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Journal of Texas School Women Executives, Volume II, Issue 1 2013 Significance of the Study The top motivators for the position of superintendent seem to be the same for men and women (Harris, 2007). The need to make a difference, initiate change, make a positive impact, and personal/professional quest were the top five reasons Harris (2007) determined motivate women, as well as men, to pursue the superintendency. For women who are aspiring to the superintendency, knowing some of the experiences that other superintendents have had is beneficial to their preparations to attain a superintendent’s position. This knowledge could help close the gap between the number of women superintendents compared to the number of men superintendents. Method The purpose of this study was to examine current Texas women superintendents’ backgrounds and the educational preparation programs they attended. At the time of this survey, women occupied about 18% of superintendent positions in Texas (TEA, 2011). After receiving approval from the UT Arlington Institutional Review Board, a link to an anonymous, online survey at surveymonkey.com was e-mailed to all 1,232 superintendents in Texas listed in the Texas Education Agency’s database (TEA, 2011). The survey instrument for this study asked demographic information, district information and the name of the educational preparation program the superintendent attended. The survey consisted of 10 multiple choice questions with the opportunity to fill in an answer if their educational preparation program was not listed. They were also asked to fill in the state in which they received their credentials if it was a state other than Texas. Participants’ responses were collected in Survey Monkey. Descriptive statistics were used to describe this research. Findings The most important question this survey sought to answer was the name of the university or other educator preparation program current female superintendents in Texas attended. Of the 186 female (including interim) superintendents in Texas, 46 responded. One female was excluded since she was not a superintendent. This is a response rate of 25%. About 43% of current female superintendents in Texas that responded to the survey attended five colleges and one service center most frequently. Of those, Tarleton State and Texas A&M University – Commerce had the highest percentages with 9% each (Table 1). Table 1 College or Preparation Program

Percent

Number

Region 08 Education Service Center

6.5%

3

Sam Houston State University

6.5%

3

Texas State University-San Marcos

6.5%

3

West Texas A&M University

6.5%

3

Tarleton State University

8.7%

4

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Profile for Texas Association of School Administrators

JTWSE—Volume 2  

JTWSE—Volume 2  

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