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NOVEMBER 30–DECEMBER 3, 2011


TASH would like to thank the following sponsors for their support of the 2011 TASH Conference!

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TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


CONFERENCE PROGRAM TABLE OF CONTENTS

4 Letter from the Board President 5 Letter from the Executive Director 6 About TASH 7 Committee Meetings and Chapter Meetings 8 Program 8 Keynote Speakers 10 Sponsors 12 Exhibitors 14 Wednesday At-a-Glance 15 Pre-Conference Workshops 16 Thursday At-a-Glance 19 Thursday Session Listing 43 Friday At-a-Glance 44 Friday Session Listing 65 Saturday At-a-Glance 66 Poster Session Listing

57 Session Glossary 92 2012 Conference Announcement

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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A LETTER FROM THE BOARD PRESIDENT

Dear TASH Conference Participants, Welcome to Atlanta and the 2011 TASH Conference! This conference marks a subtle shift in TASH’s growth and power. We are poised to have one of the largest conferences that we have had in years, with more visibility and participation in national policy, more active TASH committees, more outreach to our national and local partners, and a strong staff and board. We have continued TASH’s longstanding and strong opposition to the use of restraint and seclusion. We continue to presume competence and promote full community participation for ALL – NO MORE EXCUSES! While I’ve been lauding our strength and progress, I would be remiss if I didn’t also acknowledge the areas that need more attention. In the next several years, we need to take actions to: Increase diversity in our membership and leadership, Increase outreach and responsivity to families, schools, and agencies that traditionally don’t participate in mainstream organizations such as TASH, Expand our projects to address areas of concern to our membership, including the use of alternative and augmentative communication systems, Disseminate information strategically to young families and early childhood providers that fosters the values of inclusion, membership, and belonging for ALL – and the methods for achieving meaningful participation,

Carol Quirk, Board President of TASH

Promote preparation programs for service providers and educators that lead to services that honor the individual and promote positive social relationships, and Influence the preparation of educators so that students with significant support needs participate and learn alongside their nondisabled peers. I don’t know about you, but I am tired of the excuses: “in this economic time…” – as if money was the sole barrier for the people about whom we care. “We are doing all we can” – when no outside-the-box thinking has occurred. “But she can’t use that device…” – when no one has taught her how. “But he WANTS to live in a group home” – when the variety of living choices have not been explored, explained, or experienced. We MUST continue our messages: ALL means ALL! Inclusive Lives NOW! Communication for EVERYONE! NO restraint or seclusion! QUALITY and INDIVIDUALLY designed services! NO more disparity in educational placements and discipline! We need INCLUSIVE SCHOOLS! We must continue to develop our relationships with significant organizations and policy makers at all levels: local, regional, national, and international. We must grow in numbers and strength. We are all in this together - NO MORE EXCUSES! Please come to the membership meeting this year, and share your ideas, suggestions, and goals for the people you care about and for TASH. Our board of directors will be there to listen and discuss our directions. Thank YOU for all you do, and I hope you enjoy the conference. See you here!

Carol Quirk

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TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


A LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Dear TASH Conference Participants, It is my honor and pleasure to welcome you to the 2011 TASH Annual Conference and to the lovely, hospitable city of Atlanta! Atlanta holds a special place in my heart – it was my home for 20 years, it was where I came to learn the meaning of civil rights, and it’s where I developed my disability advocacy “muscles.” Atlanta is a natural place to develop, nurture and celebrate these sensibilities. Take advantage of Atlanta’s walkable downtown and accessible MARTA system, and visit the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center while you are here. You might also want to visit Centennial Olympic Park, which commemorates the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games and the Paralympic Games, the first time this worldclass tribute to the athletic achievement of people with disabilities was on equal ground with the Olympic Games in the United States. Atlanta is a city of many “firsts” – the first black middle class in the United States; the first African American Mayor of a major city in the South; and one of ten cities where the first disability protests were staged simultaneously. It is the home of Martin Luther King, Jr., Concrete Change, Maynard Jackson, Lois Curtis (plaintiff in the landmark Olmstead Decision), The Children’s Freedom Initiative, and so many other agents of change and possibility.

Barb Trader, Executive Director of TASH

TASH is indebted to unprecedented support from the Atlanta Host Committee. Your Atlanta Host Committee “team” has gone out of their way to extend hospitality, provide good intel on what to “see and do” in Atlanta, organize volunteer staff, and share the strength of advocacy in this state. Make sure to join in on the Opening Rally and Welcome Reception on Wednesday afternoon to get a flavor for what’s in store. Stop in to say “hi” at the Hospitality Room and make it a point to participate in an unforgettable community event, the reading of Waddie Welcome and the Beloved Community on Thursday evening. And each time you have a chance, thank the Atlanta Host Committee members for their graciousness and support! Special thanks to the many sponsors who supported the conference financially – and a special “shout out” to our premiere level sponsors, the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities, the Georgia Department of Labor Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and Southeast TACE, Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center. We couldn’t do this event without you. TASH members say they come to the TASH conference, year after year, for the practical skills they learn, and also for the motivation and inspiration to continue to work toward a more inclusive world. I hope you gain those things and more from your experience here! May you be inspired to continue to create change, motivating others with a “No Excuses!” attitude!! In solidarity,

Barb

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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ABOUT TASH

EQUITY. OPPORTUNITY. INCLUSION. TASH is an international leader in disability advocacy. Founded in 1975, TASH advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities and support needs – those most vulnerable to segregation, abuse, neglect and institutionalization. TASH works to advance inclusive communities through advocacy, research, professional development, policy and information and resources for parents, families and self-advocates. The inclusive practices TASH validates through research have been shown to improve outcomes for all people. The work of TASH focuses on five core areas identified as our National Agenda. These areas were selected due to serious human rights implications, the intractability of the problem identified and the specific expertise TASH relative to each. This National Agenda relies upon a network of self-advocates, family members, researchers, educators and other partners to affect change for people with significant disabilities. The National Agenda supports the mission of TASH to eliminate physical and social obstacles that prevent equity, diversity and quality of life for children and adults with disabilities. Inclusive Education: Transform school communities based on social justice principles in which all students (a) are presumed competent, (b) are welcomed as valued members of all general education classes and extra-curricular activities in their local schools, (c) fully participate and learn alongside their same-age peers in general education instruction based on the general education curriculum and (d) experience reciprocal social relationships.

Community Living: Expand the provision of person-centered, long term supports and individualized choice for community living for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in every state.

Employment: Increase the employment rate for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and eliminate federally sanctioned sub-minimum wages.

Diversity and Cultural Competency: Expand the participation rates of people of diverse backgrounds who have disabilities in advocacy efforts and every aspect of life.

Human Rights: Eliminate the use of aversive interventions as an acceptable strategy for behavior modification or control, and promote positive and proactive strategies to prevent dangerous situations.

TASH Board of Directors Carol Quirk, President – David L. Westling, Vice President – Barbara Loescher, Ex Officio, Treasurer – Diane Ryndak, Secretary – Ralph Edwards – Jean Trainor – Shirley Rodriguez, Ex Officio – Michael Callahan – Curtina Moreland-Young – Mary Morningstar – Ari Ne’eman – Betty Williams –Micah Fialka-Feldman – Bill Smith – Gail Fanjoy – Doug Loeffler – Lewis Jackson – Sharon Lohrmann – Lisa Mills, Ex Officio – Martin Agran, Ex Officio – Charles Dukes, Ex Officio – Pat Amos, Ex Officio – SungHo Park, Ex Officio

2011 TASH Conference Committee

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Sharon Lohrmann, Chair University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey

Charles Dukes Florida Atlantic University

Heather Allcock Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education

Ralph Edwards Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services

Judy Bailey Everyone Communicates

Micah Fialka-Feldman Self-Advocate

Mike Callahan Marc Gold & Associates

Mary Morningstar University of Kansas

Barbara Coppens Self-Advocate

Susie Schaefer Open Door for Multicultural Families

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


COMMITTEE MEETINGS

Tuesday, November 29 12–8 p.m.

Board of Directors Meeting, Crystal Ballroom C/D

Thursday, December 1 12:30–1:30 p.m.

Family Issues Committee Meeting, Room 201

At the Family Issues Committee meeting, we’ll identify, from a previous list of concerns, one or two family issues that we can tackle as a group; and ideas on how to move forward. Do we have a common issue? Let’s find out.

Early Childhood Committee Meeting, Room 202

If you have early childhood interests, join us at the Early Childhood Committee Meeting. This committee provides a forum to connect families and professionals focused on young children with disabilities.

Diversity & Cultural Competency Committee Meeting, Room 203

This meeting will be held to review DCC Committee objectives and chart its future course. Input from TASH members and friends is encouraged.

Inclusive Postsecondary Education Committee Meeting, Room 206

The Inclusive Postsecondary Education Committee is a group that meets each year to share information, triumphs and challenges related to inclusive college education opportunities for people with intellectual disabilities. It is coordinated by Cate Weir, Project Coordinator for Think College at the Institute for Community Inclusion, UMass Boston. Anyone interested in this topic is welcome and encouraged to attend this year’s meeting.

Employment Committee Meeting, Room 207

Join the Employment Committee to discuss TASH activities in developing and supporting employment policy change and practice. We’ll recap the Alliance for Full Participation Summit, and discuss current legislation and TASH action plans.

Connections Editorial Committee Meeting, Room 209

The Connections Editorial committee welcomes all those interested in learning more about the publication as well as those who have interest in serving as a guest editor.

RPSD Associate Editors Meeting, Room 210

Friday, December 2 12:30–1:30 p.m.

International Issues Committee, Room 213

The International Issues Committee connects professionals, families, self-advocates, policy-makers, and other advocates and facilitates dialogue, collaboration, and international and cross-cultural exchange. Join us to learn more!

RPSD Editorial Committee Meeting, Room 214

Saturday, December 3 9-10 a.m.

Membership Committee Meeting, Room 206

Join us to learn more about TASH’s membership, activities, and other organizational updates over the past year. TASH members interested in serving on the membership committee are encouraged to attend.

12-4 p.m.

Board of Directors Meeting, Crystal Ballroom C/D

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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2011 TASH CONFERENCE KEYNOTE SPEAKERS Lynnae Ruttledge

Employment for Youth In Transition Conference Keynote Wednesday, November 30, 9-10 a.m. Commissioner Lynnae Ruttledge has headed the Rehabilitation Services Administration since January 2010. Previously, she served as the Director of the Washington Department of Social and Health Service, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation where she led Washington’s vocational rehabilitation program, working annually with more than 23,000 individuals with significant disabilities to achieve their vocational goals. Lynnae has used her perspective as an individual with a disability receiving assistance through the vocational rehabilitation system to push for broad systems change and improvement efforts in this arena.

Melody Musgrove

Employment for Youth In Transition Conference Keynote Wednesday, November 30, 9-10 a.m. Melody Musgrove, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) Director for the U.S. Department of Education, has focused her career on identifying creative and collaborative solutions for the most challenging educational problems. During her previous role as State Director of Special Education for the Mississippi Department of Education, students with disabilities achieved improved results in reading and math, schools implemented more inclusive practices, graduation rates increased, and work was undertaken to prevent the disproportionate identification of African-American students for special education.

Sharon Lewis

Opening Rally and Welcome Reception Keynote Wednesday, November 30, 5-7 p.m. Sharon Lewis was appointed Commissioner of the Administration on Developmental Disabilities in March 2010. Previously, she served as Senior Disability Policy Advisor to the U.S. House Committee on Education & Labor, advising members

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of the Committee on legislative strategy and disabilityrelated policy issues in education, employment and healthcare, and as a Kennedy Public Policy Fellow for U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Children & Families. Sharon is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 2010 Distinguished Leadership in National Disability Policy Award and the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities Chairman’s Award. Sharon is a parent to three daughters, including one with disability.

Norman Kunc

Welcome Dinner Keynote Wednesday, November 30, 7-9 p.m. Norman Kunc is a well-known advocate within the disability rights community who prefers to think of himself as a modern day storyteller, infusing humor and narrative in his speeches to initiate self-reflection and social change. Born with cerebral palsy, Norman attended a segregated school for children with physical disabilities; then, at the age 13, he was integrated into a “regular” school. Norman and his wife, Emma Van der Klift, are co-directors of Broadreach Training & Resources Ltd and travel extensively throughout North America and internationally providing keynote addresses and trainings for educators, human service agencies and advocacy groups.

Kate Gainer

General Session Keynote Thursday, December 1, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Kate Gainer is the Managing Principal of the Georgia Disability Advocate Consulting Group. Nationally recognized as a disability rights leader and speaker, Kate organized the first Long Road Home Project, an annual week of events throughout Georgia to raise awareness of the Olmstead decision. Previously, she worked as a disability and minority outreach coordinator for a number of different organizations, including the Mayor’s Office for the City of Atlanta. Kate was born with cerebral palsy and grew into a life of advocacy as a black woman with a disability in the South.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


2011 TASH Conference Keynote Speakers (continued)

John O’Brien

Rev. Gerald Durley

John O’Brien learns about building more just and inclusive communities from people with disabilities, their families, and their allies. He uses what he learns to advise people with disabilities and their families, advocacy groups, service providers, and governments and to spread the news among people interested in change by writing and through workshops. He is a member of Center on Human Policy, Law & Disability, Syracuse University, and a Fellow of the Centre for Welfare Reform, and is associated with in-Control Partnerships, and the Marsha Forest Centre.

The Rev. Dr. Gerald L. Durley is Pastor of the historic Providence Missionary Baptist Church of Atlanta, where he has served for nearly 25 years. At Providence, Rev. Durley has worked to ensure that people with disabilities in the congregation are able to share their gifts, skills and abilities, resulting in a new system of supports for persons with autism and their families in the congregation and in the community. Rev. Durley’s previous roles include Executive Director of the Head Start Program for Fulton and Douglas Counties, Director of the Health Promotion Resource Center at the Morehouse School of Medicine, and founder of Perspectives, International, a consortium of historically black colleges and universities. In 2011, Rev. Durley was inducted into the International Civil Rights Walk of Fame for his contributions during the civil rights movement of the 1960s.

General Session Keynote Thursday, December 1, 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Rob Horner

General Session Keynote Friday, December 2, 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Rob Horner is Alumni-Knight Professor of Special Education at the University of Oregon. He is a past editor of the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, and the Journal of the Association for the Severely Handicapped. Dr. Horner’s research interests focus on positive behavior support, applied behavior analysis, stimulus control, instructional technology, severe disabilities, and sustainable systems change. Horner’s 25-year history of research, grants management, and systems change efforts related to school reform and positive behavior support include helping schools and school administrators develop systems for embedding school-wide systems of positive behavior support.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

General Session Keynote Friday, December 2, 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

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2011 TASH CONFERENCE SPONSORS Cal-TASH

www.tash.org/chapters/caltash Cal-TASH supports practices that promote our resolution that all people, regardless of label or perceived level of disability, should have supports needed to direct the course of their lives, and to live and participate successfully in inclusive schools and communities.

Center for Leadership in Disability http://publichealth.gsu.edu/678.html

The Center for Leadership in Disability (CLD) is a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD). The CLD envisions a Georgia in which all people – with and without disabilities, urban and rural, and of all races and ethnicities – are full, contributing members of their communities.

Georgia Advocacy Office www.thegao.org

GAO envisions a Georgia where all people have value, visibility, and voice; where even the most difficult and long-lasting challenges are addressed by ordinary citizens acting voluntarily on behalf of each other; and where the perception of disability is replaced by the recognition of ability.

Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities www.gcdd.org

The GCDD works with legislators and advocacy groups to influence and support public policy that fosters a positive change in the way education, housing, workplace/careers and community living opportunities are made available to persons with developmental disabilities.

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Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities http://dbhdd.georgia.gov/portal/site/DBHDD/

The Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities is the state agency responsible for policies, programs, and services for people with mental illness, substance use disorders, and developmental disabilities.

Georgia Department of Education www.gadoe.org

“Making Education Work for All Georgians,” the Georgia Department of Education, Division for Special Education Services & Supports, provides support and technical assistance to over 190 local school districts and over 177,000 students with disabilities, ages 3-21, and their families.

Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation www.dol.state.ga.us

Georgia VR assists individuals with disabilities to seek, secure, and sustain competitive employment. Expert teams in 50 offices statewide focus on people with disabilities who want to work and employers who want to hire them.

The HSC Foundation www.hscfoundation.org

The HSC Foundation is dedicated to improving access to services for individuals who face social and health care barriers due to disability, chronic illness, or other circumstances that present unique needs.

King County Developmental Disability Services www.kingcounty.gov/healthservices/ddd

The King County Developmental Disabilities Division provides a full range of services to enhance the lives of individuals with developmental disabilities. Our services are from birth and throughout an individual’s life enabling them to lead integrated lives in their communities.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


2011 TASH Conference Sponsors (continued) MetLife Center for Special Needs Planning www.metlife.com/specialneeds

MetLife Center for Special Needs Planning helps families plan for the future of dependents with special needs, including preserving government benefits and providing insurance and other financial solutions which can help provide lifetime quality care.

Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation www.MitsubishiComfort.com, www.meus.org

Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation and Mitsubishi Electric employee volunteers are working to help empower young people with disabilities to lead productive lives by investing in innovative leadership development and employment preparation programs. Visit www.meaf.org to learn more.

Parent to Parent of Georgia www.p2pga.org

Parent to Parent of Georgia is a unique statewide organization because WE are parents too! We strive to be the source of choice for support, information, education, and leadership development to families and individuals with ANY disability or special health care need.

Southeast TACE

www.southeasttace.org

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration www.samhsa.gov

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America’s communities. In order to achieve this mission, SAMHSA has identified strategic initiatives to focus the Agency’s work on improving lives and capitalizing on emerging opportunities.

Ticket to Work

www.socialsecurity.gov/work Choosing to work means earning money and eventually becoming financially independent. Ticket to Work helps people with disabilities find good jobs and lead better, self-supporting lives. Visit us at www.socialsecurity.gov/work or www.chooseworkttw.net, email us at support@chooseworkttw.net, or call the Ticket to Work Help Line at 1-866-968-7842 or 1-866-833-2967 (TDD/TTY)

University of New Hampshire Institute on Disability www.iod.unh.edu

Since 1987, the Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire has served as a national resource for individuals, families, and professionals by providing the latest learning opportunities, research, and services that create greater access to opportunities and support the full membership of individuals in their communities.

The mission of the Southeast Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Center is to provide technical assistance and continuing education that meet the strategic goals and performance needs of state vocational rehabilitation agencies and their community partners in the Southeast.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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EXHIBIT LISTING Acumen Fiscal Agent

www.acumenfiscalagent.com Acumen was established for the sole purpose of helping people and families self-direct their support services. People who use Acumen as their fiscal agent enjoy access to friendly customer service, competent accounting and compliance to Department of Labor, State and Federal regulations. Acumen supports people to be proficient, organized and a good steward of public funding.

Advocacy in Action LLC

www.advocacyinaction.info Ellen Perry is an international speaker and consultant on disability issues, including the ADA, housing, transportation, self-determination, leadership and employment. She is the author of two books: Ellen Perry’s Journey: Learning Self-Determination, and Ellen Perry’s Journey: Learning Leadership, which will be available for purchase at $10/book.

The Arc

www.thearc.com The Arc is a national community-based organization advocating for and serving people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. We encompass all ages and all spectrums from autism, Down syndrome, Fragile X and various other developmental disabilities. We are on the front lines to ensure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families have the support they need to be members of the community.

Art by Amie

micro-enterprise marketplace exhibitor Amie McElhaney is a 29 year old visual artist. Reaching beyond challenges, Amie creates beautiful paintings that warm the heart and energize the spirit. Please visit her Facebook page at Art by Amie, and drop by to meet her at the conference.

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Brookes Publishing Co.

www.brookespublishing.com For over 30 years, Brookes Publishing has been a leading provider of resources on disabilities, autism, education, child development, early intervention, communication, language, behavior, and mental health. An independent company, Brookes Publishing is headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland.

Dare 2 Dream

micro-enterprise marketplace exhibitor www.ryanduncanwood.com My name is Ryan Duncanwood. I am an AAC User and the proprietor of Dare 2 Dream. Stop by our booth to check out my exciting inspirational products: t-shirts, tote-bags and a DVD about my life. They’re fun, their functional and they’ll start conversations wherever you go!

Inclusion Institutes at Syracuse University

www.gadoe.org The Inclusion Institutes are a consortium of research and service projects related to inclusive education supported by the Syracuse University School of Education. These programs are leading the way toward greater inclusion for individuals with disabilities and other students who have historically been marginalized in the educational system. The three Inclusion Institutes are: The Institute on Communication and Inclusion; Schools of Promise; and the Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education.

Inclusion Press

www.inclusion.com Inclusion Press creates person centered resource materials for training events, public schools, high schools, community colleges, universities, human service agencies, health organizations, government agencies, families, First Nations organizations—nationally and internationally.

It’s All About Buttons

micro-enterprise marketplace exhibitor It’s All About Buttons is a button making business started by Carmine Vara and his girlfriend, Amanda Lineberry. They make three inch buttons to order. You can use your own design or one can be created for you. Carmine and Amanda can make all kinds of buttons for such purposes as the workplace, church,

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


Exhibit Listing (continued) school, self advocacy, holidays, and just for fun. They will work with you and provide friendly service. Each button costs $1.50 and is 3 inches in size. You can contact Carmine at (404) 226-3749 or Carmo93775@att.net

Jorie’s Jewels

micro-enterprise marketplace exhibitor Jorie’s Jewels has been in business for several months selling beautiful bracelets. She has expanded her line of bracelets to include a faith bracelet, a salvation bracelet, a peace bracelet, a bridal bracelet, and a breast cancer awareness bracelet.

Just for You CardArt

micro-enterprise marketplace exhibitor www.justforyoucardart.com Just For You CardArt by Donna and Jenna was launched July 16, 2010. Their cards are truly works of art. Each one is handmade with no two cards exactly alike. Check out their website and become a friend on Facebook, too.

Lakeshore Learning Materials

www.lakeshorelearning.com Lakeshore is dedicated to creating innovative educational materials that spark young imaginations, instill a sense of wonder and foster a lifelong love of learning. With materials for infants & toddlers through the 6th grade, we help children reach developmental milestones and achieve educational goals— while still having fun! We know that each child is unique, and we strive to develop materials that appeal to children of all interests, backgrounds and abilities.

Lois Curtis Art

micro-enterprise marketplace exhibitor www.loiscurtisart.com Lois Curtis spent her adolescent and adult life as a resident of various state-run institutions. She sued the state of Georgia and her case eventually came before the U.S. Supreme Court. Her victory, commonly referred to as the Olmstead Decision, became a national mandate to free tens of thousands of people with disabilities from institutionalization. She is an activist and an artist, and her artwork has been displayed in venues across the country.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

Prentke Romich Company

www.prentrom.com PRC believes that everyone deserves a voice. Visit our booth to view our line of AAC devices including ECO2™, ECOpoint™, Vantage Lite, and SpringBoard™ Lite and see how we combine ease of programming with the advantage of the Unity® language.

RaceCAR Waterboy LLC

micro-enterprise marketplace exhibitor www.racecarwaterboy.homestead.com/ RaceCAR Waterboy Vending sells bottled water at NASCAR races, street festivals and other events. David Taylor, Jr., is the owner of RaceCAR Waterboy and is also a keynote speaker and author. David is author of “MicroEnterprise 25-Step Business Plan Workbook.”

Scan with Nan

micro-enterprise marketplace exhibitor Nandi Isaacs runs her own business, “Scan with Nan,” where she scans photographs and provides CDs to customers so they can preserve their memories and reproduce pictures. Her business is valuable to people who save their photographs in a shoebox!

Youth Advocate Programs, Inc.

www.yapinc.org Youth Advocate Programs serves individuals with autism and developmental differences by fostering respectful and inclusive relationships. Our work, grounded in research based practices, builds community resources and creates inclusive, autism-friendly practices that are based on the expectation that all people have the right to enjoy good lives.

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AT-A-GLANCE

Wednesday, November 30, 2011 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Conference Registration, Pre-Function South

9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Pre-Conference Workshops (Ticketed Event)

Conference attendees can stop by the registration booth at any time throughout the day to pick up their conference materials and address questions.

See Pre-Conference Schedule for Room and Session Details

Join local and national experts for a day of intensive skills-building and learning on different topics, including assistive technology, housing, community living, preventing restraint & seclusion, and transition. Lunch is provided. 1 – 5 p.m.

Chapter Leadership Workshop, Room 206

Join Chapter Leaders from across the country as they share experiences, address challenges and build skills to lead grassroots advocacy efforts in their communities and regions. Individuals who are interested in starting chapters in their state or region are encouraged to attend. 1 – 5 p.m.

Self-Advocacy Forum, Room 203

The 2011 Self-Advocacy Forum will focus on creating an open space for people with disabilities to come together, share stories and information, and create actionable opportunities to move forward in developing advocacy skills. All people with disabilities are encouraged to attend and connect with other conference attendees before kicking off the 2011 TASH Conference. 4:30 – 5 p.m.

Conference Information Meeting, Salon B

Learn how to take advantage of everything the conference has to offer! This meeting will address all of your questions about the TASH Conference. First-time conference attendees, long-time TASH conference attendees and anyone in between are welcome! 5 – 7 p.m.

Opening Rally and Welcome Reception, Salon West & Pre-Function

This year’s Welcome Reception kicks off with an Opening Rally featuring video clips from the Georgia Long Road Home campaign and the My Medicaid Matters Rally, keynote speaker Sharon Lewis, Commissioner of the Administration on Developmental Disabilities, who will get you fired up about building community through advocacy, and a visual celebration of flags, banners and signs. Snacks and refreshments will be served. Don’t miss this opportunity to jumpstart your TASH Conference experience and connect with new and old friends!

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5 – 7 p.m.

Conference Exhibit Hall, Salon E

7 – 9 p.m.

2011 TASH Welcome Dinner (Ticketed Event - $40), West Ballroom D

The 2011 Conference Exhibit Hall, featuring organizations and businesses from across the country, will be open for business starting with the Opening Rally and Welcome Reception and will remain open to conference attendees throughout the TASH Conference. This year’s exhibit hall also includes the MicroEnterprise Marketplace where entrepreneurs with disabilities will share their products and services. Be sure to stop by! Come celebrate with us as we recognize the accomplishments of TASH and its members over the past year. Keynote speaker Norman Kunc will regale attendees with stories that use humor and narrative to initiate self-reflection and social change. This is a great chance to learn about the impact TASH is having, meet and recognize some of the people who are making change happen, and receive inspiration for your conference experience and once you return home.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

Wednesday, November 30, 2011 All Pre-Conference Workshops are ticketed events. If you have not registered already and wish to sign up, please go to the registration desk. 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Employment for Youth in Transition Conference – Day 1, Room 202

This conference-within-the-conference features best practices in youth transition that result in integrated employment for young people perceived as the most challenging to serve. Topics covered include multi-agency partnerships and funding strategies; defining and describing “employment first” strategies; philosophy and values that guide practice; successful transition planning; experiences during high school and post-secondary options that lead to employment; parent and student roles in successful transition outcome and much, much more.

Accessing the General Curriculum through Assistive Technology, Room 207

Highly effective, evidenced-based strategies can be used to develop and integrate communication systems for students with complex communication needs, enhancing access to academic content across the school day. This full-day workshop will highlight practical examples of cognitive scaffolding, adaptations, technology and modifications for students with multiple disabilities, and the relationships between curriculum and functional skills will be discussed. Also included in this workshop will be two 45-minute panel discussions on the selection and use of IOS applications and assistive technology in the context of Universal Design for Learning.

Integrated Community Housing Options – Challenges and Opportunities, Room 204 Creating, establishing and funding community-based housing options is one of the most challenging issues facing individuals with disabilities, family members and providers who work in the residential and housing arena. The State of Georgia is a hot bed of activity on this issue, and there’s no better time than the present to join this pre-conference workshop and participate in a robust discussion on housing policy.

Shouldn’t School be Safe? Parents and School Personnel Working Together to Prevent and Eliminate the use of Restraint and Seclusion, Room 205

Parents and school personnel can be strong allies in ensuring school is a safe and pleasant learning environment for everyone. Unsettling news has surfaced in recent years about the use of restraint and seclusion techniques in classrooms around the United States. These practices have resulted in trauma, injury and even death of children as young as five years old. This day-long workshop will help parents, advocates and teachers understand how to work together to prevent and eliminate the dangerous and traumatizing practices of restraint and seclusion.

Conversations on Citizenship and Person-Centered Practice, Room 201

This engaging pre-conference workshop will explore the ideals of citizenship as they relate to people who rely heavily on human service disability systems for support and access to typical community experiences. The workshop will include hosted conversations that explore the practice of supporting deep personal and organizational changes that contribute to the full expression of citizenship for people with significant disabilities.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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AT-A-GLANCE

Thursday, December 1, 2011 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Conference Registration, Pre-Function South

Conference attendees can stop by the registration booth at any time throughout the day to pick up their conference materials and address questions. Opens at 8 a.m.

Conference Hospitality Room, Room 338

The TASH Conference is jam-packed, exciting and very, very high energy. When you need a breather, a snack or a spot to check out what is happening AWAY from it all, step inside the Hospitality Room where the Local Host Committee has worked very hard to create a space for reflection, quiet conversation and peaceful moments. The Hospitality Room also includes our Event Wall, which lists opportunities for meet-ups. So if you crave culture, shopping, sight-seeing or early morning yoga, look here first. Welcome to Atlanta, we’re glad you are here! The Conference Hospitality Room will be open throughout the TASH Conference. To get more specific information about Hospitality Room hours, stop by Room 338 or check with the registration desk. 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Conference Exhibit Hall, Salon E

The 2011 Conference Exhibit Hall features organizations and businesses from across the country. This year’s exhibit hall also includes the Micro-Enterprise Marketplace where entrepreneurs with disabilities will sell their products and services. Be sure to stop by and check the exhibit hall out! 8:30 – 9:30 a.m.

Community Living Open Space Gathering Kick-Off, Salon A

Join us as Jack Pearpoint and Lynda Kahn kick off the dialogue in the Community Living Gathering Space. At the Open Space Gathering, you can work with others (including agenda facilitators Judith Snow and Joe Donofrio) to design exactly the learning, sharing, revitalizing experience you need at the TASH Conference. So, bring your gifts, questions, and experiences in building inclusive community and let’s get started! Events in the Community Living Open Space Gathering will continue throughout the conference. All conference attendees are welcome. 8:30 – 10:45 a.m.

Morning Concurrent and Panel Sessions

See Conference Session Schedule for room assignments and session information. Morning concurrent and panel sessions will take place during this time. 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Employment for Youth in Transition Conference – Day 2, Salon C

11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

General Session with Keynote Speakers Kate Gainer and John O’Brien, Grand Ballroom East

This conference-within-the-conference features best practices in youth transition that result in integrated employment for young people perceived as the most challenging to serve. Topics covered include multi-agency partnerships and funding strategies; defining and describing “employment first” strategies; philosophy and values that guide practice; successful transition planning; experiences during high school and post-secondary options that lead to employment; parent and student roles in successful transition outcome and much, much more. Keynote Speakers Kate Gainer and John O’Brien have used innovation and creativity to address the most challenging issues people with disabilities face today. Join us as they share their wisdom and experience.

12:30 – 1:30 p.m.

Lunch

12:30 – 1:30 p.m.

Missouri TASH Chapter Meeting, Room 204

This meeting is for any individual interested in learning about the Missouri TASH chapter. We will go over our efforts in the past few months to rejuvenate the chapter, as well as future action steps needed to maintain momentum. 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.

Ohio Gets Together, Room 205 Ohio – the heart of it all! Are you here from Ohio? Please stop by and connect with other Buckeyes. Exchange e-mails or phone numbers and continue the conversation and the energy after the conference. Lunch will not be provided, but you are welcome to bring one, sit and chat or just make a quick visit on your way to lunch. Let’s get together!

1:30 – 6:15 p.m.

Afternoon Concurrent and Panel Sessions

See Conference Session Schedule for room assignments and session information. Afternoon concurrent and panel sessions will take place during this time.

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TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


Thursday At-a-Glance (continued) 4 – 6:15 p.m.

Diversity Town Hall Event Racism or Not; Here We Come! Disability-Related Health Disparities and Race/Ethnicity: Double Jeopardy, Room 302 Leandris Liburd, Marshalyn Yeargin-Allsopp and Vincent Campbell, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Lisa Sinclair, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities; Carol Quirk, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education and TASH Board; Ralph Edwards, Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services and TASH Board Facilitated by experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD) and the National TASH Board, this Town Hall Event focuses its discussion around reports from the CDC and NCBDDD. Join us for a thoughtful discussion on challenges and opportunities in addressing excess rates of morbidity and mortality for people with disabilities who are of diverse backgrounds.

6:15 – 8:15 p.m.

Poster Presentations and Conference Reception, Salon West & Corridor

The 2011 Poster Presentations include nearly 120 different posters sharing the latest research and information about issues impacting the disability field. All posters will be on display with presenters available to share additional information and address questions. Light refreshments will be served and a cash bar will be available. 8:30 – 10 p.m.

Waddie Welcome & the Beloved Community reading, Location To Be Determined

Join us for an evening reading featuring Waddie Welcome & the Beloved Community author Tom Kohler. This book tells the story of friendships that transcended divisions of disability, race, and income and created powerful new possibilities in a whole community.

WE VALUE YOUR SUPPORT AND CONTRIBUTION TO TASH It’s true that the more you give to an organization, the more you get out of it. And TASH provides a number of grassroots opportunities that you can support through your energy, expertise and resources.

SUPPORT TASH WITH YOUR ENERGY

There are numerous volunteer opportunities throughout the year, both in-person and virtual. TASH is always seeking assistance with events, outreach and other tasks. If you have the time and energy to make a contribution, we will find something for you!

SUPPORT TASH WITH YOUR EXPERTISE

So many members of TASH have academic and professional backgrounds, deep personal stories and unique skill sets that can make a valuable contribution to our work. Whether your interest is in policy, training and education, advocacy or another area, we want to hear from you.

SUPPORT TASH WITH YOUR RESOURCES

Financial contributions to TASH are put to good use. We underwrite more than $120,000 each year in conference registration and membership dues so self-advocates and family members can be a part of TASH. These contributions also ensure we can provide innovative training and educational resources at a low cost. Making an investment in TASH with your energy, expertise and resources feels great and significantly benefits a cause that matters to you. Our mission continues to be advanced with a strong values base because of the commitment and contributions of TASH members and others motivated to create lasting, positive change. Now more than ever, we must work together to ensure equity, opportunity and inclusion for all. To make a contribution, send an e-mail to info@tash.org, call us at (202) 540-9014 or click the orange “Donate” button at www.tash.org. Thank you for all that you do!

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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Georgia Department of Education http://www.gadoe.org/ Division for Special Education Services & Supports http://www.gadoe.org/ci_exceptional.aspx

“Making Education Work for All Georgians”

Serving over 190 school districts and more than 177,000 students with disabilities, ages 3 to 21, and their families throughout Georgia Additional information regarding available resources and supports: Georgia Parent Mentor Partnership—www.parentmentors.org State Personnel Development Grant—www.GraduateFirst.org Georgia Project for Assistive Technology—www.gpat.org Georgia Learning Resource System Network—www.gadoe.org/ci_exceptional.aspx?PageReq=CIEXCGLRS

GaDOE is delighted to welcome TASH to Atlanta for its 2011 Conference.

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TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. Customized Employment: Tools To Systematically Coach/Mentor Initial Implementation Room 201 Linda McDowell, The University of Southern Mississippi; Melynda Burck Ross, Gautier High School Employment

Explanation of materials on a CD - containing Checklists for Steps of Customized Employment, complementary to Marc Gold and Associates forms; part of coaching/mentoring training, producing documentation of systematic/ consistent use of the process during initial implementation.

“All” Really Means “ALL”: Employment as the Priority Post-School Outcome for Youth with Significant Disabilities Employment

Salon C Mike Callahan and Ellen Condon, Marc Gold and Associates

Employment begins for most youth at age 16. This session will cover the various types of work experiences that lead to employment outcomes. The progression of work experiences lead to a career direction with targeted skill development and mentors to assist with further education or a job. This section will highlight teacher, family and student presentations.

Enhancing the Inclusive Academic Experience for Students with Significant Disabilities with Technology Inclusive Education

Room 203 Alicia Saunders and Bethany R. Smith, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Various computer technologies can be used to enhance academic instruction in inclusive, general education settings for students with significant disabilities. Discussion includes research supporting technology in academics for this population and demonstrations on how to incorporate technology to enhance the academic experience.

Promoting Communication In Young Children With Significant Developmental Delays Through Caregiver-implemented Intervention Inclusive Education

Room 205 Ann-Marie Orlando, University of Florida

The purpose of this multiple baseline design study was to examine the effects of a caregiver-implemented intervention on children’s use of communication forms and functions during shared book reading sessions. The results of the study will be shared with participants.

Why We Can’t Just Tell You How to Implement Inclusion!

Room 206 Jennifer Kurth, Lissa Keegan and Vanessa Dicarlo, Northern Arizona University Inclusive Education

“Inclusion is a process, not an event. Successful problems and solutions evolve rather than occur” (Hobbs & Westling, 1998). This presentation will introduce position statements, strategies and guidelines implementing inclusion and maintaining inclusive practices, including addressing assumptions, concerns, and action planning.

Beyond Boundaries: Our School Based Journey from Segregated Service Delivery to Inclusion. Inclusive Education

Room 207 Amy L-M Toson, University of South Florida; Lisa Maltezos, Jaime Losinski and Jenny Paloumpis, School District of Hillsborough County Self-advocate elementary students, along with their support team, share their journey from segregated programming to inclusion. In the only school within a large urban district to fully shift to inclusive education, presenters share (1) what they can do now that they couldn’t do before, (2) what the support team does differently, and (3) how they’re addressing challenges along the way.

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SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. continued Providing Accommodations During Reading Instruction To Students Who Are Non-verbal Inclusive Education

Room 209 Nancy Harayama, Boston University

Some students with the most significant cognitive disabilities also exhibit difficulties speaking. These students require accommodations that compensate for their disabilities rather than modifications that result in the lowering of the skill level. This presentation will show how a decision-making flowchart can be used to select appropriate accommodations and how accommodations can be provided during reading instruction.

Denied: Interventions used to Suppress Sexuality and Why this Must Change! Room 204 Charles Dukes and Pamela Lamar-Dukes, Florida Atlantic University Cross Topic

This presentation will report the findings from a review of the literature on sexuality for individuals with severe disabilities and use this information as the centerpiece for a discussion on the change efforts to decrease inappropriate sexual behavior, but more importantly, increase appropriate sexual behavior and relationship building repertoires.

Georgia DOE Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports Room 212 Jean Ramirez, Georgia Department of Education Cross Topic

The Georgia DOE PBIS unit has trained and supported a variety of schools in Georgia. This presentation will focus on the different needs that some of our unique settings have and the way the essential elements of the PBIS framework look in the different settings and the impact it has on the students that attend these schools.

Reinterpreting Behavioral Methodologies as Learned Oppression Room 213 Andrew Granite, Chapman University Cross Topic

This presentation seeks to examine behavioral methodologies and reinterpret them as a system of social control. It looks at behaviorism from both application and theoretical perspectives; drawing parallels between relationships of behaviorist and patient/student with relationships of capitalist and proletariat. From these parallel relationships the oppressive and hegemonic nature of applied behavioral methodologies becomes apparent.

Journey To The North Star: Building Relationships, Changing the Culture

Room 304 Peggy Kurz, Dawn Freudenberg and Matt Briner, Hamilton County Developmental Disabilities Services Cross Topic

This session shares the journey to build positive relationships with all people to reduce and eliminate the use of aversive behavior support strategies. This philosophical change occurred through a shift brought about by values training and skills training for staff supporting people facing severe challenges in their lives.

Amplify One’s Voice

Room 306 Kim Henry, ACTS Learning Center Cross Topic

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This session will discuss how individuals can express and advocate for their wants and needs about their lives, their community, and their freedom. Through group discussions and power point, the session will illustrate methods and possibilities on how to assist individuals to overcome stepping out of one’s comfort zone and to make positive progress within their community.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. continued Close Encounters Of The Medical Kind: Autism, Developmental Disability, and Doctor Visits Room 307 Kristy L. McGinnis, Pacific University Cross Topic

Taking a child to the doctor is not always an easy task, even when the child does not have a disability. When individuals have autism or other developmental disabilities, doctor visits may be difficult even into adulthood. Parents, caregivers, and practitioners will learn to develop strategies to support individuals to have successful encounters at the doctor’s office.

Opening of the Community Living Open Space Gathering

Community Living

Salon A Jack Pearpoint, Inclusion International; Lynda Kahn, Marsha Forest Centre; Judith Snow, Laser Eagles Art Guild; Joe Donofrio, Community Housing Options: Integrated Community, Employment and Social Services (CHOICESS) Join us as Jack Pearpoint and Lynda Kahn open our dialogue in the Community Living Gathering Space. Celebrate the journey with music, story, and conversation. Judith Snow and Joe Donofrio will help us create our agenda to learn from each other. This Open Space will be available to all conference attendees throughout the conference.

End of Life, Grief and Loss Supports with People with Significant Disabilities Salon B Bill Gaventa, Elizabeth M. Boggs Center on Developmental Disabilities Community Living

End of life, loss, and grief are areas of life that impact everyone, but only recently have service providers and others begun to pay attention to those in the lives of people with significant disabilities, their families, friends, and support staff. This session will explore the challenges, opportunities, strategies and resources available for all of those individuals.

Community-Building and Relationships: Staff Training Versus Direct Approaches to Community Community Living

Room 202 Angela Amado, Institute on Community Integration

How do direct approaches to community members compare with staff training to promote friendships, social relationships and community belonging for adults with intellectual disabilities? This presentation will report on results of a research and training project comparing the two different approaches and summarize effective approaches for promoting community belonging.

The International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities Room 301 Esme Grant, U.S. International Council on Disabilities Human Rights

This session provides background on the history of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and its present status in the U.S. This interactive presentation will offer participants grounding in the CRPD; skillsbuilding in how to take a human rights-based approach to disability issues, and information for those interested in U.S. ratification of the CRPD.

The Neurobiological and Psychological Effects of Trauma and Simple Sensory Interventions to Promote Healing Human Rights

Room 303 Janice LeBel, Mass. Dept. of Mental Health; Joan Gillece, NASMHPD

Traumatic experience impacts the mind, body, and functioning. The compelling evidence of the physical impact of trauma on the brain, particularly with children, will be reviewed. Normative sensory-based methods and interventions to promote recovery, learning, and wellness will be discussed as well as simple strategies to use at home, in school, or in other community settings.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 8:30 – 10:45 a.m. Meaningful Participation of Adults with Significant Disabilities in Their Meetings

Room 210 Dolly Singley, Amanda Helman, Freya Koger, Julie Beaulieu, Shaun Tomko and Colleen Tomko, Lehigh University Inclusive Education

Opportunities to enhance self-determination skills are important for adults with significant disabilities. Actively participating in their meetings is key to obtaining these skills. This presentation consists of the lead researchers, two adults with significant disabilities, and their parents. The strategies that these individuals employed to help them actively participate in their meetings will be discussed.

Steps to General Education for Students with the Most Significant Cognitive Disabilities

Inclusive Education

Room 211 Gail Wilkins, Gail Wilkins Educational Consulting; Tim Villegas, Vicki Scheffel, Cheryl Mauldin, Donna Boyer, Damian Boyd and Mr. and Mrs. Damian Boyd, Kincaid Elementary School; Susan Brozovic, Georgia Department of Education; Shylema Collins, Weaver Middle School This session focuses on the Georgia Department of Education’s LRE Initiative to include students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. A step by step process for making this happen will be reviewed and reflected upon by administrators, teachers, parents and students. Challenges and successes will be discussed and suggestions for replication given. Examples pertaining to specific students will be highlighted.

Wretches & Jabberers Further Stories from the Road; Institution to Movie Stardom

Cross Topic

Room 214 Harvey Lavoy and Tracy Thresher, Community Developmental Services; Larry Bissonette and Pascal Cheng, Howard Center The movie Wretches & Jabberers staring Larry Bissonnette and Tracy Thresher, two men with Autism, was shown at TASH 2010. This year, Tracy and Larry will do a workshop with somewhat supporting actors Harvey Lavoy and Pascal Cheng looking back on a year of touring the film and sharing what they have learned on their quest to change the world.

Scaffolding School Communication to reach all Families and Community Stakeholders Room 302 Patti Solomon, Georgia Department of Education; Allison Stevenson, Parent Diversity

Scaffolding communication by medium, frequency and message unplugs barriers! A tiered Communication Plan can change the course of a student’s success. Using Skype to attend IEP meetings, routinely running family pulse checks and many other low- and high-tech tools will be highlighted to connect your families, schools and communities.

9:45 – 10:45 a.m. Self-Advocate Entrepreneurship Roundtable

Room 201 David Taylor, Racecar Waterboy, LLC.; Ryan Duncanwood, Dare2DreamTrack; Other presenters to be announced Employment

Establishing a business that draws upon an individual’s strengths to drive a profit reflects a major tenet of customized employment. At this roundtable, you’ll have the opportunity to see micro-enterprise and the practice of customized employment come to life by hearing from entrepreneurs with disabilities. Come prepared to learn what it takes to envision a business, get it started and keep it alive!

Ticket to Work: Free Support for People Who Have a Disability and Want to Work Room 307 Employment

Attend the Ticket to Work breakout session and learn about special employment programs and rules that may apply to you because of your disability benefits and medical condition. You will learn from Work Incentives experts about: • Ticket to Work & Work Incentives for people with significant intellectual disabilities • Frequently asked questions • Success stories from people who used Ticket to Work

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TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 9:45– 10:45 a.m. continued Helping Youth Build Their Financial Future Salon C

Sally Atwell, Shepherd Center; Abby Cooper, Marc Gold and Associates Employment

How do young adults work toward economic stability and maintain important benefits? This session will outline strategies and tools for achieving both goals.

Proloquo2go and Students with ASDs: Curriculum Participation and Membership in General Education Inclusive Education

Room 203 Barbara Gruber and Heather Allcock, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education

Inclusive practices research reveals positive outcomes in IEP quality, student engagement, and individualized supports. A study using Proloquo2go with two elementary students with ASD resulted in increases in: 1) academic engagement in general education and 2) task-related interactions with their general educators. Both students experienced decreases in task-related interactions with paraprofessionals. Implications for practice and future research will be discussed.

Using a Video iPod and Picture Prompts to Teach Pedestrian Navigation Skills Room 204 Kelly Kelley, Western Carolina University Inclusive Education

Transportation access is a major contributor to independence, productivity, and societal inclusion for individuals with disabilities (Myers, 1996). This presentation will discuss findings from a study that examined effects of pedestrian navigation training using picture prompts displayed through video iPods on travel route completion with four young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities attending an inclusive individualized postsecondary program.

Patterns of Peer Victimization among Young Children with Disabilities: Prevalence and Implications Inclusive Education

Room 205 Esther Son, The Lurie Institute for Disability Policy, Brandeis University

The Pre-Elementary Education Longitudinal Study (PEELS) secondary data set was analyzed to examine the prevalence, nature, and pathways between child characteristics, family factors, school factors and peer victimization for young children with developmental disabilities. Family income, time in special education, language and social skills were associated with patterns of peer victimization. Results and recommendations will be discussed.

From Novice Teacher to Master Inclusive Educator: The First Five Years Room 206 Julia White, University of Rochester Inclusive Education

This presentation will explore the first four years of a five-year study of the experiences of novice teachers as they become master inclusive educators who support equal educational opportunity and meaningful participation in schools and confront and challenge exclusion from regular educational settings of students with significant disabilities by creating opportunities for inclusive practice.

Arizona WINS with Inclusive Schools: Developing and Sustaining a Statewide Training Series Inclusive Education

Room 207 Sherry Mulholland and Andrea O’Brien, AZ TASH/AZ WINS Co-Coordinators

Arizona TASH sustains a successful training series on inclusive schooling for individuals with significant disabilities. Funds generated through this series allow Arizona TASH to support persons/projects sharing their vision. Cocoordinators will explain the series’ inception and execution: translating vision into curriculum, developing a “brand”, creating partnerships, evaluating effectiveness, outreach, etc....These trainings reach thousands, including family members, self-advocates, and school personnel.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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www.MitsubishiComfort.com

Mitsubishi Electric is proud to support local communities through employee volunteerism, like our L.O.V.E. committee volunteers provide in Greater Atlanta.

Summer Internship Program American Association of People with Disabilities Washington, DC

L.O.V.E. Erosion Control Project Coweta Organization for Riding Rehabilitation Newnan, GA

Since 1991, Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation has been empowering youth with disabilities to lead productive lives by supporting TASH and projects like the I am Norm inclusion campaign. Disability Mentoring Day SEDOL Vernon Hills, IL

Visit the MEAF booth to learn more!

www.MEAF.org

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TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 9:45 – 10:45 a.m. continued “The Train’s Pulling Out of the Station”: Stakeholders in Inclusive Education Reform Room 209 Nicole M. DeClouette and Julie Causton-Theoharis, Syracuse University Inclusive Education

The next wave of inclusive education for students with disabilities will likely be whole school inclusive reform. This presentation highlights the experiences of stakeholders in Kennedy School (K-8), as they engage in restructuring their school to make it inclusive for all students. We highlight important turning points and the eventual creation of their new mantra, “It’s what’s best for kids.”

Post School Outcomes for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities / Partnering with Postsecondary Students: Kentucky’s Supported Higher Education Project Inclusive Education

Room 12 Tony LoBianco and Beth Harrison, Human Development Institute, University of Kentucky / Wendy Willeroy, Human Development Institute, University of Kentucky This presentation examines recent findings from Kentucky’s post-school outcome study. Presenters report findings regarding transition planning, employment and post-secondary education for persons with intellectual disabilities. Multivariate analysis isolates those factors most predictive of post-school success for this population. Implications for policy at state and local levels will be discussed. The Supported Higher Education Project is one of twenty seven TPSID projects funded through the federal Office of Postsecondary Education to facilitate inclusion of students with intellectual disabilities in postsecondary settings. This panel discussion will highlight academic, economic, and social benefits to full inclusion for students and their families.

Transforming Parent-Child Interaction in Family Routines: Longitudinal Results and Family Perspectives Cross Topic

Room 213 Joseph M. Lucyshyn, University of British Columbia

The study examined the efficacy of a family centered PBS approach. Ten families of children with developmental disabilities participated. Group design results showed improvements in child behavior and routine participation. Single subject design results documented a functional effect for 7 of 10 families. Sequential analysis results documented the transformation of parent-child interaction for 8 of 10 families. Implications are discussed.

Gifts In Disguise: Unique Abilities

Room 304 Erin Vachon-Vierra, Northern Arizona University Cross Topic

This session will explore important issues in the lives of people with disabilities and their communities by allowing students with disabilities to believe in themselves, learn to appreciate their “gifts in disguise”, and therefore be the next generation of students that can change the world with a very powerful influence. It will explore strategies that help individuals maximize their potential.

Moving From Rights to Relationships: The Power of Inclusive Spiritual Supports

Cross Topic

Room 306 Bill Gaventa, Elizabeth M. Boggs Center on Developmental Disabilities; Mark Crenshaw, Interfaith Disability Network; Erik Carter, Vanderbilt University Congregations and service systems can make compelling partners in supporting people with significant disabilities to participate fully in the life of their community. This session addresses innovative approaches for addressing the spiritual support needs of people with significant disabilities, establishing effective partnerships between service providers and faith communities, and expanding meaningful access to congregational life.

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SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 9:45 – 10:45 a.m. continued Every New House with Basic Access: Why, How - and Some Successes Salon B Eleanor Smith, Concrete Change Community Living

A zero-step entrance and wide interior doors in ALL new houses? ‘They’ said that’s not practical. But the presenter will show that some success through advocacy is already happening. Two cities and one Habitat for Humanity chapter that mandate basic access in every new house will be highlighted. The ‘why’ and the ‘how’ of this movement will be addressed.

Not Home: A Documentary about Kids Living in Nursing Facilities Room 202 Narcel Reedus, Charlotte, N.C. Community Living

Not Home: A documentary about kids living in nursing facilities is a 90-minute documentary focusing on four interweaving stories: Mathew, Qualeigh, Essie Evans and Nola Sayne – a young adult, a child and two parents whose separate lives intersect though institutionalization.

411 on Disability Disclosure: What to Tell, To Whom, When, and Why Room 301 Andraéa LaVant, Institute for Educational Leadership Human Rights

This interactive workshop is for youth, families, and other adults who care about youth. Participants will hear about a three guides that assists youth in deciding what to disclose and to whom in work, school, and social settings. Each participant will receive a copy of the 411 on Disability Disclosure Workbook, the Adult Companion Workbook, and the Cyber Disclosure Supplement.

The Case for Eliminating Restraint and Seclusion

Human Rights

Room 303 Linda M. Bambara, Lehigh University; Joan Gillece, SAMHSA; Janice Lebel, Massachusetts Department of Mental Health Child & Adolescent Division Pressure to eliminate the use of restraint and seclusion in schools is mounting, but many argue that they are necessary tools to control problem behaviors of children. In this session, panelists make the case for why restraints are unnecessary from three perspectives: (a) the trauma experienced by children, (b) the costs associated with their use, and (b) the effectiveness of alternative and preventive research-based practices.

1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Social Skills at Work: Which Skills are Really Valued?

Employment

Room 201 Martin Agran, University of Wyoming; Carolyn Hughes, Vanderbilt University; Colleen Thoma, Virginia Commonwealth University It is well acknowledged that social skills are positively associated with job success. Although the relationship between social competence and work success has been well acknowledged, there is relatively little current research about the specific social skills needed to promote job success. This presentation will discuss a study which identified the specific social skills valued by employers.

Using Computer-Delivered Embedded Instruction to Teach Science to Students with ASD Room 203 Bethany Smith and Fred Spooner, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Inclusive Education

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Embedded computer-delivered instruction is one way to use technology to increase academic knowledge for students with ASD. In this study, three secondary participants will acquire nine vocabulary words, definitions, and answers to comprehension questions via embedded computer assisted instruction within the science general education setting. Additionally, this study will assess the participants’ ability to generalize knowledge across materials and situations.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


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SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. continued Research on Improving Education of Children with Autism: Four New Studies

Room 204 George Singer, Sarah Smith, Jill Randall, Rebecca Cox and Jamie Vaughn, University of California at Santa Barbara Inclusive Education

This panel will present four recent studies on ways to promote early communication in bilingual homes, conversation in children learning to stay on topic, and a way to promote positive social interaction in an after school club using disability awareness training. A fourth study presents a way to train early interventionists using fidelity of implementation observation and video self-modeling.

Extreme Makeover: Classroom Edition- Building on Child and Family Strengths and Interests Inclusive Education

Room 205 Mary E. Rugg and Carol Darrah, Institute on Human Development and Disability, University of Georgia

As early childhood teachers reflect upon their practices in the classroom and strive to meet the needs of diverse students, they look for practical tools to assist them in bringing research to practice. This session will highlight several teachers’ experience in using a strengths-based portfolio to transform their teaching practices.

The IM:PACT Project: Multi-leveled Collaboration for Fully Inclusive Elementary Teacher Preparation Inclusive Education

Room 206 Kimberly Rombach, and David Smukler SUNY Cortland; Judy K.C. Bentley, Texas State University; Susan Stratton; Michele Paetow, SUNY Cortland and Syracuse University; Kristin Barnoski, Caitlin Mack This presentation will showcase a collaborative curricular redesign model being used to prepare future childhood educators to teach students with and without disabilities together. We will highlight our process for obtaining a cooperative agreement through the United States Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs to attain funding for our project.

Yes, We Can Support Grade Appropriate Academic Content in Inclusive Environments! Room 207 Anne Denham and Mike Burdge, Keystone Alternate Assessment Design; Lou-Ann Land, University of Kentucky Inclusive Education

Educators struggle with providing accessible instruction to address state or national academic content standards in reading, mathematics and science. This presentation will share a system of student support using elements of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) that will provide students with a means to access instruction, show what they know and remain engaged long enough to learn.

Supporting Courageous Conversations about Inclusion in Schools Room 209 Phyllis Jones, Aisha Holmes and Amy Toson, University of South Florida Inclusive Education

This presentation describes a process that promotes systems change for greater inclusive practices by supporting courageous conversations around policy and practice. Best Practices in Inclusive Education (BPIE) is a Florida-based facilitated process that focuses upon building capacity to develop robust inclusive policies and practices for all students This session presents the BPIE and shares survey results from one elementary school.

Peer Support Strategies To Promote Inclusive Education: An Evidence-Based Practice Room 210 Lisa Cushing, University of Illinois at Chicago; Erik Carter, Vanderbilt University Inclusive Education

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This panel presentation will examine the efficacy and feasibility of peer support arrangements in secondary inclusive settings. Presenters will describe their prior research on peer supports and share current findings from a large-scale study of 50 secondary students with significant disabilities and peers without disabilities who served as peer supports.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. continued University Participant Program: First Hand Experiences from Families, Faculty, Students, and Participants/Evaluation Results from a Postsecondary Program for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities Inclusive Education

Room 211 Kelly Kelley, David Westling and Charlotte Pritchett, Western Carolina University; Rebekah Norris, Tiffany Allen, Aaron Hoefs, Corey Hambrick, Elizabeth Pritchett, Anna Grace Davis/Kelly Kelley, David Westling, Donna Yerby, Deborah Zuver The University Participant Program is a model postsecondary education program at Western Carolina University. Key members of the program will share first hand experiences and perspectives related to their involvement with the program. Key presenters will include family members, college faculty, student volunteers, and university participants involved in this inclusive individualized model demonstration postsecondary program. / The University Participant Program at Western Carolina University is a model post-secondary program. This presentation will provide an overview of program evaluation results from external evaluators from the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities for the first year of the program. Evaluations were conducted through focus group interviews with student volunteers, families, and participants in the program.

Inclusive Educational Programming for Students with Severe Disabilities: An International Perspective Inclusive Education

Room 212 John Filler, Katie O’Hara, Conrad Oh-Young, Christine Baxter and Delilah Krasch, University of Nevada

This presentation is focused on the history of inclusive education for students with disabilities in various educational settings and compares and contrasts different approaches revealed by a two-year long review of over 8,600 scholarly articles published.

Autism and Anxiety: From Stress To Success

Room 213 Pat Amos, Janet Crawford, Susan Oscilowski and Andrew Oscilowski, Youth Advocate Programs, Inc. Cross Topic

Self-advocates with autism frequently characterize their daily experience as marked by chronic anxiety. This session investigates the nature, prevalence, and impact of anxiety and hyper vigilance on the autism spectrum, explores environmental modifications, psychological strategies, body awareness, accommodations, and other positive behavioral supports, and explores socially valued activities that respect and use positive aspects of vigilant behavior to achieve desired goals.

Facilitating Socio-sexual Decision-making Through Direct Instruction: The PACS Model / Using Social Stories to Promote Socio-sexual Decision-making for Individuals with Severe Disabilities Cross Topic

Room 214 Pamela S. Wolfe and Stephanie Gardner, Penn State University

The proliferation of specialized supports in the disability world can cause us to overlook many natural supports, willing partners, and rich opportunities available in every community. We will discuss practical community organizing strategies -- including community conversations, apprentice organizers, support circles, and grassroots mini-grants -that encourage the broader community to connect with and support people with significant disabilities.

Self-Advocacy Summits Held Across The Nation

Room 304 Liz Weintraub, Hillary Spears and Dawn Rudolph, Association of University Centers on Disabilities Cross Topic

A series of regional self-advocacy summits called ‘Envisioning the Future: Allies in Self-Advocacy’, was held in the spring of 2011 to strengthen and enhance self-advocacy efforts both in individual states and nationally. This presentation will explore the summits’ purpose, leadership, preparation, accessibility, and partnership in supporting selfadvocacy at state and national levels.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. continued Choice Matters

Cross Topic

Room 307 Ellen Nicholson, Solutions for You, Inc.; Leslie Lederer, Kentucky Protection and Advocacy; Stella Smith, Fayette County Public Schools Choice Matters brings to life first hand experiences reflecting the importance of a planning process that includes listening, observing and strategically putting things into place for teens and young adults by honoring what each individual chooses.

Building a Life in the Community...Not a Program

Community Living

Salon B Karen Lee, SEEC; Carol Beatty, The Arc Howard County; Cindy Kauffman, Maryland DDA; Joe Wykowski, Community Vision; Patti Scott and Dave Hasbury, Neighbours International In Maryland, learning Communities of Practice, are actively engaging DDA (Developmental Disability Administration), Providers Agencies, Service Coordinators, and people who use services, in a collaborative journey to “figure out” how to do business in ways that make it possible for people to control their resources and supports, own their homes, and engage as contributing citizens in their local communities.

Independent and Community Living for People with Disabilities

Community Living

Room 202 Pat Puckett, Ga. Statewide Independent Living Council; Mark Johnson, NAB & Shepherd Center; Merrill Friedman, Amerigroup; Kathy Brill, National Advisory Board on Improving Health Care Services for Seniors and People with Disabilities Disability Advocates are leading the way for Community Living and Olmstead implementation. Based on six principles developed by The National Advisory Board on Improving Health Care Services for Seniors and People with Disabilities (NAB) a panel of advocates will engage discussion on how to successfully incorporate an independent living philosophy into healthcare, long-term services, supports, competitive employment and self advocacy.

Educational Advocacy: Issues And Perspectives Across Cultures and Countries

Diversity

Room 302 Lewis Jackson, Rehab AlZayer, Supattra Andrade, Reem Alrusaiyes and Feng Chen Lin, University of Northern Colorado; Kara Halley, Metro State College; Keith Larsen, The ARC of Mesa County Achieving parity in human rights and societal options across cultures requires a broadened perspective on the goals and processes of advocacy and systems change. A panel from the Gulf Region, Asia, and the United States describe experiences, trials, and potential solutions for realizing educational and transitional opportunities within varied cultural contexts and in situations where minority status complicates the process.

No Excuses: Ending the Practice Of Restraint And Seclusion In Schools Room 301 Leslie Lipson and Jenny Puestow, Georgia Advocacy Office Human Rights

This presentation will tell the compelling story of how thousands of people banded together to end the dangerous practices of restraint and seclusion in Georgia public schools. Participants will learn how advocates and community members worked together to campaign the State Board of Education to prohibit this practice, and will develop a vision for what is possible in their communities.

1:30 – 2:45 p.m. Model Programs that Support Seamless Transition

Salon C John Butterworth, Institute for Community Inclusion, U-Mass Boston; Rich Luecking, TransCen, Inc. Employment

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This session will highlight creative transition programs around the country that show a systematic braiding of funding cross-agency, provide incentives for youth to exit with a job and offer very individualized work experiences.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 1:30 – 3:45 p.m. Real Communities in Georgia: A Panel Discussion

Room 306 Caitlin Childs and Eric Jacobson, Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities Cross Topic

The purpose of the Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities’ Real Communities Initiative is to connect people with developmental disabilities and their organizations to other citizens and their associations and act collectively on community issues. This panel will include representatives from our Real Communities projects sharing their experiences of using community organizing and community building at the grassroots level.

In their own voices successes, challenges of raising children with severe disabilities

Diversity

Room 303 Pavan John Antony, Ruth S Ammon School of Education; Anne Mungai, Curriculum and Instruction Department, Ruth S. Ammon School of Education; Sookyung Shin, Center for Educational Testing and Evaluation, University of Kansas In this panel discussion, presenters have recruited minority parents of children with severe disabilities who immigrated to the US from other countries to share their stories. There will be parents from five different countries who will share about their culture, traditions and the journey with their children who have severe and intensive needs while residing in the US.

2:30 – 3:45 p.m. Successful Post-Secondary Outcomes: One State’s Twist on Workbased Learning

Room 201 B. Lu Nations-Miller, Georgia Department of Education; Sandra MacDonald and Sue Carter, Walton County Schools Employment

This session will offer national, state and local perspectives on an 18 to 21 year old work-based learning program. Participants in this session will learn how to set up a successful work-based learning program and will be given examples of how students achieved better post-school outcomes.

Providing Access To The General Education Curriculum For Students Who Are Nonverbal Room 203 Jessie Moreau, Gwinnett County Public Schools Inclusive Education

This presentation provides examples of adapted curricular materials for students with significant cognitive and communication impairments, including grade-level literature, math, social studies and science activities. Communication systems, technology, and multisensory materials are highlighted to promote active participation for all students.

Life After School: Social, Work, and Educational Lives of Adults with Disabilities

Inclusive Education

Room 204 Charles Dukes, Michael P. Brady, Mary Lou Duffy, Lynn Gil Jackson, Pamela Lamar-Dukes and Julie Sheffler, Florida Atlantic University; Jessica Bucholz, University of West Georgia This symposium examines post-school lives of people with disabilities. Three studies employing different research tactics are presented: Using Social Network Analysis to Understand Relationships; Culture of Transition; Changing Face of Students in College. Following the studies, we synthesize what we know and need to learn about life after secondary school, and how our research tactics influence what we know.

Reading to Engage Children with Autism in Language and Learning Room 205 Monica E. Delano, University of Louisville Inclusive Education

This presentation will introduce families and educators to an intervention for young children called Reading to Engage Children with Autism in Language and Learning (RECALL). The goal of this intervention is to provide naturalistic strategies for adults and peers to facilitate communication and emergent literacy skills in the context of shared reading.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 2:30 – 3:45 p.m. continued Paraprofessionals In Inclusive Settings: A Guide To Success

Room 206 Kira M. Austin, Virginia Department of Education Training and Technical Assistance Center Inclusive Education

Paraeducators are increasingly working with students with disabilities in our schools. This session will provide insight into working with and supporting paraprofessionals in inclusive settings. Relevant research surrounding the employing and training of paraprofessionals will be discussed in light of NCLB and IDEA. This session will provide practical tips to improve interactions and collaborations with paraprofessionals within inclusive classrooms.

Incorporating Technology into Daily Classroom Routines

Room 207 Blanche Jackson, Tennessee State University; Kia Smith, Lee County Schools Inclusive Education

This presentation will explore the application of 21st century technology to the design of instructional materials, resources, and classroom activities. The presentation will include a demonstration on how classroom teachers can incorporate iPods and Apps, iPads, PowerPoint, YouTube, teacher tube, Smart Pens, Smart Notebook, and other technology into daily classroom routines for students with severe disabilities.

Principal Leadership: A Critical Component in Inclusive Schools

Room 209 Robin Brewer, University of Northern Colorado; Diane Carroll, Metropolitan State College of Denver Inclusive Education

This session highlights the process of assisting principals in the development of inclusive “model schools” for providing services to students with significant support needs. By using Quality Indicators for Students with Significant Support Needs we will discuss how school teams were guided and how they transformed their schools into inclusive settings. Participants will receive a copy of the quality indicators.

Quality Indicators of Inclusive Education

Inclusive Education

Room 210 Cheryl M. Jorgensen, University of New Hampshire; Carol Quirk, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education; Diane Lea Ryndak, University of Florida; Jacki L. Anderson, University of Wisconsin; Barbara McKenzie, Ohio TASH This session will present several Quality Indicator tools (developed by TASH Leaders)that describe in clear, measurable terms what inclusive education looks like at the student, classroom, team, building, district, and state levels. Participants will learn how the tools can be used to assess the current state of inclusive education, to plan a comprehensive improvement plan, and to monitor progress.

“Hey, I’m Going to College” Post-Secondary Higher Education for Students with Disabilities / Design Media Projects to Illustrate Student Experiences in PSE Inclusive Education

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Room 211 Domenico Cavaiuolo, East Stroudsburg University; Martha Mock, University of Rochester; Kristen Love, University of Rochester

The presentation will describe of the Career Independent Living and Learning Studies (CILLS) program at East Stroudsburg University, a college experience program for individuals with intellectual disabilities. The presentation will discuss how the program was conceptualized, designed and established. The program’s goals and outcome expectations and student accomplishments from the first cohort will be presented. / Technology can play a major role with increasing the participation of students with intellectual disabilities in reflecting on the programs that serve them. Students participated in a seven-week media project to document their college experience and identify specific activities they found meaningful while at college. This session will explore the successes and challenges of allowing student input to drive programming.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 2:30 – 3:45 p.m. continued Teaching Choice Making in Young Children as a Foundation for SelfDetermination Inclusive Education

Room 212 Vera Lynne Stroup-Rentier and Jean Ann Summers, Beach Center on Disability, University of Kansas

This presentation focuses on the rationale for a systematic approach to teach choice-making to young children with severe disabilities, using a family-practitioner partnership to develop consistent teaching strategies at home and in preschool settings. We will introduce a model illustrating this systematic approach and use “real life” examples to demonstrate how it works.

Now, What Does The ‘P’ Stand For? New Tools For Your Toolbox Cross Topic

Room 213 Jason Cavin, Daniel Crimmins and Stacey Ramirez, Center for Leadership in Disability, Georgia State University

With the various acronyms used in advocacy and services in support of individuals with disabilities, it is easy to understand why confusion exists regarding what is “PC” and person-centered. This workshop will serve to alleviate some of the confusion that deters collaboration and the coordination of services by further defining the role of positive-behavior supports, person-centered planning and people-first language.

Your Dependent With Special Needs-Making Their Future More Secure Room 214 Jodi L. McMahon and Pamela J. Hoppe, MetLife Center for Special Needs Planning Cross Topic

Families with dependents who have special needs, no matter what the age or disability, face many serious questions about how to best prepare for their future well-being. This workshop addresses such critical issues as protecting government benefit eligibility for Supplemental Security Income, creating Special Needs Trusts and the importance of a will.

Development of a State TASH Chapter: A Mentorship Model Room 304 April Regester, University of Missouri; Shirley Rodriguez, Cal-TASH Board Cross Topic

This presentation will outline the steps taken to re-establish a TASH chapter in Missouri. With the support of an existing TASH chapter (Cal-TASH), steps have been taken to rejuvenate and establish the chapter in Missouri. Steps outlined will include connecting with established chapter mentors, gathering interested stakeholders, appointing and electing officers for chapter, and the development of specific action plans.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 2:30 – 3:45 p.m. continued Is Voting in Your Life Important? If so, why? / Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness Room 307 Nancy Ward, Tia Nelis and Betty Williams, Project Vote / Ellen Perry, Advocacy in Action, LLC. Cross Topic

How to build strong partnerships between members of your community. Learn how to use the Project Vote Voter Education Toolkit and visit the Go Voter website at www.govoter.org. / Every person in this country has rights. I have been self-advocating for over 30 years. I’ve learned how to access my rights and how to teach this to others so they can make their own dreams come true. This session will provide a civics lesson in how laws and policy are made to help selfadvocates understand how our system works.

Directing My Own Supports: Learning To Be A Good Employer Room 202 Brian Shofner, Hope Dittmeier and Jacob Smith, Realizations Community Living

Best practice dictates that the person being supported play a major role in directing their supports. A new role for most service users - one not for the faint hearted! This presentation will share the story of one man who has learned how to get what he needs from paid supporters while at the same time being a good employer.

Lessons From Pennhurst: Creating A National Disability Museum And Site Of Conscience Room 301 James W. Conroy, Center for Outcome Analysis; Jean M. Searle and Ellen S. Tierney, PennTASH Human Rights

America has no museum, no site of conscience, for remembering how we’ve treated people with significant disabilities. Pennhurst, shut down in 1987, seems an ideal location but is at risk of demolition. Our unconscionable practice of institutionalizing people must be remembered to avoid repeating it! Learn about Pennhurst’s legacy, and what it’s like to live in an institution - firsthand.

Collaboration With Culturally And Linguistically Diverse Families Of Children With Significant Disabilities / Tapping into the Rich Repositories of Families’ Funds of Knowledge Diversity

Room 302 Bridgette Johnson, Maria Denney and Michelle Harris, University of Florida

The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate facilitators and barriers to collaboration with culturally and linguistically diverse families of children with significant disabilities. Two types of cultures will be explored: (a) the culture of diverse families, and (b) the culture of professionals. Family and professional culture as barriers to collaboration are examined. Strategies for families and professionals are discussed. / Family participation within naturally occurring routines provides powerfully motivating learning opportunities for young children. It is essential that early childhood educators learn about the diversity of families’ backgrounds, funds of knowledge, and daily routines when designing meaningful learning opportunities for young children. Families’ funds of knowledge are valuable resources for early childhood educators to incorporate into their programs and practices.

3:00 – 4:30 p.m. Employers as Partners Toward Better Futures for Young People Salon C Rich Luecking, TransCen, Inc.; Michael Callahan, Marc Gold and Associates Employment

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The perspective of employers is the focal point of this hour-long conversation with leading employers from Georgia. Using the U.S. Department of Labor’s newly-released documentaries showcasing the employment histories of several young people with significant disabilities, this session will engage employers in identifying key considerations when evaluating a potential employee. Educators, young people with disabilities, their families, and staff helping people find jobs will come away with insight on how to develop value-added relationships with employers. Employers will be introduced to important new people and processes that can meet important business needs and enhance the culture of their company in positive and significant ways.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 4 – 5 p.m. Supported Employment for Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Preliminary Data Room 201 Paul Wehman and Valerie Brooke, Rehabilitation Research and Training Center, Virginia Commonwealth University Employment

Presenters will share a study that collected data on individuals with ASD and their competitive employment experiences. Of the 23 individuals in the study, 17 obtained competitive employment, with a total of 19 positions. The successful results were achieved through the use of a supported employment using high level of positive behavioral supports and compensatory training strategies for skill acquisition.

Providing Access to the Core Curriculum for Individuals with Complex/Multiple Disabilities

Inclusive Education

Room 203 Kathy Gee, Cal State University at Sacramento; Megan Gross, Davis Joint Unified School District; Mara Gonzalez, Twin Rivers School District This presentation will provide teachers, families, and related service providers with information and examples of how children and youth with complex and multiple disabilities can access core knowledge within the general education core curriculum. Practical examples of cognitive scaffolding, adaptations, technology, and modifications will be provided. In addition the relationships between curriculum and functional skills will be discussed.

Community Presence for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities Room 204 Craig Miner, Southern Illinois University Inclusive Education

Limited opportunities for integrated adult lifestyles after leaving high school often results in the need for family members to provide the only support for leisure activities in the community. This session describes a partnership between college students and young adults with developmental disabilities to increase community presence through participation in integrated recreation and leisure activities on the university campus.

Laying Strong Foundations: Helping Caregivers Nurture Emotional Development Room 205 Nicole Megan Edwards, Georgia State University Inclusive Education

We will discuss emotional development in children and ways providers can empower families of preschoolers with behavior concerns. Implications from the literature and the presenter’s study with Head Start mothers will be discussed, including the need for tailored parenting supports and awareness of how we all directly or indirectly contribute to children’s emotional development and long-term success in inclusive settings.

The Teacher’s Toolbox: Quick and Easy Curriculum Adaptations Room 206 Lissa J. Keegan, Jennifer Kurth and Vanessa diCarlo, Northern Arizona University Inclusive Education

This presentation is intended for general and special educators. We will be sharing the “Teacher’s Toolbox”, a kit of tools that can be used by teachers. This will be a demonstration presentation of how to use simple materials to adapt general education curriculum materials and lessons for students with low-incidence disabilities.

The Top Strategies for Supporting Students with Autism in the Inclusive Classroom Room 207 Christi Kasa, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs; Julie Causton-Theoharis, Syracuse University Inclusive Education

Students with autism are having great success in the inclusive classroom! This session will engage the audience in ten of the most successful strategies for including students with autism. During this interactive session participants will learn about presuming competence, rethinking behavior, understanding attention, engaging students in communication, and supporting students to actively engage in the general education curriculum.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 4 – 5 p.m. continued My Son With Autism - Living The American Dream Room 209 Roxana Hartmann, Montgomery County Schools

Inclusive Education

This presentation is about one child who at age 3 was diagnosed with severe autism. By age 22 Mark Hartmann, totally non-verbal, finished High School with an Academic Diploma. Mark’s parents describe his journey with an emphasis on inclusion and success. You will learn to have a vision and make plans on how to carry out your vision.

Self-Advocacy: Promoting Progress In The General Curriculum For Students With Intellectual Disabilities Inclusive Education

Room 210 Amy L. Schelling, Grand Valley State University

Solutions, not excuses… The presentation describes a study evaluating the effectiveness of self-advocacy strategy instruction as a means of promoting progress in the general curriculum for secondary students with an intellectual disability. The study data showed that students learned a self-advocacy strategy and were able to demonstrate use of the strategy across settings, including the general education classroom setting.

Think College: Statewide Systems Change through Strategic Planning

Inclusive Education

Room 211 Cate Weir, Institute for Community Inclusion, UMass Boston; Debra Hart, Institute for Community Inclusion, UMass Boston This session will share outcomes of statewide planning grants awarded to eight states designed to increase the participation of students with intellectual disabilities in inclusive postsecondary education. The session will describe the strategies and approaches grantees used to engage in strategic planning, outline stakeholders engaged in the work and share the outcomes achieved.

Getting Published in Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities

Inclusive Education

Room 212 Martin Agran, University of Wyoming; Fred Spooner, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Carolyn Hughes, Vanderbilt University; Fredda Brown, Queens College, City University of New York This is an informal presentation about preparing manuscripts for publication consideration for RPSD. Editors of the journal will give practical recommendations on how to get published in RPSD and what they look for when they review manuscripts. This presentation is aimed at graduate students, new faculty, and anyone else interested in getting published in RPSD or other professional journals.

Planning for Full Participation in General Education Instruction in the General Education Classroom Inclusive Education

Room 213 Cheryl M. Jorgensen, University of New Hampshire; Carol Quirk, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education

Too often students with intensive support needs who are in general education classrooms are sitting on the sidelines or pursuing very different academic goals, being taught primarily by a paraprofessional. This session will share two planning processes that can be used by students’ educational teams to plan for students’ full membership and participation in instruction within the general education classroom.

Growing Up Inclusively

Room 214 Susie Lund, University of Northern Iowa; Linda Biermann and Michael Biermann, Tripoli, Iowa Cross Topic

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This presentation will chronicle the personal and educational experiences of Michael, a 13-year-old student with Down syndrome in a small farming community in Iowa. Linda will share the story of Michael’s early life experiences that lead her to understand Michael’s desire to choose his own path. Michael will share what leading an inclusive life has meant to him.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


GCDD works to bring about social and policy changes that promote opportunities in Georgia for persons with developmental disabilities and their families to live, learn, work, play and worship as integral members of their communities. www.gcdd.org

Get Social with GCDD: Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities 2 Peachtree Street, Suite 26-246 Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Main: 404.657.2126 Toll Free: 888.275.4233 TDD: 404.657.2133

Are You Ready T To... o

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To get started, find a service provider near you by contacting the Ticket to Work Help Line at 1-866-968-7842 or 1-866-833-2967 (TTY/TDD) or by visiting our website, www.socialsecurity.gov/work.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 4 – 5 p.m. continued Rising to the Occasion: Maximizing our Advocacy Effectiveness in Uncertain Political Times Room 303 Serena Lowe, Aneres Strategies, LLC Cross Topic

Participants will learn about TASH’s legislative agenda and key strategies for optimizing one’s potential as an effective advocate at state, local and federal levels of government. Participants will learn how to tailor complex public policy priorities into clear, digestible messages, as well as key strategies for successfully promoting high-impact policy reforms across government and communities.

Children’s Freedom Initiative – Bringing Children Home

Room 304 Dottie Adams, Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities; Katie Chandler, Georgia Advocacy Office Cross Topic

The Children’s Freedom Initiative (CFI) is a collaborative effort to ensure that children who live in facilities are given the chance to live with permanent, loving families.

Including Youth As Leaders

Room 306 Jennifer Thomas and Cashimawo Akpiri, National Kids As Self-Advocates/Family Voices Cross Topic

Including Youth As Leaders is a how-to presentation designed by youth. It demonstrates ways to develop opportunities for youth leadership. Young people who are experts on the topic share practical, clear and effective strategies that can be used to acquire youth wisdom in concrete and meaningful ways.

Creating User-Friendly Materials With Self Advocates: Partnerships And Processes

Room 307 Aaron Johannes and Susan Stanfield, Spectrum Society and Spectrum Press; Jule Hopkins, Community Living B.C. Cross Topic

People with disabilities, professionals and researchers, contributed ideas about self-determination and inclusion made into plain language booklets on Rights and Responsibilities, Support Networks and Safeguards and Vulnerabilities which have been “owned” by people with disabilities who then share with and educate peers. We will introduce the booklets, talk about the importance of partnerships, and the processes used to involve people.

Creating Future Assets for Economic Independence

Salon B Joe Wykowski, Community Vision; Rebecca Miller; Emily Fitz; Chris Fernandez Community Living

The Future Assets for Independence Program provides opportunities to create Individual Development Accounts. (IDA’s) are “matched savings” programs whereby individuals establish a plan for saving toward goals of: home ownership and accessibility modifications; small business start-up costs; education that can increase meaningful employment opportunities. Individuals who have benefited from Individual Development Accounts will share their success stories

In a Body with a Mind of its own: An Exploration of Disability, Normalcy, & Transformation Room 202 Norman Kunc, Broadreach Training and Resources Community Living

Norman Kunc gives an overview of his soon-to-be released book. The goal of this workshop is simple: to make the field of Disability Studies accessible. Concepts like the “social construction of disability,” “professional power/knowledge,” and “discourse” provide an analysis of how people with disabilities become disempowered. Unfortunately, these ideas are usually explained in dense academic language. Using stories, metaphors, and humor, Norman explains these ideas in unambiguous language.

Self-Advocacy in a New Nation: A Place at the Table in Kosovo

Room 301 Donna Bouclier, Arc of Philadelphia People with disabilities in Kosovo have earned a respected place in the emerging government. How did this happen? Human Rights What are the implications for the future implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities?

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TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 4 – 6:15 p.m. Racism or Not; Here We Come! Disability-Related Health Disparities and Race/Ethnicity: Double Jeopardy Diversity

Room 302 Leandris Liburd, Marshalyn Yeargin-Allsopp and Vincent Campbell, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Lisa Sinclair, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities; Carol Quirk, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education and TASH Board; Ralph Edwards, Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services and TASH Board Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on disparities experienced by people of color provide an evocative tableau of the challenges and opportunities to address excess rates of morbidity and mortality. Data and analysis from the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC will be presented along with Health People 2020 Objectives. Presented in town hall format.

5:15 – 6:15 p.m. The Excelling Organization: Affirming Individual Needs And Welcoming Change In Uncertain Times Employment

Room 201 Brian Berry, Holy Family University; Susan Schonfeld, Community Integrated Services

Community Integrated Services (CIS) is an employment-only program that has been serving persons with significant disabilities for over 20 years. Recent economic and funding factors have challenged many conventional employment service practices. This presentation will focus on how CIS has maintained its central mission of individualized services and used the changing external environment to improve and strengthen organizational performance.

Adapted Shared Storybook Reading: Its Application for Children on the Autism Spectrum Room 203 Andrea Golloher, University of California at Berkley and San Francisco State University Inclusive Education

Considering the limited amount of time in the school day, teachers must prioritize subject matter. For children with autism spectrum disorders, this can mean communication targets of the IEP are emphasized over reading instruction. This study explores a method of addressing joint visual attention while also addressing emergent reading skills using the template from Browder et al. (2008).

Moving Toward Literacy: Supporting Literacy Development for Students with Complex Support Needs Inclusive Education

Room 204 Lynn Murphy and Penni Telleck, Lincoln Intermediate Unit

Moving Toward literacy is a method that transforms typical reading materials into a shared language experience for all readers and embeds opportunities for movement and exploration which lead to increased literacy skills and independence. This presentation will highlight two case studies, one at the elementary level and one at the high school level using this method for building student literacy.

Seeing Children as Science Learners: Ramps and Pathways Promote Learning and Development Inclusive Education

Room 205 Dr. Shelly Counsell, Regents’ Center for Early Developmental Education, University of Northern Iowa; Melissa Sander, AEA 267 - Wapsie Valley Schools Ramps & Pathways, an innovative early physical science curriculum encourages children to build ramp structures and release marbles, observing what happens. Teachers’ shared testimonials working with young children with IEPs (Pre-k through 2nd grade) within inclusive classroom settings are highlighted. Children with severe cognitive or language impairment, autism, and Down syndrome using R & P will be discussed.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 5:15 – 6:15 p.m. continued Data-based Decisions: Training Teachers of Students with Significant Disabilities Room 206 Pamela J. Mims, Tennessee State University; Bree Jimenez, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Inclusive Education

This presentation describes results of a study investigating the effects of a teacher training on data-based decisions. Specifically, an online training was provided to 31 teachers, from 5 states, of students who participated in the Alternate Assessment for the 1%. Results showed a marked improvement in pre to posttest scores.

Understanding Alternate Assessment Misassignment and How To Prevent It Room 207 Hyun-Jeong Cho, Center for Educational Testing and Evaluation, University of Kansas Inclusive Education

Correctly identifying students eligible for alternate assessment is important since curriculum, instruction, and assessment are closely related. Although there are eligibility guidelines for alternate assessment assignment, students are sometimes misassigned. The current study examines the reasons for such misassignments and offers solutions to assure academically challenging education for SWD.

Learning Content Aligned to the Standards In An Inclusive Classroom

Room 209 Sharon L. Leonard, Jeannine H. Brinkley and Debbie Brown, Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network Inclusive Education

What does it mean to learn grade level content aligned to the standards for students with complex support needs? This session will provide an overview of a state wide project that focuses on including students through membership, participation and learning.

Meeting Our Standards Together: Teachers Work Together So Students Can Learn Together Room 210 Penelope Singleton, Cherokee County Schools Inclusive Education

An introduction to a program at Cherokee High School that facilitates the collaboration between special education and general education teachers as they help students with significant cognitive disabilities make progress toward the Georgia Performance Standards in the general education classroom with their peers.

Inclusive Postsecondary Education: Effective Practices that Support Access to College and Employment Inclusive Education

Room 211 Debra Hart and Cate Weir, Institute for Community Inclusion, UMass Boston

An overview of inclusive postsecondary education options that lead to integrated paid employment will be provided. A more detailed discussion of effective practices that support access to inclusive college options and paid employment will be highlighted. This session also includes a detailed description of the Individual Support Model.

How Teachers Can Promote Change & Refocus Efforts to Promote Inclusive Education

Inclusive Education

Room 306 Jacki L. Anderson, University of Wisconsin; Michael L. Remus, Deer Valley Unified School Disctrict; Cindy Sawchuck, Lisa Maltezos, Jamie Losinski, Jenny Paloumpis, Michelle Dunnam, A panel of administrators & teachers (general & special education) representing elementary, middle and high school will share experiences and provide practical suggestions to address the Question “What Can I do to Change My School/ Program to Foster Truly Inclusive Practices?” Discussion will follow.

Ensuring Communication for True Participation: TAALC: Teaching Age-Appropriate Academic Learning Via Communication Cross Topic

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Room 212 Jane Kleinert and Jacqui Kearns, University of Kentucky

Students with Complex Communication Needs (CCN) are often assumed to lack the ability to participate in the general curriculum or regular classrooms. This session will describe a highly effective, evidenced-based statewide

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 5:15 – 6:15 p.m. continued initiative which trains and coaches school teams via distance technology to develop and integrate communication systems for such students into the academic content across the school day.

Audio Description: The Visual Made Verbal Room 213 Joel Snyder, Audio Description Associates, LLC Cross Topic

Audio Description uses words that are succinct and vivid to convey the visual image that is not accessible to a significant segment of the population (over 25 million Americans are blind or have trouble seeing even with correction) and not fully realized by the rest of us--the rest of us, sighted folks who see but who may not observe.

Supporting Military Families Of Youth With Developmental Disabilities Room 214 Peg Kinsell, Shelli Marquette and Susan Dukavas, Statewide Parent Advocacy Network Cross Topic

Military families across the country face many challenges. Deployments, multiple moves, coupled with raising a child with a disability can be a daunting task. We will examine the barriers to and fractured services/supports available to military families and ways community, statewide, advocacy and faith-based organizations can build a partnership with them to enhance needed family supports.

All Means ALL: Advocacy Leadership Network Of Hamilton County, Ohio Room 304 Linda Kunick, Diana Mairose and Robert Shuema, Advocacy Leadership Network Cross Topic

Cross Topic

This presentation will be given by three founding members of the Advocacy Leadership Network based in Cincinnati, Ohio. Advocates from various provider agencies have joined together for the past four years to enact policy change around employment, transportation, and language. In telling our stories, others will be encouraged to network and build relationships to bring about change in their communities!

Learning To Stand Still: What Hostage Negotiators Can Teach Us About Supporting People With Difficult Behavior Room 307 Emma Van der Klift, Broadreach Training and Resources

This session explores the idea that individuals may not have inherent “behavior problems,” but may actually be trying to solve problems in unsuccessful ways. Emma outlines the unique perspective and skills that hostage negotiators use to establish trust, build rapport, and foster collaboration in crisis situations. Administrators, teachers, and support workers can use this same perspective and skill-set to create safe, collaborative environments. No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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SESSION LISTING

Thursday, December 1, 2011 5:15 – 6:15 p.m. continued Profiling of the Sexual Abuse of Students with Disabilities in American Schools Room 301 Mary Lou Bensy, Hofstra University; Stephen J. Caldas, Manhattanville College Human Rights

Workshop will present the results from a nation-wide, web-survey that profiles the prevalence of sexual abuse of children with disabilities in American educational setting.

Cross-Cultural Collaborating In China Around Children With Disabilities Room 303 Christine A. Macfarlane, Pacific University Human Rights

A collaborative, cross-cultural project including special education, occupational therapy, and physical therapy provided support and training to medical personnel at a pediatric rehabilitation hospital and staff at an orphanage serving children with disabilities in China. Participants will learn about current services for children with disabilities in China, the trainings, the collaborative process, and implications for future work and research.

Visioning a Life in the Community

Salon B Lyle Romer and Mary Romer, Total Living Concept Community Living

TLC has provided support to people with developmental disabilities for 30 years. A central principle guiding the work at TLC is the ever-expanding and changing idea of a home of one’s own. TLC will share the lessons they’re learned over the years in helping people realize their visions of home and a life in their chosen communities.

A Dynamic Process For Generating The Wisdom Of A Group Of People

Community Living

Room 202 Joseph Donofrio and Dennis Toomey, Community Housing Options: Integrated Community, Employment and Social Services Council Process is an efficient method for tapping into the collective wisdom of any group from 4-24. If you are seeking a direct honest response to any question or request, to assist or support individuals with disabilities, family members or staff this process will give you a genuine 360-degree assessment of any situation.

THANK YOU to the conference committee, Atlanta host committee, national agenda committees, volunteers, reviewers, planning teams, and many more who contributed to making the 2011 TASH conference a success!

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TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


AT-A-GLANCE

Friday, December 2, 2011 7 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Conference Registration, Pre-Function South

Conference attendees can stop by the registration booth at any time throughout the day to pick up their conference materials and address questions. 7:30 – 8:30 a.m.

TASH Membership and Business Meeting, Room TBD

TASH members are encouraged to attend this meeting and learn more about current and future plans for TASH. Members of the Board of Directors and staff will be available to answer questions. Breakfast refreshments will be served. 7:30 – 8:30 a.m.

Opens at 8 a.m.

Pennsylvania TASH Chapter Meeting, Room 213

Join fellow PennTASHers at our annual conference meeting. We’re looking for your input and ideas for Pennsylvania! Breakfast will not be provided, but feel to bring coffee and food along with you.

Conference Hospitality Room, Room 338

The TASH Conference is jam-packed, exciting and very, very high energy. When you need a breather, a snack or a spot to check out what is happening AWAY from it all, step inside the Hospitality Room where the Local Host Committee has worked very hard to create a space for reflection, quiet conversation and peaceful moments. The Hospitality Room also includes our Event Wall which lists opportunities for meet-ups. So if you crave culture, shopping, sight-seeing or early morning yoga, look here first. Welcome to Atlanta, we’re glad you are here! The Conference Hospitality Room will be open throughout the TASH Conference. To get more specific information about Hospitality Room hours, stop by Room 338 or check with the registration desk.

8 a.m. – 2 p.m.

8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Opens at 8:30 a.m.

8:30 – 10:45 a.m. 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

12:30 – 1:30 p.m. 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.

1:30 – 5 p.m. 5 – 6 p.m.

Conference Exhibit Hall, Salon E

The 2011 Conference Exhibit Hall features organizations and businesses from across the country. This year’s exhibit hall also includes the Micro-Enterprise Marketplace where entrepreneurs with disabilities will sell their products and services. Be sure to stop by and check the exhibit hall out!

StoryCorps at the TASH Conference, Room TBD

Selected interviewees will complete interviews at designated times throughout the day. Check with the registration desk for more information.

Community Living Open Space Gathering, Salon A

At the Open Space Gathering, you can design exactly the learning, sharing, revitalizing experience you need at the TASH Conference. So, bring your gifts, questions, and experiences in building inclusive community and join us! Events in the Community Living Open Space Gathering will continue throughout the conference. All conference attendees are welcome.

Morning Concurrent and Panel Sessions

See Conference Session Schedule for room assignments and session information.

General Session with Keynote Speakers Rob Horner and Gerald Durley, Grand Ballroom East

Keynote Speakers Rob Horner and Gerald Durley have used innovation and creativity to address the most challenging issues people with disabilities face today. Join us as they share their wisdom and experience.

Lunch Lunch-n-Learn, Meeting locations will be announced in the Hospitality Room

Georgia-based agencies will escort conference attendees to off-site restaurants to discuss pre-determined issues impacting the disability field. To learn more and/or sign up, visit the hospitality room where you can see what topics will be discussed.

Afternoon Concurrent and Panel Sessions

See Conference Session Schedule for room assignments and session information.

KY-TASH Meeting, Room 201

All Kentuckians are invited to join us as we share what the Kentucky chapter has been doing and our exciting 2012 goals. We want to hear your ideas for carrying out these goals and ways for our members to be involved.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. Employment First: Establishing Policy, Promoting Practice, Achieving Outcomes

Room 201 Wendy Parent, Center on Developmental Disabilities, Kansas University; Rocky Nichols, Disability Rights Center Employment

This interactive session will describe the implementation of Employment First in one state aimed at expanding capacity and promoting effective and replicable models of service delivery and systems change strategies targeted to improve employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. Challenges, changes, resources, costs, and successes experienced by agencies, providers, employment support personnel, families, and individuals will be shared.

Addressing Labor Market Needs And Building Careers For People With Disabilities/ Findings from the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Vocational Rehabilitation Employment

Salon C Robert B. Nicholas and Kathy Krepcio, John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, Rutgers University / Martha Klemm and Kelly Haines, Institute for Community Inclusion, University of Massachusetts

Many of the nation’s leading employers have recognized the “business case” for hiring people with disabilities including people with significant disabilities. This session will be a presentation on a national study of innovative partnerships between workforce and disability service organizations that support employers to recruit and retain employees with disabilities. / The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Vocational Rehabilitation (VR-RRTC) is a national center housed at the Institute for Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The VR-RRTC is a national hub for policy and operations data pertaining to employment services for people with disabilities. This presentation provides an overview of the center and reports results of research activities.

Is It Really Inclusion? Really? Really?

Room 203 Barbara McKenzie, Ohio TASH, Cheryl Jorgensen, University of New Hampshire Inclusive Education

Over the years the term “inclusion” has been misunderstood and misappropriated by people who have used it to describe educational practices that are not inclusive. We welcome seasoned activists and newcomers to join us as we remind one another of the original vision and generate possible action steps that might be taken to broadly disseminate the real meaning of inclusion.

Rewards: Hot Commodity or Meaningful Motivator? Room 204 Robin M. Smith, SUNY New Paltz Inclusive Education

This session will discuss meaningful motivation and contexts as alternatives to rewards to support self-determination and quality of life issues for students with disabilities in all settings.

Stories from the Trenches: Characteristics of Effective and Inclusive General Education Teachers Inclusive Education

Room 205 Amy Hanreddy, California State University

Participants will explore qualities that help general education teachers to be effective in inclusive classrooms and schools. The results of a case study exploring the inclusive identity and practices of one teacher will be discussed, and compared with current research related to evidence-based practices and teacher perceptions.

Supporting the Social Acceptance of Students with Disabilities in General Education Classrooms Inclusive Education

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Room 206 Rebecca L. Canges, Metropolitan State College of Denver

This study identified current strategies used to support the social acceptance of students with disabilities in inclusive middle school classrooms. Classroom observations and student interviews revealed discrepancies between the teacher’s knowledge of strategies and their implementation of the strategies to support their student’s social acceptance from their typical peers. The strategies, discrepancies, and student’s opinions will be discussed.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


Southeast TACE

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. continued Middle School Inclusive Education In Action: It Works! Teachers Beliefs, Parents, Students Room 207

Inclusive Education

Judy A. DeLeeuw, East Lyme Middle School and CCSU; Dr. Eileen Luddy, Critical Friend; Jennifer Lewis, East Lyme Middle School Inclusive practices at a middle school have afforded many opportunities for the students with disabilities, typical peers, and their parents to have authentic learning and social interactions. Examples of inclusive experiences will be shared during the presentation. Student’s lives have changed in many positive ways both academically and socially. Members of the community are realizing many benefits of inclusive practices.

One Urban District’s Journey toward Inclusive Schools: Challenges and Lessons Learned Room 209 Sunyoung Ahn and Marny Helfrich, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education Inclusive Education

In this session, presenters will present one urban school district’s transformation process to build inclusive school communities. The district’s historical background, the scope of the project implementation, participants, and the strategies and processes used will be introduced.

Cooking Up A Creative Transition: Inclusive Post-School Planning

Room 210 Danielle Cowley, Syracuse University; Emily Jahn and Maribeth Jahn, Latham community Inclusive Education

Twenty years after the IDEA was reauthorized to address poor post-school outcomes for students with disabilities, transition planning remains less than ideal. Outcomes oftentimes fall short and student-driven processes are rarely realized. This session will highlight one student’s journey as she and her family engage in student-centered transition planning, and outline strategies for an inclusive, individualized transition.

Think College New York! and TPSID

Room 211 Martha Mock and Kristen Love, University of Rochester Inclusive Education

The session is an overview of work related to a statewide mini-grant and the federally funded TPSID project in New York State to increase inclusive postsecondary options for students with intellectual disabilities. Emphasis will be on state-wide planning activities, policy work, and expansion efforts for four New York colleges.

Putting Out The Fire: Treatment Strategies For Challenging Behaviors Room 212 Jon Freer and Jon Thompson, Behavior Wizards Cross Topic

Once we have appropriately identified the causes and antecedents to a challenging behavior we need to quench the fire before it gets out of hand. In order to do this consistently we need to incorporate a multi-modal approach to intervention. This approach will include; verbal and non-verbal techniques, positive reinforcement, setting limits, daily structure and taking care of ourselves.

Important Voices: Listening Life Stories of Mothers of Facilitated Communication Users Room 213 Fernanda Orsati and Christy Ashby, Syracuse University Cross Topic

Mothers’ stories of individuals that type to communicate are essential to understanding the larger contexts to improve support and opportunities. Stories have to be heard to learn inclusion in the past 30 years and lessons for years to come. No more excuses for not including.

Evaluating Family Support: Did it make a difference?

Room 214 Susan Yuan, University of Vermont; Dottie Adams and Pat Nobbie, Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities Cross Topic

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Grants for Family Support and other projects almost always require an evaluation plan. This interactive presentation

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. continued will attempt to demystify the process of evaluation. We will discuss best practice for designing and carrying out participatory program evaluation that involves the people being served as well as those providing the support.

Including Assistive Technology in Transition Planning from Congregate Settings to the Community Cross Topic

Room 304 Julie Kegley, Naomi Walker and Leyna Crenshaw, Georgia Advocacy Office

Advocating for individuals who do not use words to communicate to move into community settings poses challenges. Appropriate assistive technology needs to be obtained allowing individuals to effectively communicate their wishes for transitioning from an institutional setting to the community. This presentation explores advocacy strategies to ensure that assistive technology is purchased for the individual and discusses successful transition stories.

Moving Beyond Tokenism: Self-advocates serving on boards and policy-making bodies Room 306 Mark Friedman, Bill Krebs and Lynette Savoy, Blue Fire Consulting, LLC Cross Topic

Self-advocates will present their project to enhance the ability of disability boards and policy-making bodies to fully include self-advocates as active and contributing members of their boards.

Transitioning Upstream: One Family’s Experience of Consumer-Directed & Agency Supports

Cross Topic

Room 307 Meira L. Orentlicher, Touro College; Cheryl Dougan, PA DPW Stakeholders Planning Team; Jackie Culbertson, Acumen Fiscal Agent

This interactive presentation will explore strategies for providing creative and individualized agency supports to persons with disabilities and their families who are receiving consumer-directed services. The guiding example for the discussion will be one family’s experience of supporting their son’s desired life in his own home. The story will emphasize the pros and cons of self-directed services vs. agency supports.

Gaining Traction, Taking Action: When A Culture Shift Makes Sense (Part One) Salon B Peter Leidy, Options in Community Living; Beth Gallagher, Life Works Community Living

“The bureaucracy doesn’t get it!” “More funding cuts!” Sound familiar? To make positive change in the system, let’s start with small changes in ourselves and our workplace culture. During this interactive 2-part session we’ll explore ways to embrace curiosity, collaboration, creativity – and fun – in our work, and see how this can lead to better lives for people supported.

Out Of The Day Program And Into Community

Room 202 Susan Stanfield and Aaron Johannes, Spectrum Society for Community Living Community Living

One agency’s experience of closing a group day program and replacing it with community-based options. We will address some of the fears faced by staff and families – questions about safety, monitoring, and sustainability - and describe how we engaged stakeholders in making the successful transition from a facility to community-based day service model.

Why Can’t New Jersey Close Institutions? The Free Frankie Campaign and Beyond

Human Rights

Room 301 Kathy Wigfield and Pat Amos, Family Alliance to Stop Abuse and Neglect; Peg Kinsell, Statewide Parent Advocacy Network; Liz Shea, ARC of New Jersey; Barbara Coppens, NJ Self-Advocate; Josephine Messina, NJ Self-Advocate New Jersey has not closed an institution since 1998. The Governor’s FY 2012 budget modestly proposes closing Vineland Developmental Center, one of seven remaining institutions in the state. This panel will discuss the advocacy initiative that developed to address the backlash against institutional closure, as exemplified by the unresolved fate of one “temporary” 17-year resident.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 8:30 – 10:45 a.m. Why Parents with Diverse Cultural Background Might Pose More Challenges For Professionals? / A comparison of special education reform in South Korea and Japan / Open Doors for Multicultural Families: Year two Diversity

Room 302 Sungho Park, California State University, Los Angeles; Young-Gyoung Kim, Clarion University; Yong-Jae Lim, University of Tsukuba; Ha-Kyung Kim, Gyerim Middle School; Sung-Wha Do Woo-Suk, University; Hyun-Suk Ju, Gyung-Ju Rehabilitation Center; Susie Schaefer, Open Doors for Multicultural Families; Ginger Kwan, Open Doors for Multicultural Families; Khadijah Toms, Open Doors for Multicultural Families; Pavan Anthony, Adelphi University In this presentation, the audience will learn about how to provide suggestions and recommendations to Korean American parents with students with severe disabilities. Also, the audience will have an opportunity to learn about factors that they need to consider when they work with students with severe disabilities and their parents who have different cultural values. / Continuous efforts to improve the quality of education have been made across all continents, and researchers typically call this education reform. This session will focus on special education reform in Japan and South Korea. Presenters will compare both countries’ special education reform efforts regarding inclusion, legislation, the special education system, special education curriculum, and administrative supports. / Now in its second year of operation Open Doors for Multicultural Families has grown and continued to learn about inclusion and systems change. We have learned that the use of multicultural family panels can be an effective tool for increasing cultural competency in the system and positive results for families can come from nontraditional and unexpected partners.

9:45 – 10:45 a.m. We Are What We Do / Are the Stars Aligning for Real Jobs, Real Lives?

Employment

Room 201 Kate Brady, National Organization on Disability; Nancy Brooks-Lane, Employment First Georgia; and Doug Crandell, Institute on Human Development and Disability at UGA /Ruby Moore, Georgia Advocacy Office; Michael Callahan, Marc Gold & Associates, Nancy Brooks-Lane, Georgia Advocacy Office; Rich Toscano, Veterans Administration, Doug Crandell, Institute on Human Development and Disability/University of Georgia We Are What We Do will explore the ways in which our employment roles expand and give definition to who we are. Work-place roles become and beget our social identity. In American culture work is the foundation upon which our lives are built and as such employment is our best tool for opening doors to new possible lives and identities. / The hope is that by sharing with the session participants a better way to build communities of inclusion and excellence, where the unique talents and contributions of all citizens are valued, and inclusive employment is the expectation for all people, the momentum to incorporate what research has proven repeatedly as best practices and evidence-based supports will take seed and grow.

Increasing Employment Outcomes for Individuals with The Most Significant Disabilities Salon C Chip Kenney, Norciva Shumpert and Cheryl Green, Southeast Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Employment

If individuals with the most significant disabilities are going to obtain employment there is a strong need for Vocational Rehabilitation to understand the possibilities customized employment brings to the service delivery system.

Making Free Online Resources Work for You

Room 203 Deborah A. Taub and Anne Denham, Keystone Alternate Assessment Design Inclusive Education

This practical presentation is geared toward educators and family members looking for free online resources and ideas on how to use them to support meaningful access to the general education curriculum for individuals with complex needs. Facilitators will provide participants with open access resources and will then model how to modify them for three learners with very different needs.

Using Evidence Centered Design and UDL to Develop Alternate Assessment Tasks Inclusive Education

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Room 204 Renee Cameto, University of San Francisco and University of California at Berkeley

Synergistic application of ECD and UDL facilitates development of assessment tasks aligned with academic content TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 9:45 – 10:45 a.m. continued standards, increases accessibility of tasks, and raises performance expectations for students with significant disabilities. This presentation describes a systematic design approach and provides examples of tasks for number and operations, measurement, data, geometry and algebra.

Understanding Teacher Decision Making About Literacy

Room 205 Andrea Ruppar and Stacy Dymond, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Inclusive Education

Teachers have many complex choices to make when determining how and where to teach literacy to students with severe disabilities. In this presentation, the results of a qualitative study examining the literacy decision-making processes of four special education teachers will be described.

Impact of Online Coursework for Teachers of Learners with Severe Disabilities Room 206 Mary Frances Hanline, Rima J. Hatoum and Jennifer Riggie, Florida State University Inclusive Education

Presents and discusses the findings of a qualitative analysis of written information provided by 24 practicing teachers of learners with severe or profound intellectual disabilities who completed the requirements for the State of Florida Endorsement in Severe or Profound Disabilities through distance learning coursework offered by Florida State University which was supported by a U.S. Department of Education grant (2005-2010).

Providing Access to Common Core Standards: Meaningful Assessment, Instruction, and Professional Development Inclusive Education

Room 207 Kate Cahill and Denise Chappell, Riverside County Office of Education

This workshop describes the RCOE Professional Development model of Professional Learning Communities, and a simple assessment tool, the SANDI, aligned to the new Common Core Standards, which specifically targets individual academic, behavioral, vocational, transition and independent living skill need areas and gives all students access to Common Core.

Balanced Literacy Instruction For Elementary Age Students With And Without Disabilities Room 209 Terri Vandercook, University of St. Thomas Inclusive Education

The primary audience for this presentation would be school personnel and teacher educators who want to learn about the assessment and intervention focused upon comprehensive literacy that occurred in a small elementary charter school that includes children with and without disabilities.

The Transition Program: Post-Secondary Alternative Model for Students with Low Cognitive Ability Inclusive Education

Room 210 Susan Woods, Disability Support Services and the Transition Program, Middlesex Community College

Middlesex Community College’s Transition Program: a two-year, non-credit certificate program in Office and Business Support, for students with significant learning disabilities/cognitive limitations. The curriculum focuses on consumer and business skills, independent living, and effective communication with the cornerstone being the internship component. This award-winning model is an alternative for students who may not meet academic demands of traditional college work.

Inclusive School Communities are for Every Child - Stories of the Possibilities

Inclusive Education

Room 211 Barb Mckenzie, Ohio TASH; Janet Sauer, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs; Vanessa Ridgeway, Mayer Brown LLP; Lynne Sommerstein, Buffalo State College Inclusive education is NOT about choice or an option for some or a place on the continuum. TASH advocates for full membership, relationships, participation, and learning for ALL students within inclusive school communities. Join parents and educators as we revisit the original vision of inclusion - All Means All!

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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GAO envisions a Georgia where all people have value, visibility, and voice; where even the most difficult and long-lasting challenges are addressed by ordinary citizens acting voluntarily on behalf of each other; and where the perception of disability is replaced by the recognition of ability.

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TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 9:45 – 10:45 a.m. continued A Call for University Based Pro Se Disability Legal Clinics Room 212 Patricia “Ajike” Williams, The Organizing Institute Cross Topic

Meet with a consumer and disability rights activist who served in her own defense in a judicial proceeding against her state’s Vocational Rehabilitation Program. Engage in an innovative exchange and join the call for a new consumer empowering model for delivery of our legal services. Give honor, in a “We Speak Their Names” ceremony, to our past legal warriors.

An Exploration of Message-Passing Skills in Facilitated Communication

Cross Topic

Room 213 Zachary S. Rossetti, Boston University; Pascal Cheng, Howard Community Services; Harvey Lavoy and Tracy Thresher, Community Developmental Services This presentation shares findings and video excerpts from a mixed methods study of message-passing skills by six individuals who communicate via supported typing. Message-passing refers to conveying unknown information to another. Findings include detailed descriptions of the ways that individuals “passed messages,” perspectives on whether these skills can be taught to others, and the best ways to do so.

Families as Partners: Efforts to Involve and Empower Families Room 214 Christy Stuart, TransCen, Inc.; Joseph Anastasio, Baltimore City Public Schools Cross Topic

Want to learn new and exciting strategies to involve, engage, and empower families? Presenters will share successful strategies based on their involvement in a Statewide Transition Initiative in Maryland that aims to empower families to be active partners with their child’s transition team.

Training for School Resource Officers on Disability Awareness

Room 303 Maureen van Stone, Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities at Kennedy Krieger Institute Cross Topic

This presentation describes the need for training of school resource officers to increase knowledge and awareness of the impact of disability on behavior, laws, and policies pertaining to students with disabilities. It will also discuss the role officers can play in reducing school arrests, suspensions, and expulsions, while maintaining and improving school safety.

The Georgia Microboards Association, Empowering People With Disabilities And Supporting Self-Direction Cross Topic

Room 304 Nancy Vara Carmine Vara Lois Curtis and Charles Hopkins, Georgia Microboards Association

The Georgia Microboards Association provides training and ongoing assistance to small, non-profit organizations called microboards, their mission is to oversee the supports and services of a person with a disability. The association is committed to providing ongoing information and support to the individual microboards, we help each microboard plan personal and individualized services and supports through the PATH process.

Growing Together: Self-Advocacy in ACTION!

Room 306 Rebecca Salon, Ricardo Thornton, John Byrd, Germaine Payne and Anthony Vessels, Project ACTION! Cross Topic

Project ACTION! members, who participate in a large active self-advocacy coalition, will share their experiences in this interactive panel presentation. These Project ACTION! members have been working together for 20 years to build their membership, develop their advocacy skills, and shape the services and opportunities available to them and others in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.

How To Start A Community Inclusive Arts Project With No Money Room 307 Polly Medlicott, NC TASH Cross Topic No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 9:45 – 10:45 a.m. continued Several successful inclusive arts projects have resulted from the experiences documented in the film “A New Kind of Listening”, TASH 2010 Media Award recipient. Using these examples and our comprehensive Toolkit, you will learn how to start a project that offers community inclusion, creative expression, valued contributions and long-term relationships, with no resources needed except your energy and enthusiasm!

Gaining Traction, Taking Action: When A Culture Shift Makes Sense (Part Two) Salon B Peter Leidy, Options in Community Living; Beth Gallagher, Life Works Community Living

“The bureaucracy doesn’t get it!” “More funding cuts!” Sound familiar? To make positive change in the system, let’s start with small changes in ourselves and our workplace culture. During this interactive 2-part session we’ll explore ways to embrace curiosity, collaboration, creativity – and fun – in our work, and see how this can lead to better lives for people supported.

Small Towns/Big Opportunities: Stories Of Community Building And Friendship In Rural America Community Living

Room 202 Gail Fanjoy, KFI Maine

KFI will share stories which show how the organization assists community members to see beyond a person’s disability by supporting people to be regular participants in typical ways, introducing them one person at a time, and using the person’s unique gifts, heritage, and interests to make connections. Small towns provide big opportunities for friendship and inclusive lives.

Mission Possible As Enablers Of Change: Embracing Diversity In An Inclusive School Room 303 Ashleigh Molloy, Transformation Education Institute Diversity

This session will explore diversity and shift the social construct from theory to practice. It will examine and affirm the ableness and unique qualities of each individual and foster student’s self esteem through competency validation. Respectful social interaction through language, routines and classroom structure will be outlined. Teaching strategies that fosters inclusion within diversity will be also be presented.

1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Supporting People with Intellectual Disabilities in Professional Employment Roles Room 201 Lynne Tamor, Center for Accessible Information; Nancy Ward, The ARC of the United States Employment

The presenters will discuss their successful struggle to create effective and congenial supports for a self-advocate in a paid professional employment situation. Much of what we have learned also applies to participation in voluntary organizations, serving on boards, and so forth.

PASS Plans: A Valuable Resource In Transition To Employment For Youth. Salon C Ellen Condon, UMT Rural Institute Employment

Work incentives can make the difference between youth waiting to go to work after graduation or actually graduating into a paying job. Unfortunately many young people who are eligible go unidentified. Social Security Work Incentives can be used to leverage other funding sources and fund supports to gain and maintain employment for youth with ongoing support needs.

Transition for Youth with Significant Disabilities Gets National Attention: The TEAM Act Room 301 Curtis Richards, Institute for Educational Leadership; Serena Lowe, Collaboration to Promote Self-Determination Employment

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This interactive discussion with youth, families, and other caring adults focuses on the Transitioning towards Excellence in Achievement and Mobility (TEAM) Legislation. Come hear from a national disabilities expert how the three pieces

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. continued of the TEAM Act, Education, Empowerment, and Employment, realign and strengthen federally-funded programs to more successfully move youth with significant disabilities toward education, employment, and community living.

Yes We Can Develop Aligned Grade Level Content!

Room 203 Deborah A. Taub and Jean Clayton, Keystone Alternate Assessment Design Inclusive Education

This research based session begins with a review of alignment. The presenters outline steps to develop universally designed lessons. They will demonstrate each step with examples and models and checks to ensure the content remains aligned. The steps and strategies presented allow educators to team effectively, even if virtually. It empowers special educators to ensure meaningful and accessible aligned instruction.

Teaching Algebraic Equations to Middle School Students with Intellectual Disabilities

Inclusive Education

Room 204 Noelle Reese, Hart County Middle School; Joshua Baker, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Chris Rivera, University of Texas at San Antonio

The current study will be a systematic replication of the procedures used by Jimenez, Browder, and Courtade (2008) and will determine the effect of task analytic instruction with concrete representation using color-coded sequencing on the acquisition of simple linear algebraic equations (e.g., 5 + Y = 15) with middle school students that are eligible for the states’ alternate assessment.

Inclusive Attitudes Through Disability Awareness: Teacher Candidate Perspectives Room 205 Christie Gilson, Moravian College Inclusive Education

Professors at two postsecondary institutions in the United States employed three stages of disability awareness training, exposure, experience, and ownership, as a means of changing the attitudes of pre-service teachers regarding inclusion. Survey data and essay excerpts from three semesters of research on this topic will be presented and discussed.

Tips and Tricks for Educating Children with Autism and other Needs: Dramatization Room 206 Stephen Shore and Pavan Anthony, Adelphi University Inclusive Education

Professors Stephen Shore, a person with autism and Pavan Antony, having extensive experience educating people with disabilities enact common school situations for people with autism. Scenarios followed by discussion depicting realities from both parties serve to enrich understanding between both individuals and promote successful inclusion. Audience interaction is encouraged.

All Means All: Using Volunteer Educational Advocates to Support a Grassroots Revolution Room 207 Leslie Lipson and Joan McCarty, Georgia Advocacy Office Inclusive Education

This session will discuss how to create and sustain a statewide advocacy training program using Georgia’s Parent Leadership Support Project as a model. Graduates of this project have advocated voluntarily on behalf of 10,000 families across Georgia, increasing access to a high quality education and strong community for students with disabilities.

Making Alternate Assessment Score Reports a Meaningful Tool for Parents Room 209 William Blackwell, Donna Lehr and Nancy Harayama, Boston University Inclusive Education

This presentation will describe findings and recommended practices developed from a research study on ways that alternate assessment score reports can be designed to function as a meaningful tool for parents of students with significant cognitive impairments to a) understand their child’s performance on the assessment, and b) inform educational planning with teachers.

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SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. continued Increasing Conversational Interaction of High School Students Across the Autism Spectrum

Inclusive Education

Room 210 Carolyn Hughes, Joseph Cosgriff, Rebekah Bernstein and Lauren Kaplan, Vanderbilt University; Linda Bambara, Lehigh University

We begin with general education high school students’ suggestions for social inclusion of students with ASD. Then we describe a study in which peer training with communication books increased conversational interactions of six high schools students with autism and their general education peers. Participants included students with Asperger syndrome, intellectual disabilities, and blindness. Conversational interactions generalized across peers and settings.

Higher Education, Higher Dreams: The Next Frontier

Inclusive Education

Room 211 Stephen Hinkle, Northern Arizona University; Pat Amos, Human services consultant; Janet Crawford, Youth Advocate Programs The IDEA states that special education must prepare students for “further education, employment, and independent living.” But are students with autism and related disabilities really accessing higher education and its rewards? How can we make change happen? A self-advocate who navigated graduate school joins with a parent of college students and a provider of support services to explore what works.

Teaching Comprehension Using Peer-Delivered Read-Alouds of Adapted Academic Content for SWSD Inclusive Education

Room 307 Melissa E. Hudson, Diane Browder and Bree Jimenez, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

This presentation describes research evaluating peer-delivered system-of-least-prompts intervention and grade-level read-alouds of adapted science and social studies on listening comprehension for SWSD in 4th grade general education class. Researchers discuss peer training, adapting academic content, and results from the study.

Video Modeling at Home, School, and in the Community Room 212 Grace Francis, Allyson Palmer and Jessica Dunn, University of Kansas Cross Topic

This presentation describes the efficacy of three types of video modeling: self, peer, and perspective, through a literature review and case studies.

Swimming Upstream: Sustaining Support for Students who Type to Communicate Room 213 Christine Ashby, Syracuse University Cross Topic

Facilitated Communication or supported typing is a method of communication access useful for some individuals with disabilities who do not demonstrate reliable verbal speech. This qualitative study examines structures, practices and beliefs of schools that have maintained a sustained commitment to the use of this practice and have provided such support to multiple students over multiple years.

Rethinking Guardianship - a Civil and Human Rights Issue Room 214 Dohn Hoyle, The Arc of Michigan Cross Topic

This session will promote the use of alternatives, accommodations and supports people need to make choices and decisions, to have their preferences recognized and honored, and to have their rights, including the right to self determination, protected.

The Creation and Successes of the Calgary Ability Network / Creating Sustainable Community Support Systems and Partnerships Cross Topic

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Room 303 Mezaun Evin, Cerebral Palsy Association in Alberta / Barton Cutter, Cutter’s Word; Megan Cutter, Cutter’s Word

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


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No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. continued The creation of the Calgary Ability Network (here on CAN) was formed in 2009. The vision is to engage community in dialogue regarding disability issues and to garner the community/Government support to address the root causes that underline problems facing the disability sector. Our goal is to influence decision makers about the remaining challenges facing persons with disabilities. / As an active participant in the community, creating sustainable support systems and partnerships is a vital in creating opportunities in these challenging times. One aspect of affecting policy or community change is by making powerful connections between people or organizations. Discover the power of your voice to become a leader in your community.

Options & Opportunities: Putting It All Together, Asset-Building for Individuals with Disabilities Cross Topic

Room 304 Jacqueline Wilks-Weathers, The Center for Financial Independence & Innovation

New tools, strategies, and ways of thinking create pathways for those with - and without - disabilities to become financially self-sufficient. Through this presentation, individuals with disabilities will be able to make informed decisions about their personal finances to increase their wealth and control their financial future. Join us for this opportunity to progress - building a better financial future!

Engaging Students in School and Community Utilizing the Partnerships for Success Model Room 306 Colleen Lambert, Hall County School System; Cindy Saylor, Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities Cross Topic

We will explore how students who participate in the activities of the Partnerships for Success model achieve greater independence and success in school, discover the freedom that comes from taking control of their lives; and demonstrate how self-determination, active participation in the IEP process and inclusive clubs will assist youth in goal attainment and development of leadership skills.

Let Freedom Ring- Michael Taylor’s Story Salon B Michael Taylor, New Directions Waiver Community Living

I lived in institutions for more than 30 years. I will share with you my transition from institutions to group homes to living my life my way! I will go over the steps to the circle process and how I utilize the New Directions waiver to maintain my staff. I will teach you how to live your life, your way!

HELL-BENT ON HELPING: Friendship, Benevolence, and the Politics of Help Room 202 Emma Van der Klift and Norman Kunc, Broadreach Training and Resources Community Living

People with disabilities need respectful support and authentic relationships if they are to become valued members of our classrooms and communities. Unfortunately, well-intended but misguided benevolence often contaminates support and friendship with paternalism and patronization. This session examines benevolence in its various forms and offers some ideas on how to provide dignified assistance and foster genuine connections in the community.

School Family Roles in Transition Goal-Setting for Diverse Youth with Disabilities Room 302 Kristen E. Jones, University of Texas at Austin Diversity

An investigation of goal-setting as one aspect of self-determination, concentrating on factors influencing the development of transition goal-setting skills for youth from diverse backgrounds with disabilities. Practices that schools use to teach goal-setting skills to youth from diverse backgrounds with disabilities, and what role the diverse family takes in the acquisition of goal-setting skills at home will also be examined.

2:30 – 3:45 p.m. Medicaid Infrastructure Grants And Employment First: Braiding Systems Change Efforts Employment

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Salon C Millie Ryan, Alaska Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education; MaryAlice Mowry, Pathways to Employment, Minnesota Department of Human Services

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 2:30 – 3:45 p.m. continued Building capacity; fostering collaboration; and changing policies, financing, and service delivery are systems change efforts that Medicaid Infrastructure Grants are undertaking to promote “employment first” for people with disabilities. This session will share innovative policies and approaches that reflect the diverse experiences of MIG projects to develop, support and complement employment first initiatives.

Comprehension Support for Middle School Students Using Typical Age Appropriate Texts Room 203 Jordan Shurr and Teresa Taber-Doughty, Purdue University Inclusive Education

This single subject study describes effects of an intervention on the comprehension abilities of four students with moderate intellectual disabilities. Students were read aloud grade-level texts and given a comprehension assessment. The intervention included representative visual symbols and discussion about the symbols before and after the read aloud. The comprehension accuracy improved in the intervention phase for each student.

CGI Works for Students with Cognitive Disabilities: Implications for Inclusive Mathematics Classrooms Inclusive Education

Room 204 Stacey N. Skoning, University of Wisconsin

Problem-solving approaches are supported in general education, but largely ignored by special educators. After studying special and general education teachers using Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI) to design their lessons, it is clear that this method also works for students with significant disabilities. Join this hands-on session to learn how to help all children think critically about mathematical concepts.

Helping or Hindering: Educator Influence on Social Opportunities in Inclusive Settings Room 206 Zachary Rossetti, Boston University Inclusive Education

This interactive session reports research findings that include strategies for paraeducators, general education teachers, and special education teachers to increase social opportunities and facilitate the development of friendships between students with and without disabilities, including students with autism spectrum disorders.

From Re-envisioning to Reform: Creating Inclusive Schools with Existing Resources

Room 207 Meghan Cosier, Chapman University; Luisa Alaniss, Jill Perez and Mike Norman, San Diego Unified School District Inclusive Education

This presentation will introduce participants to a step-by-step process for facilitating inclusive school reform and supporting inclusive practices. Participants will be provided with practical strategies and tips for increasing access.

Inclusive Reading Groups Using Evidence Based Practices Room 209 Karena Cooper-Duffy and Glenda Hyer, Western Carolina University Inclusive Education

This presentation provides an overview of how Story Based Instruction was used in an inclusive reading group to teach elementary students with significant intellectual disabilities emergent literacy skills and hand washing skills. Four small inclusive groups were formed that included two students from general education and one student with significant intellectual disability. Social validity, maintenance, and generalization measures were collected.

Creative Instructional Strategies to Ensure Meaningful Participation in Secondary Content for All Inclusive Education

Room 210 Liz Keefe, University of New Mexico; Laurel Semsch, Albuquerque Public Schools & University of New Mexico; Veronica Moore, University of New Mexico; Karen Potter, Albuquerque Public Schools & University of New Mexico This presentation offers secondary teachers an opportunity to learn strategies for including students with disabilities alongside their peers in general education settings. We will provide teachers with useful tools that will allow their students with disabilities meaningful access to and participation in a standards-based general education curriculum. Lessons, strategies for differentiation and modification, and resource information will be provided.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 2:30 – 3:45 p.m. continued DLM-AAS: A New Generation Assessment for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities Room 211 Alan Sheinker, Carrie Mark and Sookyung Shin, Center for Educational Testing and Evaluation, University of Kansas

Inclusive Education

This presentation will introduce the Dynamic Learning Maps Alternate Assessment System (DLM-AAS), developed by a 13-state consortium along with partner organizations and experts in the disability assessment field. Specifically, we will describe how students with significant Cognitive disabilities will be assessed on common core state standards through a system that accounts for multiple cognitive and learning pathways for skill acquisition.

Using On-Line Software for Professional Preparation and Consultation in PBS Room 212 Lori Long, Macon County Schools; David Westling, Western Carolina University Cross Topic

This presentation discusses the effectiveness of web-based teacher preparation and consulting. On-line delivery of a Positive Behavior Supports course was paired with on-line consulting with teachers of students with severe disabilities. Behavior data and teacher views about the program will be shared. Presenters will discuss the positive aspects and limitations about on-line teacher preparation and behavioral consulting.

“Freedom at the Keyboard”: Strategies for Typing Independently to Communicate Room 213 Christi Kasa, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs; Julie Causton-Theoharis, Syracuse University Cross Topic

This presentation will describe the best practice strategies used to teach people with autism and other movement differences to type independently to communicate. Systematic strategies of providing communicative, physical, and emotional support will be demonstrated through the use of video analysis. Steps for implementing best practice will be discussed.

How to Enable Inclusion Across the Lifespan: Natural pathways and community capacity Room 214 Bruce Uditsky, Alberta Association for Community Living; Anne Hughson, University of Calgary Cross Topic

At an early age families of children with significant disabilities were introduced to the concept of natural pathways and supported to embed their sons and daughters within these pathways in order to achieve inclusive lives. This presentation will illustrate how, over 20 years, the lives of these individuals have favorably and comparably unfolded in relation to their friends without disabilities.

Teaching Safety Skills: Why do We Continue to Neglect it?

Room 306 Martin Agran, University of Wyoming; Charles Dukes and David Garcia, Florida Atlantic University; Kyle Bennett, Florida International University Cross Topic

As we prepare students with intellectual and other disabilities to become more independent and competent, we need to teach them a full array of safety skills needed in the community. This presentation will examine the research literature and other evidence to determine the extent to which safety skills instruction is provided and what skills are being taught.

Once again...Never Doubt that a Committed Group of People Can Change... Room 307 Patricia Henry Carver, Community Drive, Inc.; Pepa Carlson, North Bay Activity Center Cross Topic

At this session, vivid examples of how a small group of committed Midwesterners took a comprehensive look at the quality of life for the people supported or “served” by their public mental health system and in turn, developed accounts of flourishing community living.

From Stumbling Blocks to Stepping-Stones; The Dignity of Risk in Supported Living Community Living

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Salon B Toby Bazan, David Spies, Sharon Snitkoff, Aaron Burgan, Melanie Miles, Scott Shephard, Steve Schreiber, Heather Hardman, Jose Perez, Erik Neri and Christopher Lin, Avenues Supported Living

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 2:30 – 3:45 p.m. continued Oftentimes people are sheltered and protected from the possibility of failing. This usually leads to lives of segregation and isolation. Making choices and taking risks leads to growth and potential that others had not thought possible. Come hear these courageous adults tell their stories of supported living while accepting “no excuses!”

Shared Living: An Overview and Discussion

Community Living

Room 202 Pat Fratangelo, Onondaga Community Living; Jeff Strully, Jay Nolan Community Services; Pam Walker, Center on Human Policy Shared living has been gaining attention from organizations and states. Representatives from organizations will describe the varying ways they implement shared living. They will discuss the use of shared living for people with significant support needs, and its role in organizational conversion from group homes to individudalized supports. The panel includes two individuals who have shared lives for 20 years.

Excluded from School in 2011: A Case Study of Support and Collaboration

Room 301 Fredda Brown, Queens College, City University of New York; Stacy Nonnemacher, Bureau of Autism Services Human Rights

This presentation is about a family whose child has been excluded from school for two years. Given the choice of “no school” or an out-of-state residential program, they chose “no school.” No school meant no educational supports. This presentation focuses on the collaborative between the family, consultants, and lawyer, and will present data regarding behavioral and quality of life outcomes.

On-The-Ground Lessons From Working With Diverse Families

Room 201 Aarti Sahgal, Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities; Mike Green, Asset Based Community Development Institute Diversity

This workshop will be hosting a conversation where we share our journey of learning from working with diverse families in Georgia and outside, with special focus on adults and children with disabilities. We will discuss the unique challenges faced by refugees and new immigrants and our attempt at building relevant practices and create an open space to hear other stories.

Addressing Disparities for People with Disabilities from Underserved Racial and Ethnic Groups Diversity

Room 302 Pamala Trivedi, Center for Child and Human Development, Georgetown University

A census of disparities work funded federally, by foundations, and by states was conducted to identify current efforts to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in health care and promotion. It was determined that there is a decided lack of inclusion of this sub-population in disparity reduction activities, which constitutes an important opportunity for policy, advocacy, and transformed research agendas.

2:45 – 5 p.m. Self-Determination Roundtable Room 303 Cross Topic

Including: No excuses: Learning Self-determination Ellen Perry, Advocacy in Action, LLC Self-Determination is the right to live, work, play, retire and die in the community of our choice. I learned the principles of the Self-Determination movement. I live my life by these same five principals and want to teach others to live by this same philosophy.

Outcome Accountability in a Former Institution: Measuring Valued Qualities of Life Daniel J. Keating, Bancroft Neurohealth

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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www.tash.org/webinar 60

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 2:45 – 5 p.m. continued Valued outcomes, including choice and self-determination, are now being tracked among the people receiving supports from an organization that was once a private institution. The transformation from institutional to community support model, and the new accountability outcomes system, are described. Cross Topic

Capacity for Self Direction: A Supported Decision Making Approach Tina Campanella, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities Directing one’s life is essential for experiencing self direction and determination. Parents, providers and others often have many questions about how to “assess” capacity and whether people with intellectual and developmental disabilities can give consent for many things. This presentation will outline the critical questions to address with a focus on responsibilities for supporting people to make all decisions possible. Successfully Implementing Self-Determination: Using Independent Supports Coordination To Its Fullest Potential David J. Taylor, Community Living Services of Oakland County; Maria Miller, Community Living Services of Oakland County Knowing how to fully implement the principles of Self-Determination is an important key to helping individuals with disabilities live meaningful lives in the community. The Independent Supports Coordinator plays a vital role in guiding individuals through the system to make these principles a reality. It’s beneficial for all involved to understand how this important service works.

Parents and Self-Advocates Building Mutual Support Across and Within All Diversity Dimensions Room 304 Lynne Tamor, TheArcLink Inc.; Nancy Ward, The Arc of the U.S.; Deborah Abraham Cross Topic

The presenters will facilitate a group discussion among parents and self-advocates about conflicting concerns and values, and learning to work together for desirable outcomes for all parties. We hope that this session can lay a foundation for an honest conversation among the parties that needs to go on for a very long time.

4 – 5 p.m. Employment Roundtable for all Employment Presenters Room 201 All employment presenters Employment

Using Person-Centered Job Selection To Help Students Transition To Employment Salon C Meada Hall, Trina Jenkins and Stacy Henderson, University of Kentucky

Employment

Seeking and obtaining competitive jobs in small rural communities can be complex and challenging especially for students with disabilities. The purpose of this presentation is to inform the audience about a unique program that uses person centered job selection to help students transition from high school to employment.

The Digital Book Project - A Community Collaboration Room 203 Karen McCaleb, Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi Inclusive Education

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act mandates that all students have access to the general education curriculum. However, educators struggle with providing meaningful access to their students who are not on grade level. This presentation will highlight a collaborative, regional project designed to provide grade-appropriate, standard-based materials to educators and families.

Importance of Play in Inclusive Classrooms for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Room 204 Amy Papacek, Arizona State University Inclusive Education

This session will share the importance of play in inclusive environments for children with ASD, as well as the importance of teaching typical developing peers skills to interact with children with social and intellectual differences. I end this session with descriptions of the ways that play impacts learning in formal and informal settings.

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SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 4 – 5 p.m. continued The Roles of Novice Secondary Dually-Certified Teachers: Implications for Inclusion Room 205 Eileen T. Radigan and Julia M. White, University of Rochester Inclusive Education

This presentation will provide initial findings of a study on how novice secondary inclusion teachers navigate the practical realities of schools to create opportunities for inclusive practice. We intend to develop a clearer understanding of the experiences of novice dually-certified inclusive educators as they enter the field and the complexity of navigating systems and relationships to create inclusive opportunities.

Better Materials + Better Teaching = Better Learning Room 206 Alson Cole, III, and Lou-Ann Land, University of Kentucky Inclusive Education

This session seeks to help educators, parents, and advocates evaluate the quality of the materials used in instruction for students with intellectual disabilities to the extent that the materials are aligned to state standards versus those that are not aligned and that are typically taught in isolation.

Teaching Adolescents With Autism. Practical Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom Room 209 Walter G. Kaweski, Knowledge and Heart Consulting Inclusive Education

Students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) require informed educational supports and services in order to learn and develop to their full potential. Including these unique and complex students in the general education setting requires planning, training and support for the teachers assigned to assist them. Research informs us that these critical elements improve outcomes for students with ASD.

Promoting Active Participation in College Classes for Two Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities Inclusive Education

Room 210 Amanda Helman, Dolly Hoffman, Freya Koger, Linda Bambara, Colleen Tomko, Shaun Tomko, and Julie Beulieu, Lehigh University Panel members will describe how to provide modifications in a college classroom to support two students with intellectual disabilities. The process that was used to successfully gain access to college courses will be discussed. Collaboration between all members was essential. Finally, the perspectives of the professors, family, and the two students with intellectual disabilities who were involved will be presented.

Kelsey and Chris Go to College! Effective Inclusive Practices for Higher Education Room 211 Toni Strieker, Jill Sloan, Kelsey Bizzel and Christopher Hunnicutt, Kennesaw State University Inclusive Education

Kelsey and Christopher are the two first graduates of the Academy for Inclusive Learning and Social Growth at Kennesaw State University. This presentation provides an opportunity to hear their stories and to understand the processes and procedures used to develop their standards based programs.

Extending New Invitations: Engaging Communities as Natural Supports for People With Disabilities Cross Topic

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Room 202 Beth Swedeen, Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities; Erik Carter, Vanderbilt University

The proliferation of specialized supports in the disability world can cause us to overlook many natural supports, willing partners, and rich opportunities available in every community. We will discuss practical community organizing strategies -- including community conversations, apprentice organizers, support circles, and grassroots mini-grants -that encourage the broader community to connect with and support people with significant disabilities.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 4 – 5 p.m. continued This App’s for U

Room 207 Thomas Simmons and Debra Bauder, University of Louisville; Beth Harrison, University of Kentucky

Cross Topic

This session will discuss the use of everyday technologies such as the iPhone, iPad and iPod and how they can be used to increase independence and inclusion for people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities. Material will be presented that include a variety of applications (Apps), software and hardware that can be utilized in a functional approach to daily living/work environments.

Improving Behavior Through Functional Behavior Assessment and Function-Based Interventions Cross Topic

Room 212 Lina Scharff, Henry County Schools; Amy Childre, Georgia College & State University

This session focuses on how to address disruptive and challenging behavior by effectively using functional behavior assessment. Participants will have the opportunity to learn methods for implementing FBAs and utilizing the data to design, implement, and evaluate function-based interventions. Specific steps and examples to support teachers and school-based teams improve FBA effectiveness and intervention outcomes will be shared.

Who Is Really Teaching Your Child? 1:1 Paraprofessionals- Critical Link to IEP Room 213 Lucinda Kramer, National University Cross Topic

Parent of students served by 1:1 paraprofessionals should have knowledge of the federal law regarding para’s and teacher’s roles and responsibilities in the classroom. Research-based recommendations for requesting skilled paras, effectively including a 1:1 para in the IEP, and student assisted strategies for monitoring the level of the student’s independence, interactions with peers, and instructional support are presented.

The Star Raft: Person-Centered, Family-Friendly Circles Anchored in Authentic Community Relationships Cross Topic

Room 214 David Wetherow, CommunityWorks

Using the image of a Star Raft (a pattern used by sailors to anchor ‘in community’), this action workshop offers a robust set of tools and strategies for developing and maintaining action-oriented personal support networks that are assetbased, family-friendly, and anchored in valued community relationships. Participants will learn to build, navigate and sustain networks that are creative, trustworthy and self-renewing.

21st Century Law Enforcement Programs; Safely Resolving Crisis for Persons With Disability Cross Topic

Room 307 Bruce Handler, MH Consultants, Inc.

Law Enforcement is 7 times more likely to interact with a person with disability than the general public. The primary goal of family, loved ones and the community is for a safe outcome for all involved during a crisis. This can be accomplished using newer tactics taught to police and resolve situations for persons with disability without injury.

Person Centered Planning Used In Community Building for Family Support

Salon B Dottie Adams, Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities; Stacey Ramirez, Georgia State University Community Living

Georgia has two Projects of National Significance in Family Support which are using Person-centered planning tools as a way to build communities and support families. PATH and Personal Futures Planning (both individual and group) have become useful methods to use in helping families focus on their dreams and to build allies and community efforts to help them reach their goals.

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SESSION LISTING

Friday, December 2, 2011 4 – 5 p.m. continued Rediscovering Personal And Community Capacity

Room 202 Jack Pearpoint, Inclusion Press International; Lynda Kahn, Marsha Forest Centre Community Living

Using Conversational Leadership principles, we will explore stories, create imagery, plumb for gifts, and discover capacity and clarity that gives direction and purpose to our lives. We will pose big questions that will explode “fixed answers” while creating a safer space to plan first steps on new, challenging and hopeful journeys into the future.

Inclusion in General Education as Human Right: Beyond “LRE”

Room 301 Judith Gran, Reisman Carolla Gran, LLP; Barbara Ransom, Disability Rights California Human Rights

This presentation addresses sources of the right to an inclusive education in general education classes as an alternative to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which continues to be interpreted to embody the failed “continuum” model. It will explore both American and international sources of law and human rights.

Building Infrastructure for Cultural and Linguistic Competency in Disability Organizations Room 302 Stanley Holbrook, Three Rivers Center for Independent Living and the National Council for Independent Living Diversity

To stimulate thought and provide practical tools for disability organizations to build the capacity to serve all people with disabilities; to equip and build leaders from disability community; to cultivate and sustain practices that infuse cultural competence in all services they deliver; to recognize that the first step to cultural competence is cultural and linguistic competency.

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TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


AT-A-GLANCE

Saturday, December 3, 2011 8 – 10 a.m.

Conference Registration, Pre-Function South

Conference attendees can stop by the registration booth to pick up conference materials or address any questions. 8:30 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Doctoral Students and Beginning Special Education Faculty Networking Session, Room 201

Diane Ryndak, University of Florida; Jacki Anderson, California State University East Bay; Maria Denney, University of Florida; Stacy Dymond, University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign; Donna Lehr, Boston University; William Sharpton, University of New Orleans; John McDonnell, University of Utah; Marty Agran, University of Wyoming; Erik Carter, Vanderbilt University; Sharon Lohrmann, Boggs Center on Developmental Disabilities; Fredda Brown, Queens College; Carolyn Hughes, Vanderbilt University; Vicki Knight, University of Kentucky; Fred Spooner, University of North Carolina-Charlotte; Charles Dukes, Florida Atlantic University This session is intended both for doctoral students who are planning to join the faculty at a college or university, and for tenure accruing faculty in their ďŹ rst three years as a college or university faculty member. The session will focus on strategies for becoming tenured, publishing papers, writing grants, establishing a network of colleagues, preparing teachers, supporting service providers (e.g., schools, customized employment, independent living), establishing a research/scholarship agenda, and balancing professional and personal lives. These and other topics will be discussed by and with nationally-recognized special education faculty members with successful records as college and university faculty members. 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

International Issues Committee Roundtable, Room 203

The International Issues Committee Roundtable provides professionals, families, self-advocates, policy-makers, and other advocates a forum for dialogue, collaboration, and international and cross-cultural exchanges. Individuals who attend the Roundtable are encouraged to establish networks that foster collaboration in working toward the common goals of promoting the inclusion and participation of persons with disabilities in their communities. 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

IEP Training for Parents, Advocates and Parents’ Attorneys, Room 202 Barbara Ransom, Disability Rights California

For children with ED labels or with behaviors that interfere with their learning or that of others, it is almost inevitable that the pitfalls of increased segregation deny him/her the beneďŹ ts that Congress has determined are the product of an appropriate education in the least restrictive environment. This training will provide parents with a tool box of strategies to ensure that students with ED labels receive the full beneďŹ ts of the IDEA. Primary objectives include: developing IEPs to prevent Interim Alternative Placements, preparing for a Manifestation Determination and discussing the school-to-prison pipeline.

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No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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POSTER PRESENTATIONS Creating Transition Opportunities on a College Campus Kagendo Mutua and Amy Williamson, University of Alabama Inclusive Education

Creating inclusive and age-appropriate opportunities for high school students with disabilities is difficult. We will discuss ways to create transition programming on college campuses for students with moderate to severe disabilities. The presentation will include examples of opportunities and challenges of the CrossingPoints Program on campus at the University of Alabama.

Building Early Numeracy Skills in Elementary Students with Severe Disabilities

Bree Jimenez, Diane Browder, Alicia Saunders, Fred Spooner and Melissa Hudson, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Inclusive Education

This presentation will discuss preliminary results for the Early Numeracy Skills Builder on math concept acquisition for students with severe disabilities. Special education teachers used engaging math lessons, with embedded systematic instruction, to teach math skill progressions. Special education paraprofessionals conducted generalization probes in the inclusive general education math classroom.

Promoting Transition Goals And Self-Determination Through Student Directed Learning Patricia Devlin, University of Toledo Inclusive Education

This session will inform participants of research examining use of the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction (SDLMI) for secondary students with significant disabilities; a) as a means for educators teaching transition related goals, and b) to examine the degree to which students receiving instruction benefited in terms of enhanced selfdetermination.

Person-Environmental Fit Model of Support for Students with Intellectual Disabilities: Children’s SIS Inclusive Education

Carolyn Hughes, Vanderbilt University; James Thompson, Illinois State University; Michael Wehmeyer, University of Kansas We discuss the implications of a person-environment fit conceptual model of intellectual disability in today’s schools. We address the potential benefits of the model for students in the context of special education services and supports delivery and the development of the Supports Intensity Scale (SIS) for Children to assess support needs.

Using Assistive Technology in Postsecondary Programs for Individuals with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities Kelly R. Kelley and David Westling, Western Carolina University Inclusive Education

Assistive technology helps individuals with disabilities and can serve as a key support fostering independence and inclusion. This presentation will demonstrate how one fully inclusive postsecondary program serving individuals with IDD has partnered with an assistive technology center to enhance independence in navigation, academics, employment, and independent living. Practical strategies and videos of participants using assistive technology will be shared.

Empowering Computer Science High School Students with Disabilities for College Inclusion James Lawler, Pace University; Christina Muccioli, AHRC New York City Inclusive Education

This session describes a program that is empowering computer science high school students with disabilities to be included in the campus life of a university. The program is designed to lead these students to be future scientists. Attendees of this session will learn critical features of the program that might be modified into programs in their own settings.

Educating Children with Autism: Matching Best Practice To Needs Stephen Shore, Adelphi University Inclusive Education

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Noting that there has been no true comparison between approaches for working with children on the autism spectrum, qualitative research was initiated to investigate Applied Behavioral Analysis, TEACCH, Daily Life Therapy, Miller Method, and DIR. Some preliminary findings suggest current definitions of autism are lacking, many techniques are applicable across approaches, and people with autism make important contributions to society.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


POSTER PRESENTATIONS Mentoring Teachers of Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities – Enhancing Inclusion Harold Kleinert and Belva Collins, University of Kentucky; Patti Whetstone, Western Kentucky University Inclusive Education

A tool will be shared that can be used by resource/cooperating teachers, mentors, building principals, university supervisors, and state trainers to support and encourage best practices for the newly hired MSD teacher.

Testing EBASS-Mobile: PDA Approach to Ecobehavioral Classroom Observation in Support of RTI Joungmin Kim, Kyougwon Lim and Hyejeon Lee, Kongju National University Inclusive Education

The proposed study is a separate usability study planned by this author focused on pilot testing the beta version of the new Windows Mobile software system using the PDA. Research questions addressed include (a) product development as well as (b) empirical research questions regarding the sensitivity and construct validity of the measure for some aspects of RTI.

The Effects of Integrated Visual Art Instruction Based on UDL

Eunsook Lim, Eunhee Paik and Abraham Seonghee Han, Kongju National University Inclusive Education

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of integrated visual art instruction based on Universal Design for Learning (UDL) on social interaction of students with intellectual disability. In this study, the integrated visual art instruction based on UDL of 12 sessions was carried out, targeting 7 students with intellectual disability in integrated learning environment.

The Effect of Orff-Schulwerk Music Activity based Program on the Communication Skills of Young Children with Developmental Delay in the Inclusive Classroom Yuree Kim and Jina Noh, Kongju National University; Hyouja Lee, Chungju National University Inclusive Education

The purpose of this study is to carry out research on the effect of the Orff-Schulwerk music activity-based program on the communication skills of young children with developmental delay in the inclusive classroom. The result of this study is the frequency of communicative function has increased generally, and the communicative function has stabilized passing through the maintenance phase and generalization.

A Study on the Kindergarten Life of Young Children with Developmental Delay Hyoung Jun Kim and Seungchul Kwak, Kongju National University Inclusive Education

The purpose of this study is to analyze circumstances, changes, and the efforts that make changes in the kindergarten life of a young child with developmental delay (DD) through interview with a child’s teachers and parents and observation regarding education settings, events, etc.

Job Experience of Female Special Education Teachers in South Korea Elementary School Kyung-Im Han, Mi-Seung Song and So-Yeong Yun, Changwon National University Inclusive Education

This poster will present findings of a study designed to investigate the job experience of female special education teachers in South Korea regular elementary school. Results indicate the job experience paradigm model on female special education teachers in regular elementary school. Implications for support systems of South Korean special education teachers will be discussed.

Students with Intellectual Disabilities in Secondary School Inclusive Classrooms: Findings from NLTS2 Renee Cameto, University of San Francisco and University of California at Berkeley Inclusive Education

This session presents findings from a nationally representative sample of students with ID on their secondary school experiences and achievements focusing on inclusive academic classrooms. Comparisons between students with ID and general education students in the same inclusive classrooms are compared, including teachers’ expectations, curricula, instruction, and student participation and performance.

High Quality Research in Secondary Transition: Current Status and Future Needs Renee Cameto, University of San Francisco and University of California at Berkeley Inclusive Education

In an effort to promote future research endeavors, the DCDT Research Committee and NSTTAC have developed recommendations for the field of special education for needed research in secondary transition. This presentation will focus on the current status of and need for high quality experimental and correlational research in secondary transition.

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POSTER PRESENTATIONS An Analysis of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Research for Students with Developmental Disability (2000-2009) Yunsuk Lee and Byungun Jeon, Kongju National University Inclusive Education

This study was conducted from 2000 to 2009 on experimental research about the Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) system among domestic and foreign studies relating to students with Developmental Disabilities (DD) It was analyzed based on arbitrating purpose, arbitrating targets, arbitrating environment, AAC type, and arbitrating strategy.

Inclusive School: To Be Or Not To Be That Is The Question Ashleigh Molloy, Transformation Education Institute Inclusive Education

The culmination of building an inclusive school is the goal of all disability stakeholders. These include students, educators, parents and advocates. The roles and responsibilities of each of these will be clearly outlined. Coteaching models will be explored as part of a framework that promotes inclusion through community building that demonstrably validates diversity in all grandeur.

Logo Reading As An Integral Form of Functional Literacy

Desiree Cabrices, Paul Alberto and Rebecca Waugh, Georgia State University Inclusive Education

Reading logos increases the ability of individuals with moderate to severe disabilities to navigate independently their communities. Logos are used by businesses and public services to inform the public of their purpose and content. The ability to read logos as text is initial literacy for young students and maybe the primary form of literacy for older students.

College Students’ Attitudes About An Inclusive Post-Secondary Education Program Kelly R. Kelley and David Westling, Western Carolina University Inclusive Education

The results of a survey conducted to determine the influence of an inclusive, on-campus, post-secondary education program on the attitudes of undergraduate students will be presented. The study will report on the attitudes of more than 500 undergraduates about the University Participant Program at Western Carolina University.

Making it Happen: Inclusion in a High School English Class Carrie Spitler, University of Florida; Monica Delano, University of Louisville Inclusive Education

This presentation provides an example of how to take research-to-practice for a secondary student with a significant intellectual disability in a general education English class. We will describe how to adapted units/lessons to include IEP goals and effective instructional strategies.

Special Education Is Dead! What’s That Mean For Educators, Families, and Students? Phil Smith and Casey Harhold, Eastern Michigan University; Christie Routel, University of Toledo Inclusive Education

Special education doesn’t work – outcomes for students with disabilities are awful. What comes next? In what ways might real teachers end special education; create opportunities for students with disabilities that ensure positive outcomes; create schools in which students have control over their learning. In this session, participants will envision the work needed in order to realize those goals.

Changing Minds And Attitudes: Inclusive Education For All Angela West and Leslie Morgan, Haralson County Schools Inclusive Education

Successful inclusion of students with moderate/severe disabilities does not happen overnight, it takes a good communication, good support, and an open mind. This presentation will discuss outcomes for elementary students with moderate/severe disabilities who have been included as often as possible in the general education classroom. Specific information on how this was accomplished will be provided.

Building A Transition Academy: Rethinking Resources In A Restricted Economy Karla Wade, Cobb County Schools Inclusive Education

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As school systems navigate into challenging financial waters, programs and personnel face deep cuts. Careful analysis of resources can suggest re-organization strategies that may result in stronger, fully effective approaches to delivering Special Education Services. This session outlines the process by which Cobb County Schools, a large metropolitan school-system, created an innovative Transition Academy Network.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


POSTER PRESENTATIONS Teacher Preparation and College-Based Transition Experiences: A Winning Partnership Terri Ward, the College of Saint Rose Inclusive Education

This presentation will focus on how two teacher preparation courses are used to provide inclusive supports to individuals with intellectual disabilities in a College-Based Transition Experience. The process of course selection, course participation, and tutoring sessions will be addressed. Teacher candidate instructional methods, reflections, and suggestions for improvement will also be shared.

Preparing Pre-service Teachers To Write Effective IEPs

Kathleen Winterman, Xavier University; Clarissa Rosas, College of Mount St. Joseph Inclusive Education

Inclusion of children with disabilities in the general curriculum requires active involvement of the child's educational team. In an effort to instruct pre-service teachers in the development of compliant IEPs, this study investigated the use of an IEP Rubric to assist teacher candidates in the development of compliant IEPs.

The Continuum of Services as a Barrier to Systems Change for Inclusion Amy L-M Toson, Jeannie Kleinhammer-Tramill and Aisha Holmes, University of South Florida Inclusive Education

Essential understanding for all self-advocates, parents, advocates, school administrators, teachers, and university faculty, this session is a critical look at the concept “The Continuum of Services” in P.L 94-142 (IDEA). This session presents findings from an intensive policy analysis of IDEA’s continuum of alternative placements, commonly referred to as “the Continuum of Services” in pk-12 education and offers solutions.

Teaching Elementary Students With Severe Disabilities To Participate In Shared Story Readings Margaret A. Cooper, University of West Georgia Inclusive Education

Literacy is a critical area for instruction for all students. Systematic instruction, adapted materials, and individualized adaptations (based on universal design for learning principles) of an instructional sequence were used to teach elementary age students with severe developmental delays and multiple disabilities to increase independent responses reflecting early literacy and reading comprehension within the context of shared story reading.

Social Stories™ Decrease Aggression in Students with Significant Developmental Disabilities or Autism Shelley Anderson, Carroll County Schools; Jessica Bucholz and Meg Cooper, University of West Georgia Inclusive Education

This presentation will discuss results of a study designed to examine the effects of Social Stories™ to decrease instances of aggression displayed by kindergarten and first grade students. The study used a multiple baseline design across three participants. Results showed decreased acts of aggression by students with significant developmental delays or autism spectrum disorders as a result of the intervention.

Embedding Transition Within the Common Core State Standards

Audrey Bartholomew and Jennifer Cease-Cook, National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center Inclusive Education

This presentation will provide an overview of both transition education and the movement towards access to the general curriculum via the Common Core State Standards. Practical strategies will be provided along with general strategies towards facilitating participation in activities designed around the Common Core State Standards.

Organizing Web Resources For People With Disabilities And Their Families Using Delicious.com Katie Scarlett O'Hara, University of Nevada Las Vegas Inclusive Education

There are many resources available online to individuals with disabilities and their families. Some of these are high quality, research based resources. Other types may be non-research based, completely fictional, or even harmful. This presentation suggests one method of using the social bookmarking website Delicious.com to collect, organize, and host web resources for individuals with disabilities and their families.

Creating Service-Learning Opportunities That Include High School Students With Severe Disabilities Michelle L. Bonati, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Inclusive Education

Service-learning is a teaching method that connects curricular objectives to service in the community. During this interactive session, participants will learn how to use technology and other resources to create inclusive service-learning

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POSTER PRESENTATIONS opportunities for high school students with severe disabilities. The process was developed and successfully used to create potential collaborations between community partners and two high schools in Illinois.

Pre-Academic Instruction And Quality Of Life For Students With Profound/Multiple Disabilities Jonna Bobzien, Ann Maydosz and Sabra Gear, Old Dominion University Inclusive Education

A research study conducted compared the effects of two educational conditions, pre-academic skills instruction and functional life skills instruction, on the quality of life indicators of four students with profound/multiple disabilities. Results, indicating all students demonstrated a greater number of happiness indicators while receiving pre-academic instruction, as well as implications for current and future educational practices will be addressed.

Research Based Advice For Including Your Child In Their Neighborhood School Jennifer Greening, Opening Doors, LLC Inclusive Education

Gain insights and advice about successfully including your child with special needs in their neighborhood school from someone doing it! Jennifer Greening, Ed.S., is the author of Opening Doors, Opening Lives: Creating awareness of advocacy, inclusion, and education for our children with special needs. Jennifer shares educational research and advice from her perspective as a classroom teacher and a parent.

Critical Factors Which Facilitate the Inclusion of Young Children with Multiple Disabilities Megan Foster, University at Buffalo Inclusive Education

This poster session will review a current research study that is examining the critical factors which facilitate the successful inclusion of children with multiple and severe disabilities into the regular education classroom. The research takes places in NYS, which has historically been a state with one of the highest percentage of segregation amongst its special education students.

The Effects of Collaborative Teacher Portfolios between General Educators and Special Educators Joohye Kim, Busan Presbyterian University; Kyoungsoon Lee, Kyonggi University Inclusive Education

This study examined the effects of collaborative teacher portfolio between general educators and special educators on teaching behaviors and teacher efficacy. The teacher portfolio consisted of five stages in constructing the portfolio and collecting the material for teaching. Each stage was followed by a portfolio application process on their colleagues’ activities and a conference held among the teacher's council.

Power of Communication and Peers: Effect of Tablet PC-based AAC Intervention Janghyun Lim, Ewha Womans University Inclusive Education

This research was the first attempt to apply high-tech AAC for students with severe disabilities in Korean inclusive elementary school. Multiple baseline across subject design is used. Participants were 3 elementary students with severe and multiple disabilities who have difficulty to interact with peers verbally. Independent variable of this study is tablet PC based AAC intervention.

Standards-Based Instruction and Assessment – Where We’ve Been, Where We’re Going Alson Cole, III, and Lou-Ann Land, University of Kentucky Inclusive Education

This session will explore how large-scale assessment has influenced student expectations, access to the general curriculum and appropriate supports, reflecting on what has and has not worked. We will discuss the impact teacher expectations and beliefs have on these issues as well. We will wrap up with an overview of the Common Core State Standards and college and career readiness

Curriculum Practices Advocated for Students with Severe Disabilities in Secondary Education Stacy Dymond, Alicia Pence, Julie Pickens and Rahkyung Kim, University of Illinois Inclusive Education

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This session will provide an overview of the literature on secondary curriculum practices advocated for students with severe disabilities. Data will be presented from a review of journal articles published between 1975 and the present. Implications for future research will be discussed.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


POSTER PRESENTATIONS Middle-School ELA Lessons Aligned to Academic Standards for Students with Significant Disabilities Pamela J. Mims, East Tennessee State University; Diane Browder, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Inclusive Education

This presentation provides teachers/administrators with results from implementation of scripted lessons that are aligned to middle school academic standards. Results stem from year-long research conducted with teachers of students with significant disabilities. The audience will learn what aligned instruction entails; including research based instructional strategies and gaining meaningful student outcomes.

Inclusion: Using Person Center Planning Strategies and Peer Supports for Success

Donna Consacro and Susan Hiscutt, Monroe Carell Jr. Childrens's Hospital at Vanderbilt University, Center for Child Development; Nancy Steele, National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness and the Helen Keller National Center Inclusive Education

This presentation showcases strategies for building and maintaining a successful inclusive environment for a child with multiple disabilities including deaf-blindness as he moved from Kindergarten, through Elementary School and Junior High and into planning for High School. Person Center Planning (PCP) tools and a transition tool developed by his elementary school peers for transition to Junior High will be spotlighted.

Quality of Life for Those with Rare Health Impairments and Severe Disabilities Mary Pearson, University of Central Arkansas Inclusive Education

7% of children in the America have rare health impairments (Farmer, Clark, & Marien, 2003). Many have severe disabilities, encountering difficulties in obtaining positive quality of life because of the effects of their disabilities (Jaff, n.d.). This presentation will report an initial pilot of an education measure of quality of life with students with rare medical disorders and severe disabilities.

I completed High School…now what?

Cassandra L. Keller and Mayra Camacho, Lynn University Inclusive Education

Although attending college didn’t seem like a possibility just a few years ago, postsecondary institutions are now establishing programs for students with moderate developmental disabilities. We will discuss our program and how to implement it focusing on three main components: academics, social skills, and employment.

Implementing Systematic Instruction Plans: A Training For Paraprofessionals Inclusive Education

Sarah Hayden, Washington County Schools; Pamela J. Mims and Cynthia Chambers, East Tennessee State University This presentation will inform participants on the procedures and results of a study conducted on training paraprofessionals to interpret and implement, with high fidelity, systematic instruction plans for students with significant intellectual disabilities and/or autism, with a secondary focus on student progress on their particular IEP goals.

Successfully Including Every Learner in Physical Education Inclusive Education

Colin Saby, Alberta Association for Community Living; Clive Hickson, University of Alberta

This session will build educators’ confidence and skills for creating inclusive physical education for students with developmental disabilities. Through use of the STREET Approach, participants will learn to deliver lessons that

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

Strengthening communities and ensuring full access, equal opportunities, and participation for all.

To learn more about the IOD and to view our comprehensive list of resources available in our bookstore, visit:

www.iod.unh.edu phone: 603.862.4320 | contact.iod@unh.edu

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TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


POSTER PRESENTATIONS effectively meet the needs of a diverse range of learners. The session emphasizes developing high quality physical activity experiences in games, gymnastics, dance, and more.

Taking the Next Steps: Inclusive Postsecondary Education for Students With Intellectual Disabilities Megan Griffin, Steven Greiner, Carolyn Hughes and Joseph Casey Cosgriff, Vanderbilt University Inclusive Education

Today, more students with intellectual disabilities are going to college than ever before. Inclusive postsecondary education programs allow students with intellectual disabilities to continue learning and developing independence— all alongside peers at college. This presentation will describe Next Steps at Vanderbilt University, an inclusive postsecondary program, and will include a panel of speakers offering multiple perspectives about the program.

Disability, Normalcy and The Individual: A Transformational Learning Experience for Educators Rodney Hume-Dawson, Chapman University Inclusive Education

Transformational learning and education is a powerful tool that can be used to create change of attitudes about disability and the concept of normalcy in the classrooms. The presentation will focus on the inequities and social fences that continue to linger in American schools.

Opportunity And Social Justice: Transition To College For Students With Intellectual Disabilities Eric Marshburn and Natsuko Takema, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Inclusive Education

The poster will provide an overview of NC’s first 4 year post secondary certificate program for adults with intellectual disabilities established in 2007 including major program components, qualitative and quantitative outcomes, strategic partnerships, funding options, policy implications and challenges/lessons learned.

Toolbox and Teams: An Approach to Including Students with Deafblindness

Lynn Murphy and Christine Snellman, Blind/Vision and Deaf/Hard of Hearing Support Program, Lincoln Intermediate Unit 12 Inclusive Education

A team approach and the use of a myriad of tools is necessary to ensure that students with deafblindness are appropriately supported in accessing and progressing in the general education curriculum. Two case studies will be presented that detail the tools and the team important in creating an education environment that is meaningful and supports success of all students.

Medium or Message? Teaching Core Content Sight Words to Students with SID J. Matt Jameson, University of Utah Inclusive Education

Media commentators have long recognized a connection between the medium of information conveyance and the message communicated. This proposal examines this premise through the presentation of a research study comparing core content sight word acquisition taught using a traditional instructional medium (flashcards) and a technology based intervention (iTouch).

Using Technology to Promote Academic Inclusion for Students with ASD

Vicki Knight, University of Kentucky; Alicia Saunders and Bethany Smith, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Inclusive Education

An emerging research base indicates computer-assisted instruction (CAI) may be used to teach academic content to students with significant disabilities, including students with ASD. When technology is incorporated into the framework of UDL, all students in the classroom can benefit from the instruction. Presenters will discuss examples from the research for integrating technology into a UDL framework.

Soaring To New Heights: The Communal Practice Of Meaningful Transitions For Students Richard Parent-Johnson, Center for Research on Learning, Kansas University Inclusive Education

Soaring to New Heights is both an innovative universal-design curriculum and a process model engaging students, teachers and human service agencies in a legitimate "community of practice" that develops the skills and provides opportunities for the practice of transition related thinking and action. Students, teachers and agency personnel ALL develop a common ground for extended participation in these transitions.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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POSTER PRESENTATIONS Making the Common Core Curriculum Work for Students with Severe Disabilities Rebecca Mullican, Leslie LaVergne and Hollie Filce, University of Southern Mississippi Inclusive Education

This presentation will explain why it’s important to align students with severe disabilities to the common core curriculum and how to do it efficiently. By using a backwards planning design, planning for students with severe disabilities in the general classroom can be effective and efficient.

Issues and Visions of Korean Higher Education for Students with Disabilities Hyojung Lee, DongKook University; Eunhye Park, Ewha Womans University Inclusive Education

This poster presentation will provide 1) the current problems and issues in Korean higher education for students with disabilities, 2) suggestions for future improvement, and 3) Korean government’s new policy for students with disabilities. Integrated literature reviews on legal and administrative documents and focus group interviews with students with disabilities and their parents, and related professionals have been conducted.

Furthering Inclusive Education for Students w/Severe Disabilities/Autism Using Hybrid Teacher Education Courses Patricia Sheehey, Mary Jo Noonan and Patrick Sheehey, University of Hawaii Inclusive Education

Students with severe disabilities are generally taught in segregated classrooms in Hawaii. One reason may be the limited number of special education teachers with an emphasis in severe disabilities. The introduction of our hybrid special education severe/autism teacher licensing program has helped address that problem. This presentation will provide details regarding our hybrid program and its positive effects on students.

Outcomes of Children Who Experience Deaf-Blindness with Cochlear Implants: A Multi-Site Study Susan M. Bashinski, East Carolina University Inclusive Education

Since October 2005, back-to-back national research studies have been underway with children who experience deaf-blindness and have received a cochlear implant. This presentation will highlight final results and data regarding participants' skill gains. Information specific to factors that appear to be related to communication development will be discussed, along with an overview of strategy tip sheets developed by project staff.

A school-wide Program to facilitate understanding of disability Joohye Kim, Busan Presbyterian University Inclusive Education

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a school-wide program to facilitate understanding of disability on attitudes toward students with disabilities. The participants were around 1000 children in grades from 1 to 5 in elementary school. The program was run for 3 months. To analyze the difference in attitudes before and after, a t-test was used.

Quality Indicators for Inclusion Programming: Ensuring the Success For All Sheila J. Wagner, Emory University Inclusive Education

As the philosophy of inclusive programming spreads throughout the nation's schools for students with severe disabilities, parents and teachers require guidelines that can assist in analyzing classrooms, schools and programs. This lecture will highlight the key indicators that will determine successful inclusion programs based on the presenter's more than 20 years of inclusion program assistance to schools and families.

The System Of Special Education In Poland

Ewa Alina Nassalska, the Maria Grzegorzewska Academy of Special Education Inclusive Education

Many countries, for which the welfare of children is a point of interest, struggle with the construction of a fully inclusive and responsive system that bridges the needs of each individual with their respective educational system. Taking advantage of the possibility to share experiences nationally and internationally the following presentation describes the system of special education in Poland.

No More Excuses: Increasing Your Effectiveness And Productivity In Challenging Times Randy Seevers, University of Houston-Clear Lake Inclusive Education

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Case studies in which graduate students make informed decisions utilizing a nine-step process to guide teaching and to promote opportunity and inclusion for all children are presented. Preliminary results suggest this approach assists

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


POSTER PRESENTATIONS teachers in making informed decisions resulting in positive outcomes for all children. Portfolio examples representing the strengths and uniqueness of students and their families are also included.

Educational Justice: The Capability Approach and Inclusive Education Amy L-M Toson and Greg Knollman, University of South Florida Inclusive Education

The Human Capabilities Approach purports that education exists to “expand young people’s capabilities and develop opportunities for them to pursue a life they have reason to value.” (Hart, 2009, p 401). It is a promising framework for rethinking social justice agendas in education. This presentation examines CA as a bridge to inclusion for all, including those labeled with significant disabilities.

Consultants. Coaches, Collaborators, and Critical Friends: Supporting Inclusive Education from the "Outside." Marny Helfrich and Barb Gruber, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education Inclusive Education

Technical assistance providers (such as district-level specialists, state coordinators, and facilitators from university and non-profit programs) assist schools and district in implementing and expanding inclusive practices. The role is vital, but the challenges are many! Come share ideas, experiences, and solutions as we work to build a professional network for information and support among TA providers.

Supporting Children With Autism Through Functional Sports And Fitness Training Shelton Gilyard, Center for Autism & Related Disabilities, University of South Florida Inclusive Education

Current literature suggests children with disabilities including autism appear to be at increased risk of chronic health issues associated with obesity in part due to limited exercise opportunities, medication side effects, and challenging behavior. This presentation will demonstrate how sports and fitness training is being exercised to support the complex needs of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

Outside The Frame

Melissa Good and Kelly Carroll, Community Integrated Services Employment

This session will discuss the evolution of starting an employment based art's program for individuals with disabilities and discuss how Community Integrated Services developed this integrated employment opportunity for artists and artisans to work in a studio space with other local artists, develop a portfolio, compete in exhibitions and sell their art work.

Stack The Deck For Successful Employment In These Challenging Times Denise Sosbe, SOSbe's Solutions Employment

Learn strategies for reaching a dream of employment. This presentation is designed to provide information, tools and motivation to people seeking employment and those who support them. Attendees will actively participate. No Excuses! We will look beyond obstacles to opportunities in these challenging times to assist job seekers to discover their ideas and dreams for meaningful work.

Page Forward The Author Inside And Publish Yourself To The Top Marian L. Thomas, Jones International University Employment

Page Forward the Author Inside and Publish Yourself to the Top, is all about creativity not disability. Writing can be a way of living. It can be the ultimate "Plan A" that opens the door for expression through the power of the pen. This inspiring presentation shares 10 easy ways to find and Page Forward the Author Inside of You!

Training Grounds Coffee Business- The Ideal Partnership Among Schools,Goverment, And Community Employment

Joe Shaw and Rosemary Smith, Warren Tech High School, Jefferson County Public Schools; Lynn Fisher, Jefferson County Public Schools Jeffco Public Schools, the largest in Colorado, provides students with developmental disabilities, County TANF clients and culinary arts students on-the-job training at coffee cart businesses located in government buildings. This unique partnership has provided opportunities for students to achieve paid employment outcomes as well as broadening inclusiveness in area businesses. Attendees will leave with a template of this successful model.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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POSTER PRESENTATIONS Effects of Video-Modeling on Work-Related, Problem-Solving Skills for Students with Disabilities Audrey Bartholomew, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Employment

This poster presents the methods and results of an investigation of peer video modeling used to teach problem solving in the work-place. Results, implications for practice, and future research recommendations are included.

The Effects of Self-Determination Learning Model of Instruction on Vocational Achievement Changho Kim, Sunjin Special School; Eunhee Paik, Kongju National University; Insuk Jeong, Korean National Institute for Special Education Employment

The effects of implemented SDLMI model was carried out for study participants’ vocational achievement at a garden for gardening skill, a car wash for car washing skill, and school cafeteria for clear skill at the study participants’ special education school.

SD.Futures: Self-Directing the Road to Employment

Wendy Parent, Kansas University Center on Excellence in Developmental Disabilities; Emily Shea Tanis, Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities at the University of Colorado Employment

SD.Futures is a cognitively accessible online curriculum designed to teach students with severe disabilities how to selfdirect their own employment exploration and attainment. SD.Futures is based upon best-practices in the areas of selfdetermination and supported and customized employment fused with research-based knowledge of accessibility features for internet users with IDD.

Open Talks: Opportunities for People with Autism in Inclusive Employment Supattra Wongvisate Andrade and Lewis Jackson, University of Northern Colorado Employment

Transition supports the opportunities of lifelong learning for people with disabilities to obtain independent living, and social employment. This presentation explores the experiences of people with low-functioning autism that have faced solutions of behavior for working within inclusive employment. The presentation also shares the perspectives of their families and colleagues to support the opportunities and social relationships in the community.

How to Make Jobs Come to You Buna Dahal, DynamicBuna, Inc. Employment

Presentation participants will realize the value of professional self-definition; The participants will learn to evaluate and polish their transferrable skills; participants will gain confidence in matching their abilities to the employers’ needs.

Autism and Robots: A Multidisciplinary Collaborative Approach to Learning Social Behavior Deitra A. Kuester, Bradley University Community Living

“Alphena and Rex”, born of Lego NXT platforms, playacted an ‘invasion of personal space’ while helping to gauge sensory behaviors. “Tony and Tilly”, born spring 2011 helped field test student responses while playacting ‘touching other’s property’. Objectives of this multidisciplinary project include video clips, preliminary findings, and an interactive conversation targeting future case studies.

Socialization: The Missing Link In Transition

Kimberly Puckett, Pamela Cornette, Rebecca Petrey and Joseph Lindon, Model Laboratory School at Eastern Kentucky University; Bill Phillips, Eastern Kentucky University Community Living

Socialization is a key component to a fulfilled life especially for individuals with disabilities. Transition is typically comprised of three areas: education, employment and daily living skills with socialization often being overlooked. In our transition program, we have included socialization as a high priority to ensure our students will have an optimum quality of life.

Addressing Spiritual Supports As Part of Preservice And Continuing Education Programs Bill Gaventa, The Elizabeth M. Boggs Center on Developmental Disabilities; Erik Carter, The Kennedy Center and Vanderbilt University Community Living

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Pre-service and continuing education programs, both for human service professionals and clergy, are an important tool for training clergy for inclusive ministries and congregational supports, training human service professionals on appropriate ways and strategies to address spirituality, and training skills in collaboration across faith based supports and service systems. Models, resources, and strategies will be presented. TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities the Journal of TASH

TASH Wants Your Manuscript Submit your articles to one of the most influential journals in the field of significant disabilities, Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities (ISSN 0274-9483).

Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities (RPSD) is a quarterly international journal focused on advancing inclusion and improving quality of life for individuals with severe disabilities and their families. Since 1975, RPSD has published groundbreaking applied research on service delivery models tested in school and everyday community elements, and explored how cutting-edge interventions result in meaningful, replicable behavior change.

RPSD offers policy analysis, literature reviews, position papers that promote progressive models of inclusion, and descriptions of best practices. You can learn more about submitting your articles at www.tash.org/publications or contact Martin Agran, editor, at magran@uwyo.edu.

Did you know you can read Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities Online? Now available at http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tash/rpsd

Personal Subscribers • Register for free at https://www.ingentaconnect.com/

TASH has teamed up with IngentaConnect to bring you full-text electronic

register/personal

access to RPSD over the Internet! Just register online and you ll have

• Following registration, select Personal Subscriptions

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back issues. IngentaConnect makes searching and viewing RPSD easier

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No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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POSTER PRESENTATIONS Knowledge Of Autism Spectrum: Similarities And Differences Between Campus And City Police Lindsey DeVries and Jessica King, Eastern Kentucky University Community Living

The present study examines the knowledge that campus police and city police have of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Researchers will use a survey method to identify consistencies and discrepancies of knowledge of ASD between the two groups. The information presented will be valuable for family members, individuals with autism spectrum disorders, and officials of public and campus agencies.

What It Means to Belong: Perspectives of Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Sarah Hall, Ashland University Community Living

The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of belonging of young adults with intellectual disabilities. Participants included fourteen adults from 22 to 35 years old with an intellectual disability. I adapted the research procedures and interview to accommodate participants. The finding consisted of themes and descriptions of their experiences. Suggestions to enhance experiences of belonging are provided.

Ten-Years Of Self-Determination at Kern RC in California: Outcomes, Costs, and Stories Russell Rankin and Michal Clark, Kern Regional Center Community Living

This session will present outcomes of Kern Regional Center’s (CA) Ten-Year Self-Determination Pilot. The presentation will focus on consumer outcomes and satisfaction, financial considerations, and the future of Self-Determination as a model for providing supports to people with the most significant and challenging disabilities in the areas of housing, work, relationships, and contributing back to the community.

Increasing Access to Community Living: Comparison of supported apartments and group homes Rah Kyung Kim and Stacy Dymond, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Community Living

The purpose of this study was to identify critical independent living skills and community-based activities deemed to be important for adults with disabilities who live successfully in community residences in the United States, and evaluate their level of independence on each skill and frequency of participation in each activity. Participants included residential specialists from small community residences.

An Advocacy Perspective: Lessons Learned About People's Choices In Community Living Vernessa Broddie, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities; Ricardo Thornton, Project Action! Community Living

This interactive session is for disability professionals, self-advocates and families. Join Quality Trust and Project ACTION! to learn from our advocacy work in DC supporting people with disabilities to have their voices heard and their choices respected. This session, accessible to a varied audience will provide insight on best practices to have choice be the driving force in supporting people.

Community Inclusion Through Community Gardening Heidi Devlin and Nicholas Morrison, Jacksonville, Fla. Community Living

Participation in a community garden can aid in integration of a person with disabilities into a community. Sharing the clearing, planting, and caring for the garden can be therapeutic, and encourage relationships with other members of the community. It can also help prepare individuals with disabilities for employment within the community.

Overcoming Excuses to Live a Typical Life in the Community Whitney Kays and Morgan Crawford, Realizations Community Living

This presentation will follow the story of a woman with a disability and the agency that supports her, as she overcomes all of the excuses that life has presented her. On any given day, there are numerous reasons/excuses to not live a typical lifestyle. Morgan and the agency that supports her has found a way to overcome this.

A Quality Of Life Through Sustained Employment And Community Engagement Brian Berry, Justin Solomon, Kevin Kuczynski and Melissa Fields, Holy Family University Community Living

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Since transitioning from high school, a young man with significant intellectual disabilities has worked and participated in a rich, community integrated life. A schedule of full day supports has been developed, utilizing full-time graduate students as part of a university based program. Implications for quality of life and the impact on future educators and service providers will be discussed. TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


POSTER PRESENTATIONS Training Parents and Direct Support Professionals To Teach Meal Preparation Meada Hall, University of Kentucky Community Living

This study investigated the effectiveness of training parents and direct support professionals to use a constant time delay procedure and PowerPoint to teach their son or daughter with Down syndrome to prepare three different recipes. A multiple probe design across recipes and replicated across participants was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the procedure and its relative efficiency.

Boccia: A Sport Tailor Made for Inclusive Settings Jeff Jones and Dan Humphreys, BlazeSports America Community Living

Played world-wide, the Paralympic sport of Boccia is the ideal activity for physical educators and community recreation professionals. Join us for the latest resources including rules, equipment providers and activity cards for drills and games. Looking for a new activity that includes strategy and precision? Think you are training a future USA Boccia Team member? This presentation is for you!

Good Help Can Be Easy to Find: Personal Assistance Services Toolkit Andraéa LaVant, Institute for Educational Leadership Community Living

This presentation is for youth, families, and other adults who care about youth. Participants will hear about a new guide that assists youth in strengthening some of the most fundamental skills essential for successfully managing their own Personal Assistance Services (PAS). Each participant will receive a copy of the PAS Toolkit and there will be time for questions.

Being Active with a Disability: Adapted Equipment, Sports, and Physical Activity Options Jeff Jones and Dan Humphreys, BlazeSports America Community Living

Physical activity at all ages has positive health, social, and emotional benefits. Yet too many individuals face obstacles when attempting to participate in sport or physical activity programs. This session will explore the benefits of physical activity, sample inclusive activities which open up sport and physical activity to all individuals, and adapted equipment options.

Accessible Meetings and Events

Corina Miclea Rotsko, Association of University Centers on Disabilities Community Living

Although meetings represent an important opportunity for networking and exchanging ideas, there are many challenges that people with disabilities face. Accessibility is essential to creating an environment that accommodates everyone. This poster will provide specific guidelines and pictures of accessibility requirements. The focus will be on meeting room, audio-visual and food/beverage set-up and service options, based on attendees' needs.

Collaboration Works: Coming Together to Serve Youth With Significant Disabilities Curtis Richards, Institute for Educational Leadership Community Living

Youth, families, and caring professionals must work closely together to improve the likelihood that youth with significant disabilities will live fulfilling lives in their communities. This workshop will share information from a newly developed guide that provides information about the status and outcomes for these youth, necessary opportunities and supports, and strategies that work from successful programs.

My Journey to a Better Life

Lorrinda Mabry, Tennessee Disability Coalition Community Living

My presentation is about TennCare CHOICES in Long-Term Care (or “CHOICES”) which is TennCare’s program for long-term care services. Long-term care includes help doing everyday activities that you may no longer be able to do for yourself as you grow older, or you have a physical disability—like bathing, dressing, getting around your home, preparing meals, or doing household chores.

Assisting People to Follow Public Ordinances - No Excuses! Toby Bazan, David Spies, Jose Perez and Scott Shephard, Avenues SLS Community Living

Many people have interactions with police and other public officials resulting in a need for follow-up paperwork or action. Listen as three people give examples of their encounters on both sides of the law and how they follow through, with support from their supported living agency, to insure compliance.

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POSTER PRESENTATIONS Home Literacy Practices in Bilingual Families' of Children with Severe Disabilities Susan R. Copeland and Julia Scherba de Valenzuela, University of New Mexico Diversity

We will present results of a study examining perceptions of monolingual Spanish/bilingual parents of children with severe disabilities concerning their child’s literacy development and their role in the child’s literacy development, literacy practices they engaged in with their child in home and community settings, and how these experiences were similar or different to those the child encountered in school settings.

Korean special education teachers’ perceptions of sexuality and sex education

Young-Gyoung Kim, Clarion University; Hyun-Suk Ju, Gyung-Ju Rehabilitation Center; Sung-Wha Do, Woo-Suk University; Ha-Kyung Kim, Gyerim Middle School; Yongjae Lim, University of Tsukuba Diversity

Delivering appropriate sexual education to people with disabilities is an issue in all countries. Korean special education teachers started to receive in-service training for sex education in 1990. It is time to examine changes of teachers’ perceptions on sexuality. This session will discuss the results from focus group interviews of special education teachers on the issue of sexuality.

Using Explicit Instruction: Teaching English Vocabulary To English Learners With Intellectual Disability

Christopher Rivera, University of Texas at San Antonio; Fred Spooner, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Diversity

This study investigated the comparative effects of two linguistic instructional approaches (i.e., Spanish versus English), using Microsoft PowerPoint, to teach English vocabulary words to English language learners with a moderate intellectual disability.

Analysis of State Policies on Serving English Language Learners with Disabilities Brigid E. Brown, University of Utah Diversity

Given the expanding number of English Language Learner (ELL) students with disabilities in the U.S, it is becoming apparent that federal and state governments face significant challenges in meeting the needs of this population. While there are federal statutes and guidelines in place to serve this population, these laws are often vague and open to individual state interpretation and implementation.

Partnership Between Special Educators and Culturally Diverse Families Regarding Students’ Educational Planning

Joo Young Hong, Hyunjoo Lee and Hsiang-yi Wu, University of Kansas; Szu-Yin Chu, National Taitung University Diversity

Partnerships between special educators and culturally diverse families on the issue of students’ educational planning are examined through a search of databases for the years 1990 to 2011. Teachers as well as culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) parents experienced significant challenges in building partnerships. Specific strategies in building trusting partnerships are discussed for teachers as well as CLD parents.

Yes We Can Build a Culture of Change, Improving Outcomes for Students

Lou-Ann Land and Darrell Mattingly, University of Kentucky; Mike Burdge, Keystone Alternate Assessment Design Diversity

This session examines building cultures of high expectations for all students, including those with the most complex needs. This highly interactive presentation offers participants examples of change from business and education worlds. Discussions and activities are designed to generate ideas on how to build and maintain a culture of change with a basis of high expectations for all students.

Cultural Awareness of Special Education Teachers: Issues and culturally responsive practices Hyun Ju Kang, University of Wisconsin-Madison Diversity

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Culturally and linguistically diverse students (CLD) have experienced a variety of school barriers, including lack of learning opportunities, unchallenging curricula, culturally irrelevant assessments, instructional practices, and low expectations. The majority of CLD students are disproportionally identified as having disabilities and represented in special education programs. Special education teachers need to understand the importance of cultural diversity and culturally responsive practices.

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


POSTER PRESENTATIONS The Practicum Experiences of Early Childhood Student Teachers in Inclusive Preschools Misuk Lee, Kongju National University Diversity

This study investigated the perceptions of early childhood student teachers on inclusion in preschool settings in Korea. A qualitative research design is employed gathering responses from the student teachers participating in inclusive preschools. This study identified findings on how the perceptions of the student teachers were changed on the issue of inclusion.

Questioning the Image of Women with Disability in Grimm’s Fairy Tales Victoria Zascavage, Xavier University Cross Topic

For the female character with a disability, Grimm tales present disability as a destructive flaw. By grouping the tales into areas of exceptionality, this presentation allows for a thought provoking comparison of the treatment of the female character with a disability in the 19th century to situational similarity and difference within the 21st century model of inclusion and equity.

Life After High School: Addressing Unmet Needs for Youth Transition

Judy K. C. Bentley, State University of New York College at Cortland; Chad W. Underwood, Access to Independence of Cortland County, Inc.; Mary Ewing, Access to Independence of Cortland County, Inc. Cross Topic

Students with disabilities typically leave high school without the knowledge and skills to succeed in adult life. Access to Independence, an Independent Living Center, and the State University of New York-Cortland are assessing unmet needs for youth transition services in Cortland County, addressing evidence-based components of ideal transition planning and implementation. Co-investigators will present findings, and resulting service development strategies.

Effects of Augmentative and Alternative Communication on Challenging Behavior: A Meta-Analysis Virginia L. Walker and Martha E. Snell, University of Virginia Cross Topic

We will share preliminary findings from a meta-analysis evaluating the efficacy of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) intervention on challenging behavior of individuals with disabilities. We will describe data collection and analysis procedures, results, and implications for future research.

The Form And Function Of Preschool Special Education Teams In NYC Mollie Sheppard, Boston University Cross Topic

In New York City, children with special needs attend schools that represent the continuum of placement options. Every child is entitled by IDEA to a team of professionals to develop and implement their Individual Education Programs. This is a presentation of a study that examined, from the perspectives of parents, the form and function of some of those teams.

Humor, Coping Strategies And Functioning In Families With Children Having a Disability Alicja Rieger, Valdosta State University; J. Patrick McGrail, Jacksonville State University Cross Topic

In this study we will test whether parents who use coping humor also report more successful family functioning. We hope to contribute to greater understanding on how families cope with humor when a child in their family has a disability.

The Experience of South Korean Fathers Raising Children with Disabilities Kyung-Im Han, Changwon National University; Hyun-Cheol Lee, Sangbuk Elementary School Cross Topic

This poster will present the findings of a study designed to investigate the experience of fathers on the child rearing of children with disabilities in South Korea. Results indicate the child rearing experience paradigm model on fathers of children with disabilities. Implications with regards to support system for South Korean fathers of children with disabilities will be discussed.

Health and Long-term Recovery for Individuals with Disabilities Laura M. Stough and Elizabeth McAdams Ducy, Texas A&M University Cross Topic

Individuals with disabilities can encounter barriers to good health during natural disasters. We will present the barriers to health and medical services experienced by individuals with disabilities impacted by Hurricane Katrina. We will focus on participants’ health status, including medical, dental, and psychological health, both before and after the disaster, and examine the intersection of health and long term recovery.

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

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POSTER PRESENTATIONS Time Spent Meaningfully by Adults with Very Severe Disabilities

Donna Lehr and Zach Rossetti, Boston University; Leslie M. Lederer, Disability Rights Advocate, Protection and Advocacy Cross Topic

It is generally assumed that meaningful employment is an essential component of good quality of life for adults. Achieving this is challenging for individuals with the most severe disabilities, and some parents and professionals call for the “work day” to be defined differently. This presentation focuses on extant and emerging research on meaningful lives for adults with significant disabilities.

An Inclusive Co-Teaching Model Utilizing Facilitated Communication Nathan Trainor, Inclusion Connection Cross Topic

This model was developed by a third grade teacher and a person who utilizes augmentative alternative communication. Through this venture they have brought an increase in literacy, acceptance and friendship to a classroom of 22 diverse third grade students.

The POWER Program: We Hold Within Us The POWER To Succeed Lisa Winters, Murray County High School Cross Topic

POWER stands for Providing Opportunities in Workforce Employment Readiness. The purpose of this program is to allow Exceptional Students the opportunity to progress from an academic setting to one focused on work-related activities and personal growth. Participants in this program are exposed to the skills required in post-secondary living and the workforce which will define their personal requirements for success.

Predictors Of Autism Enrollment In The Maryland Public School System Katelyn Boswell and Christopher Smith, Kennedy Krieger Institute Cross Topic

This study examines Maryland public school ASD enrollment and its predictors within each jurisdiction using school and federal census data. Analyses found the prevalence of ASD was more than expected according to the CDC’s projected national prevalence. The prevalence was highly variable across jurisdictions with enrollment status (above, on par, below) predicted by SES, race, and location in the state.

Changing Challenging Behavior: Teacher Implementation of Functional Behavior Assessment Lina Scharff, Henry County Schools; Amy Childre, Georgia College & State University Cross Topic

This session will share results of a research study through which a teacher conducted an FBA and designed and implemented function-based interventions to address challenging behavior exhibited by a student with autism. Results and implications for practice such as addressing multiple behavior functions and training teachers will be discussed.

MY VOTE, MY VOICE, MY RIGHT

Leslie A. Jones, Kentucky Protection & Advocacy Cross Topic

An important part of being a citizen in the United States is the right to vote. Many people have been prevented from voting. A brief historical view of voting and current laws that affect voting rights will be provided. We will discuss barriers such as competency with, guardianship, restoration of voting rights, accessibility at the polls, voting and absentee voting.

Using "Context Instruction" to Develop Critical Moments for Instruction and SelfDetermined Learning. Kathy Gee, California State University Cross Topic

This presentation will describe 3 related single subject design studies addressing instructional strategies for developing conceptual understanding and initiation for learning with individuals who have multiple sensory disabilities in addition to significant cognitive disabilities. The method, which will be described practically for teachers to use, is intended to avoid learned helplessness, and to increase a child's self-determination, anticipation, and engagement.

Supporting a Low Incidence Parent Group to Easily Collect Information Dennis Campbell, University of South Alabama; AmySue Reilly, Auburn University Cross Topic

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We discuss the use of parents as informants to gather data to aggregate information about a rare syndrome. Parent input is gathered in a non threatening way to assist them in networking. We will share some preliminary findings to demonstrate the usefulness of the system. We will also provide a model for other organizations to use to collect similar data. TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


POSTER PRESENTATIONS What Starts The Fire? Understanding Challenging Behaviors Jon Freer and Jon Thompson, Behavior Wizards Cross Topic

Addressing challenging behaviors can be one of the most difficult aspects of working in the mental health field. This presentation will review some of the most common causes of challenging behaviors, the role of antecedent behavior, mental preparedness and when to intervene to prevent challenging behaviors. Participants will learn the importance of a pro-active approach to decrease future challenging behaviors.

The Politics of Autism: Asynchronous Open Forum for All Interested Elizabeth J. Grace, National Louis University Cross Topic

Open forum where those in the Autism Community can speak freely about important, controversial topics of interest. Individuals with Autism and family members, but also educators, students, employers, support workers and interested others invited. Subject matter will be solicited from the group by the facilitators, one of whom has a diagnosis of Autism, but may include the usual suspects.

How AAC Impacted My Mental Health Isabel Cordoba, Connecting to Care

How the use of my AAC device allowed me to be able to better express myself and as a result cut down on negative Human Rights behavior patterns. AAC also allowed me to obtain employment and become a strong advocate for myself and others.

Fifty Years of Advocacy: What I Learned Louis V. Wilcox Jr., Yesterday's Children, Inc.

This presentation is about what I learned as an advocate for my son, Terry, and his peers over the past fifty years. I will Human Rights focus upon institutions, community living and human rights, and will address the question: where do we go from here?

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SESSION GLOSSARY Topic

Employment

Inclusive Education

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Title

Page

Addressing Labor Market Needs And Building Careers For People With Disabilities

44

"All” Really Means “ALL”: Employment as the Priority Post-School Outcome for Youth with Significant Disabilities

19

Are the Stars Aligning for Real Jobs, Real Lives?

48

Customized Employment: Tools To Systematically Coach/Mentor Initial Implementation

19

Employers as Partners Toward Better Futures for Young People

34

Employment First: Establishing Policy, Promoting Practice, Achieving Outcomes

44

Employment Roundtable for all Employment Presenters

61

Findings from the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Vocational Rehabilitation

44

Helping Youth Build Their Financial Future

23

Increasing Employment Outcomes for Individuals with The Most Significant Disabilities

48

Medicaid Infrastructure Grants And Employment First: Braiding Systems Change Efforts

56

Model Programs that Support Seamless Transition

30

PASS Plans: A Valuable Resource In Transition To Employment For Youth.

52

Self-Advocate Entrepreneurship Roundtable

22

Social Skills at Work: Which Skills are Really Valued?

26

Successful Post-Secondary Outcomes: One State's Twist on Workbased Learning

31

Supported Employment for Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Preliminary Data

35

Supporting People with Intellectual Disabilities in Professional Employment Roles

52

The Excelling Organization: Affirming Individual Needs And Welcoming Change In Uncertain Times

39

Ticket to Work: Free Support for People Who Have a Disability and Want to Work

22

Transition for Youth with Significant Disabilities Gets National Attention: The TEAM Act

52

Using Person-Centered Job Selection To Help Students Transition To Employment

61

We Are What We Do

48

Adapted Shared Storybook Reading: Its Application for Children on the Autism Spectrum

39

All Means All: Using Volunteer Educational Advocates to Support a Grassroots Revolution

53

Arizona WINS with Inclusive Schools: Developing and Sustaining a Statewide Training Series

23

Balanced Literacy Instruction For Elementary Age Students With And Without Disabilities

49

Better Materials + Better Teaching = Better Learning

62

Beyond Boundaries: Our School Based Journey from Segregated Service Delivery to Inclusion.

19

CGI Works for Students with Cognitive Disabilities: Implications for Inclusive Mathematics Classrooms

57

Community Presence for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

35

Comprehension Support for Middle School Students Using Typical Age Appropriate Texts

57

Cooking Up A Creative Transition: Inclusive Post-School Planning

46

Creative Instructional Strategies to Ensure Meaningful Participation in Secondary Content for All

57

Data-based Decisions: Training Teachers of Students with Significant Disabilities

40

Design Media Projects to Illustrate Student Experiences in PSE

32

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION GLOSSARY Topic

Inclusive Education

Title

Page

DLM-AAS: A New Generation Assessment for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities

58

Enhancing the Inclusive Academic Experience for Students with Significant Disabilities with Technology

19

Evaluation Results from a Postsecondary Program for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

29

Extreme Makeover: Classroom Edition- Building on Child and Family Strengths and Interests

28

From Novice Teacher to Master Inclusive Educator: The First Five Years

23

From Re-envisioning to Reform: Creating Inclusive Schools with Existing Resources

57

Getting Published in Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities

36

Helping or Hindering: Educator Influence on Social Opportunities in Inclusive Settings

57

"Hey, I’m Going to College" Post-Secondary Higher Education for Students with Disabilities

32

Higher Education, Higher Dreams: The Next Frontier

54

How Teachers Can Promote Change & Refocus Efforts to Promote Inclusive Education

40

Impact of Online Coursework for Teachers of Learners with Severe Disabilities

49

Importance of Play in Inclusive Classrooms for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

61

Inclusive Attitudes Through Disability Awareness: Teacher Candidate Perspectives

53

Inclusive Educational Programming for Students with Severe Disabilities: An International Perspective

29

Inclusive Postsecondary Education: Effective Practices that Support Access to College and Employment

7

Inclusive Reading Groups Using Evidence Based Practices

57

Inclusive School Communities are for Every Child - Stories of the Possibilities

49

Incorporating Technology into Daily Classroom Routines

32

Increasing Conversational Interaction of High School Students Across the Autism Spectrum

54

Is It Really Inclusion? Really? Really?

44

Kelsey and Chris Go to College! Effective Inclusive Practices for Higher Education

62

Laying Strong Foundations: Helping Caregivers Nurture Emotional Development

35

Learning Content Aligned to the Standards In An Inclusive Classroom

40

Life After School: Social, Work, and Educational Lives of Adults with Disabilities

31

Making Alternate Assessment Score Reports a Meaningful Tool for Parents

53

Making Free Online Resources Work for You

48

Meaningful Participation of Adults with Significant Disabilities in Their Meetings

22

Meeting Our Standards Together: Teachers Work Together So Students Can Learn Together

40

Middle School Inclusive Education In Action: It Works!

46

Moving Toward Literacy: Supporting Literacy Development for Students with Complex Support Needs

39

My Son With Autism - Living The American Dream

36

One Urban District’s Journey toward Inclusive Schools: Challenges and Lessons Learned

46

Paraprofessionals In Inclusive Settings: A Guide To Success

32

Partnering with Postsecondary Students: Kentucky's Supported Higher Education Project

25

Patterns of Peer Victimization among Young Children with Disabilities: Prevalence and Implications

23

Peer Support Strategies To Promote Inclusive Education: An Evidence-Based Practice

28

Planning for Full Participation in General Education Instruction in the General Education Classroom

36

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

85


SESSION GLOSSARY Topic

Inclusive Education

86

Title

Page

Post School Outcomes for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

25

Principal Leadership: A Critical Component in Inclusive Schools

32

Proloquo2go and Students with ASDs: Curriculum Participation and Membership in General Education

23

Promoting Active Participation in College Classes for Two Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

62

Promoting Communication In Young Children With Significant Developmental Delays Through Caregiverimplemented Intervention

19

Providing Access to Common Core Standards: Meaningful Assessment, Instruction, and Professional Development

49

Providing Access to the Core Curriculum for Individuals with Complex/Multiple Disabilities

35

Providing Access To The General Education Curriculum For Students Who Are Nonverbal

31

Providing Accommodations During Reading Instruction To Students Who Are Nonverbal

20

Quality Indicators of Inclusive Education

32

Reading to Engage Children with Autism in Language and Learning

31

Research on Improving Education of Children with Autism: Four New Studies

28

Rewards: Hot Commodity or Meaningful Motivator?

44

Seeing Children as Science Learners: Ramps and Pathways Promote Learning and Development

39

Self-Advocacy: Promoting Progress In The General Curriculum For Students With Intellectual Disabilities

36

Steps to General Education for Students with the Most Significant Cognitive Disabilities

22

Stories from the Trenches: Characteristics of Effective and Inclusive General Education Teachers

44

Supporting Courageous Conversations about Inclusion in Schools

28

Supporting the Social Acceptance of Students with Disabilities in General Education Classrooms

44

Teachers Beliefs, Parents, Students

46

Teaching Adolescents With Autism. Practical Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom

62

Teaching Algebraic Equations to Middle School Students with Intellectual Disabilities

53

Teaching Choice Making in Young Children as a Foundation for Self-Determination

33

Teaching Comprehension Using Peer-Delivered Read-Alouds of Adapted Academic Content for SWSD

54

The Digital Book Project - A Community Collaboration

61

The IM:PACT Project: Multi-leveled Collaboration for Fully Inclusive Elementary Teacher Preparation

28

The Roles of Novice Secondary Dually-Certified Teachers: Implications for Inclusion

62

The Teacher’s Toolbox: Quick and Easy Curriculum Adaptations

35

The Top Strategies for Supporting Students with Autism in the Inclusive Classroom

35

"The Train's Pulling Out of the Station": Stakeholders in Inclusive Education Reform

25

The Transition Program: Post-Secondary Alternative Model for Students with Low Cognitive Ability

49

Think College New York! and TPSID

46

Think College: Statewide Systems Change through Strategic Planning

36

Tips and Tricks for Educating Children with Autism and other Needs: Dramatization

53

Understanding Alternate Assessment Misassignment and How To Prevent It

40

Understanding Teacher Decision Making About Literacy

49

University Participant Program: First Hand Experiences from Families, Faculty, Students, and Participants

29

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION GLOSSARY Topic

Inclusive Education

Cross Topic

Title

Page

Using a Video iPod and Picture Prompts to Teach Pedestrian Navigation Skills

23

Using Computer-Delivered Embedded Instruction to Teach Science to Students with ASD

26

Using Evidence Centered Design and UDL to Develop Alternate Assessment Tasks

48

Why We Can’t Just Tell You How to Implement Inclusion!

19

Yes We Can Develop Aligned Grade Level Content!

53

Yes, We Can Support Grade Appropriate Academic Content in Inclusive Environments!

28

21st Century Law Enforcement Programs; Safely Resolving Crisis for Persons With Disability

63

A Call for University Based Pro Se Disability Legal Clinics

51

All Means ALL: Advocacy Leadership Network Of Hamilton County, Ohio

41

Amplify One’s Voice

20

An Exploration of Message-Passing Skills in Facilitated Communication

51

Audio Description: The Visual Made Verbal

41

Autism and Anxiety: From Stress To Success

29

Children’s Freedom Initiative – Bringing Children Home

38

Choice Matters

30

Close Encounters Of The Medical Kind: Autism, Developmental Disability, and Doctor Visits

21

Creating Sustainable Community Support Systems and Partnerships

54

Creating User-Friendly Materials With Self Advocates: Partnerships And Processes

38

Denied: Interventions used to Suppress Sexuality and Why this Must Change!

20

Development of a State TASH Chapter: A Mentorship Model

33

Engaging Students in School and Community Utilizing the Partnerships for Success Model

56

Ensuring Communication for True Participation: TAALC: Teaching Age-Appropriate Academic Learning Via Communication

40

Evaluating Family Support: Did it make a difference?

46

Extending New Invitations: Engaging Communities as Natural Supports for People With Disabilities

62

Facilitating Socio-sexual Decision-making Through Direct Instruction: The PACS Model

29

Families as Partners: Efforts to Involve and Empower Families

51

"Freedom at the Keyboard”: Strategies for Typing Independently to Communicate

58

Georgia DOE Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

20

Gifts In Disguise: Unique Abilities

25

Growing Together: Self-Advocacy in ACTION!

51

Growing Up Inclusively

36

How to Enable Inclusion Across the Lifespan: Natural pathways and community capacity

58

How To Start A Community Inclusive Arts Project With No Money

51

Important Voices: Listening Life Stories of Mothers of Facilitated Communication Users

46

Improving Behavior Through Functional Behavior Assessment and Function-Based Interventions

63

Including Assistive Technology in Transition Planning from Congregate Settings to the Community

47

Including Youth As Leaders

38

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

87


SESSION GLOSSARY Topic

Cross Topic

Title

Page

Is Voting in Your Life Important? If so, why?

34

Journey To The North Star: Building Relationships, Changing the Culture

20

Learning To Stand Still: What Hostage Negotiators Can Teach Us About Supporting People With Difficult Behavior

41

Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness

34

Moving Beyond Tokenism: Self-advocates serving on boards and policy-making bodies

47

Moving From Rights to Relationships: The Power of Inclusive Spiritual Supports

25

Now, What Does The ‘P’ Stand For? New Tools For Your Toolbox

33

Once again...Never Doubt that a Committed Group of People Can Change...

58

Options & Opportunities: Putting It All Together, Asset-Building for Individuals with Disabilities

56

Parents and Self-Advocates Building Mutual Support Across and Within All Diversity Dimensions

61

Putting Out The Fire: Treatment Strategies For Challenging Behaviors

46

Real Communities in Georgia: A Panel Discussion

31

Reinterpreting Behavioral Methodologies as Learned Oppression

20

Rethinking Guardianship - a Civil and Human Rights Issue

54

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community by sharing your experiences with friends, family, colleagues and others who have an interest in

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www.tash.org/share TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


SESSION GLOSSARY Topic

Cross Topic

Community Living

Title

Page

Rising to the Occasion: Maximizing our Advocacy Effectiveness in Uncertain Political Times

38

Self-Advocacy Summits Held Across The Nation

29

Self-Determination Roundtable

59

Supporting Military Families Of Youth With Developmental Disabilities

41

Swimming Upstream: Sustaining Support for Students who Type to Communicate

54

Teaching Safety Skills: Why do We Continue to Neglect it?

58

The Creation and Successes of the Calgary Ability Network

54

The Georgia Microboards Association, Empowering People With Disabilities And Supporting Self-Direction

51

The Star Raft: Person-Centered, Family-Friendly Circles Anchored in Authentic Community Relationships

63

This App’s for U

63

Training for School Resource Officers on Disability Awareness

51

Transforming Parent-Child Interaction in Family Routines: Longitudinal Results and Family Perspectives

25

Transitioning Upstream: One Family’s Experience of Consumer-Directed & Agency Supports

47

Using On-Line Software for Professional Preparation and Consultation in PBS

58

Using Social Stories to Promote Socio-sexual Decision-making for Individuals with Severe Disabilities

29

Video Modeling at Home, School, and in the Community

54

Who Is Really Teaching Your Child? 1:1 Paraprofessionals- Critical Link to IEP

63

Wretches & Jabberers Further Stories from the Road; Institution to Movie Stardom

22

Your Dependent With Special Needs-Making Their Future More Secure

33

A Dynamic Process For Generating The Wisdom Of A Group Of People

42

Building a Life in the Community...Not a Program

30

Community-Building and Relationships: Staff Training Versus Direct Approaches to Community

21

Creating Future Assets for Economic Independence

38

Directing My Own Supports: Learning To Be A Good Employer

34

End of Life, Grief and Loss Supports with People with Significant Disabilities

21

Every New House with Basic Access: Why, How - and Some Successes

26

From Stumbling Blocks to Stepping-Stones; The Dignity of Risk in Supported Living

58

Gaining Traction, Taking Action: When A Culture Shift Makes Sense (Part One)

47

Gaining Traction, Taking Action: When A Culture Shift Makes Sense (Part Two)

42

HELL-BENT ON HELPING: Friendship, Benevolence, and the Politics of Help

56

In a Body with a Mind of its own: An Exploration of Disability, Normalcy, & Transformation

38

Independent and Community Living for People with Disabilities

30

Let Freedom Ring- Michael Taylor's Story

56

Not Home: A Documentary about Kids Living in Nursing Facilities

26

Opening of the Community Living Open Space Gathering

21

Out Of The Day Program And Into Community

47

No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times

89


SESSION GLOSSARY Topic

Community Living

Human Rights

Diversity

90

Title

Page

Person Centered Planning Used In Community Building for Family Support

63

Rediscovering Personal And Community Capacity

64

Shared Living: An Overview and Discussion

59

Small Towns/Big Opportunities: Stories Of Community Building And Friendship In Rural America

52

Visioning a Life in the Community

42

411 on Disability Disclosure: What to Tell, To Whom, When, and Why

26

Cross-Cultural Collaborating In China Around Children With Disabilities

42

Excluded from School in 2011: A Case Study of Support and Collaboration

59

Inclusion in General Education as Human Right: Beyond "LRE"

64

Lessons From Pennhurst: Creating A National Disability Museum And Site Of Conscience

34

No Excuses: Ending the Practice Of Restraint And Seclusion In Schools

30

Profiling of the Sexual Abuse of Students with Disabilities in American Schools

42

Self-Advocacy in a New Nation: A Place at the Table in Kosovo

38

The Case for Eliminating Restraint and Seclusion

26

The International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

21

The Neurobiological and Psychological Effects of Trauma and Simple Sensory Interventions to Promote Healing

21

Why Can't New Jersey Close Institutions? The Free Frankie Campaign and Beyond

47

A comparison of special education reform in South Korea and Japan

48

Addressing Disparities for People with Disabilities from Underserved Racial and Ethnic Groups

59

Building Infrastructure for Cultural and Linguistic Competency in Disability Organizations

64

Collaboration With Culturally And Linguistically Diverse Families Of Children With Significant Disabilities

34

Educational Advocacy: Issues And Perspectives Across Cultures and Countries

30

In Their Own Voices Successes, Challenges of Raising Children with Severe Disabilities

31

Mission Possible As Enablers Of Change: Embracing Diversity In An Inclusive School

52

Open Doors for Multicultural Families: Year two

48

Racism or Not; Here We Come! Disability-Related Health Disparities and Race/Ethnicity: Double Jeopardy

17

Scaffolding School Communication to reach all Families and Community Stakeholders

22

School Family Roles in Transition Goal-Setting for Diverse Youth with Disabilities

56

Tapping into the Rich Repositories of Families' Funds of Knowledge

34

Why Parents with Diverse Cultural Background Might Pose More Challenges For Professionals?

48

TASH Conference 2011: November 30–December 3, 2011


Welcome to the 2011 TASH Conference

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health & Developmental Disabilities Frank E. Shelp, M.D., M.P.H., Commissioner Two Peachtree Street, N.W.24th Floor Atlanta, Georgia 30303 No Excuses: Creating Opportunities in Challenging Times dbhdd.georgia.gov

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TASH 2011 Conference Program