time when it’s optimal for them to visit and a lot of folks come to the fair anyway, but then we also look at when the SAT and ACT are being held,” Nicole Wood, director of communication, said. “All those factors fall into place, and it makes for a good turn out at the event,” Fair added.

flicts.   Their current location was appropriate for their initial start three years ago, but due to their current success, they have grown out of their Franklin Street location. They have little space, no coolers and limited parking for their workers, who often have to arrive to start the baking day very early in the morning.  Sugarland is reconsidering resigning the lease on Franklin Street. New parking regulations by the city of Chapel Hill have made business tougher. They hope to have a decision made regarding the status of the store on Franklin Street very soon.  If they are to move and not expand, they will be welcoming all of the current 26 employees to work at the new Raleigh location. Regardless of the move or expansion, they hope to hire around 15 to 20 new members at their new location, several of whom they expect to be NCSU students. However, they expect most of the pastry chefs and gelato makers to continue on with them to their Raleigh location.  Ryan has currently hired extra baking staff in order to train them at the current location before the split or the move occurs.   With the new location

Sugarland Quick facts:

Sugarland’s routine specials: • Half-price cupcake Tuesdays • Buy-one-get-one-freegelato Wednesdays • Special offers provided only to their Facebook fans.

Gelato: • 24 daily flavors Bakery: • 6-10 different flavors of cupcakes made daily • Hot fudge sundae cupcakecurrent best-seller

being twice as large as the current location, Ryan conveyed her great excitement about the new store. She hopes to also be able to experiment and offer a potential brunch menu over the weekend at the Cameron Village location along with their current products.  Both Ryan and her husband traveled to Italy and learned to make gelato under various traditional gelato maestros. Ryan still writes every gelato recipe and then trains her two gelato staff members to recreate her recipes precisely.   Her pastry chefs all have strong backgrounds with degrees from renowned culinary institutes.  “The cake decorators both have art degrees, so we have a knowledgeable staff,” Ryan added.   “Each four ounce serving of gelato made at Sugarland has around 90 to 140 calories, whereas Coldstone’s four ounce servings contain around 400 calories, so this is definitely a healthier alternative,” Ryan said.  Ryan said she is not worried about competition from Goodberry’s or The Cupcake Shoppe

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Source: Katrina Ryan & SugarlandChapelHill.com

near the new location.  “Nobody does what we do,” she said, “and once the customers taste our products I am sure they will be coming back for more. I believe we have no competition.”  Christy Holdsclaw, a freshman in psychology, said she was looking forward to the store’s arrival.   “I love cupcakes and gelato, and Cameron Village is pretty close, so I am very excited about their opening and will definitely be trying it out,” she said.  The new location is expected to open beside Priscilla of Boston in Cameron Village somewhere between Valentine’s Day and April 1. Katrina also mentions there will be a grand opening party with lots of free products, as they are prepared to start off with a big bang.   John Pharr, senior vice president for Regency, said, although only paperwork is left, nothing is set in stone however, because the costs involved haven’t been laid out yet. He said he has seen deals fall through this late. “She is still in that vital discovery phase. We’re hopeful.”

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