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LS: Much to my mother’s horror, Mason and I both have sabbaticals coming up, and we’ve been talking about going up there for a period of time. We’ve traveled there several times now, but to fly in for a week is very different than living there, particularly in the context of the North. There’s a whole set of complex cultural challenges in terms of being a Southerner projecting onto the North, and I think it would be hugely helpful for us, both to build knowledge and to build trust, to spend a significant amount of time there. We keep joking that we’ll open an outpost of Lateral in Iqaluit, but we haven’t figured out the logistics of that yet! D26: It’s funny that someone from Toronto is considered a southerner of Canada. LS: I know, I know. Americans always laugh at this, but they literally use the term “Southerner” up there. That dynamic is very interesting. I know people that have been in the North for ten years, and they’re still referred to as a Southerner because it’s as much a cultural distinction as a geographic distinction. We know that one can never understand someone’s culture fully, and there’s a fairly large gap between growing up in a city like Toronto and trying to envision everything from social dynamics to cultural dynamics and so forth from a Northerner’s perspective. Projects like the Arctic Food Network very much engage questions of culture by recognizing that food harvesting, food sharing, etcetera, is central to the Inuit way of life because that’s their means of survival. So we have to deal with these issues in a very conscious way within our work. It’s like any thesis, really. You’re trying to invent the project, which means figuring out where architecture has a role and where it doesn’t. JH: How do you select the territories that you work on in the projects? What sort of process gets you into these places? LS: It usually starts with a very broad hunch, if I were to be totally honest. Often, there’s an element of accident followed by rigorous research at different resolutions, and we pick up productive leads along the way. Slowly, places like the American Southwest, and particularly the Salton, emerge as a condenser and a litmus test of so many issues related to water infrastructure—and all happening essentially in our backyard, yet rarely rendered obvious in the design disciplines. Similarly, for Next North, we began very broadly and then would happen upon interesting intersections. And we find, for example, that the caribou are diminishing in a certain region, and

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