Page 1

STUDIO AIR TAT YA N A P R O C A K | S E M E S T E R 2 , 2 0 1 6


ARCHITECTURE DESIGN STUDIO: AIR TAT YANA PROCAK | SEMESTER 2, 2016 TUTOR: MANUEL MUEHLBAUER


CONTENTS PA RT B: CRI TE RI A DE S I G N B1 B 2 B 3 B 4 B 5 B 6 B 7 B 8

| | | | | | | |

|

PA RT B

Researc h Fi el d Case Study 1.0 Case Study 2.0 Tec hni que: Dev el opm ent Tec hni que: Prototy pes Tec hni que: Proposal L earni ng Obj ec ti v es and Outc om es Appendi x: Al gor i thm i c Sk etc hes

04 06 14 20 26 28 32 34


FIG URE 1 : V iew of th e Vo l ta D o m f ro m th e e x te ri o r

FIG URE 2 : Interio r of 2011 IC D / IT KE R e se a rc h Pavi l i o n


RESEARCH FIELD

|

B1

BI OM I M I C RY Biomimetic architecture aims to mimic efficient natural materials and processes, in order to inspire and produce sustainable architectural solutions 1 . It is a design field that, when cross-pollinated with the field of science, has the potential to create beautiful structures that emulate natural processes found within nature.

The introduction of design computa tion has enhanced this field of study as, through its application, optimisation techniques are able to be refined through the progression of analysis techniques, and also, through the use of algorithms, highly progressive designs can be formed. Generative design has become estab lished thanks to this introduction of com putation, enhancing the progression of the design, allowing for a refined result.

Biomimicr y is an emerging field due to the utilisation of innovative techniques by its proponents. Designer s are continually moving to incorporate biomimetics, which involves the crossing of elements of biol ogy and design. We are able to see this evolution of design materialise in struc tures such as the Volta Dom and many of the ICD/ITKE Research Pavilions. The Volta Dom was an installation at MIT Architecture by the SJET practice. It was through the experimentation of computational design that the creation of this structure became possible. Situated between two glass panels, the installa tion aims to experiment with the form of vaulted ceilings. The creation adopts an abstracted generation of a vaulted ceil ing while also playing with views and light through var ying oculi across the sur face 2 . The 2011 ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion also experiments structural form through tr y ing to replicate the skeletal form of a sea urchin 3 . The aim was to produce a proj ect that was able to be easily adapted with a high degree of per formance. The project managed to resolve issues relating to load bearing capacities, due to its efficient geometries as well as efficient construction techniques. This research pavilion utilised computation to optimise geometries in the lightweight construction, where cells are strategically placed for the desired cur vature and shape to occur 4 .

Biomimetics incorporates sustainability, per formance, energy usage and material efficiency 5 throughout the design process in order to optimize solutions. The whole process is aimed to have a limited impact on the Ear th creating buildings that are able to adapt to their environment. Moving into the future, biomimetic architecture will expectedly help the current defuturing of our land into a society that has a reduced impact on the environment and the ecosystems of which its environ ment is constituted.

Biomimicry Institute, ‘What is Biomimicry?’, Biomimicry 101, (The Biomimicry Institute, 2015), <h t t ps : / / bi o mi mi cr y. o rg/ w h at- i s- bi o mi mi cr y / # . V 7 U q X j X 1 r a 8 > [accessed 13 August 2016] 2 Lidija Grozdanic, ‘VoltaDom Installation / Skylar Tibbits + SJET’, eVolo, (2011), <h t t p: / / w w w. evo l o . u s / a rch i t ect u re/ vo l t a do m - i n st al l a t i o n -s kyl a r-t i bbi t s -s j et / > [accessed 13 August 2016] 3 Amy Frearson, ‘ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion at the University of Stuttgart’, Dezeen Magazine, (2011), <h t t p: / / w w w. dez een . co m/ 2 01 1 /1 0/31 / i cdi t ke-res ea rch -pa vi l i o n -a t-t h e-u n i ver s i t y-of-s t u t t gar t /> [accessed 13 August 2016] 4 Universitat Stuttgart, ‘ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion 2011’, 2011 ICD Research Buildings/Prototypes, (n.d.), <h ttp : / / i cd . u n i - s tu ttg a r t. d e/ ? p =6 5 5 3 > [accessed 13 August 2016] 5 Biomimicry 3.8, ‘Biomimicry’, About, (Biomimicry Group, 2014), <h t t p: / / bi o mi mi cr y. n et / a bo u t / bi o mi mi cr y/ > [accessed 13 August 2016] Figure 1 Skylar Tibbits. ‘18’, Arch2o (2015), <http://www.arch2o.com/wpcontent/uploads/2013/09/Arch2o-Voltadom-by-Skylar-Tibbits-SkylarTibbits18.jpg> [accessed 13 August 2016] Figure 2 Skylar Tibbits. ‘19_view-leds’, Universitat Stuttgart (2011), <http://icd. uni-stuttgart.de/wp-content/gallery/researchpavilion_2011_8/19_viewleds.jpg> [accessed 13 August 2016] 1


FIG URE 3 : Spani sh Pa v i l i o n E x te r i o r

FIG URE 4 : Close- u p of c e r a m i c h e x a g o n a l p a tte rn


CASE STUDY 1.0

|

B2

SPA N I S H PAV I LI ON ARC HITE CT(S): F OREIGN OF FICE ARCHITECTS DATE: 2005

The 2005 Spanish Pavilion designed by Foreign Office Architects utilizes an irregular lattice of ear thenware hexagons to visualize the cultural hybridization of Spain. The architecture explored cultural connections between religious groups by utilizing each group’s unique methods of construction and design providing a rein terpretation that incorporates these skills to compose one pavilion 6 . The construction techniques looked at, were arches, vaults, lattices and traceries. Taking these design ideas and mix ing them with new technologies such as computational design, produced varied oppor tunities, leading to the selection of the outstanding form. The design consists of 6 hexagonal shapes that are then repeated and latticed along the structure. Each hexagon is irregularly shaped with a mix of colour s, fashioning a non-repetitive pattern 7 .

DIVISARE, ‘Expo AICHI 2005’, Spanish Pavilion, (n.d.), <h ttp s : / / d i vi s a re. co m/ pro j ect s / 2 72 1 6 8 -fo a -s pa n i s h -pa vi l i o n > [accessed 22 August 2016] 7 Simon Glynn, ‘Spanish Pavilion, Aichi Expo, Japan’, galinsky, (2005), <h t t p: / / w w w. ga l i n s ky. co m/ bu i l di n gs / s pa i n a i ch i / > [accessed 22 August 2016] Figure 3 Ceramic Architectures. ‘01’, Ceramic Architectures (2016), <http:// www.ceramicarchitectures.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/0_FOA2005-F20_FOA-%C2%A9Satoru-mishima-1.jpg> [accessed 16 September 2016] Figure 4 Ceramic Architectures. ‘12’, Ceramic Architectures (2016), <http:// www.ceramicarchitectures.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/0_FOA2005-D11_ASCER-121.jpg> [accessed 16 September 2016] 6


| CASE STUDY 1.0 MATR IX IT E RAT IONS IMAGE SAMPLER

INTERNAL POINTS 01

OFFSET

H EXAGON A L GRID

ORIGINAL

X = 1.0 ; Y = 0.3

OFFSET = 0.4

IMAGE 02:

X = -0.7 ; Y = -0.3

OFFSET = -0.

IMAGE 03:

X = 1.0 ; Y = 1.0

OFFSET = -0

IMAGE 04:

X = -0.6 ; Y = 0.3

OFFSET = 0.1

TRIANGUL A R GRID

RADIAL GRID

IMAGE 01:

RECTANGU L AR GRID

B2


INTERNAL POINTS 02

FORMUL AE

INTERNAL POINTS 03

INTERNAL POINTS 04

48

X = -0.3 ; Y = -0.6

1. 2.4n(s 2 -(s/4) 2 ) 2. n(1.8s)

X = 0.6 ; Y = 0.7

X = 0.7 ; Y = -0.3

27

X = -0.7 ; Y = 1.0

1. -n 2 s(s/2) 2. n(-1.7s)

X = 1.0 ; Y = -0.9

X = -1.0 ; Y = -1.0

.2

X = -0.7 ; Y = 1.0

1. n(1.5sqr t(s 2 - (s/6) 2 ) 2. n(0.8s)

X = -0.9 ; Y = 0.4

X = 0.8 ; Y = 0.7

13

X = 0.4 ; Y = 0.8

1. 1.1n(1.4s 2 -(s/1.8) 2 ) 2. n(1.48s)

X = -0.5 ; Y = -0.5

X = 1.0 ; Y = 0.8


HEXAGONAL GRID: ITERATION 3

RADIAL GRID: ITERATION 1

RECTANGUL AR GRID: ITERATION 4

RECTANGUL AR GRID: ITERATION 8


CASE STUDY 1.0

|

B2

S EL ECT ION CRIT ERIA 1 . SH APE The shapes that are formed from these iterations should cause interest and inspire imaginative responses.

2 . F LUI DI T Y The layouts formed through the itera tions need to work together, not forming sharp irregularities and theref ore allowing continuous movement.

3 . CL AR I T Y The iterations highlighted to the lef t were deemed to be the most successful out of the 32 due to the suitability in accordance with the selection criteria. The iterations best fulfilled the requirem ents of shape, fluidity, clarity, potential biomimetic usage and con structability. Throughout the iteration process, 4 variants of the base grid were used. The hexa gonal, diamond, triangu lar and rectangular grids allowed for greater variation when altering the finer movements forming unique geometric formations. Each alteration was intended to build upon the previous ver sionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s charac ter and clarity while also enhancing its suitability in terms of the selection criteria. These final ver sions meet the require ments of the selection criteria and therefore have design potential.

The iterations should be clear and in formative. The patterns should be eas ily decipherable with no stress points.

4 . POTE NTI AL B I O M I M E TI C USAG E Patterns formed in the iteration need to have potential in biomimetic archi tecture. The mixture of regular and irregular shapes and lines closely re sembles the natural environment.

5 . CO NSTR UCTAB I L I T Y All iterations chosen through this se lection criteria have to be able to be applied to a future structure. Designs therefore require the ability to be replicated and reproduced, as well as being able to be connected together.


CASE STUDY 1.0

|

B2

DESIGN POTENTIAL ARCH I TE CTUR AL APPL I CATI O N S : The geometric variations selected can be potentially used in facade treatments. Each of the iterations can be constructed in a number of ways with various connection details possible. As the possibilities for these iterations are broad, they are suitable for further development due to their flexibility and conformity to the selec tion criteria.

Q UAL I TI E S AND E F F E CTS: In the application of these geometric patterns, a number of different effects could be created. Layer s, textures and colour s provide options for the development of iterations, and help form a connection to people, the envi ronment and the structure itself. The effects used can enhance the quality of its function and usage, as well as its execution. Facades are a possible future applica tion of these geometric variations, and these iterations could also potentially inspire floor layouts and structures.


FIG URE 5 : Rende re d c o m p u ta ti o n a l d e si g n d e m o n s t r a t i n g fo res t r y effect of t h e fa ca de

FIG URE 6 : Air spac e To k y o E x te ri o r Pa n e l s


CASE STUDY 2.0

|

B3

A IR S PAC E TOK YO ARCHITECT(S): FAUL DERS STUDIO DATE: 2007

Air space Tokyo is a multi-family home and studio in Japan. In order to construct the building, large amounts of vegetation had to be removed, and therefore the of Faulder s Studio’s aim was to mimic the aesthetic and function of dense vegeta tion in a facade. “Layer s of the porous, open-celled mesh work changes densities” 8 , and develops the sense of dense vegetation. These densities responded to the internal layout requirements while sunlight and water are managed through refraction and channel ing 9 . Faudler s Studio utilised parametric design techniques to mimic that of dense vegetation. The design produces an effect which successfully produces the desired “foliage-like cover ” 10 .

Arch2o, ‘Airspace Tokyo | Faulders Studio’, Architecture, (Arch2o.com, 2015), <h t t p: / / w w w. a rch 2 o . co m/ a i r s pa ce-t o kyo -fa ul de r ss tu d i o / > [accessed 28 August 2016] 9 Faulders Studio, ‘Airspace Tokyo’, Airspace Tokyo, (2007), <h ttp: / / fa u l der s -s t u di o . co m/ A I R S PACE -TOK YO> [accessed 28 August 2016] 10 Faulders Studio, ‘Airspace Tokyo’. Figure 5 Thomas Faulders. ‘06’, Arch2o (2015), <http://www.arch2o.com/wpcontent/uploads/2012/06/Arch2O-Airspace-Tokyo-Faulders-Studio-12. jpg> [accessed 16 September 2016] Figure 6 Faulders Studio. ‘close-white-905’, Faulders Studio (2007), <http:// payload148.cargocollective.com/1/11/356647/5260292/close-white_905. jpg> [accessed 16 September 2016] 8


1

5

2

6

3

7

4

8


CASE STUDY 2.0

|

B3

REVERSE ENGINEERED 1 . PO PUL ATE G E O M E TRY Populate a sur face with randomly po sitioned points.

2 . VO RO NO I Form angular cells using the points as centre points.

3 . O F F SE T Fillet the voronoi cells to form the desired cur ves before offsetting to create a frame between the cells.

4 . E X TR UDE D IF F IC ULT IES: Once forming the voronoi cells, a process of trial-and-error developed the right procedure to form the solid framework. To begin with, capping was trialed to tr y and bridge between the exterior boundar y and the cur ves of the voronoi how ever it was ultimately unsuccessful due to the lack of u nion between the two shapes. On a 2D frame of the voronoi the weaverbird plugin for Grasshopper was used to create a frame around the voronoi cur ves. While this created a solid frame which could be extruded once filleting the sharp edges, gaps appeared between each frame of the cells, making this option unsuccessful. The ‘Solid Difference’ node was effectively utilised to create the desired frame effect, however the sequence did not initially work, due to the need for data tree flattening .

Extrude both the voronoi and offset cur ves to develop the z-direction.

5 . CAP Cap both extrusions to form two different sets of solids.

6 . SO L I D DI F F E R E NCE Utilising ‘Solid Difference’ between the capped extrusions of the voronoi and offset, the framwork becomes a solid of itself.

7 . SO L I D UNI O N ‘Solid Difference’ forms many polysurfaces and therefore ‘Solid Union’ joins the polysur faces into one unit.

8 . B AK E AND R E PE AT Baking the result of this process will create a panel resembling that found in ‘Air space Tokyo’, which can then be repeated for its full effect.


B3

| CASE STUDY 2.0 FINA L O U TCO ME

PANEL EX TRUSION

L AYERED PANELS

RENDERED L AYERED PANELS


FINAL INTERPRETATION


| TECHNIQUE: DEVELOPMENT MATR IX IT E RAT IONS

CURL

DOME

DYNAMIC

TUN N EL

ORIGINAL

WARP

B4

AT TRACTOR POINT

AT TRACTOR POINTS

AT TR


RACTOR CURVE

AT TRACTOR CURVES

FORCE

OCTREE


| TECHNIQUE: DEVELOPMENT MATR IX IT E RAT IONS

CURL

DOME

DYNAMIC

TUN N EL

BRANCH

WARP

B4

CRYSTALIZE

PEEL


TECHNIQUE: DEVELOPMENT

|

B4

S EL ECT ION CRIT ERIA 1 . SH APE The shapes that are formed from these iterations should cause interest and inspire imaginative responses.

2 . F LUI DI T Y The layouts formed through the itera tions need to work together, not forming sharp irregularities and theref ore allowing continuous movement.

3 . CL AR I T Y The iterations should be clear and in formative. The patterns should be eas ily decipherable with no stress points.

4 . POTE NTI AL B I O M I M E TI C USAG E Patterns formed in the iteration need to have potential in biomimetic archi tecture. The mixture of regular and irregular shapes and lines closely re sembles the natural environment.

5 . CO NSTR UCTAB I L I T Y All iterations chosen through this se lection criteria have to be able to be applied to a future structure. Designs therefore require the ability to be replicated and reproduced, as well as being able to be connected together.


TECHNIQUE: DEVELOPMENT

|

B4

DES IGN POT ENT IAL ARCH I TE CTUR AL APPL I CATI O N S : The application of these iterations has been directed towards the conception of sustainable developments. The mul tiple pockets and spaces which these geometric variations offer, allow for many future possibilities. Mimicking nature allows a design to respond and emulate to the natural environment, thereby making design more efficient and sustainable. As flexibility is key for the changing environment, it is so as well in the building industr y. Multi-functional ma terials and buildings will form spaces that have a low impact on society.

Q UAL I TI E S AND E F F E CTS: Textures and layer s will be the basis of interesting structural formats however it is the way in which a building can be designed to contribute to the surrounding environment, while also being functional that will provide the greatest effect. The aid of parametric design, through which a design is able to develop to a number of factor s meaning that it is possible for pockets and framing to hold, and carr y water, and sustain plant growth.


PROTOT Y P E 1 Inspired by the geometric variations from the B3 iterations, I aimed to analyse how connections between these geometric forms are able to alter their structural composition. While this prototype may not directly resemble the final design, it greatly assisted in progressing my exploration of how connections either blend in and become invisible in the environment or stand out and become a prominent feature.

PROTOT Y P E 2 Continuing on from the initial prototype, I wanted to further develop techniques I was using to form geometrical structures. Thinner members allowed for a more dynamic structure but my most important discov ery was the importance of materials. A malleable material can form a smoother, more geometric shape that would be more appropriate in applications of biomimicry. It is essential that this st ructure remains rigid, as demonstrated through testing of the prototype; suitable joints could be notches or plugs.

PROTOT YPE 3


TECHNIQUE: PROTOT YPES

|

PROTOT YPE 3 For my third prototype I wanted to retain the fluid surface I used in the second prototype, while also applying layers of geometric variation for purposeful aesthetics as inspired by Case Study 2.0. Use of a laser cutter greatly improves the execution of effect, however analysis of the patterned effect can still be gathered from prototype 3. In Airspace Tokyo, the material used can aid the forestry effect, and therefore material choice will dramatically change the effect of prototype 3.

B5


B6

| TECHNIQUE: PROPOSAL E X H IB IT IO N TO P IC

FI G UR E 7 : M o r ph o gen es i s P receden t

M ul t i funct i on al stru ctu res an d ma t er i a l s a re th e fu tu re of design . B i omi me t i c arch itectu re ado pts th e q u a l i t i e s of morph ogen esis in its d esi re t o a p pro priate astu te de s ig ns found i n n atu re an d adapt th em t o t he con stru cted form.

co l o u r u n der v ar i abl es, ch an ge sh ape an d ev en s el f- h eal . T h ese i n n o v at i v e m at er i al s , u sed co r rectl y, can en h an ce a des i gn ed s pace an d br i n g abo u t a po s i t i v e en v i ro n m en t al i mpact . T h e f o l l o w i n g pro po s al ch ampi o n s h o pes t h at desi gn so l u t i o n s w i l l be abl e t o i m pro v e an d en h an ce t h e en v i ro n m en t at Mer r i Creek. My des i gn f o cu s mo v i n g f o r w ard i s ‘ h o w can a pav i l i o n s t r u ct u re gi v e so met h i n g t o an en v i ro n men t?’.

T hroug h research an d an alysis i n Pa r t B , t he excellen t design s a chi eved b y morph in g n atu ral ph e n omens t o st ru c tu res, is visible in c ase st ud i es su ch case stu dy 1 an d c ase st ud y 2. Th e growin g tren d f o r d esi g ne r s to en h an ce th e abil i ty of a st r uctu re to c o n tribu te to th e envi ronmen t (in tern al o r ex terna l ) he l p s develop th e so cietal n e e d t o cha nge an d realise effi c iency a nd optimisation .

P ro bl em s of t h e s i t e cu r ren t l y cau s i n g i s su es i n cl u de po l l u t i o n an d degredat i o n of t h e l o cal en v i ro n men t , du e t o t h e i n creas i n g po pu l at i o n an d bu i l di n g den si t y i n t h e area. T h e ai m i s t o pro du ce a pav i l i o n u s i n g geo met r i c v ar i at i o n s dev el o ped an d an al y s ed i n prev i o u s s t ages , an d t o t h ereby i mpro v e t h e n at u r al en v i ro n m en t .

Whi l e st r uct u ral systems are able to b e op t i mi sed, so to o are materia ls. I nnova t i v e materials h ave th e a bi l i t y t o b e poro u s, ch an ge

Mitchell Whitelaw. ‘Uniform Density: Space-filling and the voronoi diagram’, The Teeming Void (2010), <http://payload148.cargocollective. com/1/11/356647/5260292/close-white_905.jpg> [accessed 16 September 2016] Figure 7


TECHNIQUE: PROPOSAL

|

DES IGN T RA NS L AT ION

B6


TECHNIQUE: PROPOSAL

|

PL A NS A ND S ECT IONS

The site chosen for the pavilion design in situated along Merri Creek in Green Reser ve, between Brunswick East and Nor thcot e. The reason for doing so is the fact that it is a point of stress between the natural and built environment. As the aim of the design is to utilise the techniques of biomimicr y to create a sustainable structure, it is impor tant that it is situated in the most effective spot and is therefore situated along the river where their is an increase in run-off due to the buildings close to the river, as well as the introduction of water from a pipe. A community garden south of the reser ve is encouraging for future use of a new pavilion aimed to improve the community. As it is between two s ections of the Merri Creek trail , roa ds and railways, it presents itself as the optimal solution.

B6


TEC

Feedback f ro m t h e Int er i m P res en t at i on h a s l ed m e t o reco n s i d e r my i dea. I n t h i s d e v e l o pm en t I ai m def i n e my des i gn agen d a a n d po s i t i o n t h e pav i l i on i n a m o re su i t abl e p os i ti on ( red) . Mo v i n g i n t o t h i s i te r a t i o n of t h e desi gn I a i m t o keep t h e n o n -l i n e a r mo v em en t an d f oc u s on su s t ai n abi l i t y. Wo r k i n g w i t h t h i s des i gn I s ti l l w an t t o i n cl u de â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; p oc ket s i n t h e f aced w i th th e geo m et r y t o al l ow f or u ser ex per i en ce.


CHNIQUE: DEVELOPED PROPOSAL

LO CAT I ON: Th e R o tu n da Wetlan ds, M er r i Creek, C lif to n Hill (L oca t ed n ear po pu lar parklan d wi t h fa cilities) DESI G N AGENDA: To edu cate the community on th e Merri C reek w at e r ma nagemen t system USERS: Walk er s, R u n n er s, C yc lis t s , Community User s PAVI L I O N: Th e pavilio n will com b i ne ma n ipu lated sph erical sh a pes t o rep resen t eac h of th e steps wi t hi n t h e water cycle. Th e pav i l i o n wi l l e ncase th e main path way in ord er for th e pavilion to be exper ienced i n adver ten tly. S P HERE STAGES: S t a g e 1 - Fast movemen t of water d ownst ream S t a g e 2 - Water slo ws do wn du e t o t op og r a ph y an d lan dscape S t a g e 3 - Slo w mo vemen t of wa t er a l l ows fo r con tamin an ts an d se di ment s t o settle an d filter S t a g e 4 - C lean water is slowly rel e a sed i n to th e bo dy of water

|

B6

FI N E R D E TA I LS : - N u mber of po i n t s u s ed f o r a v o ro n o i f acade w i l l di ct at e t h e s p e e d of t h e w at er - Larger n u mber of po i n t s i n di c a te f as t mo v i n g w at er - S mal l n u mber of po i n t s i l l u s t ra te s sl o w m o v i n g w at er - Per f o r at i o n s i n t h e pan el s f o rm i n g t h e v o ro n o i i n di cat e t h e con t am i n an t s - Per f o r at i o n s s et t l e t o t h e bo t tom pan el s t o i n di cat e sedi m en t at i on i n S t age 3 - Cl ean w at er i n di cat ed t h ro u gh f r am ew o r k t h at w i l l s l o w l y di s sip a te FU T U RE D E VE LO P ME N T S : - T h e i n t ro du ct i o n of i n n o v a t i v e m at er i al s t h at co u l d ch age i ts sh ape w i t h t h e w eat h er - I n cl u de i n t er act i v e el emen t s i n to t h e pav i l i o n f o r u ser ex per i en c e


LEARNIN


NG OBJECTIVES AND OUTCOMES Throughout Par t B I have continually aimed to develop my skills and im prove on my design thinking. Precedent research always aids the design process as it is able to advise how structures can be, and have been, designed and develop design thinking, therefore occurring during B1, B2 and B3 at the beginning of Par t B. Eva luating precedents relating to the topic of study becomes an information gathering process for a future design. From detailed joints, to materials, precedent research is essential in developing an innovative design (Objective 6). Design computation is becoming an integral par t of the design world and throughout B3 and B4 Grasshopper and Rhino were used to begin design ing parametrically. Though I faced a steep learning cur ve in becoming comfor table using these programs, I have enjoyed the challenge and revel in my newfound ability to easily make slight changes and adjustments in ac cordance with changing factor s (Ob jective 2 & 3). It has come to attention the importance of not only under standing the visual programming aid, but also the logic behind it. It is this logical thinking process that allows complex p ara metric models to be realised. Learning computer programming throughout univer sity cer tainly helped aid my under standing of Grasshopper and its plugins, and also extended my knowl edge through the uniqueness of visual programming (Objective 7).

|

Learning Grasshopper and Rhino has broadened my knowledge base and are exciting tools for future applica tions, as they allow for pure imagi nation to be represented on paper (Objective 8). Progressing design thinking into design making is a useful technique, since restrictions and flaws in the design become evident in physical models (Objective 3& 4). Prototyping is an impor tant stage to realise design faults as computer-generated models continue to depend on the absence of human error. By utilising all of the skills and em ploying all of the ideas gathered during precedent studies applying this knowledge to a sustainable structure proposal in B6 was an exciting pros pect. Critical research into materials and structures created a holistic ap proach to design creation (Objective 5). Moving into Par t C of Studio Air, I hope to continue to increase my knowledge of Grasshopper, to fur ther analyse the proposed structure, and refine and finalise the project.

B7


E V A L U AT I N G F I E L D S

APP

Evaluating fields allowed for complex forms to be created. These forms respond to the cur ves in its region that can either attract or repel. This attraction and repulsion i s displayed through the extrusion of the vector s. In these images, the form created was due to the inclusion of a graph mapper determining the pathway in the z-axis.


PENDIX: ALGORITHMIC SKETCHES

|

B8


GRAPH CONTROLLERS

APP


PENDIX: ALGORITHMIC SKETCHES

Graph controller s lead to the following complex patterns. In order to gain an pattern utilising irregular shapes it was impor tant to divide the circle with only odd inter vals. By adjusting the number of divisions and the cull pattern, various patterns can be formed.

|

B8


IMAGE SAMPLER

APP


PENDIX: ALGORITHMIC SKETCHES

|

Image sampler describes an image with the chosen geometr y. In the examples shown, the geometr y responds to a grayscale image. The larger the circle, the darker the area it responds to. Images can also be transposed over each other to develop complexity.

B8


GEODESIC CURVES

APP


PENDIX: ALGORITHMIC SKETCHES

|

Geodesic cur ves are utilised around lof ted cur ves. Manipulation of the Grasshop per algorithm allowed for va r ying angles to be formed along the base sur face. Each line reponds to a point along the cur ves used to form the base. By shuffling the index number s for each point, var ying degrees are formed.

B8


FIELD FORCES

APP


PENDIX: ALGORITHMIC SKETCHES

The following examples use colour s to display the vector direction. The vector s are manipulated within a bounding box for these images. The vector s forming the display are attracted or repulsed, depending on the set charge, around points or lines. It is the change of position or addition or subtraction of these points or cur ves that account for the var ying displays.

|

B8


CURVE INTERSECTIONS

APP


PENDIX: ALGORITHMIC SKETCHES

To analyse the inter sections of cur ves, a sphere is used as a base before extruded cur ves are formed around the geometr y. Populating and jittering points along the sur face allowed for lof teded offsets to form these interesting forms. The number of iterations of these circles arounf th e sphere was determined by the number of points used to populate the geometr y, the number of points and the number of cur ves around the geometr y were directly propor tional.

|

B8


Studio Air Part B  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you