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T. ABRAHAM WILSON SELECTED WORKS - 2018


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T. A BR AHAM WILSON

ED UC ATI ON Charlottesville, VA Dec. 2018

4 2 1 9 t h S t . NW Cha r l o tt e s v ille , V A 2 2 9 03 4 3 4 . 4 0 9 .3 9 9 0 a br a ha m wils o n @ v ir g in i a. ed u

College Park, MD 2004 - 2006 Charlottesville, VA May 2004

Master of Architecture Candidate University of Virginia Lester A. Sorensen Scholarship - Awarded for academic excellence. Master of Architecture Candidate University of Maryland Left in good standing to pursue professional opportunities. B.A. Religious Studies University of Virginia

WORK EXPERI ENC E Charlottesville, VA 2012 - 2016

Architect Intern / Designer Sutphin Architects - Aided principal architect in SD, DD, CD and CA phases of residential design projects. - Assumed role of lead designer on several projects, including $1.2 million pool house.

Charlottesville, VA 2006 - 2012

Architect Intern Train & Partners - Aided principal architect in all phases of institutional and commercial building design and construction from schematic design to construction administration.

TE ACHI NG EXPERI ENC E

Charlottesville, VA Spring 2018

ARCH 1030 - Foundation Studio I, Anselmo Canfora Teaching Assistant - Provided guidance and criticism to first-year undergraduate architecture students addressing comprehensive design principles, process and critical thinking.

Charlottesville, VA Fall 2017

ARCH 1010 - Lessons of the Lawn; Architecture Theory, Peter Waldman Teaching Assistant - Led discussions sections in architectural theory and philosophy.

Charlottesville, VA Spring 2017

ARCH 2360 - Building Matters; Architectural Detailing, Seth McDowell Teaching Assistant - Educated undergraduate architecture students on building technologies and helped them to produce detail drawings for studio design projects.

SK I LLS Digital

REF E RENC E S IĂąaki Alday UVa School of Architecture 434.924.2540 alday@virginia.edu

Analog

AutoCAD, Revit, Rhino, Adobe Creative Suite, VRay, Maxwell, Lumion Hand drafting, physical modeling, color rendering, carpentry, freehand drawing

OTHER Delhi, India Fall 2017

Anselmo Canfora UVa School of Architecture 434.924.7057 anselmo@virginia.edu

Kwari Kwar, Uganda Spring 2017

Kirk Train Train & Partners Architects 434.293.2965 ktrain@trainarchitects.com

Vicenza, Italy Summer 2017

The Yamuna River Project - Spent one week in Delhi, India as part of a semester long design studio studying urban blight and environmental pollution - Met with governmental officials to present progress drawings for urban design solutions. reCOVER - Kwari Kwar Faith & Nursery School - University of Virginia - Selected by reCOVER to design a primary school in Kwari Kwar, Uganda with Arup Engineers, London, England. - Construction Slated for spring, 2018. . The Vicenza Program - Spent five weeks traveling throughout the Veneto developing freehand drawing and diagramming skills. 3


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TABLE OF CONTENTS STUDIO PROJECTS H o u s i n g U n i v e r s i t y L i f e 0 6 R e - i m a g i n i n g t h e N Y C B l o c k 1 4 U r b a n i z a t i o n o f C o r o n a t i o n P i l l a r 2 4 COURSEWORK S a n c t u a r y : D e s i g n D e v e l o p m e n t 3 2

K w a r i K w a r S c h o o l & N u r s e r y - S t u d i o r e C O V E R

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T h e V i c e n z a P r o g r a m 4 4 C h i a r o s c u r o 4 8 IN PROGRESS C a m p b e l l H a l l A d d i t i o n 5 0

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HOUSING UNIVERSITY LIFE


HOUS ING UNI V ER SI TY L I F E Research Studio | Fall 2016 Critic: Margarita Jover Location : Charlottesville, VA

Completed in 1900, the West Complex at the University of Virginia was one of the first academic hospitals of its kind in the Mid-Atlantic region. Today, after numerous ill-planned and under-funded additions over the last century, the complex has been slated for decommission in 2020. Despite its historic significance, many have called for the demolition of the old hospital because of its odd, layout and its lack connection to the surrounding city. This design scheme re-imagines the West Complex at UVa as a new music school and student housing campus which questions the socially impoverished lives of modern day college students and their sociologically abstracted roll as pure consumer.

HOUSING UNIVERSITY LIFE

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The basis of this scheme was formulated following a thorough investigation of the hospital’s growth over the last century. The first few phases of the hospital plan between 1900 and 1940 were indicative of the importance of light and air during this era, including their beneficial effects on patients’ health and well-being. After 1960, one can see a distinct shift in these priorities as the hospital’s architects began filling in courtyards and undoing previous efforts to keep the complex

1905

1924

1936

1960

1929

open and porous to light and fresh air, as well as to pedestrian traffic. The primary changes to the massing were an effort to reestablish the original grain of the complex and open it back up to both the university and the city of Charlottesville. In my proposal, the central bay to the medical school was demolished, opening the new campus up to the commercial street to the north known as “The Corner.” In addition, the 1960s tower was removed and the building mass redistributed along the eastern edge of the site. 8

HOUSING UNIVERSITY LIFE

PROPOSED DEMOLITION


PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION

PROGRAM:

HOUSING

MUSIC SCHOOL

EXISTING

PROPOSED

The majority of the music school program was allocated to a one to two story mat building on the eastern half of the site, effectively creating a pedestrian street to the east as well as a series of courtyards which run north-south, descending with the topography, through the center of the campus. Rehearsal rooms were located off of both the street and the courtyards which can be opened up to allow performances to be viewed by passers-by, further activating these spaces. HOUSING UNIVERSITY LIFE

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FLOOR PLAN

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HOUSING UNIVERSITY LIFE


PROCESS MODEL

PROCESS MODEL

FINAL MASSING MODEL

Above the music school are four fingers of student and staff residences which are splayed

In a similar vein, the northern exposure of residencies is given over to kitchens, living

axially in order to address both the new pedestrian street and Jefferson Park Avenue. All

spaces, and study rooms--weaving together a “dispersed household” and encouraging

bedrooms in both the new and existing buildings are provided with access to a small,

social activity within the dormitory. To further this notion of dispersed household, the re-

private, south-facing garden-porch. This arrangement was chosen in an effort to lessen the

purposed buildings on the western half of the campus are tied together by a skewer of

abstracted nature of the first-year experience and to subvert the students’ typical role as

raised circulation and small living rooms, echoing the original hospital arrangement and

pure consumers by giving them a small space to grow food.

allowing for increased social interaction between dormitories. HOUSING UNIVERSITY LIFE

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One challenge of the adaptive reuse of the existing hospital buildings was how to make use of the roughly 13-foot floor plates which are too tall for typical dormitory rooms and not tall enough for a typical two-story loft. The solution was a “sleepingpod” and loft arrangement which takes advantage of the extra floor-to-floor height and gives each students a small private space while maintaining the footprint of a standard dorm room. Thus, while the traditional dormitory typology deprives students of their public and private lives, this arrangement

STUDENT UNIT PLAN (CUT AT FIRST LEVEL)

gives equal value to both, providing a healthier and more holistic first-year experience.

AXONOMETRIC DIAGRAM - STUDENT HOUSING UNIT

STUDENT UNIT PLAN (CUT AT TWO LEVELS)

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HOUSING UNIVERSITY LIFE

SECTION DIAGRAM - STUDENT UNIT AGGREGATION


HOUSING UNIVERSITY LIFE

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NORTH ELEVATION 14

REIMAGINING THE NEW YORK CITY BLOCK


R E I M A G I NI N G T H E N E W Y O R K CI T Y B LO C K Foundation Studio II | Spring 2018 Critic: Seth McDowell Partners: Emily Feidler and Aisha Sawatsky Location: New York, NY

It was not until the modern era that designers began to imagine cities which operate at multiple vertical levels as they attempted to increase the ease and quickness with which its occupants could move throughout an increasingly dense and crowded environment. With the introduction of subway systems, raised highways, sky-ways, high-rise construction, and now elevated parks, it is becoming more and more difficult for a single level to claim primacy. Throughout history, this loss of a ground plane has been used in movies, literature, and other art forms as a metaphor for humankind’s social and cosmological dislocation. In addition to this idea of the ground plane orienting humankind within the cosmos, it can also be said that it has acted historically as a visual barometer of scarcity and abundance. Within the current engineered city environment, food, water, light, heat, cooling and other amenities are bestowed upon occupants through what appears to be its own natural order without conveying any notion of scarcity or abundance. In our project we sought to create a new ground that recaptures the natural environment’s expression of resource availability while maintaining an honesty that it is nothing more than another artificially constructed ground in another somewhat arbitrary location.

REIMAGINING THE NEW YORK CITY BLOCK

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Historically, designers’ attempts to dissociate pedestrian circulation from the street level has been by and large unsuccessful. The Highline, which runs through our site, is a rare successful example. The street level of New York has achieved a great enough density that pedestrians are willing to ascend to a new level to move throughout the city. With this in mind, we made our site an appendage to the Highline, taking cues from its composition and spatial design characteristics. We began the design of our site after a thorough investigation of its geological history. Manhattan sits upon bedrock that cleaves and skews underneath the city contrary to the established street grid. It was this image of subterranean rifts of bedrock that informed the poetics of our massing and facade articulation. These ‘rifts’ were explored in both plan and section as a way of creating shared territories and adjacencies of public and private spaces. This idea was also used as a compositional device which informed how we allowed natural light and ventilation into our site. Formally, the block massing is derived from the towerpodium typology. The design addresses the historical failures of this massing scheme by making efforts to relate to the human scale and by taking cues from traditional urban street sections. The central rift of the elevated park allows the site to maintain a high density of construction while creating public space that is appropriately scaled and intimate. Though the park is associated with the High Line, the massing is arranged so that it engages with the street level MANHATTAN GEOLOGY 16

PROCESSION OF SHORELINE

REIMAGINING THE NEW YORK CITY BLOCK

rather than standing alone and above the common ground.


SITE PLAN

The addition of a school to the program was appropriate because of the didactic

mimicking the natural environments expression of resource scarcity and availability, a

quality of the block scheme. The school is a STEM program which specializes in

series of stepped fountains are located throughout the central linear park. These fountains

sustainable environmental sciences. The result is a hybrid public park / educational

act as rain gauges to inform occupants of the level of harvested rainwater available

and professional campus. Composition of the block allows visitors and residents a

to the block. When cisterns are full, water overflows and ascends down to street level

glimpse into the technological efforts that go into making resources readily available

fountains. If cisterns are empty, the fountains are dry and the block uses water from the

in a metropolis such as NYC. To further the notion of our new engineered ground plane

city water system. REIMAGINING THE NEW YORK CITY BLOCK

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FLOOR PLAN AT APARTMENT LEVEL

FLOOR PLAN AT PARK LEVEL 18

REIMAGINING THE NEW YORK CITY BLOCK


VIEW FROM 30TH STREET

REIMAGINING THE NEW YORK CITY BLOCK

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VIEW FROM INTERIOR STREET

PROCESS MODELS 20

REIMAGINING THE NEW YORK CITY BLOCK


REIMAGINING THE NEW YORK CITY BLOCK

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URBANIZATION OF CORONATION PILLAR

SITE PLAN


UR BA NI Z AT IO N O F C O R O NAT I O N P I L L A R Research Studio | Fall 2017 Critic: Iñaki Alday, Pankaj Vir Gupta Location: Delhi, India

As rural land-holding patterns in developing countries,

After a thorough survey of traditional Indian housing

such as India, become less and less able to support

types, including the haveli palaces and pol housing

growing populations, millions of migrants have moved

of the 19th century, it became clear that what

to larger cities in hopes of higher wage jobs. The

allowed them to be livable housing types at such high

shortage of affordable housing in large developing

densities was their strong connection to public space.

cities has led to the construction of hundreds of

In traditional Indian cities, such as Old Delhi, streets

thousands of illegal, structurally unsound dwellings on

are places of both social and economic exchange.

the city periphery, often built on illegally occupied land.

Shallow porches are ubiquitous and are places of

The result is vast expanses of ultra-dense neighborhoods

gathering which allow for interaction with the messy

with little to no planning or access to basic utilities and

vitality of the street life. The procession from street to

public transportation.

sleeping quarters is a seamless continuum from public to private and features multi-use rooms which allow for

The housing most often constructed with funding from

comfortable living at extreme density.

the city are high-rise apartment blocks which offer no connection with the vibrant Indian street life and

The driving questions of this project are: Can this vital

quickly develop into “vertical slums.” The little social

connection to public space be maintained at building

housing that is provided within the city is already

heights of five to seven stories to surpass the densities of

beyond the budgets of the city’s foundering economy.

both the ad-hoc, illegally occupied urban villages and the government subsidized apartment buildings? Could

At this point in time, there have been little to no

there be a new housing type that allowed for the same

examples of low-rise, high density social housing that

access to light and air at this density? One solution was

incorporate traditional dwelling patterns, access to

to “pull the public space upward” to create a second

mobility, or any semblance of healthy urbanity. In the

level interior “street.” In this scheme, the lower two to

in this design project I explore the question of whether

three floors are given over to the primary street while

there are high density social housing models that are

the upper floors are accessed from a secondary raised

affordable to large developing cities such as Delhi, as

street.

well as compatible with traditional urban scale and streetscapes. URBANIZATION OF CORONATION PILLAR

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TRADITIONAL STREET SECTIONS

HIGHER DENSITY STREET SECTION STUDY

PROCESS BLOCK SECTION 24

URBANIZATION OF CORONATION PILLAR

BLOCK STUDY


BLOCK SCHEME WITH PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION

Inclusion of incremental housing units increases the accessibility of the housing type to Indian citizens of lesser means, ultimately positioning the tradition of self-construction not as a problem to be dealt with, but as a positive force to be harnessed. Through incremental housing, not only can residents make a dwelling his or her own, but it also becomes an

POTENTIAL BLOCK ARRANGEMENTS

Construction is of pre-cast concrete and tilt-up concrete slab. This construction type has been found to be not only inexpensive but appropriate for the high seismic zone in which Delhi resides. Bamboo screens provide shade to outdoor gathering spaces and act as brisolee to reduce thermal heat gain in the hot Indian climate.

investment for the tenants and the city as a whole, building value through sweat equity.

URBANIZATION OF CORONATION PILLAR

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1 - 3 BEDROOM INCREMENTAL UNIT

1 - 3 BEDROOM INCREMENTAL UNIT 1 - 2 BEDROOM UNIT

COMMERCIAL / OFFICE

UNIT PLANS

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URBANIZATION OF CORONATION PILLAR

UNIT AXONOMETRIC


SITE SECTIONS

5,000 UNITS @ 50 SQ. METERS ( 75 SQ. METERS BUILT OUT ) 6,000 UNITS @ 35 SQ. METERS ( 75 SQ. METERS BUILT OUT ) 3,500 UNITS @ 100 - 150 SQUARE METERS 14,500 TOTAL UNITS 208,000 TOTAL PEOPLE HOUSED IN SOCIAL HOUSING 308,000 TOTAL PEOPLE HOUSED DENSITY: 113,000 PEOPLE / SQ. KILOMETER

URBANIZATION OF CORONATION PILLAR

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BLOCK PLAN - SECOND FLOOR 28

URBANIZATION OF CORONATION PILLAR


BLOCK PLAN - THIRD FLOOR URBANIZATION OF CORONATION PILLAR

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TYPICAL SECTION

VIEW FROM PEDESTRIAN STREET 30

URBANIZATION OF CORONATION PILLAR

VIEW FROM RAISED STREET


TYPICAL ELEVATION

VIEW FROM PRIMARY STREET URBANIZATION OF CORONATION PILLAR

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S A NC T U A R Y

Design Development Course Partner: Mert Kanzu The sanctuary is composed of an armature of site-cast concrete walls and steel trusses which act as both the primary structure of the interior space as well as exterior landscape elements. The envelope is a steel curtain-wall system interspersed with light wood framing. The butterfly roof is designed to funnel water into a reflecting pool and is constructed from structural insulated panels (SIPS) and standing-seam copper. 32

SANCTUARY


SANCTUARY

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FLOOR PLAN

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SANCTUARY


SANCTUARY

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NORTH - SOUTH SECTION

EAST - WEST SECTION

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SANCTUARY


CONSTRUCTION SEQUENCE

1. WALLS

2. TRUSSES

3. ROOF

4. ENVELOPE DETAILS

WALL SECTION

SANCTUARY

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K WA R I K WA R FA I T H S C H O O L & NURSERY - UGANDA Team: Scott Fundling, Anselmo Canfora Construction Slated for 2018 Kwari Kwar Faith School & Nursery was a joint effort between Engineers for Overseas Development (EFOD), Arup Engineers (Cardiff, UK) and Studio reCOVER UVa—a program founded by Professor Anselmo Canfora to assist under-served populations through partnerships with humanitarian, community-based organizations, professional firms, and manufacturers. In the design, we sought not only to provide the standard classrooms as described by EFOD, but, in addition, chose to create a set of “outdoor classrooms” and places of gathering in the interstitial spaces between the built mass. Given Uganda’s temperate climate, the flexible outdoor space allows the school to expand and contract in size without further construction. Security was of utmost concern to the school’s founders. Not wanting to simply surround the school with a typical security wall, the architectural language allows the classroom walls to bleed out into the landscape both for security and a feeling of openness and porosity. The school is constructed from site-formed sun-cured brick and a top band of cast-in-place concrete. Roofs are composed of a steel rebar space frame (not shown in perspectives) designed by Arup and galvanized corrugated steel sheeting. This system creates an air gap between the roof and the classroom space, allowing for ventilation and decreased solar heat gain.

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KWARI KWAR FAITH SCHOOL & NURSERY

FLOOR PLAN


VIEW OF MAIN COURTYARD KWARI KWAR FAITH SCHOOL & NURSERY

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AXONOMETRIC 40

KWARI KWAR FAITH SCHOOL & NURSERY


VIEW FROM ENTRANCE KWARI KWAR FAITH SCHOOL & NURSERY

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SOUTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION

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KWARI KWAR FAITH SCHOOL & NURSERY


VIEW FROM OUTDOOR CLASSROOM KWARI KWAR FAITH SCHOOL & NURSERY

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V I C E NZ A Critic: Charlie Menefee During a five-week drawing program in the Veneto, I analyzed works by Carlo Scarpa, Andrea Palladio, and Leon Battista Alberti, among others.

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SCARPA DETAILS


VILLA ROTUNDA

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VICENZA SKETCHES


BASILICA SANT’ ANDREA, MANTOVA

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CHIAROSCURO Critic: Charlie Menefee Four-week course exploring the analysis and representation of form and space through tone, shade and shadow.

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CAMPBELL HALL & ERIC GODWIN MEMORIAL


SHER MANDAL - DELHI, INDIA

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I N P R O G R ESS : C A M P B E L L H A L L A D D I T I O N Critic: Luis Pancorbo Location: Charlottesville, VA Semester: Spring 2018

Tasked with designing a new robotics lab and maker’s space at Campbell hall, I chose to locate it on the building’s north terrace, lifting the occupiable outdoor space upward for better sun exposure and breaking it up into smaller, more human-scaled spaces. The scheme avoids long spans and the need for large, new foundations by employing a light steel structure that “dances” around the existing building mass. In this scheme, interior and exterior circulation is improved, and new entry points create a sense of arrival on the first and second level.

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CAMPBELL HALL ADDITION

PERSPECTIVE SKETCH


SITE PLAN

CAMPBELL HALL ADDITION

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CAMPBELL HALL ADDITION - BASEMENT LEVEL


CAMPBELL HALL ADDITION - FIRST FLOOR

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CAMPBELL HALL ADDITION - SECOND FLOOR


CAMPBELL HALL ADDITION

- FOURTH FLOOR

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NORTH ELEVATION

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

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CAMPBELL HALL ADDITION


WEST ELEVATION

TRANSVERSE SECTION

CAMPBELL HALL ADDITION

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Portfolio - T. Abraham Wilson  
Portfolio - T. Abraham Wilson  
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