Current - Winter 2018

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WINTER 2018

26 MARINE DEBRIS PAG E

MAKING A DIFFERENCE

AN 30 SAVING ENDANGERED PAG E

SPECIES GIANT KELP REFORESTATION

PAG E

WITHIN OUR

36 COMMUNITIES

FEATURE:

INTRODUCING Tassie’s Tassal

PAG E

04

News from Tassal and the communities we proudly call home.


One Tray Salmon Bake with Cherry Tomatoes INGREDIENTS 300g Tassal Tasmanian Fresh Salmon, skin-off 3 small potatoes, quartered 1 punnet cherry tomatoes 1 small red onion, peeled and sliced 1 bunch asparagus, trimmed ¹⁄³ cup Kalamata olives, pitted 40g feta cheese Pinch of salt Cracked black pepper, to taste 2

2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

WINTER 2018 CURRENT

TIME 50 mins

SERVES 2

METHOD Pre-heat oven to 180°C and place potatoes, tomatoes, onion and asparagus into a baking tray. Drizzle with olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Place in oven and bake for 30 mins, or until potatoes are tender. Add olives, feta and salmon. Bake for a further 12-15 mins. Remove from oven, serve and enjoy! For recipe inspiration visit tassal.com.au and follow us on /TassalSalmon

The Tasmanian Salmon


CONTENTS

P26

P14 P29 P30

4 TASSIE’S TASSAL Meet our ambassadors

18 BROADSCALE MONITORING What do we test for?

6 INTRODUCING BEK Omega 3 and the health benefits of salmon

20 100% RECYCLING INITIATIVE Our partnership with Envorinex

8 INTRODUCING WILL Investment in aquaculture and globally leading sustainability programs 10 INTRODUCING DEPHA Carbon footprint and feed to food conversion 12 INTRODUCING STEVE Farming footprint and our people 14 INTRODUCING HEIDI Water quality 16 INTRODUCING MARK Tassal within our communities

21 SALMON TRUCK Pull out feature! 25 FOCUSING ON THE HEALTH OF MACQUARIE HARBOUR Our joint venture with Petuna 26 MARINE DEBRIS FEATURE 30 KELP REFORESTATION Bringing back an endangered species 34 ACHIEVING TOGETHER 36 WITHIN OUR COMMUNITIES 38 MEET OUR PEOPLE Margate Processing

CURRENT is a publication produced for Tassal employees and our stakeholders. If you have information you would like to share, please email: current@tassal.com.au

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THANKS TASSIE for taking

the time to provide feedback. Over the past six months, over 1000 Tasmanians have given their time to tell us what they think. They have taken tours of our farms, joined us at community engagement sessions and completed an extensive telephone feedback survey.

We truly appreciate your time, your honesty, your opinions and your thoughts on our business and the communities we share. What we have learned has become instrumental in creating a long-term plan for positive change.

We heard more information about our industry was required. People wanted to know about our carbon footprint, our water quality monitoring, our farming footprint, the health benefits of salmon and how we compare on the global stage. This has resulted in our new information campaign called “Tassie’s Tassal”. During Winter and Spring, we are very pleased to introduce you to some of our wonderful team who will share information about the topics important to you. Extra information on each of these ambassadors, plus more about their topics, can be found over the following pages, as well as on our webpage: tassalgroup.com.au/tassies-tassal Check out some fun behind the scenes photos to the right.

More accessible information on our webpage. Our webpage has had a makeover! We have structured the site around our core pillars. You can find everything you need under: • Our People; • Our Planet; • Our Product; • Our Performance; and • Our Community. Find it at tassalgroup.com.au

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Greater community support.

Real time monitoring!

We are proud to launch our new “Better Together Community Grants”. Details are on page 17.

Our new Dashboard was created - providing updated information on all of our operations. As technology advances we will increase the dashboard’s function and offer you even more.

The Better Together Community Grants program not only offers financial assistance but also in-kind assistance. Individuals, as well as not-for-profits and other organisations can apply for a grant or assistance.

Find it at dashboard.tassalgroup.com.au

Grants will be assessed and decided on by a group which is a combination of Tassal staff and local community members.

W

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AB ING ET

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Community Foundation

R TE

Community Foundation approach

In 2017 we launched our Community Foundation - a commitment to the way we farm and engage in the communities where we operate. Our Foundation approach balances across core community pillars (education & training, environment, health & wellbeing and social inclusion). Our Foundation Charter is delivered through the establishment of dedicated Community Advisory Groups. We have also committed to two Community Information sessions in every region annually, plus an Open Day!

Better biosecurity for Macquarie Harbour We joined forces with Petuna under a Joint Venture to achieve better biosecurity outcomes for Macquarie Harbour salmon farming. Find out how on page 25.

Marine debris action We have engaged pakana Services to support cleaning our coastal areas one day per week - so far they have completed over 1000 hours! Read more on page 29. We also commited to 100% recycling of all our hard and soft plastics through a partnership with Envorinex - see page 20. Furthermore, we are proactively engaging in a number of community clean-ups - find out how on page 26.

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“Food for thought. Of all the proteins, salmon is the leading source of Omega 3.” Rebekah Willmer

People & Culture Advisor

Q:

‘Just one, 100 gram serve of salmon supplies your brain with 159% Omega 3’ - what is this based on?

Check it out for yourself!

A:

Visit the Heart Foundation Website for more info on Omega 3s. www.heartfoundation.org.au

The Heart Foundation’s daily Omega 3 recommendation intake is 250-500mg (of EPA and DHA). We have added up the amount of EPA and DHA Omega 3s found in a 100g salmon portion and divided it by 500mg to get this result, although 159% is a modest figure.

What are EPA & DHA Omega 3s? EPA (Eicosapentaenoic Acid) and DHA (Docosahexaenoic Acid) The human body can make most of the types of fats it needs from other fats or raw materials. This isn’t the case for Omega 3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA).

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l Vitamin B min D 6 l Vita Vit am i

Protein

l

Source: Harvard School of Health

n

Ome ga 3

Sele niu m

They are an integral part of cell membranes throughout the body and affect the function of the cell receptors in these membranes. They provide the starting point for making hormones, which regulate blood clotting, contraction and relaxation of artery walls and inflammation. They also bind to receptors in cells, which regulate genetic function. Likely due to these effects, Omega 3 fats have been shown to help prevent heart disease and stroke, may help control lupus, eczema, and rheumatoid arthritis and may play protective roles in cancer and other conditions.

2 B1

Omega

horus l Pota Phosp ssiu m

What makes Omega 3 fats special?

Vitamins

ml siu ne ag M

These are essential fats—the body can’t make them from scratch but must get them from food.

Minerals


Q: A:

Do other proteins (such as beef, lamb and pork) combined only provide a fraction of Omega 3s compared with salmon? Using nutritional information found on the Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) website, we compared the total long chain Omega 3 fatty acids in mg for 100g portions of salmon, lamb, beef and pork. It was found salmon contained over 1500 mg of Omega 3 fatty acids, with other proteins scoring below the 150 mg range.

Have you seen Bek’s ad yet? Visit: www.tassalgro up.com.au /rebekah/

Brain Food! Q:

Why do our brains need Omega 3s?

A: A 150g salmon portion provides you with a good source of essential fatty acids, protein, vitamins and minerals (B3, B12, E, phosphorus and selenium). It is also a source of antioxidants (vitamin D), magnesium and vitamin B1 - all of which are vital ingredients for a healthy balanced diet.

Studies suggest Omega 3s are essential for brain development and function throughout all stages of life and help maintain healthy brain activity. Many studies also suggest Omega 3s play a significant role in reducing depression and increasing memory.

Resource: Brain Research Journal

More info ... www.foodstandards.gov.au/science/monitoringnutrients/nutrientables/nuttab/Pages/default.aspx

About Bek

People & Culture Advisor Bek has a background in psychology and HR, completing her bachelor’s degree in South Australia before heading to Tasmania in 2016. She joined Tassal’s People & Culture team in early 2017.

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“It’s true. Our salmon industry is growing.”

“We invest in aquaculture and globally leading sustainability programs.”

Steve Witkowski

Environmental Officer (Marine Scientist)

Will Perry

Environmental Officer (Marine Scientist)

Q:

How do you determine there has been an increased demand for salmon in Australia?

A:

The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources found seafood demand in Australia has increased steadily, due to increased production and gross-value of the industry.

Find more info at ... www.agriculture.gov.au/fisheries/aquaculture/ aquaculture-industry-in-australia

We invest in aquaculture! OUR NEW SANCTUARY PENS Our new Sanctuary Pens are just one of the ways we invest in our industry. The Sanctuary Pens keep our people and fish safe, while keeping seals out! The netting is made from a patented heat treated bi-polymer, which is both rigid and strong. The single walled design significantly decreases algal growth and allows for fluid movement with the waves. Our pens are scientifically tested in environments overseas to ensure safety of infrastructure as we move into more exposed, further off-shore farming regions. 8

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Which globally leading sustainability programs are Tassal involved with? Global Salmon Initiative (GSI): The Global Salmon Initative (GSI) is a world-wide leadership initiative, which shares a vision of providing a healthy and sustainable source of protein to feed a growing population, while minimising environmental footprint and continuing to improve social contribution.

Global Reporting Initiative (GRI): The GRI Standards are global standards for sustainability reporting. They feature a modular, interrelated structure, and represent the global best practice for reporting on a range of economic, environmental and social impacts.

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC): The ASC standards for responsible aquaculture are based on best practices and sound science. To ensure a credible, inclusive and transparent standard setting process, the standards were developed in line with the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) guidelines and ISEAL’s (International Social and Environmental Accreditation and Labelling) Codes of Good Practice.

About Will

Environmental Officer (Marine Scientist)

Have you seen Will’s ad yet? Visit: www.tassalgro up.com.au /will/

Tassie born and bred, Will has always had a love for the outdoors and the ocean. In 2013, he undertook a Bachelor of Marine Science at the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) in Launceston. Will became a valuable member of our casual workforce working with Tassal in 2014 in our Channel Zone during his study breaks. Graduating in 2015, Will moved to a full-time position with Tassal and was given the opportunity in 2016 to transition to the role of Environmental Officer.

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“As far as farming goes, salmon has one of the lowest carbon footprints.”

“It’s true. Our salmon industry is growing.”

Depha Miedecke

Senior Manager - Community Engagement (Salmon Farmer)

Steve Witkowski

Environmental Officer (Marine Scientist)

Q:

Does salmon farming really lead the way when it comes to feed-to-food conversion?

A:

The Global Salmon Initative (GSI) has found land based proteins such as chicken, pork and beef have a signifcantly higher feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared to farmed atlantic salmon. The feed conversion ratio measures the productivity of protein production methods, demonstrating the efficiency of each animal to convert food into meat.

How is FCR measured? Feed Conversion Ratio measures the efficiency of a protein to convert feed into desired output (meat).

You will find more information at www.globalsalmoninitiative.org 10

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Farmed Atlantic Salmon

Chicken

Pork

Lamb

Beef

Edible Yield

68%

46%

52%

38%

-

Carbon Footprint

9.8

42.3

56.7

-

337.2

Protein Retention

28%

37%

21%

-

14%

Calorie Retention

25%

27%

16%

-

7%

Energy Retention

23% 10%

14%

5%

-

Source: Global Salmon Initiative 2017 Sustainability Report

What do all these figures mean? Edible yield is calculated by dividing edible meat by total body weight.

Have you seen Depha’s ad yet ?

Visit: www.tassalgro up.com.au /depha/

Carbon footprint measures the total greenhouse gas emissions caused directly and indirectly by the production of a product. Carbon footprint is measured in tonnes of carbon dioxides equivalent (kgC002e) per tonne of the edible protein of the product.

Protein retention measures the gain in edible protein in relation to the consumed protein intake from food sources. It is calculated by percentage (grams protein in edible portion vs grams protein in feed). Calorie retention measures the gain in edible calories of the product as a percentage of the calories consumed in the feed. It results in percentage calculation (calories in edible portion vs calories in feed). Energy retention measures the efficiency of the product in relation to the energy retained from feed consumed. It is a calculated percentage (energy in edible parts vs gross energy fed).

About Depha

Senior Manager - Community Engagement Depha completed studies in Aquaculture at the University of Tasmania before starting her career with Tassal 19 years ago. Hard work, determination and her love for growing salmon found Depha promoted to Regional Manager Tasmania in 2005 and Senior Manager of Farming in 2010, where she took on environment and community projects in the area. Recently Depha has joined Tassal’s Engagement Team as Senior Manager Community Engagement due to her industry knowledge and commitment to transparency.

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“It’s true our industry is growing, however, in terms of footprint, we use the equivalent of this dot for all our farming.”

Steve Witkowski

Environmental Officer (Marine Scientist)

Q:

How did you determine your farming footprint and work out the dot in the graphic?

A:

0.014027 955.5 7,0 00,000

All of Tassal’s combined active lease space is 955.5 hectares. Tasmania’s total land area is almost seven million hectares, therefore our footprint is 0.014027% of the total land. If you take Tasmania’s marine areas into account, Tasmania’s land and water area adds up to over nine million hectares. Therefore, our footprint then equals 0.010561% of the total land and water area.

Tasmania’s total land area equals 6, 811, 900 hectacres

Q: 12

How many people do you employ across the state and Australia-wide?

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A:

Tasmania’s total land and water area is over nine million hectacres

As a result, the footprint of all our active leases equals 0.010561%

The headcount for the month of May 2018, found Tassal directly employs 1259 people Australia-wide, with 935 of our employees in Tasmania, resulting in some of the highest employment numbers in the state for a non-government business.


Our people

Did you know?

69% Male

Our industry has a unique multiplier effect, which means for every one salmon job – there are five other jobs generated, supporting a further 10,000 jobs!

31% Female

Full Time 73.5% Male 21.2% Female

Part Time 1.3% Male 3.9% Female

TAS

73.2% Male 26.8% Female

8.5%

VIC

47.1% Male 52.9% Female

Our people are diverse! We have career opportunities across a diverse range of skill sets! Some of these include marine operations (freshwater and saltwater), legal, human resources, sales, communications and stakeholder engagement, quality, processing, accounts and finance, work health & safety, environment and sustainability, payroll, maintenance, purchasing, retail, hospitality, research & development and marketing.

NSW

57.8% Male 42.2% Female

57.4% 8.5% 37.6% 51.8% 16.6% 30%

About Steve

Female Male

Department by Gender

Environmental Officer (Marine Scientist)

42.6%

Admin

91.5%

Marine Operations

62.4%

Processing

48.2%

Sales & Marketing

83.3%

Senior Managers

70%

Executives

Have you seen Steve’s ad yet?

Visit: Steve originates from Melbourne, where he www.tassalgro up.com.au completed a Bachelor of Science (majoring in /steve/ Marine Biology) at the University of Melbourne in 2014.

He then ventured to Tasmania to undertake a Bachelor of Applied Science (Marine Environment) with Honours from the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) graduating in 2016. Steve worked at IMAS before joining Tassal in our Fish Health Department, before progressing to our Environment team. CURRENT WINTER 2018

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“We lead the way “It’s true.for Our salmon globally water industry is growing.” quality monitoring.”

Ollie

Steve Witkowski

Environmental Officer (Marine Scientist) Heidi Hansen Sustainability & Certification Manager

Q: A:

Lucy

How does Tassal lead the way in the industry globally for water quality monitoring?

See page 18 for Broadscale Monitoring information an d a map of testing sites.

The Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) standards present a rigorous template for global best practice and address the preservation of water resources and water quality. In order to maintain our ASC certification, we use sophisticated modelling and monitoring programs to understand changes in near field and far field water quality as a result of our farming operations and invest heavily into research in this area.

One metre below surface

One metre below the surface, we measure: • Total Phosphorus (P) • Ammonium (NH4) • Total Nitrogen (N) • Phosphate (PO4) • Temperature • Dissolved Oxygen (DO)

• Silicate (SiO4) • Nitrate (NO3) • Salinity

In the middle at five metres, we measure: • Temperature • Dissolved Oxygen (DO) • Salinity

One metre above the sea floor

On the sea floor 14

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One metre above the bottom, we measure: • Total Phosphorus (P) • Ammonium (NH4) • Total Nitrogen (N) • Phosphate (PO4) • Temperature • Dissolved Oxygen (DO)

On the sea floor, we measure: • Infauna • Particle size • Redox • Sulphides

• Silicate (SiO4) • Nitrate (NO3) • Salinity

• Total Organic Carbon (TOC)

12 metre integrated algal sample

What do we test the water for?


What do we test the water for? Phosphorus

Phosphate

Dissolved Oxygen

Nitrogen

Nitrate

Silicate

Ammonium

Temperature

Salinty

What do we test the sea floor for?

Q:

Infauna

Sulphides

Redox

Organic Carbon

Have you seen Heidi’s ad yet? Visit: www.tassalgro up.com.au /heidi/

About Heidi

Did our Tasmanian salmon industry really pioneer the high standards for water monitoring in Tasmania?

A:

Through the Tasmanian Salmonid Growers Association (TSGA), Tassal participates in a Broadscale Environmental Monitoring Program Did Tassal really pioneer the high standards for water (BEMP) across multiple locations in monitoring in Tasmania? south-east Tasmania. The monitoring program has a water quality component (surface and bottom water) and a sediment component (sediment biology and chemistry). Sampling is conducted by Aquenal (Environmental Consultants) every two weeks in summer and monthly over winter. More recently, Tassal has implemented real time sensors at various growing regions across the state, which measures key water quality parameters such as dissolved oxygen levels and temperature.

Heidi studied Environmental Science in New South Wales before relocating to Tasmania in 2009 for family reasons. She has been with Tassal for over eight years. Heidi has played a pivotal role in our partnership with WWF-Australia, as well as achieving Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) and Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) certification for Tassal’s operations. Not only does Heidi support maintainence of our compliance with certification standards, but she also coordinates the production of our annual Sustainability Report, ranking Tassal #2 globally for transparent reporting by seafoodintel.com in 2017.

About Ollie

About Lucy

Ollie is a grand old gentleman.

Lucy is the latest edition to Heidi’s family. At just eight months old she is full of excitement!

At 11 years old he is very happy to cruise along enjoying the beach. Heidi rescued Ollie when he was just a year old and they have been best mates ever since!

Lucy thought hanging out at the beach helping Heidi tell you her story was the best day ever!

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Locks gone for a great cause! “We love the fish, but it’s really about the people” Mark Ryan

Managing Director & CEO

Have you seen Mark’s ad yet?

Our People I’m incredibly proud to lead an organisation of almost 1300 people who are truly passionate about the work they do and the communities they live in.

Visit: www.tassalgro up.com.au /mark/

About Mark

Given we operate in regional Tasmanian areas, where the need for stable employment is critical it has been heartwarming to be part of positive change for many families who we have been able to provide meaningful jobs and opportunities in these areas. Partnering with local skills and trade institutions, manufacturing, logistics and feed businesses, community and environment groups, as well as schools and apprentice programs, has made us proud to be part of positive social and economic growth for our State. We are deeply connected to our Tasmanian roots and it is the commitment to make a difference to the communities where we operate which inspires us to be among global leaders for our industry, for the benefit of our local regions. Our team’s innovation, commitment to the community and focus on continuous improvement inspires me everyday. It is incredibly humbling to see and hear the stories about purpose, hope and opportunity our company provides. I love the fish, but it’s really about the people.

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G A BET TIN

TO

To find out more about our Community Foundation and to apply for a grant visit tassalgroup.com.au/our-community/ tassal-community-foundation

MO R R

O

Community Foundation

TER

Our Community Foundation

Mark holds a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Tasmania, is a Chartered Accountant, a fellow of the Australian Institute of Management and a member of Australian Institute of Company Directors. Mark is passionate about Tasmania’s future and holds, among others, a Board position with the Tasmanian Development & Resources Board, whilst he is also on the Seafood Industry Australia Board. As a former partner of KordaMentha, Mark returned to Tasmania to review salmon companies. With his significant experience in turnaround management and seeing the potential of the industry, he committed to leading Tassal and working with fellow industry members, to achieve greater success for the business and broader industry.


Better Together Community Grants Our operations play an integral role in supporting community prosperity and opportunity – yet at Tassal we believe in a continued focus on being better together.

Applications close by end of business Friday 7th September 2018.

Health & W ellb e

ion s u

All applications will be presented to our Community Advisory Groups (CAGs), which comprise members of the communities where we operate for assessment.

Yout h&

We invite you to apply online at: tassalgroup.com.au/our-community/better-together-community-grants

Socia l I nc l

How to apply for a Better Together Community Grant

Environmen tal S ship ard tew

We welcome community organisations, initiatives and individuals to apply for a Better Together Community Grant for the 2018/19 year.

ing

tion uca Ed

Through our Community Foundation, we are proud to partner with community-minded organisations, which provide better outcomes aligned to our core foundation pillars: Environment; Education; Social Inclusion and Health & Wellbeing.

Criteria Local services, not-for-profit and charitable organisations as well as Australian citizens or permanent residents are eligible to apply for a Better Together Community Grant. There are very few restrictions and no age limit – everyone from children, young adults and older Australians are all welcome to apply. Applicants under 18, however, need the permission of a parent or guardian.

Other considerations include: Priority will be given to supporting communities where we operate through programs, which deliver direct and positive benefits. CURRENT WINTER 2018

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BROADSCALE Environmental Monitoring Environmental consultants (Aquenal and Marine Solutions) travel to sites around Tasmania, frequently collecting water and sea floor samples. The purpose is to document broadscale environmental conditions over time. The teams travel to over 40 different sampling stations throughout the state, including the D’Entrecasteaux Channel, Huon Estuary, Mercury Passage, Okehampton Bay, Port Arthur and Tasman Peninsula. There is also an environmental control site in Recherche Bay, which is sampled 15 times each year. The marine scientists collect a range of samples from the ocean, which are then analysed and sent to the Environmental Protection Agency for review. It’s a regulatory requirement Tassal undertakes this farfield monitoring to provide a high level of confidence to ensure we are maintaining a healthy marine environment. Both Aquenal and Marine Solutions employ local marine scientists – it’s great to have such highly qualified personnel assisting us with a range of environmental programs, from water monitoring to reef community and threatened species surveys. Once each month, our scientific consultants survey the same monitoring locations regularly throughout the year. Making sure the survey positions are sampled consistently is key to providing the most reliable data, a GPS is used to ensure each site is sampled in the same location for each survey. Water samples provide a vast amount of information about the health of the ecosystem. Through the Tasmanian Salmonid Growers Association (TSGA), Tassal participates in a Broadscale Environmental Monitoring Program (BEMP) across multiple locations in south-east Tasmania. The monitoring program has a water quality component (surface and bottom water) and a sediment component (sediment biology and chemistry). Water quality sampling is conducted by Aquenal (Environmental Consultants) every two weeks in summer and monthly over winter. 18

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Mercury Passage

Hobart

Nubeena

Huon

Port Arthur

South and South Eastern Broadscale Monitoring Testing Sites Recherche Bay

From the boat, the team can collect significant data such as water temperature, depth, salinity, pH levels and dissolved oxygen levels using a Water Quality Meter. With ever-improving technology – the quality of sampling equipment is getting better by the year. So much data can now be stored automatically to be taken back to the lab and analysed for environmental trends. Sediment samples are also collected annually from the sea floor. The marine life collected in these samples are a key indicator of ecosystem health. Other tests require further analysis and samples are sent to Analytical Services Tasmania to test for chlorophyll, microalgae (or phytoplankton) and nutrient concentrations. A range of different sampling apparatus are specially designed for collecting a range of different sample types, and at different depths in the water column. The factors measured monthly are key in monitoring any changes in the environment. By developing a more intimate understanding of environmental patterns, we can predict how these changes may affect the health of our salmon, or the ecosystem. After all, we need a healthy, functioning marine ecosystem to produce healthy fish!


2

The Niskin bottle is used to collect water at different depths through the water column. The water collected is transferred to sample bottles for nutrient analysis.

2

1

Some critters found in our marine environment 1

3

2 3

4

5

4

1. Crustacean - Hermit Crab 2. Crustacean - Tanaid 3. Polychaete - Sabellid

6

4. Mollusc - Bivalve 5. Echinoderm - Brittle Star Photos courtesy of Aquenal

3

Sam Gray, Marine Scientist at Aquenal taking a closer look at the sample in the lab.

4

The surface sample is skimmed from the top of the water and placed into a sample bottle, where it will be later analysed for phosphorus, ammonium, phosphate, nitrate, nitrogen and silicate.

5

The Integrated Sampler (also known as ‘the snake’) travels 12 metres from the water’s surface to collect a sample, which is then placed into a separate bucket and further analysed for microscopic algae (phytoplankton).

6 The water quality meter takes measurements throughout the water column and shows the team data on the salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen and temperature. Data is stored electronically for later analysis.

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100% RECYCLING INITIATIVE!

Egg transfers go environmentally friendly

Tassal is tackling waste in Tasmania, with plans to achieve 100% recycling of all major plastics across our operations. Partnering with Tasmanian company, Envorinex, plastics will be sent to the George Town based facility to be made into second life products – some of which can be recycled up to 17 times!

Tassal’s drive to continuously improve sustainability extends to our hatchery, where teams have invested in a new egg transferring system to eliminate the need for single use polystyrene boxes when transporting eggs between hatcheries.

The extended partnership with Envorinex sprouted from an initiative pioneered in 2015 by our Senior Manager of Environment, Matt Barrenger. “I initially contacted Envorinex in relation to our options for recycling in Macquarie Harbour,” Matt told Current.

With the new system, eyed eggs are loaded into perforated tubes and transported in large cooler boxes. Both the egg tubes and the cooler boxes can be easily cleaned and disinfected between trips, meaning we can maintain a higher level of biosecurity while eliminating the waste!

“From here we developed a solution for our recyclable equipment at the time – stanchions, feed pipe, cage pipe, blue plastic drums, intermediate bulk containers and black buoys.” Following the success of the partnership over the previous years, Envorinex will now also be recycling all soft-plastics such as nets, ropes, feed bags and processing bin liners.

Below: Envorinex Managing Director Jenny Brown and Tassal’s Head of Environment Sean Riley with Envorinex Grid recycled from Tassal’s old pipes

Envorinex Managing Director Jenny Brown said from Tassal’s waste plastics a raft of second life products are made, including permeable grids for car parks, stockyards and roadways, steel truss spacers for housing frames, fence posts, components for fire extinguishers, shellfish products and other innovative custom products.

1. Mike McMann packing eggs at the hatchery 2. Ready to transport 3. Doug Paveley receiving tubes at the nursery where eggs will hatch and baby fish will live until they grow to around 300g

1

Annually, approximately 500 tonnes of Tassal’s plastics will be transformed into products, which will support the building, horticulture, essential services and fishing industries. As a result of the partnership, Tassal will now become Tasmania’s largest single supplier of redundant plastics for recycling. Tassal Head of Environment, Sean Riley, said the company was pleased to take its recycling to the next level. “Envorinex is a good example of the level of innovation which exists in Tasmania,” he said.

2

Matt Barrenger

“We have a strong focus at Tassal on reducing waste, and our environmental footprint, and it’s very rewarding when two organisations can work together like this to achieve a solution for the potential benefit of other industries through the creation of recycled and remanufactured product.”

3

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DISCOUNT Coupons Inside!

Your Salmon Truck pull out guide Everything you need to know to find fresh Tasmanian salmon and produce!

CURRENT Including MAP, TIMETABLE AND DISCOUNT COUPONS

CURRENT WINTER 2018 WINTER 2018

21 17


Delivering fresh Salmon to a region near you soon!

Keep up t BURNIE DEVONPORT LAUNCESTON LAUNCESTON

Tasman 11am - 2pm

Queenstown Queenstown

Tasman 11am - 2pm

Strahan Strahan Triabunna Triabunna Orford Orford

New New Norfolk Norfolk HOBART HOBART

Tasman 11am - 2pm

Huonville Huonville

Kettering

Franklin Franklin Geeveston Geeveston

Tasman Tasman

Tasman 11am - 2pm

Dover Dover

Geeveston Dover 9am - 11am 10.30am - 2.30pm Dover 12noon - 3pm Nubeena Tasman 11am - 2pm 11am - 2pm

22

Geeveston Geeveston 9am 10am- -11am 2pm

Check out the Orford Facebook page to 10am - 12noon see where the truck is heading!

Triabunna 12.30pm - 2.30pm Check out the Orford Facebook page to 10am - 12noon see where the truck is heading!

Dover 12noon - 3pm

Triabunna 12.30pm - 2.30pm

Tarrana Tasman 11am - 2pm 11am - 2pm

Geeveston Dover 9am -- 2.30pm 11am 10.30am Dover 12noon - 3pm

Check out the Orford Facebook page to 10am - 12noon see where the truck is heading!

Tasman Tasman 11am - 2pm 11am - 2pm

Geeveston 10amNorfolk - 2pm New 10am - 12noon

Tarrana 11am - 2pm Tasman 11am - 2pm

Dover Geeveston 10.30am 9am - 2.30pm 11am

Check out the Facebook page to Orford see where the truck 10am - 12noon is heading!

Dover 12noon - 3pm

Triabunna 12.30pm - 2.30pm

WINTER 2018 CURRENT

Triabunna 12.30pm - 2.30pm Check out the Facebook page to see where the truck Strahan is heading!

10am - 4pm

Tasman 11am - 2pm

Triabunna Kettering 10.30pm - 2.30pm 10am - 3pm

Huonville Franklin 10am - 1pm 10am - 2pm Franklin 2pm - 4pm

Orford Kettering 10.30am - 2.30pm 10am - 3pm

Huonville Huonville 10am - 1pm 10am - 2pm

Triabunna Kettering 10.30pm - 2.30pm 10am - 3pm

Huonville Franklin 10am - 1pm 10am - 2pm Franklin 2pm - 4pm

Tarrana Tasman 11am - 2pm 11am - 2pm

Orford 10.30am - 2.30pm Queenstown 9am - 11am

Huonville Huonville 10am - 1pm 10am - 2pm

Nubeena 11am - 2pm Tasman 11am - 2pm

Triabunna 10.30pm - 2.30pm Kettering 10am - 3pm

Franklin 2pm - 4pm

Franklin 2pm - 4pm

Nubeena 11am - 2pm Tasman 11am - 2pm

Tarrana 11am - 2pm Tasman 11am - 2pm


SAVE $2/kg

on Fresh Salmon Deli Portions or Whole Fillets Valid until 30th November 2018. One coupon per day. Can not be used in conjunction with any other offer.

to date with the Truck! /thesalmontruck

Geeveston 9am - 11am

Orford 10am - 12noon

Dover 12noon - 3pm

Triabunna 12.30pm - 2.30pm

Geeveston 9am - 11am

Orford 10am - 12noon

Dover 12noon - 3pm

Triabunna 12.30pm - 2.30pm

New Norfolk 10am - 12noon

Strahan 10am - 4pm

Geeveston 9am - 11am

Orford 10am - 12noon

Dover 12noon - 3pm

Triabunna 12.30pm - 2.30pm

Kettering 10am - 3pm

Huonville 10am - 1pm Franklin 2pm - 4pm

@thesalmontruck Huonville Kettering 10am - 3pm

10am - 1pm Franklin 2pm - 4pm

thesalmontruck.com.au Huonville Queenstown 9am - 11am

10am - 1pm Franklin 2pm - 4pm

mobilesalmontruck@tassal.com.au Huonville



Kettering 10am - 3pm

1300 001 103

10am - 1pm Franklin 2pm - 4pm

MULTIBUY 100g SPECIAL Smoked 2 FOR $6 Salmon

Valid until 30th November 2018. One coupon per day. Can not be used in conjunction with any other offer.

10%OFF

your entire purchase Valid until 30th November 2018. One coupon per day. Can not be used in conjunction with any other offer.

Bring a friend & you both receive

15% OFF your final bill!

Valid until 30th November 2018. One coupon per day. Can not be used in conjunction with any other offer. Huonville Franklin 10am 1pm 10am -- 2pm Franklin 2pm - 4pm Geeveston Geeveston 10am - 2pm 9am - 11am Dover 12noon - 3pm

Check out the Orford Facebook page to see where the truck 10am - 12noon is heading!

Triabunna 12.30pm - 2.30pm Check out the

Geeveston Orford Dover Facebook page to see where the truck 9am - 11am - 12noon 10.30am - 2.30pm 10am Dover 12noon - 3pm Geeveston 10am - 2pm New Norfolk 10am - 12noon

is heading!

Triabunna 12.30pm - 2.30pm Check out the Facebook page to seeStrahan where the truck is heading!

10am - 4pm

Check out the

Dover Geeveston Orford Facebook page to see where the truck 10.30am - 2.30pm 10am 9am - 11am - 12noon

Dover 12noon - 3pm

is heading!

Triabunna 12.30pm - 2.30pm

Orford 10.30am - 2.30pm Kettering 10am - 3pm

Huonville 10am - 2pm 1pm

Triabunna Kettering 10.30pm - 2.30pm 10am - 3pm

Huonville Franklin 10am--2pm 1pm 10am

Orford 10.30am - 2.30pm Queenstown 9am - 11am

Huonville Huonville 10am 10am--2pm 1pm

Triabunna 10.30pm - 2.30pm Kettering 10am - 3pm

Franklin Huonville 10am 10am--2pm 1pm

Franklin 2pm - 4pm

Franklin 2pm - 4pm

Franklin 2pm - 4pm

Franklin 2pm - 4pm

ENJOY

20%OFF

ANY ONE SELECTED ITEM Valid until 30th November 2018. One coupon per day. Can not be used in conjunction with any other offer.

FREE

Tassal Salmon Truck Stress Toy for the first 100 customers! CURRENT WINTER Valid until 30th November 2018. One coupon per2018 day. WINTER 2018 Can not be used in conjunctionCURRENT with any other offer.

23 19


SAVE $2/kg

Meet our team!

on Fresh Salmon Deli Portions or Whole Fillets Valid until 30th November 2018. One coupon per day. Can not be used in conjunction with any other offer.

MULTIBUY 100g SPECIAL Smoked 2 FOR $6 Salmon

Valid until 30th November 2018. One coupon per day. Can not be used in conjunction with any other offer.

10%OFF

your entire purchase Valid until 30th November 2018. One coupon per day. Can not be used in conjunction with any other offer.

Bring a friend & you both receive

15% OFF your final bill!

Valid until 30th November 2018. One coupon per day. Can not be used in conjunction with any other offer.

Bobby and Brittani

IN HOBART?

Visit The Salmon Shop Salamanca

ENJOY

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WINTER 2018 CURRENT Valid until November 2018. One coupon per day. WINTER 2018 30th CURRENT

Can not be used in conjunction with any other offer.

2 Salamanca Square, Battery Point TAS 7004 Phone (03) 6244 9025 Email info.salamanca@tassal.com.au


Joint Venture approach to deliver better outcomes for Macquarie Harbour In May Tassal and Petuna joined forces to set a new benchmark in aquaculture biosecurity standards in Tasmania, by entering into a joint venture, which will see our companies cooperatively manage marine farms in Macquarie Harbour. Under the joint venture, each company continues to own its leases, fish and infrastructure whilst a joint management comittee will oversee the management of the leases, with the goal to achieve better biosecurity and environmental outcomes. The joint management and utilisation of our marine leases will allow better fallowing and separation of year classes of fish, which will significantly enhance the wellbeing of fish and the biosecurity in the Harbour. Tassal’s Head of Environment, Sean Riley, told Current by allowing a period of 12+ months for fallowing each lease, the seabeds will have the opportunity to rest, recover and regain health. “The industry has been strongly advocating for improvements to biosecurity in aquaculture and this is a positive step towards it,” Sean said. “The joint venture reflects international best practice in biosecurity and aligns with principles outlined in the Tasmanian Government’s Salmon Sustainable Industry Growth Plan, which encourages improved area management planning.” The joint venture supports sustainable salmon farming and job security for the local workforce in Strahan. We were pleased to confirm there were no job losses associated with the joint venture approach.

Traditonally • Young fish and older fish on same leases • No coordination between operators as to when leases are stocked • Limited long term fallow planning for optimal seabed recovery • Greater rest and recovery time for all leases • Young fish and older fish on different leases • Coordination between operators for lease management • 12 months+ fallowing for 50% of leases

Future: Year 1 Rest

Rest

Rest

Future: Year 2 • Young fish and older fish on different leases • Coordination between operators for lease management • 12 months+ fallowing for other 50% of leases

Rest

Rest

Rest

Results

• Seabed sustainability and longevity for Macquarie Harbour • Improved biosecurity environmental outcomes • Lesser risk of disease • Rest and recover (fallowing) of leases

• Job security in the area – taking control and providing a solution.

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HELPING HAND TO HARBOUR:

Macquarie Harbour Shoreline Clean-up 2018 Over five days in April, 168 volunteers from the community, salmon industry, Parks & Wildlife Service and Cradle Coast Authority NRM, came together to target 36 shoreline locations at Macquarie Harbour to tackle marine debris. The clean-up was coordinated by the Macquarie Harbour Steering Committee with funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program. This year’s data was calculated by counting everything in two representative bags from each site and then multiplying the number of bags of debris collected. The results reflected the commitment of every volunteer towards cleaning the Harbour with over 30,000 pieces of rubbish collected, filling three 15m3 skip bins. “A clean-up of this scale wouldn’t be possible without different industries and community groups coming together, focused on improving the health of this important marine environment,” Anna Wind, Cradle Coast Authority NRM’s Coastal Coordinator said.

“Everywhere you looked there were examples of team work.” Throughout the clean-up, Tassal recognised the tremendous efforts from all the volunteers involved and acknowledged while debris associated with aquaculture only represented around 19% of what was collected, the industry needs to play its part to maintain continuous improvement with a zero-debris focus. “We are dedicated to reducing marine debris in Macquarie Harbour, as with all areas where we operate, and will be continually performing more regular clean-ups internally throughout the year to hopefully eliminate the need for bigger, annual clean-ups,” Don McIntyre, Tassal Western Zone Senior Manager said. 26

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TOP: Active Strahan and Conservation Volunteers Australia at Meredith Street boat ramp. BOTTOM: Collecting debris in rafts on the King River. Photos courtesy of Cradle Coast Authority NRM.


MARINE DEBRIS FEATURE

Macquarie Harbour Clean Up 2018

TOP: Active Strahan and Conservation Volunteers Australia at Meredith Street boat ramp displaying the bottles and cans they collected. MIDDLE: Volunteers from Tassal and Petuna sorting and counting debris. BOTTOM: Cradle Coast Authority’s NRM team Photos courtesy of Cradle Coast Authority NRM.

Around 45m3 of rubbish was removed (three skip bins full), plus 5m3 of recyclable drink containers and 9m3 of recyclable rope

1392 cans, 1250 glass bottles and 2434 plastic bottles were collected. 41% of the rubbish was from domestic or recreational sources.

410 bags of rubbish were removed, as well as 491 other pieces too big for bags. All together, there were over 30,000 pieces of rubbish.

1020kg of rope and 855m of polypipe were salvaged for recycling. 19% of the bagged rubbish was from commercial sources.

Other debris found included 56 tyres, 26 drums, and over 200 gloves, shoes and hats.

Breakdown of sources:

• 19% attributed to commercial operations (aquaculture and other)

• 41% attributed to domestic/recreational • 40% from unknown sources. CURRENT WINTER 2018

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Marine Debris Hotline

MARINE DEBRIS CLEAN UP IN THE HUON AND D’ENTRECASTEAUX CHANNEL

The Marine Debris hotline allows the public to report any debris found on shorelines. This information is relayed to the company corresponding with the adopted shoreline, which collects the debris and responsibly disposes of it. Tassal, in collaboration with the Tasmanian Seafood Industry Council and other salmon companies, are working to develop a smartphone app, as an extension of the hotline. The app would allow users to take a photo of the reported debris while increasing location accuracy through the smartphone GPS system

GROUPS RESPONSIBLE FOR ALLOCATED SHORELINE:

Huon Aquaculture

Tassal

Bruny Island Shellfish Growers Association

PROUD PARTNERS OF THE PROGRAM:

IF YOU FIND MARINE DEBRIS OR RUBBISH IN THIS AREA PLEASE CALL AND REPORT TO 1300 706 973

You can report any marine debris found by ringing 1300 706 973

Marine Debris in Charlotte’s Cove Following last year’s successful clean-

collected also. During May, all Tasmanian

up, the D’Entrecasteaux and Huon

salmon companies focused on tackling

Collaboration conducted a community

marine debris in the Huon, Bruny and

marine debris clean-up at Charlotte’s

Channel areas, contributing to the bigger

Cove during May.

picture of a collaborative effort to clean-

More than 50 volunteers from the

up our coastline.

community braved the Tassie chill to

The D’Entrecasteaux and Huon

participate. The majority of rubbish

Collaboration is hosted by NRM South

collected on the day included land-based

and supported through funding from

sources, although sea-based debris was

the Australian Government’s National

Community volunteers came together to clean up Charlotte’s Cove. Photo courtesy of NRM South. 28

WINTER 2018 CURRENT

Landcare Program, the Derwent Estuary Program, Tassal, Huon Aquaculture, Huon Valley and Kingborough Councils, and TasWater. Following the storms in early May, the D’Entrecasteaux and Huon Collaboration’s Alonnah clean-up day was postponed due to unforeseen conditions. Make sure to visit www.nrmsouth.org.au and follow their Facebook page to stay updated on the August 18th marine debris clean-up.


MARINE DEBRIS FEATURE

Tassal and pakana partner to tackle marine debris

Tassal has partnered with pakana Land Management Services, a not-for-profit social enterprise, to perform clean-ups on a weekly basis. pakana, meaning ‘Aboriginal Tasmanian,’ provides work and training for Aboriginal people in natural resource management, agriculture and other industry sectors. Community work pakana undertakes includes landscaping, nursery work and weed spraying throughout the entire state. By partnering with pakana, Tassal aims to achieve not only positive environmental outcomes but also employment opportunities. To date, 13 pakana participants have gone on to full-time employment, with two working with Parks & Wildlife. John Eastern, Manager at pakana Services told Current the marine debris work undertaken with Tassal has been a rewarding and enriching experience for the team. “For pakana Services members, this has included developing pride in their work and an understanding of how the simplest of tasks (litter collection), can make such a large environmental difference in our country,” he said. Based in Kingston, the cleaning crew of five will travel where they’re required every Friday and perform coastline clean-ups. The team regularly visits areas in Nubeena, Dover and Channel and helps to beautify and maintain cleanliness of our Tassie coastlines. To date, the crew has completed over 1000 hours of work collaboratively! “Marine debris is, unfortunately, a complex but critical issue we must address,” Depha Miedecke, Senior Manager of Community Engagement said. “We have contracted pakana services to help us ensure we are looking after the environments we operate in, while working towards strategies to reduce industry-based debris.”

TOP: The pakana team taking a well earned break looking towards Wedge Island. MIDDLE: The pakana team from left to right: Mark West, James Mathews, Peter Robertson, Ricky Radford, Jayke Binns. BOTTOM: Some of the collected debris.

The pakana team has also undergone training with Bird Life Australia to ensure there’s no disruption to wildlife, while clean ups are occurring. The crew is now conscious of the breeding patterns of different species found in Tasmania and ensures clean ups respect our wildlife. Since the pakana and Tassal marine debris partnership kicked off in 2017, there has been a decline in industry sourced debris in areas such as Nubeena. CURRENT WINTER 2018

29


Giant Kelp Reforestation At our Okehampton Bay farm and throughout our leases in the D’Entrecasteaux Channel, Tassal is growing Giant Kelp as part of an Integrated Multi-Tropic Aquaculture (IMTA) program. IMTA utilises by-products, including waste, from one aquaculture species as inputs (fertilizers, food) for another. We are combining fed aquaculture (our salmon) with extractive aquaculture (giant kelp) aiming to create more balanced ecosystems. The growth of the kelp adjacent to our farms is performing above expectations. Now, we are taking hatchery produced kelp seed outside our leases with an initiative, which aims to repopulate Giant Kelp forests at sites where they have disappeared. Tassal’s Eco-Aquaculture Researcher, Dr Craig Sanderson, told Current the Giant Kelp forests on Tasmania’s east coast have progressively disappeared since at least the 1940s, thought to have been due to warmer temperatures and concurrent lower nutrients of the surrounding oceanic waters. This has occurred to such an extent, Tasmanian Giant Kelp communities have been listed by the Federal Government as critically endangered. 30

WINTER 2018 CURRENT

“We have so far replanted three species of kelp in the Pirate’s Bay area at Eaglehawk Neck,” he said. “These kelp species include the Giant Kelp: Macrocytis pyrifera, Lessonia corrugata and Ecklonia radiata. These species are all endemic or native to Tasmania.”

“Macrocystis pyrifera (or Giant Kelp) is the largest and fastest growing of the kelps and possibly the fastest of any plant in the world.” “Giant Kelp stands are associated with a higher diversity of marine organisms and form a greater complexity of habitat, which can protect various fish species,” Craig said. “It is also believed to be important to the health of local abalone and lobster populations through providing food, shelter and helping to keep larvae on reefs.” There are upwards of 1000 species of seaweed found in Tasmania’s coastal

waters, approximately one tenth of these are green, a quarter brown and the remainder red. The kelps are brown seaweed and are some of the larger seaweed plants. The local Eaglehawk Dive Centre has been keen to get involved in the project with community support, helping replant Giant Kelp in Pirate’s Bay, in front of the Lufra Hotel and Deep Glen Bay. Mick Baron, co-owner of the dive centre told Current: “Giant Kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) was everywhere in 1991; there was so much it was a nuisance as it grew around boat ramps, most shallow waters and therefore tended to wrap around propellers. It disappeared from the northernmost dive location for Eaglehawk Neck Dive at Deep Glen Bay around 1997.” Operating in Eaglehawk Neck since 1991, Mick has witnessed the disappearance of the Giant Kelp forests in the area. “The Giant Kelp forest was a major drawcard for any non-Tasmanian diver. It is more than 50% of requests as a dive location as the word spread it was


in decline. There are only a few places in the world where this experience is possible,” he said. “We have also had interest from the community to help replant Giant Kelp in selected areas of the D’Entrecasteaux Channel, which we are looking into,” Craig explained. He said he is proud of the success

Tassal is having with the kelp IMTA program around its leases. “By growing Macrocystis in the vicinity of the cages, this may also encourage the growth of this species on nearby reefs, where it was formerly abundant,” he said. “Macrocystis is one of the fastest growing plants in the world, with recorded growth rates of a massive 50cm a day and can reach 20 to 30

metres in height – in only one growing season! We have seen plants sourced through Tassal and planted in Deep Glen Bay grow from around 20cm tall, to over four metres high in two or three months.” Photos for this story courtesy of Craig Sanderson and Marine Solutions.

From the laboratory to Tasmania’s oceans the Giant Kelp reforestation story. Giant Kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) for Tassal’s reforestation program begins its life in the laboratory

3

1

1: Releasing spores ready for planting. 2: Pipes with twine wrapped around them are planted with Giant Kelp spores.

4

3: Kelp babies at three weeks. 4: Growing strongly at five weeks.

5

2 6

5: After approximately eight weeks, the baby seaweed is ready to be planted. 6: A close up view of the seedlings. CURRENT WINTER 2018

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1

2 1: On planting day, the strings with seedlings are wound around rope and clip-tied to bricks.

3

4

2: Each brick is individually numbered with different shaped tags showing the species and origin of seedlings. 3: Laura Smith from Marine Solutions preparing to dive the seaweed seedlings into their new home at Eaglehawk Neck. 4: Divers Simon Brooks and Mick Barron giving the A’OK.

5

5: Bricks with seedlings in their new home. 6: An older brick, which has been in place for approximately 12 months.

6

32

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1: A close up of the Giant Kelp.

2

3

2: After approximately 18 months the brick is engulfed by sealife. 3: Success! Some of the thriving Giant Kelp. 4: A cheeky crayfish and a Hinge-Back shrimp keeping an eye on the proceedings.

1

4

WE ARE HIRING IN TASMANIA NOW!

We have a wide range of exciting, marine-based job opportunities. Build a career in Tassie with an industry leader. Entry level to experienced vacancies. Find out more at tassalgroup.com.au/join-our-team

CURRENT WINTER 2018

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The Foundation is supported by four core pillars aligned to our company values - Health & Wellbeing, Environmental Stewardship, Youth & Education and Social Inclusion. It offers communities an opportunity to support an array of programs, events and organisations dependent on the local needs, priorities and aspirations of the community. Our Foundation is flexible and versatile, understanding all community needs are different.

W

ORR

O

CRE A

M

R TTE

Tassal’s Community Foundation underpins our intention to thoughtful, meaningful and sustainable partnerships in the communities where we operate.

TO

Within Our Communities

GA TIN BE

1

2

We love supporting local community events and sporting teams:

6

1. Kingston Boxing Club 2. Channel Junior Footy Club 3. Guilford Young College Economics students visit our feed centre

7

4. Triabunna Football Club’s Maroon and White Ball. Photos courtesy of Hayley Belbin Photography 5. Kings Basketball Club 6. Tasmanian Hospitality Association (THA) sushi challenge 7. Triabunna Under 11’s Football Team 8. ‘Dark Clifton’ at the Clifton Beach Surf Life Saving Club 9. Tasmanian Maritime Radio new headquarters at the Queen’s Domain 10. Home-schooled Ethan had an excursion to our Hobart Feed Centre and was given some salmon to take home and prepare for his family!

New Town High students set to the sea! In mid-June 2018, students from New Town High School set to the seas and acquired their boat licenses. The boys completed six-hours of theory sessions and one practical session on the water, all passing with flying colours! Tassal was pleased to fund the boys’ training - supporting the next generation out on the water!

34

WINTER 2018 CURRENT

3


Hi Ta ssa l Tea m, 4

4 5

8

9

What did the boys have to say about getting their license?

29th Ju ne 20

18 Et ha n an d I woul d lik e to sa y a ve ry big ‘ Th an k You’ to Ti m an d all th e sta ff at Ta ssa l fo r ta kin g th e tim e to sh ow us th e ‘Ta ssa l F ish Fe edin g Co nt rol Ce nt re’. Et ha n ab so lut ely LO VED it an d ha s ha d great fu n te llin g his brot he rs an d sis te r all about it! We ce rta in ly di d not rea lis e th ere wa s so m uch te ch no log y be hin d fe edin g th e sa lm on! Et ha n wa s a m az ed by th e co m pute r sy ste m an d by ju st how m uch ef fo rt goes int o m akin g su re th e fis h are fed ju st th e rig ht a m ou nt. We we re so im pre ssed with th e sy ste m an d th e scien ce be hin d fis h fa rm in g. It wa s a fa nt astic ex pe rie nce which Et ha n will rem em be r fo r a lon g tim e! I wa s su pe r im pre ssed with th e oppo rtu nity fo r Et ha n to be given so m e sa lm on to ta ke ho m e fro m th e Ta ssa l sh op an d watch him cook te a fo r th e fa m ily …. which wa s de liciou s an d enjoy ed by every on e but be st of all it ga ve m e a nig ht of f in th e kit ch en so th an ks ag ai n! Th an k you so m uch on ce ag ai n!

Ki nd Re ga rds, Den ise

in getting mkisy and d e st e r e t in s I wa I have Jet S boat licenseallasow me to have a Jet this would ! Ski license ould set me duopwn c it e v e li e b o I als if I was to go with boatinrgy, pathway with Coxswain the indust being an opportunity, license nowought is also great. which I th nk Tassal Alex I’d like to ptphoartunity! o is h t for

17 0

TO DO LIST:

Harry

Now I have my boat licence, I would like to: ◊ Tow people into waves; ◊ Go diving with m y family and friend s; ◊ Go fishing; ◊ Get my dive ticke t; ◊ Get my coxswains ticket; and ◊ Work at Tassal on a boat.

CURRENT WINTER 2018

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ACHIEVING GREAT THINGS TOGETHER It’s not just all about salmon at Tassal! We love working within our communities!

01

European Trade Union Delegation

During May, the European Trade Union Delegation came to Hobart, giving us the opportunity to showcase our delicious Tassal salmon to all attendees. Wrest Point’s Executive Chef, Andre Kropp, did an amazing job of preparing loads of delicious tasting plates and canapes, featuring Tassal salmon.

03

Emmanuel School Environment talk

Our Head of Environment, Sean Riley, visited the Emmanuel Christian School in June to give the students a presentation on sustainability and water monitoring practices within the aquaculture industry.

05

Students learn about sustainability

Huonville High students were visited by our Sustainability and Certification Manager, Heidi Hansen, who gave a presentation about our world leading sustainability practices. The year 10 students were then invited on a VIP tour of our Rookwood hatchery and see where the whole process all starts.

07

‘Julie’ has hit our roads!

09

Mummifying salmon smolt

‘Julie’ the Salmon Truck officially launched at the Derwent Valley Autumn Festival in April. 7HOFM’s Mick and Maria broadcasted live from the truck, and there were plenty of giveaways and free tastings.

Fish from our Rookwood Hatchery were shipped off to Campania District High School for a history project the students undertook. The class learnt all about Egyptology and the fish were mummified in the process!

36

WINTER 2018 CURRENT

02

Strahan team raises funds for school

The Macquarie Harbour team did an awesome job, sizzling Tassal salmon on the barbeque as Targa Tasmania zoomed through Strahan. The team raised funds for Strahan Primary School, which Tassal matched dollar for dollar.

04

01

Spawning Season at Russell Falls

This spawning season, the team extracted and incubated over 30 million eggs at our Russell Falls hatchery. A further 1.6 million eggs were sold as caviar.

06

Rowing to victory in the Channel!

04

After the previous training site became unavailable, Derwent Canoe Club reached out to our Channel team to utilise one of our dam facilities at Electrona for training. Once all the health and safety protocols were ticked off, the Channel team was happy to help the canoeists paddle their way to victory!

08

Auction for a cause

10

Australia’s Biggest Morning Tea

Tassal’s People and Culture team raised over $1500 for a recently departed, valued member of our Tassal family, Paul “Shaggs” Davey , who lost his battle with cancer. All money raised will go towards supporting his family during this difficult time.

Our team at the Triabunna rendering plant raised funds by participating in Australia’s Biggest Morning Tea! Contributions went towards helping those affected by cancer.

07

05


03

02

06

08 09

10

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We are Better Together... Our Margate processing facility resides 30 minutes south of Hobart, in the Channel. The processing facility has been in the same location for 25 years. Our Margate facility produces a range of salmon products, including a customer favourite – our delicious hot smoked salmon. Like any good team, the Margate Processing crew sets its game play up for success everyday! Meet the team kicking the goals…

THE

coach

Justin ‘Gus’ Crane is the Factory Manager at Margate, supporting and helping his team be better together!

Smokehouse The Smokehouse crew is our team’s ruck, they’re responsible for getting us off to a swift start everyday! The Smokehouse crew cures, racks and smokes all of the hot smoked portions and fillets Tassal produces.

THE

ruck

Pre-Smoke The Pre-Smoke team puts in a lot of leg-work, making sure the team’s in the best position to kick goals.

THE

centre 38

WINTER 2018 CURRENT

The Pre-Smoke team racks up salmon to create Tassal and Superior Gold hot smoked products such as our delicious natural and peppercorn portions.


Margate Processing Teams Value-Add Our Value-Add crew works hard to produce multiple products to make sure our team gets everything out the door. The Value-Add crew produces skin-on and skin-off portions, followed by chopping and salting fillets for hot smoked portions and salting fillets for superior gold, as well as supplying the Salamanca Salmon Shop with fresh produce.

THE

WING

Packing The Packing team, gets the ball up to the posts ready for goals to be kicked! Our Packing team is responsible for processing and packing all hot smoked products, ready for despatch to retailers. This includes processing and vacuum packing of whole fillets.

THE

half-forward

Despatch Our Despatch crew is set up for success through the hard work of the rest of the team, and gets products out the door in a fresh and timely way!

THE

full-forward

Margate’s Despatch crew ensures all the products are packed in boxes, wrapped and placed onto their pallets, ready to load once the trucks arrive at site.

Cleaning

ď Ą

The Cleaning crew provides expert shepherding skills to the team, ensuring everything is spotlessly clean and hygienic, providing a high quality environment supporting successful outcomes. The Cleaning crew cleans the machinery and all facets of the factory.

THE

defender CURRENT WINTER 2018

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Discover your tomorrow • Works Crew / Farmhand • Coxswains • Wildlife Officers • Divers • Team Leaders / Supervisors • Skippers (Master IV) • Marine Engineers (MED 1) • Deckhands • Maintenance Electricians (ship and shore based) • Netcleaner Operators • Marine biology graduates, aquaculture and fish husbandry specialists

WE ARE HIRING NOW! At Tassal we love our fish, but it’s really about the people. So come join us, and bring a friend or two. Salmon is one of the healthiest, most efficient farmed products with one of the lowest carbon footprints. Many wild-caught fisheries have been depleted over the years, yet demand for salmon continues to increase, which is why we invest in aquaculture and globally leading sustainability programs. This is why our industry is growing and Tassal is now one of the largest employers in Tasmania. We all have a choice about where we live and work and at Tassal we create opportunities for people who dream about a better tomorrow.

Email us at: mytomorrow@tassal.com.au 40

WINTER 2018 CURRENT