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Journal of Texas School Women Executives, Volume II, Issue 1 2013 role of women in leadership, including the United States (Sherman, Beaty, Crum, & Peters, 2010). There is an apparent unfairness that women leaders must have a strength that is not required of men. Women leaders must be resilient enough to overcome stereotypes that are culturally embedded in order to both model and promote a socially just society. This resiliency from women leaders increases the quality of organizations through more competitive personnel selections and different perspectives. Method Narrative Inquiry In the tradition of qualitative research, narrative inquiry seeks to understand and know through what individual lives and stories tell us. “Narrative inquiry is stories lived and told” (Clandinin and Connelly, 1999, p. 20). Narrative is a both a research method and a means of reporting research. In this method, the researcher gathers, analyzes, and represents their personal stories. Narrative inquiry aims to share individual experiences within the natural setting of the individual (Clandinin and Connelly, 1999). Critical to this method is the role of the researcher who is an active participant in the process. The researcher’s own experiences and beliefs play a role as the accounts are restoried. Consequently the researcher is present in the reporting of this methodology. As an interesting twist to this study there are in fact two researchers present. Wes Hickey interviewed Rebecca, and Genie Linn entered the story in the analysis of Dr. Hickey’s transcripts and the ensuing dialogues. Therefore, the story is Rebecca’s story through the lens of the interviewer. Dr. Hickey, and fellow researcher, Dr. Vance Vaughn, bring the male view and understanding of women in leadership. There is also Dr. Linn’s perspective of the story retold and analyzed through the feminine lens of a school leader. The contrasting and paralleling views offer a multidimensional view of the same data. Background Narrative of the Interview In August of 2011, Dr. Hickey returned to Central America for the twelfth time as a volunteer within an international partnership. The main purpose of the trips was to assist with principal workshops. These workshops had principals entering the largest town in the region for five days in August with two follow-up meetings during the school year. This consistent assistance was important in the scaffolding of information. The principals had previously complained about the lack of continuity in their workshops. Having a consistent trainer helped provide for common strategies that could be built upon. Another benefit of multiple visits was building strong trusting relationships with the principals. Trust is not built with an introduction. Developing these strong relationships takes time embedded with honesty and kept promises. Dr. Hickey had known Rebecca for several years before he began to question her about challenges as an educational leader. There were a few women who led schools in the principal workshop, but Rebecca was unique. Rebecca was in a rural village within the Central American rain forest, and she was achieving success despite cultural challenges. There were several interviews with Rebecca during a visit during August 2011. 32

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