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Journal of Texas School Women Executives, Volume II, Issue 1 2013 Each participant had to meet the following selection criteria; refugee from southern Sudan, living in the U.S. for less than three years, with young children not yet enrolled in preschool or early education programs, cannot read and write English in their homeland or in refugee camps, and speak the Dinka language fluently. The foremost reason for selecting refugees from southern Sudan was the extreme hardship of civil war and limited academic tutelage the southern Sudanese characteristically have compared to those hailing from other Sudanese regions. Method and Timeline of Events The study commenced with an orientation meeting, including the translators, at a centralized location in the Dallas, Texas area. Expectations and purpose of the study were explained. The timeline for the entire study was established and each translator received information about his/her role during the study. The next step was to meet with the 15 potential families for introduction, establish expectations, explain purpose of study and answer questions. After this meeting, ten interested families confirmed their participation in the study, two families withdrew and three families remained undecided up until the day of orientation. Orientation for the 10 families was then conducted. These 10 families completed consent forms (parent consent for children 0-8 years old and adult consent form). Four translators were available to translate to families in the Dinka language. After the orientation meeting, the families were divided up into four groups and paired with a specific translator for the duration of the study. The next step was the main instrument of the research. Participants were interviewed using a highly structured questionnaire (30 questions; Questions 1-25 were multiple choice, while Questions 26-30 were open ended questions). Parents were interviewed individually in Dinka language and answers were recorded. Each translator had an audio recorder to use with each interviewed participant. Children ages 4-8 were also interviewed and recorded. The analysis of the interview responses began immediately. The translators transcribed the recorded messages from Dinka into English. Secondly, the transcribed responses were typed for each participant into an Excel spreadsheet. Eleven patterns were identified from the responses which prepared the framework for an effective intervention. The patterns offered information about perception of family literacy among the refugee families, one that was different from what is generally known here in the U.S. Interventions The results of the analysis paved the way into the intervention phrase. Each family received a tote bag that was filled with the following books: 1 Manny’s Tool Belt 1 Moving Circles 21

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JTWSE—Volume 2  

JTWSE—Volume 2  

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