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Journal of Texas School Women Executives, Volume II, Issue 1 2013 Managing the Job. In Sacred Dreams, Brunner (1999) found that women are communicators and followers of seven specific organizational management strategies for successful careers. 1. Create and maintain a balance between job roles and gender related responsibilities. 2. Keep the agendas simple with a strict and clear focus on the care of children and student achievement. 3. Remain feminine and still be the head who is heard. 4. Do not act like a man. 5. Remove or let go of that which rises up to block success. 6. Remain calm, fearless, courageous and be a risk-taker with a “can-do” attitude. 7. Share power and give credit to those getting the job done. Managing Life. The strategies above assist the busy woman executive in the successful management of an organization while Riss and Palagano (2011) offer suggestions for life management with practical ideas for personal success. 1. Make time for family. 2. Don’t compare yourself to others. 3. Stay in the moment and try to complete one task, then another; instead of multitasking. Multitasking can lead to quick burnout. 4. Meditate daily to keep your personality in check. It shouldn’t be set on ‘irritated’ all of the time. Commit to 10 minutes of exercise. 5. Find and keep someone to confide in so you can express yourself. 6. Limit sugar and caffeine 7. Write your worries down in two columns and label them: Things You Can Control and Things You Cannot Control. Take care of what you can control. Pray about the things you cannot control. 8. Focus, set limits, and do what matters most. 9. Practice saying No! The first time you do this, the tank will be running over…refueled at maximum capacity! 10. Keep a sense of humor. I have learned to recognize the negative pressure and stress habits in my own life. Rushing to work on time or a few minutes late is a set up for a bad start of the day; therefore, forging forward, I am working each day to arrive a little earlier to avoid traffic delays and a stack of phone calls and problems waiting for attention. I have learned that on days when I arrive early, I have time to answer early morning emails and voice mails. In our rushed and busy world, we typically eat, walk, talk, and work at the same time. Learning to separate meals from work gives a much needed break from mental stress. While learning to separate work from “things” it is important to separate work from personal life so the weekends and evenings can be spent guilt-free, (Gmelch, 1996). 71

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JTWSE—Volume 2  

JTWSE—Volume 2  

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