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Tasburgh Parish Plan Published 2009 from information compiled in 2008


Tasburgh Parish Plan

Our thanks to all those who completed questionnaires, debated the resulting analysis and contributed to the writing of this plan. Without you all it would not have been possible.

Produced with financial support from:

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

Introduction The Parish Plan is a document that sets out the vision for the village of Tasburgh in the future, and identifies the action we need to take to achieve that vision. It brings together the views of the whole community and includes those things that are important to all our residents. The Tasburgh Parish Plan started with a questionnaire that was given to all residents of the village over the age of 11 years. The questionnaire asked about a wide range of issues including what people like or dislike about Tasburgh and the changes they would like to see, if any. It also encouraged people to mention new projects or facilities they would like to see in the village. The results of the questionnaire were analysed, and the information used to draw up this Parish Plan. Once it is finalised, the Parish Plan will need to be adopted by the Parish Council. This will ensure that it will be taken seriously by the higher tiers of government and other service providers. The Parish Council will also have responsibility for carrying out some of the actions listed in the Plan.

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

How we produced this Parish Plan The idea of producing a Parish Plan came from the Government as a way of identifying problems in a village and starting new projects. Parish plans encourage communities to come together to identify their needs, prioritise the issues raised and address them with an agreed action plan. – Defra In Tasburgh, a group of residents was formed to take the project forward and the Parish magazine, the Tasburgh Quarterly, was used to invite new people to join the group. A questionnaire was developed and circulated by hand to all households in the village to find out what people thought and what they would like to see in Tasburgh in the future. The questionnaire produced 425 responses out of 1050 adults in the Parish and 450 households which is considered a very good response rate. 425 out of 1050 questionnaires were returned, an excellent response rate.

Many ideas were suggested and the overall impression from the results of the questionnaire was that residents are happy in Tasburgh and value it in its present form. In addition to the results of the survey, ideas have been fed in by the Parish Plan Group and other residents. 4


Tasburgh Parish Plan

Description of Tasburgh Tasburgh is a village of about 450 homes located seven miles south of Norwich on the Norwich to Ipswich Road. The village of Long Stratton is about two miles to the south and provides local services including health care, shops, a leisure centre and the local secondary school. There is evidence of people living in the area since Mesolithic times. Flint fragments from 4,000 BC have been found near the River Tas and iron-age pottery fragments have been found close to the church. The geographical centre of the village is set around the church and the site of an iron-age fortress. On Low Road there is a wide mixture of dwellings ranging from some several hundred years old to modern properties. In Upper Tasburgh the homes are more modern dating from the 1960s onwards.

Lower Tasburgh, the older part of the village, follows the line of the River Tas and the village extends up a small hill to the Church and on to a larger residential area, Upper Tasburgh, where there is a Post Office and Primary School. Across the A140 Norwich to Ipswich Road is the Countryman Pub. 5


Tasburgh Parish Plan

Tasburgh’s facilities The facilities in the Village consist of: Village Hall including all-weather courts, skateboard park and playing field Church Post Office and shop Primary school Iron-age fort The Village Hall lies between Upper and Lower Tasburgh and is used for a wide range of activities including a Playgroup, Scouts, an amateur dramatics group, a social club and meetings of the Parish Council. The size of the village means that many of these groups depend on residents of other nearby villages to contribute to their activities. This is a positive thing and means that residents meet and work with friends from the wider area. However, it also means that some activities cannot be made to be self-sustaining and this is a limitation on new activities that can be set up in Tasburgh.

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

The People of Tasburgh Of those who are in work, the majority (67%) work locally (in Norfolk). There is also a high proportion (44%) of people not in paid work. Extended families – how many can you think of? One characteristic of Tasburgh is that there are a significant number of extended families where more than one generation of a family live in the Village. This contributes to the tight social network in the village and the support that families can give each other. This is a desirable aspect of the village which should be retained if possible.

What do people think of living in Tasburgh? The general impression from the responses to the questionnaire was that people very much enjoy living in Tasburgh. The tranquillity of the village is valued, as well as the ease of access to work and facilities in Norwich and the surrounding area. There is no significant deprivation or problem with crime. The questionnaire tried to draw out any problems that might exist due to the isolated location of the village, but in general the transport links are considered satisfactory at present and car ownership is high.

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

Likes and dislikes What people like most about Tasburgh: 41.6% – friendly community / people 31.1% – peaceful village 19.3% – access to the city 18.4% – access to the countryside

What people like least There are very few things that people dislike in the village, other than the right turn onto the A140. In addition, there is very little demand for additional facilities. This reflects the high range of activities available in the village and the ease with which activities in Long Stratton and Norwich can be accessed.

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

The issues and our responses The following were the issues that are considered important or very important to residents of Tasburgh: Road safety / traffic Recycling Open spaces Footpaths / pavements Transport links / bus services Climate change Education Design of new development Development in the village Affordable housing

93.4% 91.5% 88.0 % 83.3% 81.4% 78.1% 75.0% 66.5% 60.5% 59.3%

These issues are taken up in the Parish Plan where action could be taken and our responses to them are contained on the following pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Communications Biodiversity and open spaces Traffic Physical improvements Footpaths Other access issues Renewable energy Facilities Future housing development

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pg 10 pg 12 pg 14 pg 15 pg 16 pg 18 pg 20 pg 21 pg 22


Tasburgh Parish Plan

Issue 1 – Communications Communication between residents is important to maintain and improve cohesion within the village, and prevent people becoming socially isolated. Communication is important to prevent social isolation.

Communication occurs through a number of mechanisms. Informal chats at events or in the street are important elements and should be encouraged by enabling people to walk through the village and enjoy its open spaces. A Welcome Pack could be put together for people who move into the village. This could include a map and a short history of the village, information about local services and contact details for the Parish Council, together with a letter of welcome from the Chairman of the Parish Council. The Tasburgh Quarterly is an important form of communication with all residents in the village and should continue to be developed and distributed as a key method of enabling residents to communicate with each other and the Parish Council. The Notice Boards around the village are also an important way of publicising events and should continue to be improved and maintained to communicate with residents and others who may pass through the village. Residents could also be reached through use of e-mail and the village website. It is clear that a significant number of people in the village 10


Tasburgh Parish Plan

work from home for a significant proportion of their time, and networks could be created between different groups who could help each other in different areas of work or interest. Parish Council meetings are held once a month in the Village Hall and are open to the public. Details of these meetings are published in the Quarterly and on the village notice boards. The Parish Council website should be further developed and updated. This should become an additional method of publicising events and decisions taken by the Parish Council. Links to other relevant sites should be included, such as the South Norfolk District Council page where planning applications and documents can be viewed. Discussion groups for residents could be created both through meetings and using the web so that those who currently do not engage significantly with the Parish activities can be reached, and thus links can be made between people with similar interests within the village. Policy A variety of methods of communication should continue to be encouraged and developed to enable people in the village to meet and develop strong contacts with each other. Recommended actions: Continue with improvements to the notice boards, Tasburgh Quarterly and website. Ensure that there are opportunities for people to meet and talk in informal settings such as at the park and other open spaces. Action: Parish Council

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

Issue 2 – Biodiversity and open spaces The Natural Environment and Rural Communities (NERC) Act came into force on 1st October 2006. This legislation introduces a new duty which requires public authorities including Parish Councils to have regard to the conservation of biodiversity. The definition of biodiversity is “the variety of life, including habitats and species (both plants and animals) and the way in which these living things interact with one another”. To all intents and purposes biodiversity is wildlife. The NERC Act makes it clear that conservation does not simply mean maintaining the existing biodiversity resource as it is today – it also means restoring or enhancing habitats or the populations of species. There are a number of parcels of open land that could contribute more positively to the amenity of the village. Some have potential for formal and informal recreation and others could have greater wildlife value if they were managed differently. Examples of these are: The site known as ‘Burrfeld Park’ on Low Road which is currently let to Tasburgh Parish Council and is being turned into a wildlife amenity area during 2009 The site of the iron-age fort which is owned by Norfolk Archaeological Trust Land adjoining Woodland Rise / Everson Road The churchyard The playing field A number of privately-owned sites

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

Some of these sites could be managed for the improvement of wildlife habitats, as well as creating access for recreational purposes for residents. Policy Open spaces in the village should be promoted and adapted for their value to residents for biodiversity, visual amenity and recreation. Recommended actions: Those open spaces that are owned by public authorities or organisations should be the first focus of future work, with those in private ownership to be the subject of later work in conjunction with the landowners. Survey the wildlife value of a specified number of open spaces and work with the landowners to develop an action plan for each site. Implement each action plan in conjunction with the relevant landowner. Action: Parish Council with landowners, support and advice from South Norfolk District Council and Norfolk County Council

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

Issue 3 – Traffic Traffic and road safety was the issue of greatest concern to the respondents of the Parish Plan survey. 93% of respondents named this as an important issue. This is a reflection of the increasing level of traffic of all kinds that use roads through the village, including heavy vehicles, farm traffic, commuters and local users. 93% of respondents named traffic and road safety as an important issue. The creation of better and safer footpaths is one way in which this issue can be addressed, but other measures should be taken forward also. These include developing ways to reduce speeding on roads within the village, and reduce the amount of heavy traffic using roads through the village. Policy Safety for pedestrians and cyclists should be a priority in the village. The Parish Council should investigate ways in which road safety can be improved for all road users and reduce speeding on all roads in the village. Recommended actions: Agree priorities for road safety measures and lobby highway authority accordingly. Action: Parish Council with County Council and Police

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

Issue 4 – Physical improvements There was no clear single issue raised about physical improvements to the village in the Parish Plan Survey, but many ideas were suggested for further consideration. These included improving some untidy open sites and private properties, less litter and more trees and street-scape improvements. Policy The appearance of the village should be maintained to a high standard through the efforts of property owners and the Parish Council. Recommended actions: Regular ‘litter picks’ should be organised to keep the roads free from litter. Verges and open spaces should be maintained and kept tidy. Action: All residents with Parish Council

Litter pickers, March 2007

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

Issue 5 – Footpaths It is a paradox that living in a country village such as Tasburgh does not afford easy access to the countryside by foot. Most of the walks in the vicinity of the village are on roads without footways. While walking along a country lane can be very pleasant, if these roads have a significant level of traffic then they can become unsafe, especially for children or older people. Some of the roads around Tasburgh are narrow and unsafe when there is traffic passing at speed. Access through and around the village suffers from the same problems and even walking to bus stops can involve a difficult journey on narrow roads. The responses to the Parish Plan questionnaire raised the provision of footpaths around and through the village as the most urgent issue. The single route that was identified as most important was the joining of Upper and Lower Tasburgh with an improvement to the pedestrian route at the bottom of Grove Lane. 60% of respondents from the questionnaire said that better footpaths are needed in the Village and of those 43% identified the bottom of Grove Lane as an area in need of a footpath. The other key areas include different points along the A140 – to Long Stratton, from Marlpit Lane, between the Mill Inn and the Countryman. Recreational footpaths are also needed and could be developed by maintaining existing paths and linking them to new routes. Policy Footpaths through the village should be promoted so that residents of all ages have easy access through the village both to reach all the available facilities (school, village hall, shop etc) and also for leisure purposes. Footpaths should be kept clear and safe. This will involve 16


Tasburgh Parish Plan

continuing joint work between the Parish Council and the Highways Authority (Norfolk County Council). The first footpath to be implemented should be the link between Lower Tasburgh and Upper Tasburgh. Others that could be investigated are, for instance, routes to the A140 along Saxlingham Lane and recreational footpaths, for example to follow the River Tas. Recommended actions: The feasibility for the following footpaths needs to be established: Internal access paths Lower Tasburgh and Upper Tasburgh connecting Marlpit Lane to the village External access paths along Saxlingham Lane to the A140 and Newton Flotman along the A140 to Long Stratton Leisure paths footpaths for walks that give access to the countryside around the village circular country walk around the village Action: Parish Council with County Council

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

Issue 6 – Other access issues Cycle paths 37% of respondents to the survey said that better cycle paths are needed in the village, while 50% said that they are not needed. Routes identified include around the village generally, including the bottom of Grove Lane, and to Long Stratton. While the majority of residents have not expressed a demand for cycle paths, the Parish Council could consider encouraging the trend for more sustainable forms of transport. In the context of reducing the demand for fuel and increasing the amount of exercise taken by young and old, cycling could play an important part in the future.

Policy Cycling should be encouraged, where it is safe, and opportunities should be taken to develop more safe routes where possible.

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

Recommended actions: If major highway works are proposed cycle routes should be built into the design. Buses 37% said we need better bus services and the main point made was a need for a later service to and from Norwich. The bus services to Tasburgh are regarded as satisfactory but there may be a need to publicise the timetables and routes so that services can be accessed more easily. Policy The use of buses should be encouraged as a sustainable form of transport and a way in which those who do not have access to a car such as the young and old can access services. This should be done through the promotion of bus routes and information about timetables.

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

Issue 7 – Renewable energy The issue of climate change is high on the agenda and the village could look at ways in which energy conservation measures could be undertaken, as well as ways in which renewable energy could be generated in order to make Tasburgh a more sustainable community. 67% of respondents to the survey said there is a role for renewable 67% of respondents said that there is a role for renewable energy in the village. energy in the village. Projects to develop renewable energy could include biomass, wind or water power. Combined heat and power schemes could be developed to minimise power losses and improve efficiency. Policy The generation of renewable energy in the village should be encouraged. New development in the village should be built with high levels of insulation to achieve the maximum amount of energy conservation. Recommended actions: Examine ways in which renewable energy could be generated and used in the village, eg: biomass project, solar power, wind power, and bring these forward. Action: Interested residents and Parish Council.

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

Issue 8 – Facilities The Parish Plan Survey did not reveal a significant demand for new facilities in the village. The main facility in the village is the Village Hall where the majority of the groups in the village meet. Discussions are underway to improve this building. Preston Primary School is based in a modern building which is not used out of school hours. There is scope for more activities to be held at the school and also for the Village Hall to be used more.

The size of the village means that many activities are not viable without significant support from residents who live in neighbouring villages. Policy Improvements to the Village Hall should be discussed. More use should be made of the school buildings as a central facility in the community. Recommended actions: Refurbishment or redevelopment of the Village Hall should be carried out, use should be made of other buildings and facilities as required. Action: Parish Council and Village Hall Committee 21


Tasburgh Parish Plan

Issue 9 – Future housing development The over-riding result from the Parish Plan Survey was that residents enjoy living in the village as it is and that there is resistance to any significant additional development: 50% said they did not want any new development in the village. 29% said they would accept more development if there were additional facilities to support it. 16% said they would not mind more new housing in the village. 28% said that if there is to be new housing, it should be a mixture of private and affordable housing. 17% said that it should be low-cost housing for first-time buyers. However, there is a possibility that a significant amount of new housing will be proposed in Tasburgh in the next five to ten years. It is important that the Parish Council has a clear policy on this matter so that it can respond to such proposals as and when they are made. In the latest draft of their Joint Core Strategy, the Greater Norwich Development Partnership classifies Tasburgh as a ‘Service Village’. This indicates that it “will be expected to accommodate 10 to 20 new dwellings as well as small scale employment or service development appropriate to the needs of the village and its immediate surroundings.” Policy 1. The site adjacent to the Primary School must be retained for future expansion of the school.

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Tasburgh Parish Plan

2. It is important that the rural character of the village is retained; additional development of up to 5% could be accommodated without jeopardising this. 3. Any small development should unite Upper and Lower Tasburgh and not further polarize it. 4. If new development is to be carried out in the village, the infrastructure of the village should keep pace with this. In particular this applies to road and footway improvements, and improvements to the School and Village Hall. 5. Field between Village Hall and Iron Age Fort to be acquired for better quality playing field. This could release the current playing field for a development of not more than six dwellings along the roadside frontage. Recommended actions: The local planning authority to take account of this policy. Action: District Council

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Thank you for taking the time to read this document, if you have an views or comments please let us know.

Tasburgh Parish Council 22 Henry Preston Road Tasburgh Norwich NR15 1NU 01508 470759 tasburghpc@btinternet.com tasburghpc.norfolkparishes.gov.uk

Tasburgh Parish Plan  

Sets out the vision for the village. Published in 2009 from results obtained by parishoners in 2008.

Tasburgh Parish Plan  

Sets out the vision for the village. Published in 2009 from results obtained by parishoners in 2008.

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