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Crepes | Sopa De Lima Con Pollo Y Elote | Stir-Fried Chicken & Vegetables

Taste of

Plus

Five recipes complete with chef interviews and instructions A collection of Rattler Recipes from St. Mary’s University, San Antonio, Texas

Jo knows pizza Learn how to make a dorm friendly pizza with a twist

Volume 8, Issue 1 | Fall 2014


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Table of Contents

Taste of

StMU

Table of Contents Pizza 5 Margherita Feat. Joseph Hernandez 8

Taste of StMU | Fall 2014

Sopa de Lima con Pollo y Elote

Feat. Deandra Barerra

10

Crepes

12

Stir-fried Chicken and Vegetables

14

Lemon-Pepper Salmon

16

Vanilla Cake

Feat. Sarah Nasr

Feat. Alex Gomez

Feat. Maria Angela Zavala

Feat. Stephanie Quiroz

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Editor’s Note

Taste of

StMU Editor Brian Magloyoan Staff Alex Gonzalez Mariajose Romero Michelle Vogel Sarah Jardine Cindy Kafie Adviser Brother Dennis Bautista, S.M., Ph.D. Disclaimer Taste of StMU is a class project for EA 4362 Graphic Design. Questions & reprints, contact Brian Magloyoan. Email: bmagloyoan@mail.stmarytx.edu 1 Camino Santa Maria, St. Mary’s University, San Antonio, TX 78228 www.tasteofstmu.com

Crepes | Sopa De Lima Con Pollo Y Elote | Stir-Fried Chicken & Vegetables

Taste of

Plus

Five recipes complete with chef interviews and instructions A collection of Rattler Recipes from St. Mary’s University, San Antonio, Texas

Jo knows pizza Learn how to make a dorm friendly pizza with a twist

Volume 8, Issue 1 | Fall 2014

4

It is only the beginning by Brian Magloyoan When I began working on Taste of StMU, I could not imagine myself at the end of the semester with a full 20-page publication. Of course, this all would not have been possible without the work and contributions from Alex Gonzalez, Mariajose Romero, Michelle Vogel, Sarah Jardine and Cindy Kafie. Their articles and photos provided the content and substance for this magazine and made it easier for me to accomplish this task. Also, I would like to give a very special thank you to Brother Dennis Bautista. His passion was contagious and constant encouragement gave me the belief that anything could be accomplished. Without his guidance and patience throughout this whole process, this magazine would have been nothing more than a graphic designer’s worst nightmare (though the first several drafts were just that). The amount of work it took to produce this was not surprising. In fact, I was anticipating it, having friends who had done these same tasks before me. At times, I would have remind myself that the publication would be only as good as the amount of time I invest in it. I would be lying if I said that this whole process was smooth and painless. There were days that I would stare at the computer with a blank expression on my face, not knowing what to do on the next layout. This course taught me not only the fundamentals of graphic design, but what it takes to develop a quality publication. It was a long road to get to the end of developing this, all beginning with the tutorials beforehand that laid the groundwork for building the publication. It was through those tutorials that I was able to learn and improve my knowledge about Adobe Photoshop and InDesign. Much like the recipes in this issue, making this magazine took time, patience, plenty of planning and hard work. And, just like these recipes, the process was enjoyable. Through this course, I have been able to gain important skills that will help me in the future with whatever profession I end up with. The amount of work can be

photo by | Antonio Morano “This course taught me not only the fundamentals of graphic design, but what it takes to develop a quality publication.” overbearing at times but the end product is worth the time and effort. Although this publication is finished, I know I am not finished quite yet when it comes to graphic design. For me, this is not the end. It is only the beginning. I hope all of you that read this magazine enjoy the recipes featured as well as appreciate the hard work that was put into this by everyone who made this possible. Thank you,

P.S. Mom, Dad and Sis, this is for you. All of you have been there for me since the beginning. I couldn’t have done this without you. -Brian

Taste of StMU | Fall 2014


Feature Story

Jo

Cool Future doctor gives prescription for tasty pizza

article | photos by Brian Magloyoan When it comes to food, Joseph Hernandez, senior biology major, sees no limits when creating his favorite dishes. The aspiring doctor from El Paso, Texas, has a taste for several types of food, his favorite being steak. “The biggest steak you can think of, medium-rare, with just Lawry’s seasoning salt and a ton of butter,” Hernandez says. “Pretty much whatever I like to eat, I can cook.” Hernandez shared an experience he had in a small town near El Paso, where he and his friend ran a food stand during a town festival. “That was probably the most I had to cook for people because we were selling the food. We were making steaks, bratwurst, hamburgers, (and) hot dogs. It was continued on page 6 Taste of StMU | Fall 2014

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Margherita Pizza

continued from page 5 hard work,” Hernandez says. As to why he selected margherita pizza to showcase his cooking talents. “Pizza is pretty easy to do in our type of circumstance. We’re in a dorm, (and) we only have an oven. It doesn’t take a lot of prep work. It’s pretty straightforward,” Hernandez says. “I feel like it’s the most traditional form of pizza that someone can have.” Although it may be traditional, Hernandez did not hesitate in adding his own twist to the recipe, pepperoni. Putting his own personal touch to pizza is nothing new to Hernandez, whose experience in pizza making includes a bratwurst pizza. For Hernandez, his favorite part about cooking is eating the final product. He compares it to studying for a test then getting an “A” on it. “The whole cooking part is like a buildup,” Hernandez says. “You put all this hard work into it and once it’s done, especially when it comes out really good, it’s like ‘Yeah! I accomplished something.’”

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Chef Joseph Hernandez (above) gets creative when it comes to making food, especially pizza, once making one with bratwurst.

Taste of StMU | Fall 2014


Margherita Pizza

Chef Tip

Directions

Have fun when making the pizza. Don’t be afraid to put your own twist on it.

First, make the dough by stirring the yeast, a tablespoon of flour, dash of honey and one fourth cup of warm water together. Let it stand until the surface appears creamy for about 5 minutes. Next, add 1 ¼ cups of flour, half cup of water, salt, and oil. Stir and add flour so the dough begins to pull away from the side of the bowl. Then, massage the dough on a floured surface, reflouring when the dough becomes sticky. Once the dough is smooth, soft and elastic, form it into a ball. Put it into a bowl and dust it with flour. Cover it with a damp paper towel then place it somewhere that is draft-free and has a warm room temperature (microwave is acceptable), to allow for the dough to rise. While the dough rises, prepare the sauce and toppings. For the sauce, put the tomato sauce into a bowl. Add salt, two tablespoons of olive oil and some flour then mix. As for the toppings, have the basil leaves chopped and tomatoes, pepperoni, and mozzarella cheese sliced. Next, shape the dough onto the pan. Place olive oil on top before placing in oven, preheated at 420 degrees. Once dough is slightly baked, take out of oven. Add sauce, cheese and toppings. Place back into oven and bake for 30-35 minutes or until it is crisp with a golden brown color. Serves six to eight people.

Ingredients Dough • 1 (1/4-oz) package active dry yeast (2 ¼ teaspoon) • 1 3/4 c unbleached all-purpose flour, divided, plus more for dusting • 3/4 c warm water, divided • 1 tsp salt. • 1/2 tbsp olive oil • honey Sauce and toppings • 1 (14 to 15 oz) can whole tomatoes in juice • 3 cans of tomato sauce • 2 tbsp olive oil • 4 basil leaves plus more for sprinkling • 1/4 tsp sugar • pepperoni • salt • 6 oz fresh mozzarella, cut into ¼-inch-thick slices

Taste of StMU | Fall 2014

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Sopa De Lima Con Pollo Y Elote

Sopa para la alma (Soup for the soul)

Soup for the mind, soul and spirit article | photos by Michelle Vogel Student chef Deandra Barrera tells readers about herself and gives us the inside scoop on how to cook up something yummy! The senior English major is an active student around campus and is involved in many organizations such as Sigma Alpha Phi, Beta Sigma Phi and S.M. Friends. Barrera developed her love for cooking as a child and enhanced her skills in her seventh grade home economics class. She continued her culinary education in high school, participating in several competitions. Barrera earned a scholarship to attend Le Cordon Bleu Culinary School, but found her home at St. Mary’s University. “I like St. Mary’s because it feels like home,” she says. Barrera says she loves cooking “because it is the most widely experienced form of fine art in the world. There is no greater experience than watching the components of a dish transform before your eyes with the application of simple spices and heat,” she says. Barrera’s favorite and most requested dish to make is Fettuccini Alfredo. She serves this dish with a pan speared chicken

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breast topped with a sautéed mushrooms and a pan sauce. For the magazine, Barrera cooked Sopa De Lima Con Pollo Y Elote. She chose this dish because it is an easy beginner’s dish to demonstrate. “Who doesn’t love soup?” she asks. Her tip for cooking Sopa De Lima con Pollo is that “if the chicken has bones, it will float to the top when done. If it doesn’t

path. “It was always a dream of mine to be on Chef Gordon Ramsay’s Sous-Chef, or be a contestant on his show Hell’s Kitchen, or have my food critiqued by Joe Bastianich,” she says.

“Who doesn’t love soup?” then the chicken will turn white when it is ready,” she says. Barrera’s secret to making all dishes taste good is butter. Another tip is “learn to make rice and boil your water” and always look for bubbles. A final tip is always season for taste after cooking. “Not everybody’s tastes are like your own,” she says. Barrera looks forward to a bright future as a writer or Arson Investigator. She plans on continuing to cook no matter her career

Chef Deandra Barrera

Taste of StMU | Fall 2014


Sopa De Lima Con Pollo Y Elote

Chef Tip To know if the chicken is finished cooking, look at it’s color. When it turns white is when it is done. If it has bones, the chicken will float to the top when it is coooked.

Ingredients

• • • • • • • • • •

Salt and Pepper for taste 1 tsp cumin 1 tbsp vegetable oil 3 c chicken stock 1 1/2 tbsp fresh lime juice 3 tbsp cilantro 2 garlic cloves (minced) 2 jalapeños (seeded and minced) 1 c onion (1/4 in dice) 1 1/2 c tomato (peeled, seeded, ¼ in dice) super duper long ingredient • 1 1/2 c corn kernel • 1 c chicken (thinly sliced)

Directions

Heat 1 tbsp of vegetable oil over medium heat. Add 1 cup of onions (1/4 in dice) and 2 garlic cloves (minced). Cook 8-10 minutes or until very soft. Add 3 cups of chicken stock, 1 1/2 cups of tomato (peeled, seeded, 1/2 in dice), 1 1/2 cups of corn kernels, 2 jalapeños (seeded and minced) and 1 tsp of cumin. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook 5-4 minutes. Add 1 c of chicken (thinly sliced) and simmer for about 3 minutes or until chicken is cooked. You can tell chicken is cooked when there is no pink. Stir in 3 tbsp of cilantro and 1 1/2 tbsp of fresh lime juice. Makes 8 servings.

Taste of StMU | Fall 2014

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Crepes

Inspiration beyond borders

In fast-paced world, take a Crepè article | photos by Alex Gonzalez With such a fast-paced environment around us, it seems almost impossible to slow down and enjoy life the old way. Sophomore marketing major Sarah Nasr of Denton, Texas, knows the importance of taking a well-deserved break. Nasr enjoys cooking, baking, and anything involving the culinary arts. Nasr has been involved in crepe making for five years now. She’s somewhat of a self proclaimed expert. “Whenever I have time to make crepes, I make them, whenever I don’t have time, then I still make crepes. This system works for me,” she says. Nasr has always been fond of a good recipe, which she knows to be true of St. Mary’s and their ‘recipe‘ for success. The learning environment and Marianist community is what drove her to pick this university. “This was the right fit for me, I knew

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adapting would take no time,” she says. Nasr’s traveling experiences throughout Europe have been important in exposing her to different cultures and foods. She loves trying new things, but her all time favorite is homemade Italian pizza. “It tastes like nothing from the U.S. there’s something about it that makes it special,” she says. Since her time in Italy, Nasr has picked up a lot of Italian dishes, which she says are her favorite to make, everything from pastas to cannolis. While in France, she noticed how popular and delicious the crepe and developed an obsession to recreate that dish, while adding her own magic touch. “This dish is so special to me because it brings back so many memories I experienced with the people I love,” she says. “This dish can be eaten at any time of the day,” Nasr concludes.

Chef Sarah Nasr

Taste of StMU | Fall 2014


Crepes

Directions

Ingredients

• 1 c all-purpose flour (about 4 1/2 ounces) • 2 tsp sugar • 1/4 tsp salt • 1 c milk • 1/2 c water • 2 tsp butter, melted • 2 large eggs • whip cream (as much as desired) • strawberries (as much as desired)

Taste of StMU | Fall 2014

Put together flour, sugar, and salt in a bowl. Combine milk, water, melted butter, and eggs in a blender. Add the flour mixture to milk mixture, and process until smooth. Heat a pan or skillet over medium heat. Pour a scant 1/4 cup batter into pan; quickly tilt pan in all directions so batter covers pan with a thin film. Cook about 1 minute. Carefully lift the edge of the crepe with a spatula to test for doneness. The crepe is ready to turn when it can be shaken loose from the pan and the underside is lightly browned. Turn crepe over, and cook for 30 seconds or until center is set. Add strawberries inside the crepe and finish off with whip cream. Makes 8 servings.

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Stir-Fried Chicken and Vegetables

Stirring up worldly taste International flavor from the comfort of home article | photos by Sarah Jardine It’s not everyday that one gets to taste food from another culture. Alex Gomez, a senior psychology major, takes others around the world with her Chinese Chicken Stir-Fry. “Cooking has always been one of my passions,” Gomez says. Growing up in Houston, Gomez enjoyed learning how to cook new recipes with her family. Her favorite food has to be her mother’s homemade chicken flautas. “I could eat those for weeks straight,” she says. Even though Gomez is 200 miles away from home, she enjoys the strong sense of community at St. Mary’s. “I actually get to know my professors and other students personally,” she says. She is a part of the Marianist Leadership Program and often finds herself in fellowship or sharing a meal at the senior Marianist house across from Holy Rosary Parish. After Gomez graduates from St. Mary’s in May 2015, she plans to become a speech pathologist. “First, I will do a year of speech pathology and then will start grad school to

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obtain my masters,” she says. Gomez learned how to make the Chinese cuisine during an HEB Central Market cooking class in Houston. The class featured a local chef, Dorothy Huang, who specializes in Chinese cuisine and was two full days of cooking. “We learned how to make chicken fried rice, shrimp lo Mein, pork pot stickers, chicken stir-fry, and crispy fried banana with mango sherbet for dessert,” Gomez says. From this class, she has learned certain cooking techniques and makes the dishes when she gets the chance. She explains

“Cooking has always been one of my passions.”

how the chicken stir-fry is a great quick, healthy meal that college students can afford to prepare. Here, Gomez used carrots and bell peppers, but she says, to “be creative and throw your favorite vegetable into the mix.”

Chef Alex Gomez

Taste of StMU | Fall 2014


Stir-Fried Chicken and Vegetables

Ingredients • 1/2 lb chicken breast, boned and skinned Marinade for chicken • 2 tbsp cornstarch • 1 tbsp soy sauce • 1 tbsp dry sherry • 1 red bell pepper • 1 white onion • 1/4 lb snow peas • 1 c sliced water chestnuts Seasoning sauce • 1 tsp cornstarch • 3 tbsp water • 1 tbsp soy sauce • 3 tbsp cooking oil • 1/4 tsp salt • 1 tbsp chopped garlic

Chef Tip

Directions

To Prepare Ahead: Cut chicken breast lengthwise in half. Slice across the grain into 1/8 inch pieces. Add marinade to chicken. Toss to coat thoroughly. Let stand for 15 minutes. Cut bell pepper into thin strips. String snow peas. Combine seasoning sauce ingredients in a bowl. Mix well. To Cook: Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a wok over high heat. Add bell pepper, snow peas, and salt. Stir fry for 2 minutes. Remove to a plate. Wipe the wok with paper towels. Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons oil. Add chopped garlic and chicken. Stir-fry 1 to 2 minutes, or until the chicken turns white. Return bell pepper, snow peas to wok . Pour in sauce stir until thickened and serve.

Be creative and throw your favorite vegetable into the mix

Taste of StMU | Fall 2014

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Lemon-Pepper Salmon

Simple, Easy, Tasty Healthy, tasty alternative for students on budget article | photos by Mariajose Romero College students face constant challenges everyday. Who would’ve thought that food would also be one of them? Between the low budgets, lack of time, and constant unhealthy food options, it’s hard to keep a healthy diet. Originally from Honduras, Maria Angela Zavala is a finance and risk management senior at St. Mary’s University. What caught her attention about St. Mary’s is the welcoming community. When she first arrived to campus, she found everyone really nice and friendly. “At first, I was scared for the change but after meeting people the transition was easy. I quickly adapted to the cultural change,” Zavala says. One of her main priorities has always been keeping a healthy diet and exercising, which is why seafood is Zavala’s favorite type of food. Fish is a versatile dish to prepare and has several health benefits. For example, it helps to maintain cardio-

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vascular health, reduces depression and mental decline, and the omega 3 fatty acids in fish may reduce the risk of many types of cancers by 30-50 percent. Lemon-Pepper Salmon is a recipe that is special to Zavala because her mom would always prepare this meal back home. “I enjoy the process, it is so simple, easy to cook, and tasty!” she says. “You may also grill the salmon with medium heat instead of using the oven.” It is also not an expensive dish to prepare. “I never spend more than $20 on groceries to prepare this meal. That’s why I love it so much,” Zavala says. Zavala recommends to avoid overcooking salmon. “The center of your salmon should flake and have a pinkish color,” she advises. Zavala offers other tips, such as adding some cayenne pepper for a little spice; after serving the salmon pour the extra sauce on top of it for a tastier flavor; and

if this dish is to acid in taste, serve it with something sweet on the side.

Chef Maria Angela Zavala

Taste of StMU | Fall 2014


Lemon-Pepper Salmon

Chef Tip The center of the salmon should flake and have a pinkish color.

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 F (175 C). Cut and squeeze 2 lemons to prepare the lemon juice. Place the fresh salmon on a plate. Pour on top together the lemon juice, sour orange juice, garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Then add the salmon skin side up into the skillet. Cook for about 1 minute until the flesh is baked. Place the skillet into the preheated oven, and cook until the salmon flakes with a fork. Serve and enjoy!

Taste of StMU | Fall 2014

Ingredients

• • • • • • • •

1 lb salmon fillet 1/4 c sour orange juice 2 tbsp lemon juice 1 tsp salt 3-4 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp black pepper 1/2 tsp garlic 1 tbsp oregano

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Vanilla Cake

Taste measured in karats

Jewelry inspired cake shines bright article | photos by Cindy Kafie Stephanie Quiroz, senior elementary education major, has developed a passion for baking and decorating cakes. Her cakes have already been featured at baby showers and other events. She plans to pursue a master’s degree after having taught for a few years. She is currently the president of SEAL, Student Educators Association for Dynamic Leadership and the Education Director of Delta Zeta Sorority. Her favorite part of attending St. Mary’s is the community and being close to the Marianists. She treasures the long lasting relationships she has built at St. Mary’s. “I am eager to graduate and see what awaits, but I will miss the friendships I built over the years,” Quiroz says. After this semester, Quiroz is going to teach at a school as part of her Student Teaching program. She is excited for what the new semester will bring as well as it being her last semester as an undergradu-

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ate student. Quiroz has Italian and Mexican heritage. Her mother’s family is Italian and her father’s family is Mexican. She grew up in a household where food from both cultures was readily available, so both foods are her favorite. Quiroz has been learning about cake decorating, and baking techniques and tips. So, she decided to bake a cake for this project because she wanted to put everything she learned into practice. “Each layer has to be dyed separately to achieve the ombré effect, it is important to use the same color but not the same amount of liquid on each layer,” Quiroz says. The inspiration for the cake was definitely from Tiffany’s. “I believe Tiffany’s jewelry makes a statement and wanted to make a cake that would make a statement as well,” Quiroz says.

Chef Stephanie Quiroz

Taste of StMU | Fall 2014


Vanilla Cake

Ingredients Cake • 3 c all-purpose flour, plus more for the pans • 2 sticks unsalted butter, at room temperature, plus more for the pans • 1 tbsp baking powder • 1/2 tsp salt • 1 1/2 c sugar • 4 large eggs, at room temperature • 1 tbsp vanilla extract • 3/4 c heavy cream

Chef Tip To achieve the ombrè

Buttercream effect, each layer has to be • 2 sticks unsalted butter dyed separately. • 1 c Crisco shortening • 1 tbsp clear vanilla extract • 1 2 lb bag of Domino powdered sugar • 4-8 tbsp milk

Directions Cake Preheat the oven to 350 F. Butter two 9-inch-round cake pans and line the bottoms with parchment paper; butter the parchment and dust the pans with flour, tapping out the excess. Whisk 3 cups flour, the baking powder and salt in a bowl until combined. Beat 2 sticks butter and the sugar in a large bowl with a mixer on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Reduce the mixer speed to medium; beat in the eggs, one at a time, scraping down the bowl as needed. Beat in the vanilla. (The mixture may look separated at this point.) Mix 1/2 cup water with the cream in a liquid measuring cup or bowl. Beat the flour mixture into the butter mixture in 3 batches, alternating with the cream mixture, beginning and ending with flour, until just smooth. Divide the batter between the prepared pans. Bake until the cakes are light-

Taste of StMU | Fall 2014

ly golden on top and the centers spring back when pressed, 25 to 30 minutes. Transfer to racks and let cool 10 minutes, then run a knife around the edge of the pans and turn the cakes out onto the racks to cool completely. Remove the parchment. Trim the tops of the cakes with a long serrated knife to make them level, if desired. Buttercream Let your butter sit out for a while to soften. Do not put it in the microwave. If you do not have time, cut the butter up in small chunks. Beat the butter until soft and creamy in your mixer. If you don’t have a kitchen mixer you can do this with a hand mixer but it is best to go ahead and left your butter soften. Now, add in shortening, beat again. I like to give mine a few minutes on medium high... beating it a little longer makes it lighter. Add vanilla and mix well. Add in the powdered sugar about a cup at a time. Add in milk 1 TBS at a time until you’ve got your desired consistency. Makes 15 servings.

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Magloyoan, Brian - Taste of StMU 2014  
Magloyoan, Brian - Taste of StMU 2014  
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