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The News Magazine for Public Education in Texas SEPTEMBER/ OCTOBER

2016

Texas School Business

ON A MISSION ​Districts align

across the state to transform schools​

Also in this issue:

TASA President​Kevin Brown, Alamo Heights ISD TCEA President Bill Lewis, Seguin ISD Spotlight on Randal O'Brien, Goose Creek CISD


Houston Independent School District

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

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TCEA President Profile Seguin ISD’s Bill Lewis brings passion, experience to state office By Shelley Seale

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In the Spotlight Goose Creek CISD’s Randal O’Brien leads $267 million makeover

TASA President Profile Alamo Heights ISD superintendent says good teaching reaches beyond academics

By Leila Kalmbach

Cover Story

Mission: School Transformation Collaboration is turning vision into reality by Merri Rosenberg

By Bobby Hawthorne

Departments 6 Who’s News 37 Regional View 39 Calendar 43 The Arts 50 Ad Index

Columns

5 From the Editor by Katie Ford 9 The Law Dawg— Unleashed by Jim Walsh 11 Digital Frontier by Lisa Monthie 13 Game On! by Bobby Hawthorne

Photo Features

10 TASSP draws principals to summer workshop

16 Student Voices by Kushal Kadakia 50 The Back Page by Riney Jordan

17 TEPSA hosts summer conference in Austin 36 UT, TASA co-host 68th annual summer conference 42 Texas ASCD hosts technology conference in Irving The views expressed by columnists and contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or Texas School Business advertisers. The publisher also makes no endorsement of the advertisers or advertisements in this publication.


We’re district success thought leaders, providing solutions for achievement for some of the top districts across the nation. sungardk12.com SuccessK12@sungardps.com


From the editor

W

elcome to the 2016-2017 school year! The dawning of a new school year is an exciting time — for administrators, teachers and students alike. In every school lies the potential for new growth and discovery. In every classroom lies the potential for relationships and community to support that growth and discovery. Many of you have been working hard through the summer to ensure both teaching staff and students have the tools and resources integral to a 21st century education. In our cover story this month, we take a look at TASA’s Mission: School Transformation and how this centralized effort has inspired districts and higher education statewide to bring a new vision for Texas public schools into reality. Also in this issue, you’ll find profiles on some visionary thinkers in Texas public education, to include TASA’s own president, Alamo Heights ISD Superintendent Kevin Brown. Lastly, I want to point out that we have roughly 18 pages of Who’s News in this issue, due to the tsunami of incoming personnel announcements (thank you, school public relations people!), which is typical for this time of year. If you don’t see your district’s news in this issue, keep an eye out for the November/December issue. As always, I welcome your feedback and story ideas. Don’t hesitate to drop me a line at katie@texasschoolbusiness.com.

Texas School Business (ISSN 0563-2978 USPS 541-620) SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016 Volume LXIII, Issue 7 406 East 11th Street Austin, Texas 78701 Phone: 512-477-6361 • Fax: 512-482-8658 www.texasschoolbusiness.com

Katie Ford Editorial Director

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Katie Ford DESIGN

Phaedra Strecher COLUMNISTS

Bobby Hawthorne Riney Jordan Kevin Schwartz Jim Walsh ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER

Ann M. Halstead

TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Johnny L. Veselka

ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, SERVICES AND SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION

Ann M. Halstead

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MEDIA RELATIONS

Amy Francisco

Texas School Business (ISSN 0563-2978) is published bimonthly with a special edition, Bragging Rights, in December, by the Texas Association of School Administrators, at 406 E. 11th St., Austin, TX 78701. Periodicals postage paid at Austin, Texas, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Texas Association of School Administrators, 406 East 11th Street, Austin, TX 78701. © Copyright 2016 Texas Association of School Administrators

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

5


Who’s News

and a master’s degree in sports administration from Florida State University.

Anderson-Shiro CISD

Abilene ISD

Joe Alcorta, who has been the district’s director of personnel since 2011, has been promoted to executive director of human resources. The Abilene High School graduate received his bachelor’s degree in applied mathematical sciences from Texas A&M University and both his master’s and doctoral degrees from Tarleton State University. Abilene ISD announces that Ryder Appleton is the new director of career and technical education. For the past five years, he has been with Waxahachie ISD as an assistant superintendent, executive director and director. An educator for 16 years, he holds a bachelor’s degree in agriculture science education and a master’s degree in educational administration, both from Texas A&M University. Stevanie Jackson, former ninth grade academic specialist at Cooper High School, has been named principal of Bonham Elementary School. Former Madison Middle School Principal Cyndi Smith has transferred to the district’s Curriculum and Instruction Department as director of professional learning. She has been with Abilene ISD since 1994 as a teacher, instructional specialist and principal. Smith holds a bachelor’s degree in deaf education from Texas Christian University and a master’s degree in education administration from Abilene Christian University. Tina Wyatt has assumed the role of principal of Madison Middle School. She was principal of Bonham Elementary since 2013 and has worked in the district as a teacher and administrator for 24 years. A graduate of McMurry University, she earned her master’s degree from Abilene Christian University.

Alamo Heights ISD

Laurel Babb retired at the end of the 20152016 school year from serving as principal of Cambridge Elementary, the same school she attended as a child. A new athletic director is in place. Jennifer Roland, who held the same position in Lubbock ISD since 2013, has a bachelor’s degree in physical education from McPherson College, where she also worked as an assistant professor,

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

The district’s new superintendent, Scott Beene, comes to Anderson-Shiro ISD from Big Sandy ISD, where he also held the top position.

Aubrey ISD

David Belding, former superintendent of Millsap ISD, is the new superintendent. He graduated from Texas Christian University with a bachelor’s degree in music education and earned his master’s and doctoral degrees from Tarleton State University.

Austin ISD

Sandra Creswell has been approved as associate superintendent for area 1 elementary schools, a position she most recently held on an interim basis. Prior to that, she was principal of Joslin Elementary. She has a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and a master’s degree in educational administration from The University of Texas. Richard Garner has been named principal of Blackshear Elementary School, coming to his new campus from serving as the district’s senior student learning and assessment associate in the Office of Educator Quality. He has a bachelor’s degree in Spanish from Whitworth College and a master’s degree in educational administration from California State University. Norman Elementary welcomed new Principal Cynthia Gonzales when the new academic year began. She was previously assistant principal of Winn and Campbell elementaries and also worked in Temple ISD. Sammi Hutchinson has been named to lead Anderson High School as principal. She was previously an assistant and associate principal of that campus, and most recently held the top position at Murchison Middle School. Hutchinson is a graduate of The University of Texas, where she also earned her master’s degree in educational leadership. The new chief human capital officer is Fernando Medina, former assistant superintendent of human resources in Richardson ISD. He received his bachelor’s degree in music from the University of North Texas and his master’s degree in education from The University of Texas at Arlington. His doctorate in education was awarded from the University of North Texas. Now leading Baldwin Elementary School as principal is Jennifer Murray, most recently an assistant principal at Dripping Springs and Walnut Springs elementary schools in Dripping Springs ISD. She has a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University) and a master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University. Corrine Saenz is now principal of Reilly Elementary School. In addition to working

in Sheldon and Grand Prairie ISDs, she was a counselor at Austin ISD’s Becker Elementary. She has a bachelor’s degree from Marywood University and a master’s degree in education from the University of Houston. Craig Shapiro will oversee 17 high school campuses as associate superintendent for high schools. He was most recently interim associate superintendent for high schools. In addition, he has been principal of Crockett High School in Austin ISD and of Dodge High School in the Bronx, N.Y. He holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Pace University, a master’s degree in education from Fordham University, and a professional diploma in school district administration and supervision from Mercy College. Pease Elementary’s new principal, Cynthia Sinegal-Jackson, was most recently an assistant principal of Hart Elementary and previously was a mentor teacher in the Department of Educator Quality. She is a graduate of Huston-Tillotson University. She has a master’s degree in educational administration from Concordia University.

Bastrop ISD Cedar Creek Elementary began the school year with a new principal. Dolores Godinez comes from Austin ISD, where she was founding principal of Webb Primary School. She is a graduate of the Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon, Mexico, and earned both her master’s degree in multicultural education and a doctorate in curriculum and instruction from The University of Texas.

Beaumont ISD

Lydia Bahnsen has been approved to lead

Vincent Middle School as principal. Her most recent position was principal of Regina-Howell Elementary School. Andre Boutte has accepted the job of head basketball coach at West Brook High School. He was athletic director of Port Arthur ISD’s Memorial High School from 2009 until taking on his new job. A head coach for 22 years, he has also worked in Port Arthur and Kountze ISDs. Lachandra Cobb, former assistant principal of Smith Middle School, is now the campus principal. The new principal of Early College High School is Kristi Fuselier, former director of student activities at West Brook High School, then the school’s interim principal. She is a graduate of Lamar University, where she also received her master’s degree. Gloria Guillory has been appointed principal of Fletcher Elementary School, having worked there as an assistant principal for the past four years. She holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Lamar University.


Now serving as principal of Bingman Head Start is Carolyn “Sue” Little, who was the school’s program coordinator for the past seven years. She earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Lamar University. The new principal of Charlton-Pollard Elementary School is Charisma Popillion, who was assistant principal of Homer Drive Elementary. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Lamar University and her doctorate from Texas Southern University. Donna Prudhomme, who had been serving as interim principal of Ozen Magnet School, is now campus principal. She received her bachelor’s degree from Lamar University, her master’s degree from Prairie View A&M University and her doctorate from Nova Southeastern University. Now serving as principal of Regina-Howell Elementary School is Kimberly Screen, moving to her new job from East Chambers Elementary, where she also held the top job. Her bachelor’s and master’s degrees were awarded from Lamar University. Paul Shipman, now principal of Homer Drive Elementary, was previously the district’s director of career and technical education. Martin Elementary has welcomed Jacqueline Strambler as its new principal. The Washburn University graduate holds a master’s degree from the University of Houston-Clear Lake and was previously an administrator at Martin and Dishman elementary schools. Former Hardin-Jefferson ISD high school Principal Diana Valdez has been appointed principal of West Brook High School, where she was an assistant principal from 2006 to 2011. She is a graduate of Oklahoma Central University. She earned her master’s and doctoral degrees from Lamar University. Wayne Wells, most recently principal of Charlton-Pollard Elementary, has been appointed principal of the Brown Alternative Learning Center and Pathways Learning Center. The new principal of South Park Middle School, Atina Young, comes to Beaumont from Sheldon ISD, where she was an elementary principal. A graduate of Stephen F. Austin State University, she holds a master’s degree from the University of Houston-Clear Lake and is pursuing her doctorate at Lamar University.

Belton ISD

Belton ISD has announced Mark Krueger as Belton High School’s head baseball coach. He has been an assistant baseball coach at that campus for the past 22 years. His bachelor’s degree was earned from the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor and his master’s degree from Tarleton State University.

Birdville ISD

Cecil “Skip” Baskerville has been approved as associate superintendent for human resources, governance and support services.

He comes from Katy ISD, where he served as a coordinator of human resources from 2002 to 2012 and was most recently interim executive director of human resources. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Southwestern Louisiana and his two master’s degrees from Houston Baptist University. Major Cheney Elementary at South Birdville now has Darrell Brown as principal. An educator since 1991, he was previously director of curriculum in Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Hardin-Simmons University and his master’s degree from Southwestern Seminary.

Bonham ISD

Jason Busbey is the new assistant principal

of Rather Junior High School. He comes to Bonham from Van Alstyne ISD, where he held the same job. The Southeastern Oklahoma State University graduate holds a master’s degree in educational leadership from LeTourneau University. Now serving as assistant principal of Evans Intermediate School is Tracy Foster, former campus instructional coach. She received her bachelor’s degree from The University of Texas and a master’s degree in education from Texas A&M University at Commerce.

Brownsboro ISD The district announces the hiring of a new superintendent. Tommy Hunter comes to Brownsboro from S&S CISD, where he held the top job for the past five years. He was also superintendent of Walnut Bend ISD.

Bullard ISD The district’s new Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS) director is Karen Beam. She has been with the district for 10 years, most recently as dean of academics for Bullard High School. Beam holds a bachelor’s degree from The University of Texas at Tyler, where she also earned her master’s degree. A second master’s degree, in education, is from Stephen F. Austin State University. Jenny Kasson has been approved as principal of Bullard Elementary School. She has been an educator for 13 years, the past two as principal of Canyon Creek Elementary in Round Rock ISD. A graduate of Stephen F. Austin State University with a bachelor’s degree in interdisciplinary studies, she holds a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas State University.

Bryan ISD

Deborah Akin has been hired as director of special education. She brings 20 years of experience to her new job, having served in Lexington ISD as a special education instructional aide, teacher and coordinator and, since 2007, director of the department. She received both her bachelor’s degree

in applied learning and development and her master’s degree in education from The University of Texas. Cody Satterfield, an employee of Bryan ISD since 2006 and assistant principal of the INQUIRE Academy at Long Middle School since 2012, is now principal of Long Middle School. She earned her bachelor’s degree in animal science and her master’s degree in education from Texas A&M University. Michael Watts has been approved as principal of the Harris School. He was previously principal of Brenham ISD’s PRIDE Academy and the disciplinary alternative education program (DAEP). He holds an associate’s degree from Blinn College, a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and a master’s degree in education from Prairie View A&M University. The district’s new transportation director, Robert Welsh, comes to Bryan from Melissa ISD, where he was student services coordinator. He holds a bachelor’s degree in secondary physical education from the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor and a master’s degree in health, kinesiology and sports studies from Texas A&M University at Commerce.

Coppell ISD

Steffany Batik has been approved as princi-

pal of New Tech High School. She has spent the past three years in Grapevine-Colleyville ISD leading Grapevine High School. A new executive director of intervention services is in place for the district. Tracy Cartas, an educator with more than 30 years of experience in Texas and New York, was most recently director of special education in Northwest ISD in Fort Worth. Amanda McCune has been named director of external communications, a newly created position. With a bachelor’s degree in political science, McCune has six years of campaign management and communications experience, most recently with Shorey Public Relations.

Corsicana ISD

Cody Muldner has been selected to serve

as the district’s construction management coordinator. He has worked on a number of historic restoration projects, including the Navarro County Courthouse, Jefferson Davis’ home and St. Roch Market in New Orleans. He holds a bachelor’s degree in construction management from Everglades University. A number of other administrative appointments have been made. They are: Elmer Avellaneda, executive director of special programs; > See Who’s News, page 8 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

7


Who’s News > Continued from page 7 Maria Christon, assistant principal, Corsicana High School; Molly Corrington, assistant principal, Carroll Elementary School; Jennifer Farmer, administrative intern, Navarro Elementary School; Jason Hervey, assistant principal, Collins Middle School; Sean Kays, associate principal, Corsicana High School; Joan Otten, director of secondary English/ language arts; Jody Reese, assistant principal, Drane Intermediate School; Bradley Thomason, administrative intern, Turning Points Corsicana High; and Hollye Usery, assistant principal, Bowie Elementary School.

Cotton Center ISD A new superintendent has been chosen for the district. Jeff Kirby is a former elementary principal from Waelder ISD. With 27 years of experience as an educator, six of those as an administrator, he has been a classroom teacher, assistant principal and principal.

Cross Roads ISD

Richard Tedder is the district’s new super-

intendent. The 21-year veteran educator earned his bachelor’s degree in agricultural mechanization from Sam Houston State University and his master’s degree in educational leadership from Stephen F. Austin State University. Formerly a teacher and campus administrator in several Texas districts, he was superintendent of Big Sandy ISD since 2008.

Cypress-Fairbanks ISD Coming to her new job as principal of Labay Middle School is Lanette Bellamy, former director of instruction at Cypress Ranch High School. She has been an educator for 21 years — 16 of those with Cypress-Fairbanks ISD — and holds a bachelor’s degree in literature and a master’s degree in counseling, both from the University of Houston-Clear Lake. Ray Zepeda has been promoted from serving as associate athletic director to athletic director. He has 23 years of experience in Texas public schools, the past three in his most recent position. Zepeda earned his bachelor’s degree in kinesiology and biology from Texas A&M University and a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas Southern University.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

Dallas ISD Dallas ISD trustees announce the hiring of Janice Lombardi as principal of Skyline High School and Career Development Center. She comes to her new assignment from leading Garza Early College High School.

Dayton ISD

Lecia Eubanks has been selected to lead

Richter Elementary School as principal. During her 14 years as an educator, she has worked as a teacher, assistant principal and principal. She holds a bachelor’s degree in interdisciplinary studies from Texas State University and a master’s degree in mid-management from the University of Houston-Clear Lake. She is working on her doctorate at Lamar University.

Denton ISD

Robert Gonzalez, former principal of Borman Elementary, is now director of the extended-day after-school program for elementary students. He has more than 22 years of experience as an educator, the past 12 as a Denton ISD principal. A graduate of Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi, he holds a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction. Crownover Middle School’s new principal, Charlene Parham, spent the past two years as principal of Sanger High School. She has been an educator for 18 years, 10 as a principal and assistant principal. She attended the University of Kansas, graduated from The University of Texas at Arlington and received a master’s degree in mid-management administration from Tarleton State University. The newly appointed principal of Borman Elementary School, Michele Sandefur, began her career in 2001 in United ISD, joining Lewisville ISD the following year. She completed her bachelor’s degree at Texas A&M University and her master’s degree in educational administration at Texas Woman’s University. She is at work on her doctorate at Dallas Baptist University.

Diboll ISD An interim superintendent has been named. Vicky Thomas, former superintendent of Fayetteville Public Schools in Arkansas, returns to Texas, where she previously spent 28 years with Pasadena ISD.

Duncanville ISD Veteran Longview ISD administrator Andrea Hill Fields has joined Duncanville ISD as assistant superintendent of operations. She has been an educator for 37 years, working as a teacher, assistant principal, supervisor and director. A graduate of Louisiana Tech University, she received her master’s degree in educational administration from Stephen F. Austin State University.

Eagle Mountain-Saginaw ISD

from 2007 to 2012, and has most recently been an educational diagnostician. Arnold holds a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and special education from Charleston Southern University, a master’s degree in special education from The Citadel and a doctorate in educational leadership from Texas Christian University. The new principal of Eagle Mountain Elementary School is Terri Floyd, who comes to the district from Lewisville ISD, where she was an English language arts/social studies learning facilitator. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University at Texarkana and a master’s degree in education administration from the University of North Texas. Misty Germaine has been appointed curriculum coordinator for pre-K through sixth grade mathematics. An educator for 18 years and an employee of the district since 2006, she was most recently a mathematics instructional coach. Saginaw High School’s newest assistant principal is Lyle “Willie” Server. He comes to his new job from Southlake ISD, where he was a teacher and AP intern. Now serving as a Let’s Inspire Innovation ‘N’ Kids (LIINK) facilitator is Candice Williams-Martin of Eagle Mountain Elementary School. She is working with the district’s four elementary campuses.

Eanes ISD

intendent.

Coming to Eanes ISD from the Barrington 220 school district in Illinois, where he was assistant superintendent for operations and outreach, is Jeff Arnett. He will serve Eanes ISD as deputy superBill Bechtol, who has been

deputy superintendent for curriculum, instruction and assessment since 2004, has postponed his planned retirement to spend the next academic year as interim principal of Barton Creek Elementary. John Burdett has been approved by the board of trustees to serve as assistant superintendent of human resources. He comes to his new position from Plano ISD, where he was director of employee recruitment and retention. He holds two master’s degrees, in secondary language arts and in educational leadership, from Auburn University, and a doctorate in educational administration from the University of North Texas.

Audrey Arnold is principal of Lake Pointe

Elementary School. She previously worked in White Settlement ISD as superintendent,

> See Who’s News, page 18


THE LAW DAWG – UNLEASHED

Who qualifies under Section 504?

A

by Jim Walsh

shley is a good student. She is a sophomore in high school, getting good grades in honors and advanced placement classes. She’s been in your district since kindergarten and has sailed through without calling much attention to herself. Teachers love students like Ashley. She is quiet, cooperative, bright and eager to learn. So it came as a big surprise when Ashley’s parents asserted that she should be served under Section 504. The parents told the principal that they believed Ashley had Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), predominantly inattentive type. The parents asked the district to conduct an evaluation to look into this and then convene a team to identify the girl as having a disability as per Section 504. The 504 team then would develop a set of classroom modifications that the teachers would be required to provide. Of course, she would need some accommodations when the state tests were administered. Teachers and administrators huddled to consider this request and arrived at the opinion that Ashley was doing very well without any special help. There were lots of kids in the school more needy than Ashley. How could she qualify as “disabled” when she earns As and Bs in high-level classes? The parents responded by explaining that Ashley’s high level of achievement was due to the extensive help the parents were providing and the exceptional efforts Ashley was making. What would you do? The recommendation here is to review the Resource Guide issued by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) before you do anything else. In this guide, which is specifically about kids with ADHD, OCR reminds us that kids who are achieving well academically should not be automatically excluded from Section 504. We’ve been told that before, so it’s not entirely new. But the particular emphasis on this issue in this publication presents practitioners with some practical dilemmas. Going far beyond its legal enforcement role,

LAWYERS. ADVOCATES. LEADERS.

OCR cites the Centers for Disease Control for the proposition that there are three types of ADHD: predominantly inattentive, predominantly hyperactive-impulsive and combined. Our hypothetical Ashley is of that first type. We usually think of ADHD showing up via impulsive and/or disruptive behavior. But OCR now advises us that we may be missing the boat by failing to evaluate the “generally quiet and cooperative student” who has the predominantly inattentive type of ADHD. Then, there is this: “A student with ADHD may perform a major life activity in a different condition, manner, or amount of time than a student without ADHD. This can explain why students who make satisfactory academic progress and are achieving good grades in academically rigorous classes may still have a disability and could be eligible for special education or related services.” That sure sounds like Ashley. She doesn’t look like your typical candidate for Section 504, but OCR advises that if she is getting those good grades “only as a result of having extra time on exams, or receiving help at home in completing assignments or studying for extraordinarily long periods of time” she may indeed be eligible. And remember: Eligibility is determined without regard to “mitigating measures.” So, the question is not: How is she doing? The question is: How would Ashley be doing without the extra time, the help at home and the “extraordinarily long periods” of study? We foresee many ambiguities here. How much help at home is too much? How long is an “extraordinarily long” period of study? Lawyers like ambiguity in the law, but, for teachers and administrators, it can be a nightmare. Ambiguity in the law leads to uncertainty. Uncertainty breeds litigation. Litigation rewards those who are assertive more than those who have greater need. So, what would you do? Read the OCR’s resource guide and discuss it with your legal counsel before you decide. You can find it online at www.ed.gov/ocr.

WALSH GALLEGOS T R E V I Ñ O R U S S O & K Y L E P. C .

Walsh Gallegos is the leader in providing reliable and effective legal representation to school districts, co-ops, and other governmental entities.

CALL AUSTIN OFFICE AT 512.454.6864

WALSHGALLEGOS.COM

JIM WALSH is an attorney with Walsh Gallegos Treviño Russo & Kyle PC. He can be reached at jwalsh@wabsa.com. You can also follow him on Twitter: @jwalshtxlawdawg. Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

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Photo Feature

TASSP DRAWS PRINCIPALS TO SUMMER WORKSHOP The Texas Association of Secondary School Principals hosted its annual Summer Workshop in Austin in June. Themed “Remember the Students,” the event explored best practices, leadership skills and 21st century education trends.

Frederick Black of Richmond ISD and Travis Young of Dayton ISD.

Brent Evans and Jeffrey Fleemor of Tahoka ISD with Janet Lumpkins and Jerry Crowell of Arlington ISD.

Michelle Coleman of Frisco ISD and Ignacio Estorga of El Paso ISD.

Maria Alcorn and Stephanie Sanders of Glenn Heights ISD.

Elizabeth Schubert and Denton Taylor of Goliad ISD.

Henry Hobbs, Raff Saeed, Demetrius McCall and Eugene Williams of Houston ISD.

Nathan Heflin of Ore City ISD and Max Rutherford of China Spring ISD.

Shad Scharlach of Wimberley ISD and Walter Darnall of San Antonio ISD.

Amanda Rasco and Laura Underwood of Houston ISD.

Cynthia Retana, Valerie Hairston and Joanne Anguiano of El Paso ISD.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016


DIGITAL FRONTIER

How technology can aid studentcentered learning by Lisa Monthie

T

hirteen years into my teaching career, I still treasure one gift given to me at my graduation: a coffee cup with a quote by Benjamin Franklin. It says: “Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I may remember. Involve me and I learn.” Involving students in the learning process is just as important today as it was when I began teaching in 2003. Research has shown that having a student-centered classroom allows students to take ownership of the learning, resulting in higher degrees of student engagement and deeper learning — and retention of that learning. A great teacher plans student-centered activities that provide opportunities for discussion, reflection and deeper learning. As administrators, how can we promote and encourage all teachers to maximize learning by integrating more student-centered instruction? With so many resources available, how do we select activities, technology and other instructional materials to leverage student-centered instruction in our classrooms?

to create a digital “vocabulary notebook.” Applicable apps: DoodleBuddy, Tayasui Sketches II, Penultimate and Notability for sketching. Pics4Learning, Photos for Class, Kiddle and Creative Commons Search for image banks. Also, for content review, create EDU Glogster posters or videos using Animoto or Adobe Spark. Graphic organizers. These can help with many areas of learning to visually organize and analyze learned information. Students can complete a Frayer model to review a concept, a Venn diagram to compare a set of concepts or a Mindmap to map the attributes of a concept. Applicable apps: Mindmeister, Coggle.it, Bubbl.us and Padlet for creating graphic organizers. LucidCharts, Google Draw and Text2Mindmap for creating and collaborating.

Do not cut off The Writing, journaling and notebooking. black outline sky’s the limit for integrating this tool. Students can write a “Twitter ticket,” summarizing what they have learned in 140 In attempting to answer these questions for characters or less. They can create a “word myself, I turn, yet again, to Robert Marza- cloud” outlining a concept’s characterisno’s “Nine Essential Instructional Strategies.” tics. Through journaling, students can reWhile all nine of these instructional strate- flect upon connections or inferences they have made about the content. Creating a gies are high-yielding and evidence-based, Advertiser: WRA flyer Architects, Inc. or brochure that summarizes a conI find myself using three components frecept’s key points is also an effective strategy. Art Deadline: Thursday, February 04, 2016 quently for all grades, performance levels and Applicable apps: Canva, Pablo, Notegraphy, Submitted Date: Friday, January 29, 2016 content areas: Wordle (or any word cloud generator), GooPublication: Texas gle School Business Magazine Drawing, visualization and other non-linDocs, Seesaw, Pathbrite, Digication or Ann Halstead, 512-963-6584 guistic representations. This component Portfolio Gen. a h a l ste a d @ ta s a n et .o rg can take many forms and is called by many names. “Sketchnoting,” or purposeful doo- Students who are actively engaged learn at higher levels, retain the learning longer, and dling, is one way Pub of Date(s): processing informaMarch-April 2016 tion non-linguistically. Students can sketch, can transfer the learning to other disciplines summarizing the information they have and contexts. The level of motivation increases while off-task behavior decreases. EngageSize/Color:to newly ac1/3-page vertical, full color mastered. Adding Adimagery 2.5” wide x 9.75” tall when the students are a part ment increases quired vocabulary is proven to increase learning process. These are a few of the Art Contact: Gradyof L. the Frank, AIA retention and deepen understanding of many ways technology can help promote a the term. Have students sketch images of WRA Architects, Inc. student-centered classroom. a term or find images online for the term 214-750-0077 main

Full Architectural Services Facility Assessment Site Evaluation Feasibility Studies Pre-Bond Planning, Budgeting Bond Election Promotion Bond Program Management Programming Master Planning Architectural Design Interior Design Scope-to-Budget Management Construction Administration

972-658-0103 cell LISA MONTHIE serves as Waco ISD’s technology professional development specialist and collaborates gfrank@wraarchitects.com with the Office of Professional Development and Instructional Technology to integrate technology at all grade levels. Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

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Helping students to identify their own interests and develop unique abilities while preparing them for 21st century careers that have not been invented yet.

perkinswill.com


GAME ON!

To play or not to play by Bobby Hawthorne

I

know this kid. He’s a natural athlete and leader. Bulldog competitive. Strong arm. Good speed and coordination. He’ll likely be free to pick his sport, and if I had to bet good money, I’d lay it on football. He comes from a football family and a football culture. His dad played middle linebacker at a private school in Savannah and is a huge Georgia Bulldog fan. The family lives in Atlanta, where prep football is almost as big as it is here. I just don’t see how he dodges getting drenched in the “Friday Night Lights” squall. This kid, by the way, is 4 years old, but, holy cow, you should see him throw a spiral. It’s a thing of beauty. Now, if you had asked me two or three years ago if this boy should play football, I would have glared at you like you’d grown a third eye.

“Well, duh,” I would have spouted. Football is to America what fromage is to France. We eat it up. It cuts a path straight to high school popularity, possibly even celebrity, and — as something of an attending benefit — it purportedly teaches all types of high-ceiling life lessons involving character, discipline, motivation and so forth. Life is, after all, a Darwinian grudge match, and young people learn to compete by competing. Repeatedly, they’re asked to “sacrifice” for the team, the school, the greater good and, classically, that means sacrificing time and sweat. And then, occasionally, as we now know, they’re asked or feel compelled to sacrifice much, much more. I was reminded of this in reading about the early retirement of former Baltimore Raven offensive tackle Eugene Moore. “The last 18 years have been full of traumatic injuries to both my head and my body. I’m not complaining, just stating a fact,” Moore wrote in a blog post. “Has the damage to my brain already been done? Do I have (chronic

traumatic encephalopathy)? I hope I don’t, but over 90 percent of the brains of former NFL players who have been examined showed signs of the disease. I am terrified.” He’s terrified. Ponder that. He’s lined up against Clay Matthews and J.J. Watts, and now he’s terrified? Though he was released recently by the Ravens, he’s confident he can overcome his recent rash of injuries and continue to play “at a very high level.” And yet, he’s walking away. “I am thinking of my family first right now — and my health and my future,” he wrote. And who can blame him? But if socioeconomics and social pressure weren’t considerations, if he knew then what he knows now, would he have played? Would his parents have let him play? Will he let his children play? Those are the big questions. I’ve read the UIL’s concussion protocol and applaud its “when in doubt, sit them out” mantra. In three or four years, when the parents of the 4-year-old boy I mentioned above are forced to make this call, should they “sit him out” even if he loves the game and is great at it? If so, how will they justify their decision?

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That’s a losing argument, inasmuch as parents often allow their teenage kids to drive four-wheelers through swamps and pickups down busy streets at night, which is spectacularly more dangerous than football or cheerleading or any other school activity.

Texas School Business provides education news to school districts, state organizations and vendors throughout the state. With ten issues a year, TSB can be an effective news source for your organization.

Besides, no one knows what’s to come over the next bend, over the next hill. Fate is fickle. Still, if this child is mine and I am forced to decide, do I allow him or her to play football? Honestly, I can’t say that I do.

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BOBBY HAWTHORNE is the author of “Longhorn Football” and “Home Field,” published by UT Press. In 2005, he retired as director of academics for the University Interscholastic League.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

13


Mission: School Transformation

Collaboration is turning vision into reality by Merri Rosenberg

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he Mission: School Transformation movement is spreading like wildfire across Texas, clearing out old ways of doing things and making room for new growth. The roots of Mission: School Transformation can be traced back to 2006, when 35 Texas superintendents developed a new vision for public schools. Their vision, in large part, was in response to the existing educational landscape of “teaching to the test” and high-stakes testing. The 35 superintendents, meeting for two years as the Public Education Visioning Institute, discussed how to transform this landscape into an environment that teaches critical thinking, collaboration, innovation, communication and problem solving. Their ideas, published in the document, “Creating a New Vision for Public Education in Texas,” called for engagement in digital learning, multiple assessments for students, meaningful learning standards, organizational transformation and a restoration of local control. A fantastic vision, indeed. But who would bring it into existence? Enter the Texas High Performance Schools Consortium, 23 districts selected in 2012 by the Texas education commissioner and charged with turning the vision into a reality. In recent years, the Texas High Performance Schools Consortium has grown to include about 85 associate districts, all desiring to support Mission: School Transformation and bring the new vision for Texas public education to life. In tandem, more centralized efforts have gained momentum too. Brandon H. Core, TASA’s associate executive director of school transformation and leadership services, says

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his department has created professional development offerings and opportunities to connect and collaborate. Moreover, in March, TASA launched a website for Mission: School Transformation (www.tasanet.org/ transformation), providing an online archive of related content and information on how to get involved. There has been an organic wellspring of regional groups determined to see the new vision take root — outfits like the North Texas Regional Consortium (NTRC) and the Community Schools Transformation Alliance (CSTA). Allen, Coppell, Frisco, Highland Park, Lewisville, McKinney, Northwest, Plano and Richardson make up the NTRC. CSTA is comprised of Anna, Blue Ridge, Caddo Mills, Celeste, Commerce, Community, Crandall, Farmersville, Kemp, Melissa, Royse City, Sunnyvale, Van Alstyne and Wolfe City. Sunnyvale ISD Superintendent Doug Williams says: “We have to change education one classroom at a time. As superintendents, we can discuss how it should change, but true change happens with the classroom teacher.” Williams says CSTA has “moved away” from superintendent-led discussions on bigpicture ideas. Instead, the alliance has embraced a more teacher-centric approach, providing space for educators to share their ideas. He points to EdCamp as one example. The content of this CSTA event is driven by what teachers and campus administrators want to explore and learn. Similarly, NTRC member Gena Gardiner, who is the assistant superintendent for curriculum, instruction and special programs in Highland Park ISD, says the collaboration

happening at the regional level is invaluable to supporting the new vision. “The regionals are having a great impact,” she says. “In our consortium work, the main focus has been how we can learn from each other.” She points to transformation site visits as a key example. For these visits, small groups of teachers and administrators travel to other schools within the NTRC to observe their peers in action. At the end of the day, the visiting teachers have a chance to compare notes. “They share resources and knowledge and go back to their districts to work with principals and campuses,” says Gardiner. “The idea is to let it serve as a laboratory.” Gardiner says teachers participating in site visits have been eager to learn how others integrate technology, improve STEAM and STEM education and incorporate multiple ways to assess students. Looking ahead, NTRC also sought proposals from area universities to develop curriculum that supports the new vision. The North Texas group found a partner in Dallas Baptist University (DBU). Neil Dugger, dean of the Bush College of Education, says of the curriculum: “It’s built to lay a foundation on that visioning work.” For example, courses on curriculum design and administration include authentic assessments and engagement with parents and the community. “DBU feels really privileged,” Dugger says. “We really want to develop servant leaders to make a difference.”


Ultimately, of course, making a difference comes down to what happens in the classroom. TASA President and Alamo Heights ISD Superintendent Kevin Brown, whose district is a Texas High Performance Schools Consortium associate member, says student engagement has been the focus of school transformation efforts in Alamo Heights. “If I walk into a classroom, rather than seeing kids sitting in rows listening to the teacher, I want to see them doing something, whether working in teams on a project or preparing a presentation,” he says. As one example, Brown cited a high school rocketry course. The course is not about encouraging all students to become rocket scientists, but to show students that what they learn in school has real-world application. Alamo Heights ISD also launched a pilot program this year in 17 redesigned classrooms, where every student is given a digital device. The district provided an intensive, one-week training for the pilot teachers, who will continue to receive support from instructional coaches. The goal is to expand the program district-wide within the next three years. “Let’s move the needle slowly,” says Brown. “I would rather have lots of small successes than a big failure. It’s not about the technology. It’s about designing experiences for kids that result in profound learning.” The focus for some districts, like Clear Creek ISD, has been developing meaningful assessments, based on their communities’ values. “We’re no longer focused on assessments for accountability,” says Superintendent Greg Smith, a member of the Visioning Institute and the High Performance Schools Consortium steering committee. “It’s about using multiple assessments to diagnose students and teach to their needs.” He says the district is more interested in what students are doing in their classrooms, as well as on the PSAT, SAT and TSIA — rather than the STAAR test. Other measures may include how students perform in robotics or in science fair projects, for example. Smith says the system has been in use for the past three years. Hudson Superintendent Mary Ann Whiteker serves on the steering committee for associate members of the Texas High Performance Schools Consortium. She was downright gleeful as she recalled the day she took down the

informational banners about state testing in her school district. “I sent an administrative directive that no teacher could mention the tests and no worksheets could go home,” Whiteker says. “Five years ago, our district embraced the new vision 100 percent.” She says her district uses multiple forms of assessments, such as portfolios, in which teachers maintain folders on the work that students produce, and authentic assessments, such as asking students to do presentations on what they have learned. Another key difference is having frequent assessments in all grades on what teachers taught. Teachers are encouraged to do quizzes at nine-week intervals to review material. These quizzes typically contain 30 short questions and a few essay questions. In high school, teachers also administer end-of-semester exams. Whiteker adds: “We redesigned the campus to align with the 21st century learning plans. It was a yearlong process, analyzing the principles and figuring out where we were and what the barriers were to what we needed to do.” A campus redesign doesn’t necessarily mean knocking out walls. It’s more about rethinking how teachers and students operate within a space. Furniture has been rearranged to promote group participation and collaboration, she says. According to Whiteker, the visioning document has “changed the culture of schools and community. It brings the joy of teaching and learning back to the classroom.”

Dealing with speed bumps There are, of course, speed bumps on the path to re-visioning public education in Texas, especially in more rural districts. “It’s still challenging with STEM,” admits Kim Alexander, superintendent of Roscoe Collegiate ISD, one of the original 23 districts in the Texas High Performance Schools Consortium. Yet, his district is making strides on other fronts. Alexander has devoted resources to the state’s first early college program in a rural district. Launched in 2009, the program’s courses start in ninth grade, but visionary thinking is part of the district’s culture from early childhood classes onward. Early college is designed to “break generational poverty,” explains Alexander. The expectation is that all students will take college courses, and 90 percent or more will com-

plete an associate degree prior to graduation from high school. In addition, all students in grades 7 through 12 go through the AVID College Readiness Curriculum every day. Moreover, last year the district added a workforce-readiness program to ensure students are well prepared for the transition after high school. “We develop partnerships with real for-profit businesses that pay student apprentices,” Alexander says. These opportunities include hands-on experience in a range of fields, from biomedical science to engineering. Students can earn certifications too, from veterinary assistant to embryologist. “Research suggests that paid student apprenticeships in a field of interest is the most engaging educational experience,” the superintendent says. Visionary work is possible even in the smallest of districts. Case in point: Gunter ISD, student population 798. In partnership with neighboring Van Alstyne ISD, Superintendent Jill Siler’s district is finding new ways to support teachers as they align student instruction with the new vision. She says Gunter ISD also is exploring options for assessments that “don’t look like STAAR.” While a few traditional assessments remain, some innovative approaches include student projects that demonstrate skill mastery. For instance, Gunter ISD students have built and tested miniature roller-coasters to demonstrate their understanding of kinetic and potential energy. Siler admits she can’t make advancements on all fronts. The district’s size and financial constraints mean “technology is nowhere near where we want it to be.” “We’re just building the infrastructure to go to a 1:1, but we won’t let that be a barrier. We want to have intentional conversations about what we want the educational environment to look like,” she says. Creating more opportunities for conversations at the campus, district, regional and state level are key to the advancement of school transformation. Says Core: “Through partnerships, we are advancing the work and changing the things we can control.” MERRI ROSENBERG is a former education columnist for The New York Times.

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

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STUDENT VOICES

Clear Creek ISD graduate explains how high school prepared him for Duke U by Kushal Kadakia

L

ike most kids, I was both excited and apprehensive in the weeks leading up to my freshman year of college. As the only student from my school district to attend Duke that year, I worried about fitting in and making friends, while my anxious parents fretted about potential laundry mishaps (which thankfully never occurred) and my lamentable cooking skills (which still remain a work in progress). But, when I first set foot on campus, I knew the brochures and email advertisements had been telling the truth. College looked like everything it was hyped up to be, from the soaring arches and weathered stone buildings to the kids casually throwing Frisbees on the quad and studying on the sun-soaked grass. The first few weeks were a blur of new faces, late nights and free food. I quickly formed friendships with people from various cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds — discovering a shared eagerness to explore different disciplines, learn new concepts and take on the world’s challenges. In that moment, despite coming from different corners of the world, we were all connected by an infectious feeling of possibility. As a result, the beginning of classes was a little anticlimactic. Taking notes in a cavernous auditorium while a professor wrote out formulas on a chalkboard felt — boring. But, I quickly discovered that “class” in college was not limited to the lecture hall. An introductory course of 200 kids was sectioned into intimate discussion groups of 10 students — turning dry lectures into active debates. The chemistry equations I learned in lecture were brought

to life the next day in lab, as we synthesized theoretical concepts into practical lessons in science. From papers to problem sets, my mounting coursework lived up to the expected workload of college classes. As my friends and I worked to balance classes and extracurricular activities, I began to notice a different kind of diversity in my peers: their academic backgrounds. Some students had already been exposed to higher-level courses, like multivariable calculus, in college preparatory schools, while others struggled to learn the foreign language of academic writing for the first time. Seeing the broad spectrum of college readiness, I developed a new appreciation for my experiences in a learner-centered learning environment. The remarkable transition my school district, Clear Creek ISD (CCISD), made to learner-centered learning is a case study for how we can transform the public school system. Like far too many educators and learners across the nation, CCISD struggled with the challenges of tight budgets, inflexible teaching requirements and far too many standardized tests. With more than 40,000 kids, individualized instruction was not always a practical expectation for teachers. With a state-mandated curriculum, exposure to college classes, like organic chemistry, was not always possible for students. With publicly funded campuses, money was not always available for extracurricular pursuits. But, these circumstances are exactly why the shift toward learner-centered learning is so necessary.

Learner-centered learning is a shared commitment between students, parents and teachers to foster an environment that can meet the needs of each and every child in spite of institutional obstacles. This approach to education recognizes that each student is unique and does not seek to diminish a child’s potential through standardization. Instead, this framework aims to foster intellectual curiosity and develop portable skills through real-world experiences. Students are taught to think critically, write articulately and speak confidently. Educators work to instill in learners a willingness to ask the hard questions and the persistence to dig deep to find the right answers. Of course, teachers and parents recognize that the structure and delivery of learning is often dependent on a student’s educational context. Although we strive for equality of opportunity in education, resource limitations and social diversity contribute to the variation in every child’s learning experience. But, while learner-centered learning will look different for each child, it is still guided by the underlying principle of “students first.” In my high school, that meant empowering students through technology. Students from all socioeconomic backgrounds were loaned a computer free of charge. This was an incredible achievement for a public education system — one that put a world of information at a kid’s fingertips. With newfound access to online databases and resources, I was able to lead my debate > See Student Voices, page 34

“Student Voices” is a regularly featured column in Texas School Business. It’s an opportunity for students of all ages from across Texas to share their experiences in K-12 public schools. Contact Editorial Director Katie Ford at katie@texasschoolbusiness.com for publishing guidelines.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016


Photo Feature

TEPSA HOSTS SUMMER CONFERENCE IN AUSTIN Elementary administrators gathered in the captal city for the Texas Elementary Principals and Supervisors Association’s summer conference, which featured general session speakers Scott Burrows, Manny Scott and George Couros.

Brittany Braden of Cuero ISD and Sherron McGrew of Calhoun County ISD.

Gaila Booth and Maria Tovar of North East ISD.

Clifford the Big Red Dog and Nora Lamos of La Feria ISD.

Dalia Torres and Melissa Cardona of Calallen ISD.

Meridith Meyer and Cherika Edens of Fort Worth ISD.

Kristin Boyd, Marge Loucks and Coni Felinski Chandra Camp and Bonnie Wright of of Magnolia ISD. Jourdanton ISD.

Maela Edmonson, Lendy Oldaker and Tammy Katrina Bailey of Round Rock ISD and Alison Parrish of Llano ISD. Hall of Bastrop ISD. Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

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Who’s News > Continued from page 8 Heather Meek has accepted the position of principal of Bridge Point Elementary School. She was most recently principal of McSpedden Elementary in Frisco ISD, where she also worked as a diagnostician, special education teacher and assistant principal. Meek is a graduate of the University of New Mexico with a bachelor’s degree in education. She received her master’s degree in special education from Texas Woman’s University. Steve Ramsey has accepted the role of interim principal of Westlake High School. He has been with the district since 2002 as a social studies teacher, assistant and associate principal, and football and soccer coach. Most recently principal of West Ridge Middle School, he holds a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology from The University of Texas and a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas State University. The new assistant principal of Westlake High School, Bryan Shippey, joined the district in 2010 as principal of Barton Creek Elementary. He received his bachelor’s degree in psychology from Texas Tech University and a master’s degree in educational leadership and policy studies from The University of Texas at Arlington. Cody Spraberry now leads Forest Trail Elementary School as principal. He returns to the school where he taught for six years from serving as assistant principal of Hill Elementary in Austin ISD. He received his bachelor’s degree in behavioral sciences from Hardin-Simmons University and his master’s degree in educational leadership and policy from The University of Texas at Arlington. The new principal of West Ridge Middle School, Kendall Still, comes to Eanes ISD from serving as assistant principal of Reedy High School in Frisco ISD. Still graduated from the University of Central Oklahoma with a degree in history education, and holds a master’s degree in educational administration from Emporia State University. Now serving as associate superintendent of curriculum, instruction and assessment is Todd Washburn, who was an assistant superintendent with the district.

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Ector County ISD The following new principal assignments have been made: Yolanda Hernandez, Wilson & Young Medal of Honor School; Sam Martinez, Fly Elementary School; Susan Shelton, Burnet Elementary School; and Tristan Specter, Burleson Elementary School.

Fort Bend ISD

Julie Diaz of Travis High School is the district’s Secondary Principal of the Year. She has 30 years of experience, having also worked as a teacher and assistant principal. She is a graduate of the University of Iowa and holds a master’s degree in administration and supervision from the University of Houston. Mark Foust has been named chief of schools after serving two decades in the district as a teacher and administrator, the past three years as an assistant superintendent. He received his bachelor’s degree in history from Texas A&M University, his master’s degree in administration and supervision from the University of Houston at Victoria and his doctorate in education from the University of Houston. Thirty-year veteran educator Donna Whisonant of Sullivan Elementary School has been named Elementary Principal of the Year for Fort Bend ISD. She came to the district in 1986. During her career, she has worked as a teacher, department chair and assistant principal. Whisonant earned her bachelor’s degree in education from Sam Houston State University and her master’s degree in education from the University of Houston at Victoria.

Fort Worth ISD Former Keller ISD Chief Academic Officer Charles Carroll has moved to Fort Worth ISD, where he will fill the same position. He was with Keller ISD since 2008, when he was named executive director for intermediate and middle schools.

Frisco ISD New Christie Elementary School Principal Katie Babb comes from Plano ISD, where she also was a principal. An administrator in that district since 2005, she holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Delaware and a master’s degree from Wilmington College. She is pursuing her doctorate at the University of North Texas. Amanda Campbell is now Frisco ISD’s secondary director for curriculum and instruction, having served most recently in that position on an interim basis. She has a bachelor’s degree from The University of

Texas at Arlington and a master’s degree from Lamar University. Now leading Wakeland High School as principal is Donna Edge, formerly the school’s associate principal. An educator for 20 years, she holds a bachelor’s degree from The University of Texas at Arlington, a master’s degree from Texas Woman’s University and a doctorate from the University of North Texas. Rebecca Gaharan, a former diagnostician with 23 years of experience in education, is the district’s new special education coordinator. She received both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Baylor University. Chastity Johnson, now leading Allen Elementary School as principal, is a former assistant principal at Nichols Elementary. The 14-year employee earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Oklahoma and her master’s degree from Lamar University. Alicia Maphies, previously an assistant principal at Centennial High School, is now principal of that campus. She is a graduate of Michigan State University with two master’s degrees from California State University and the University of North Texas. Her doctorate was awarded from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Alex Mira, an elementary principal from Bakersfield, Calif., has been tapped to lead Sem Elementary as principal. An educator for 17 years, he earned his bachelor’s degree and two master’s degrees from California State University. The district’s new executive director of communications is Chris Moore, who held the same position in Garland ISD for the past five years. Prior to that, he was Kilgore College’s public and sports information director. Moore earned his bachelor’s degree in journalism from The University of Texas and his master’s degree from Lamar University. Sarika Pride, new principal of Bright Elementary School, most recently led Memorial Elementary in Plano ISD, working in that district since 2010. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee and a master’s degree from Cardinal Stritch University. Jennifer Redden, who was an associate principal at Heritage High School, has been promoted to principal of the new Memorial High School, scheduled to open in 2017. She has been with Frisco ISD since 2005. Redden earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and two master’s degrees — one in mathematics from The University of Texas at Dallas and one in educational leadership from Dallas Baptist University. Purefoy Elementary School’s new principal, Kena Robertson, was an assistant principal at Fisher Elementary. She is a graduate of Stephen F. Austin State University with a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas A&M University at Commerce. > See Who’s News, page 20


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Who’s News

Susie Koyle, Sem Elementary School;

> Continued from page 18

School;

Melanie Schroeder, who was most recently

director of finance for International Leadership of Texas, brings 16 years of experience to her new position as district payroll director. Kranti Singh, a former assistant principal at McSpedden Elementary School, is now campus principal. With the district since 2007, she received her bachelor’s degree in interdisciplinary studies from the University of Houston and her master’s degree in educational leadership from Southern Methodist University. The new principal of Cobb Middle School is Kecia Theodore, who was principal of the Lewisville Learning Center in Lewisville ISD. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Grambling University and a master’s degree from Texas Woman’s University. Former Purefoy Elementary Principal Mary Webb is now elementary director for curriculum and instruction. She joined the district in 2007 and has served at Purefoy since 2010. She has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Oklahoma and a master’s degree from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Matt Webb has been promoted from Centennial High School’s football offense coordinator to campus athletic director and head football coach. He has 25 years of experience teaching and coaching football, baseball, track and girls’ soccer. His bachelor’s degree is from The University of Texas at Arlington, and his master’s degree is from Lamar University. Eric Green is the new associate principal of Independence High School. Allison Ginn is the new principal of Independence High School. Frisco ISD has named several new assistant principals. They are: Melissa Bahnmiller, Purefoy Elementary School; Whitney Briggs, Early Childhood School; Jesse Chavoya, Lone Star High School; Dejon Conley, Corbell Elementary School; Kelly Cutler, Christie Elementary School; Amanda Dalton, Anderson Elementary School; Melanie Davis, Early Childhood School; Tai Davis, Frisco High School; Vince Dawes, Sparks Elementary School; Paige Dawkins, Pink Elementary School; Carrie Dellinger, Bright Elementary School; Laura Flynn, Nichols Elementary School; JoBina Grace, Rogers Elementary School; Jeremy Greenway, Nelson Middle School; Jacye Jamar, Fisher Elementary School;

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

Natasha McDonald, Centennial High Jenny McGowen, Miller Elementary School; Kandra Martinez, Robertson Elementary

School;

Alex Mira, Pink Elementary School; Tina Nixon, Carroll Elementary School; Sallye Norris, McSpedden Elementary

School;

Cari Owens, Nelson Middle School; Kami Patzkowski, Early Childhood School; Anabel Ruiz, Nichols Elementary School; David Westhora, Reedy High School; Stacey Whaling, Liberty High School; and Tracee Wysinger, Trent Middle School.

Georgetown ISD

Terri Conrad has been named director of CTE/College and Career Readiness. She joined the district in 2008 as an AP physics teacher at Georgetown High School, going on to serve as an assistant principal and, most recently, associate principal there. Conrad earned her bachelor’s degree in cognitive science and neuroscience from the University of Virginia and her master’s degree in educational psychology from The University of Texas. She is at work on her doctorate in school improvement at Texas State University. The new principal of Georgetown High School, Wes Vanicek, was formerly assistant principal of Coppell High School in Coppell ISD. He holds a bachelor’s degree in biology and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction, both from Texas A&M University.

Granbury ISD

Kendra Fisher has been

selected as head choir director at Granbury High School, coming from Crowley High School in Crowley ISD, where she served in the same capacity since 2010. Fisher is a graduate of Dallas Baptist University, with a bachelor’s degree in music education. Jimmy Heffernan returns to Granbury High School as an assistant principal after working there as a math teacher from 2009 to 2012. Since that time, he was an assistant principal at Robertson Elementary. He received his bachelor’s degree from The University of Texas and his master’s degree in education from Lamar University. The new principal of Baccus Elementary School, Robert Herrera, previously held the same position at West Elementary in White Settlement ISD. He began his career

in 2001 in Mansfield ISD after earning a bachelor’s degree from The University of Texas at Arlington, where he also received his master’s degree. Ammie Hill, now an assistant principal at Granbury High School, spent the past three years at Crossland Ninth Grade Center, where she was also interim principal for a year. She has a bachelor’s degree in history from Texas Wesleyan University and a master’s degree in education from Tarleton State University. Now serving as assistant principal of Roberson Elementary School is Laura Meek, formerly the school’s instructional specialist. An educator since 2005, she earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas Tech University and has done graduate work at Tarleton State University and Angelo State University. Mambrino School has welcomed Denisa Mendel as assistant principal. She comes to Granbury from Ector County ISD, where she was district math coordinator. She received both her bachelor’s degree in business administration and her master’s degree in elementary education from Texas Tech University.

Grapevine-Colleyville ISD

David Arencibia, who was assistant principal

of Grapevine Middle School, is now principal of Colleyville Middle School. He received his bachelor’s degree in Spanish from Harding University, his master’s degree in education from Texas A&M University and his doctorate in education from Walden University. Bryan Calvert is principal of Bear Creek Elementary School. He was most recently assistant principal of de Zavala Middle School in Irving ISD. He graduated Baylor University with a bachelor’s degree in education, going on to earn a master’s degree from Lamar University. Former Colleyville Heritage High School Associate Principal Lance Groppel has been promoted to campus principal. He holds a bachelor’s degree in physical education, health and special education and a master’s degree in educational leadership, both from Tarleton State University. His doctorate in education administration was awarded from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Conrad Streeter, most recently principal of Colleyville Heritage High School, is now the district’s executive director for instructional leadership. He came to the district in 2013 with more than 15 years of experience as a teacher, coach and administrator. A graduate of North Carolina State University, he holds a master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of North Texas, where he is at work on his doctorate. The district’s new executive director of special education, JoAnn Wiechmann, comes from Irving ISD, where she was special education compliance coordinator since 2012. The 30-year veteran educator holds a bachelor’s degree in communication disorders from The University of Texas at


Dallas, a master’s degree in speech/language pathology from Texas Woman’s University and a doctorate in educational leadership from Walden University. Taylor Elementary School’s new principal, Lisa Young, most recently held the same position at Rockenbaugh Elementary in Carroll ISD. The Baylor University graduate holds a master’s degree in educational administration from the University of North Texas. The new deputy superintendent, Rick Westfall, has spent 24 years as an educator in Texas, joining the district in 2011 as chief learning officer.

Gregory-Portland ISD

Xavier Barrera retired at the end of the

2015-2016 school year, bringing to a close 46 years as a teacher and principal. He began his career in education and with the district as an intern in the mid-1960s.

Harris County Department of Education

Darlene Breaux is the new director of special populations for the Teaching and Learning Center. She has 19 years of experience as a national trainer, principal and special services coordinator. Breaux is a graduate of Texas Southern University and received her master’s degree in educational management from Texas Southern University.

Hart ISD

David Cox, who was principal of Dimmitt

High School in Dimmitt ISD, is now superintendent of Hart ISD. An educator since 1985, he has been an administrator for 11 years. The district’s new elementary principal is Krista Gregory. She has spent the past 15 years as an elementary teacher, most recently working at Swinburn Elementary School in Tulia ISD.

Humble ISD After 41 years directing Humble ISD’s middle school band programs, Buck Bankston has retired. The district’s new superintendent, Elizabeth Fagan, brings 20 years of experience to her new position. Her most recent job was superintendent of the Douglas County School District in Colorado; she also served in the top position in Arizona’s Tucson Unified School District. Fagan received her bachelor’s degree from William Penn University. Her master’s, doctoral and education specialist degrees are from Drake University in Iowa.

Irving ISD

Stephanie Cook has been named director

of guidance and counseling. She began her career in 2006 as a special education teacher in Arlington ISD and worked in Birdville

ISD before joining Grapevine-Colleyville ISD in 2010. Cook’s bachelor’s degree in psychology and biblical studies was awarded from Dallas Christian College. She holds two master’s degrees, in counseling and school counseling, from Dallas Baptist University, where she is pursuing a doctorate. Blanca De la Sierra is the new principal of Keyes Elementary School, moving there from Brandenburg Elementary, where she was assistant principal. She began her career in Irving ISD in 2008 as a fifth grade dual-language teacher. She holds a bachelor’s degree in social science and a master’s degree in bilingual education, both from Southern Methodist University. Farine Elementary School welcomed its new principal, Joe Estrada, IV, at the beginning of the school year. A product of Irving ISD schools, he began his career 13 years ago and was most recently assistant principal of Jordan Elementary School in Dallas ISD. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston and his master’s degree in education from The University of Texas at Arlington. Newly promoted Associate Superintendent of Human Resources Magda Hernandez has been with the district for 18 years, the past two as assistant superintendent of human resources. She is a cum laude graduate of Texas Woman’s University and earned her master’s degree in educational administration from that institution. Imelda Little is the new division director of pre-K-5 schools, west. She formerly worked for the district as a bilingual teacher and vice principal of Townley Elementary before transferring to Mansfield and Grand Prairie ISDs, where she was principal of Icenhower Intermediate School since 2013. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas A&I University (now Texas A&M University at Kingsville). Now serving as division director for student support services is Laina McDonald. She has 31 years of experience in education, all in Castleberry ISD, where she most recently was assistant superintendent of instruction services. McDonald received her bachelor’s degree from Cameron University and her master’s degree in education from Wayland Baptist University. Her doctorate in education administration was awarded from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Eric Ogle, a 13-year employee of the district, is now principal of Lamar Middle School.

He comes to his new job from Nimitz High School, where he was associate principal. He holds two bachelor’s degrees, one in language and composition and one in communication studies. He also has two master’s degrees — one in secondary education from the University of North Texas and another in educational leadership and policy studies from The University of Texas at Arlington. Adriana Rico, former assistant principal of Haley Elementary School, has been promoted to principal of Britain Elementary. The 16-year district employee holds a bachelor’s degree from The University of Texas at Arlington and a master’s degree in administration from Grand Canyon University. The new assistant superintendent of school leadership and development, Shannon Trejo, was previously with the district for 12 years, moving in 2002 to Pasadena ISD. She returned to Irving in 2011 and has been serving as division director of K-8 schools, west. Trejo received her bachelor’s degree from The University of Texas and her master’s degree from The University of Texas at Arlington.

Jacksboro ISD

New Superintendent Dwain Milam comes to Jacksboro ISD from Collinsville ISD, where he also held the top job.

Jacksonville ISD

Jacksonville High School alum Bill Avera has returned to his hometown as the district’s new police chief. He has more than 40 years of experience in law enforcement, 12 of those in school-based policing. He most recently was assistant chief of police for Dallas ISD. The new associate superintendent of curriculum and student services, Lisa Cox, has been with the district since 2002 and was executive director of curriculum since December 2015.

Keller ISD

Justin Barrett, assistant principal of Elder

Middle School in Fort Worth ISD since 2014, is now principal of Trinity Springs Middle School. A graduate of the University of North Texas, he received his master’s degree in educational administration from Concordia University. Donnie Bartlett has been approved as principal of Timber Creek High School. He joins the district from Grand Prairie ISD, where he was an elementary, middle school and ninth grade principal. He received his bachelor’s degree in education from the University of North Texas and his master’s degree in educational administration from Dallas Baptist University. > See Who’s News, page 22 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

21


Who’s News > Continued from page 21 Cindy Daniel now leads Whitley Road Elementary School as principal. She comes to her new job with 27 years of experience, including stints in Abilene ISD; Lawrence, Kan.; and Norman, Okla. Daniel earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas Woman’s University, a master’s degree from Tarleton State University, and a doctorate in curriculum and instruction from the University of Kansas. Jennifer Gonzales has been named principal of Fossil Hill Middle School, coming to her new position with nine years of middle school principal experience, most recently in Brownsville ISD. Both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees were earned from The University of Texas at Brownsville. Casey Riles has been approved to lead Friendship Elementary School as principal. She has spent the past five years as an assistant principal in the district, four years at Florence Elementary and one at Bluebonnet Elementary. She received both her bachelor’s degree in education and her master’s degree in education administration from Texas Christian University. Leanne Shivers is the executive director of student services. She has been with the district for seven years — the past three as principal of New Tech High @ Coppell. She completed undergraduate studies at Central College in Iowa and received her master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of North Texas. Her doctorate in educational leadership and policy studies was awarded from Tarleton State University. The new principal of Keller-Harvel Elementary School, Leslie Tewell, comes from Granbury ISD, where she held the same position at Baccus Elementary for the past three years. A graduate of Texas Wesleyan University with a bachelor’s degree in elementary education, she earned her master’s degree in education administration from Tarleton State University. Additional new administrative appointments are: Dinardo Bazile, CTE coordinator; Mose Brown, assistant principal, Fossil Hill Elementary School; Heather Claxton, assistant principal, Whitley Road Elementary School; Joe Copeland, coordinator of student services; Kierra Edgar, assistant principal, Independence Elementary School; Amy Erb, principal, Caprock Elementary School;

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

Shanel Jones, assistant principal, Bluebonnet Elementary School; Suzanne McGahey, assistant principal, Trinity Springs Elementary School; Mark Pedroza, assistant principal, Bear Creek Intermediate School; Joel Thompson, assistant principal, Hillwood Middle School; Todd Tunnell, AVID coordinator; Laura Watkins, assistant principal, Park Glen Elementary School; and Edwina West-Dukes, assistant principal, Chisholm Trail Intermediate School.

Kilgore ISD Three new members of the Sabine High athletic staff have been named. They are: Bo Barrow, assistant football coach; Kristen Reaves, head volleyball coach; and Rex Sharp, assistant football coach.

Killeen ISD Liberty Hill Middle School has a new principal. Jorge Soldevila has been with the district for eight years, the past three as assistant principal of Harker Heights High School.

La Grange ISD

Bill Wagner, who has been with the district for 33 years, has been promoted from assistant superintendent to superintendent. Now beginning his 40th year as a Texas educator, he holds a bachelor’s degree in history and a master’s degree in educational administration from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University).

Lamar CISD The new principal of Bowie Elementary School is Belynda Billings, former assistant principal at Williams Elementary. She also has been a facilitator, an instructional specialist, and a math supervisor and interventionist. Andree Osagie is the new principal of Terry High School. In addition to his most recent position as associate principal of Taylor High School in Alief ISD, he has taught graduate courses at the University of St. Thomas and has worked in Houston and Fort Bend ISDs. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston, his master’s degree from the University of Houston-Clear Lake, and his doctorate from Texas A&M University. Briscoe Junior High School has welcomed Jose Pineda Jr. as its new principal. He comes to Briscoe from Terry High, where he was an assistant principal. The Houston Baptist University graduate holds a master’s degree from Lamar University.

> See Who’s News, page 44


PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas Computer Education Association

Seguin ISD’s Bill Lewis brings passion, experience to state office By Shelley Seale

Bill Lewis, Seguin ISD’s assistant superintendent of technology and curriculum support, talks to students about how technology will be a major emphasis of the district’s new high school, which is slated to open in the fall of 2017.

A

fter Bill Lewis graduated from Duncanville High School in 1988, he moved to Austin to attend The University of Texas. There, he jumped around from major to major with no clear idea of what that should be — until his junior year, when it suddenly dawned on him that he was supposed to teach. The future president of the Texas Computer Education Association had found his calling. Lewis’ first job out of college was teaching seventh grade science at Eanes ISD. He also coached middle school tennis and high school basketball. In 1995, his classroom received its first computer, which was networked in 1996. “From that point on, everything was different for me,” Lewis says. “I had always had an interest in computers, but it took off when I was asked to be in an ‘innovative teaching with technology’ program.” Lewis entered the technology program with his first laptop: an Apple clamshell. Soon, his class was working on projects in the school’s

computer lab, immersing themselves in science presentations that integrated the use of the mysterious World Wide Web. “The principal at the time was skeptical that I could pull off a good lesson in the computer lab,” Lewis recalls. “I basically started the kids working, and they took it from there. It was 45 minutes of students collaborating and sharing; I just walked around and helped when needed.” During one of these lab lessons, Lewis received his best formal evaluation ever. Along the way, he also obtained his master’s degree in education from Texas State University. From Eanes ISD, he moved on to Mills Elementary in Austin, where he was the assistant principal for two years. “I loved every minute of my time there,” Lewis says. “I was able to watch some of the most amazing teachers I have ever seen to this day.” > See President Profile, page 24 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

23


> Continued from page 23

His deftness at integrating technology into schools was turning heads, and when Austin ISD received a technology grant, Lewis was asked to implement it across the district through the Instructional Technology Department. Lewis spent five years working in that department with what he calls “the greatest ed tech team ever assembled.” “We broke new ground every day and stayed on the bleeding edge,” he says. “We focused on students taking the technology home, with many having their work shared across the country. We built an interactive assessment that is used today throughout the USA.” Lewis’ success with technology education led to his appointment as the director of instructional technology for New Braunfels ISD in 2006. After two years, he moved on to become the technology director in Seguin ISD, where he remains today. He earned his superintendent certification in 2011 and is now Seguin ISD’s assistant superintendent of technology and curriculum support. “One of the tasks I love is supervising the planning and implementation of our summer camp programs and after-school robotics clubs,” he says. “I also get to supervise the fine arts programs and adult education services for the district, as well as some facilities and operational services.

“What I love most about working in Seguin ISD are the people I work with. The great programs are a direct result of the wonderful people who work in my department; I cannot stress that enough,” he says. One of the primary focuses of TCEA is to help facilitate the integration of technology into pre-K through 12th grade classrooms, so Lewis is well-suited for his leadership role. Yet, he is not complacent. “We have to keep offering value to our members and stay ahead of the curve,” Lewis says. “As we grow, we have to offer more services to more people in more places. We have to do what others cannot.” For Lewis, this boils down to three main goals: be great all of the time, reach members where they are and create systemic change through legislation.

Fun Facts about Bill Lewis – I earned my first dollar by:

working as a custodian during the summers at the high school I attended.

The last time I felt extremely proud: was this morning as I reflected on the many blessings I have.

Favorite flavor of ice cream:

vanilla with crushed Heath bar.

My dream vacation would entail: going to Disney World with my entire family.

For the board, he has four goals: •

develop a continuous, important process for the board and the organization; • keep the board involved and well-versed in best practices for nonprofit board governance; • make sure board members have the support they need to deliver services to their areas; and • ensure the implementation of the strategic plan. Lewis says he is driven by faith and family.

He has been married 21 years and is the father of four boys. He also credits a number of great mentors for his success: Carol McKenzie, Jeremy Lyon, Patricia Butler, Jeff Meyer, Dave Sanders, Ron Reeves and Irene Garza, among others. Says Lewis: “The awesome people I get to work with and serve are what makes my TCEA service rewarding to me.” SHELLEY SEALE is a freelance writer in Austin.

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In Focus

Texas School Business Special Section

25

How Three Texas School Districts Are Helping Students with College and Career Readiness by Hobsons

In this special section, three experts in school counseling and education share their strategies and initiatives to prepare students for college and career opportunities. From technology to local community college partnerships, they reveal key ways to prepare students for success.

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In Focus

Texas School Business Special Section

26

Living in the Solution: Designing Systems that Support K–12 College and Career Readiness in Tomball ISD by Nefertari Mundy College and career readiness (CCR) has been an educational buzz term for the past several years; yet, districts continue to graduate students who must take remedial courses in college and are unprepared for the workforce. Change is necessary to increase the number of students we launch into the postsecondary world who are not just college eligible, but truly college ready. Tomball ISD decided the solution was to focus on aligning our systems to help students gain a deeper understanding of the multiple pathways to success. We know from research that students who haven’t acquired the requisite knowledge before entering postsecondary education struggle and often do not continue to their second year of college. To combat this, effective transitioning is needed at each grade level so that students know what to expect when they step foot on a college campus. First, we had to evaluate our systems in place. We convened a CCR taskforce consisting of district stakeholders. Our elementary counselors were ready and willing to do much more with CCR but needed to know where to begin. We used the College Board National Office for School Counselor Advocacy’s Eight Components of College and Career Readiness Counseling as a comprehensive guide for school counselors to help build college and career readiness for all students. As a counseling collaborative, we spent time delving into what each component meant at every level. Equipped with that knowledge, our elementary and intermediate counselors were ready to soar. It then became a matter of aligning

 their work with what was taking place at the secondary level. From there, we developed Annual Guaranteed Levels of Service (AGLS). These alignment documents were a vague rendering of the school counselor’s duties, listing the specific, progressive and programmatic responsibilities that culminate the educational preparation necessary for postsecondary success. It is absolutely necessary for counselors to see how the work they do at each level propels students forward. Once the AGLS documents were complete, we shifted our attention toward Naviance implementation. Naviance has been an excellent complement to the services our school counselors provide. Students create success plans based on a four-year timeframe. Through this platform, students track their interests and endorsement selections, take career inventories and personality assessments, build résumé and log their service hours. We were sure to refine it so that students could clearly develop an understanding of the pathways to success. Not only has it streamlined processes for the counselor, it has made navigating postsecondary preparedness much easier to grasp. Having created a strong foundation by implementing the Eight Components of College and Career Readiness Counseling, developing AGLS and refining our Naviance implementation plan, our school counselors possess a deeper understanding of what CCR is at each level of the student’s academic career.

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About the Author Nefertari Mundy is a central office administrator in Tomball ISD. She has taught, counseled and been a campus administrator. She has always been intentional about providing opportunities to equitable support services that accelerate growth and achievement in each student’s ability to succeed on the postsecondary path of their choosing. .

FOR MORE INFORMATION: hobsons.com © 2016 Hobsons.


In Focus

Texas School Business Special Section

27

Three Ways Allen ISD Uses Technology to Help Students Prepare for Life Beyond High School By Dustin Tamplen 

One.

Create a College and Career Center. In order to help reach all our students, we opened a College and Career Center. Specialists work with the counselors to meet with all students to map out their postsecondary plans. Specialists also work with students and families to guide them through the resources available in Naviance. The center provides a variety of services to our students and parents, from assistance with college applications and financial aid to transcripts and dual credit programs. All of these elements work together to ensure we reach every student.

Two.

Three.

Increase Engagement. One of our major successes is the creation of our District Naviance Guide. We identified three key areas that we wanted our students to address: exploration, career planning and secondary planning. Our goal as a district is for each of our graduating seniors to have a successful postsecondary plan in place as he or she leaves Allen High School and becomes productive citizens. To help our students reach this goal, we identified all of the resources in Naviance and placed them by grade level in our guide to ensure the students reap all of the benefits of the program.

Collaborate. A few years ago, we created a District Naviance Team, comprised of the district coordinator, two building principals, a curriculum principal, the College and Career Center coordinator, the counseling lead and a member of the technology department. This team evaluates the processes we have in place regarding college and career readiness and makes the appropriate changes for the upcoming school year. One of our mottos is, “If it can happen in Naviance, it needs to happen in Naviance.” With this in mind, the team finds where we can continue to incorporate Naviance into our school. Some of the decisions that have come from this team include the addition of the following in Naviance: GPA and rank, transcripts, course selection and dual credit information.

About the Author Dustin Tamplen is a counselor at Allen High School and the Naviance District Coordinator in Allen ISD. He has previously worked as a college and career advisor and a Spanish teacher for Allen ISD. He moved into the Counseling Department in the spring of 2012. Dustin recently completed his 14th year in the education field.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: hobsons.com © 2016 Hobsons.

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In Focus

Texas School Business Special Section

28

Four Benefits of Creating Collaborative Partnerships with Local Higher Education Institutions By Amy B. Lawrence As counselors, we contribute to the preparation and development of our students’ postsecondary plans. In Denton ISD, the partnerships we have with the local higher education institutions play an invaluable role in helping our students succeed. Here are four benefits students in our district have experienced as a result of our partnerships with local colleges and universities.

One.

Dual Credit Opportunities Denton ISD students are able to earn college credit before they graduate by taking college courses at any of the two- or four-year institutions in our community. Because courses can be taken at school or at the university or college campus, students get exposed to life on a college campus, and they become acquainted with the college application process before their senior year.

Two.

Greater College Access The partnership with our community four-year institutions guarantee admission of Denton ISD juniors who are in the top of their class. Juniors in the top 20 percent gain admission to the University of North Texas, and those in the top 30 percent obtain admission to Texas Woman’s University. The students who choose to participate in these programs are given the option to take part in on-campus experiences throughout their senior year to help them with the transition from high school to college.

Three.

Early College Exposure Our high school students are not the only students who benefit from our district’s collaborative partnership with the colleges in our community. All Denton ISD sixth graders are taken on a field trip to tour the campus of the University of North Texas. During these tours, students view dormitory rooms, converse with professors and college students, and tour campus facilities. The opportunity to observe campus life firsthand increases student engagement in the college preparation process and helps students envision themselves as college students.

Four.

Invaluable College and Career Readiness Resources Representatives from North Central Texas College, Texas Woman’s University and the University of North Texas serve on our planning committee for our district College and Career Expo. They bring their expertise in the college admissions process and share resources and connections that afford our students additional opportunities to become college and career ready. Whether you have colleges and universities in your immediate geographic area or not, I encourage you to reach out to your higher education colleagues to foster collaborative partnerships that provide students additional resources and increase college and career readiness on your campuses. It’s a win-win for everyone involved!

About the Author Amy Lawrence has worked as a public school educator and advocate for the past 25 years. She serves as the director of counseling services in Denton ISD, overseeing a team of 75 counselors. Her primary responsibility is the continuous examination and evaluation of the comprehensive, developmental counseling programs at each of the schools.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: hobsons.com © 2016 Hobsons.

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IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Thought leaders and innovators in education

Goose Creek CISD’s Randal O’Brien leads $267 million makeover by Leila Kalmbach

Goose Creek CISD Superintendent Randal O’Brien manages to carve out some storytime in the midst of overseeing his fast-growing district.

T

alk about trial by fire: In Randal O’Brien’s first year in Goose Creek CISD, he oversaw the addition of three new elementary schools, bringing the district’s total to 28 campuses.

And that was just the beginning. O’Brien, now the superintendent of Goose Creek CISD, was hired in 2013 as deputy superintendent to oversee a four-year, $267.5 million bond project. It’s the largest bond project in the district’s history. That year, growth in the community was 4 percent to 6 percent per year. Goose Creek CISD is now at 23,356 students and counting. “We’re building the buildings and we’re moving into them at capacity,” O’Brien says. “But we’re staying just a step ahead of the curve.” The project, which will impact every facility in the district, has allowed Goose Creek CISD to retire $100 million in deferred maintenance. It started with the three elementary schools, which have room for around 850 students each. The following school year focused primarily on completing a new-concept early college high school that allows students to attain an associate’s degree along with their high school diplomas. The 2015-2016 school year focused on updating infrastructure; buildings received mechanical, plumbing and electrical

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

upgrades, as well as safety and security improvements. This year (the last year of the bond project), on the agenda are a new technology center, a new transportation center, an expansion of the district’s ag facilities, and a repurposing of the career center as a career tech high school. None of this is how O’Brien expected to spend his career; he likes to say he came into the superintendency through the back door. O’Brien grew up in a blue-collar family in the Houston area with three younger brothers. His dad worked as a foreman for a pipe fitting and pipe manufacturing company off the ship channel, and out of high school O’Brien intended to follow in his footsteps. He soon realized, though, that he may have missed some opportunities by leaving college basketball scholarships on the table. He ended up earning a business degree from East Texas Baptist University and then worked in retail management for several years. In his late twenties, he began reflecting. Says O’Brien: “I got to thinking about what I wanted to do or what impact I wanted to have in this lifetime, and I thought that, beyond


my parents, who in my life helped to form and shape me into being the young man I was?” The answer, he realized, was his teachers, coaches and administrators. He went back to school at Sam Houston State University, where he earned a degree in education, his teaching credentials, and eventually a master’s degree while working as a teacher and coach. Six years later, he was asked to become an assistant principal and worked his way up the chain of command in various districts to superintendent of Hubbard ISD before coming back to the Houston area to work for Goose Creek CISD. By that point, he had experience with fastgrowth districts, but none as fast-growing as Goose Creek. “The No. 1 challenge was classroom space when I got here, and it’s our No. 1 priority as a district,” O’Brien says. While the district has been able to meet that challenge, it hasn’t always been easy. With all the growth in the Houston area, “it’s a competitive market to get concrete, to get steel, even to get workers, to get architects,” says O’Brien. “We are booming in the area, and they can get a job in any of the plants right now.”

But the district has stayed consistent in its insistence on quality. In practical terms, that means occasionally taking a little longer on a certain facility. It’s worth it to O’Brien and the school board to open a facility a couple of months into the school year if it means the facility will last 50 to 100 years — not just for the immediate future. That said, the bond project has managed to happen on time and on budget. Once the project comes to an end, O’Brien’s work will not be finished. Growth in the community has slowed to around 2 percent per year, but developers are focusing on master-planned communities, so “they’re bringing in an entire community. For every thousand homes built, I can count on 500 to 600 kids,” says O’Brien; the district estimates more than 4,500 new students in the next decade. Not to mention, now that the district has added three elementary schools, there soon may be a need for a new junior high school or high school. The district also plans to continue to expand course offerings for academics and extracurricular activities. “It can be very challenging and very daunting at times,” O’Brien admits, “but the success of these children is what drives me. We all want our own children to be successful, so I guess

Fun Facts about Randal O’Brien – In my free time, I like to: ride bikes with my family.

A book that made a powerful impression: “Good to Great” by Jim Collins.

A memorable childhood vacation:

visiting relatives in New Mexico, where we’d go pheasant hunting.

A memorable professional development experience: visiting the Army War College in Carlisle, Pa., to look at leadership from a militaristic, strategical point of view.

I just put that under a magnifying glass and look across this community and know that as superintendent of schools, I have a great honor and a great privilege — but also an obligation — to ensure I’m taking care of these children just as much as I would my own in everything that I do.” Leila Kalmbach is a freelance writer in Austin.

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PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas Association of School Administrators

Alamo Heights ISD superintendent says good teaching reaches beyond academics by Bobby Hawthorne

Alamo Heights ISD Superintendent Kevin Brown with his daughters, Molly and Hannah, and wife, Page. Photo courtesy of Lizzy Flowers.

L

et’s say you’re a teacher, and you’ve applied for a job in Alamo Heights ISD. A word of advice: Be prepared to answer the following question: “How do your students view you?”

Because there is a decent chance this question will pop up if Kevin Brown, the district’s superintendent, is on the interview committee. It’s his favorite question to ask prospective teachers, and he knows more than a little about the topic, given that teacher selection was the subject of his dissertation. “The question puts everything in the perspective of the student,” says Brown, who also serves as president of the Texas Association of School Administrators. “Ultimately, that’s who we’re serving. How do students view you? How do you want them to view you? And, by the way, kids are great at determining who is and who is not a good teacher.” Brown leads a district that he describes as “very flat” administratively and “highly relational” collegially. Decisions are made collaboratively, and people genuinely care for each other. “We have a lot of aspirational thinking, and we’re relentless in pursu-

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

ing our vision of where we want to go, knowing we’ll never get there because the mark keeps moving,” he says. “It’s like saying, ‘I want to be a good person.’ You can’t check it off and say, ‘Done.’ It’s an everyday thing you have to do.” And so he does, striving each day to embody the spirit of the district’s ambitious “Profile of a Learner.” Toward that end, he is a voracious reader, and today, he is chugging through Ron Chernow’s biography of Alexander Hamilton — not so much because of the Broadway play or his affection for hip-hop, but because of his love of history, particularly American history. More on that later. First, some history on Brown’s journey. Brown grew up in San Marcos, where he was the typical sunbaked, sports-crazy kid. He even had a newspaper route for a while. One of his boyhood idols was Bjorn Borg, so much so that he played with a Donnay racquet and grew his curly, blond hair long — just like Borg. A bum knee robbed him of the chance to play football, but he lettered in tennis four years and was varsity basketball co-captain. While heartbreaking, the knee injury allowed him time to focus on music,


and he was an all-state trumpeter three years, as well as a band co-captain and choir vice president.

Brown has come to understand that education must be a joyful experience if it’s to take root and change lives.

“I really loved school,” he says, almost wistfully, mostly because he found that school was a lot more fun when he was involved, so he tried about everything.

“Being academically well-prepared doesn’t matter if you’re not a great human being, if you can’t work with other people, if you can’t be kind — and those kinds of things,” Brown says.

“I realized that if you just really worked hard at it, you could do it,” he says. In the process, he learned how to get along with just about everybody. His senior year, he was voted “Friendliest” and “Most Talented.” From San Marcos, he earned a music scholarship to attend The University of Texas at Austin, where he joined the Longhorn Band and toyed with the idea of being a professional musician. One of his teachers at UT nudged him toward Julliard, but Brown decided performance was too one-dimensional. He also scotched the idea of attending law school, even though he scored high enough on the LSAT to be accepted into all the schools he applied to — except the one he wanted to attend: UT. Ultimately, it didn’t matter. He was from a family of educators, and he would join them. His first jobs were in San Antonio and Round Rock ISDs, where he taught the social studies spectrum, including macroeconomics, which triggered an interest in policy and organizational structure — not unhelpful for a superintendent-to-be.

The linchpin is, and always will be, the classroom teacher. “A teacher must build relationships with each child,” he insists. “That important relationship is foundation for everything we do.” How hard is that? As hard as ever, Brown says. “Public schools are doing a better job than they’ve ever done, but the demands on us — the expectations on us, the demands on our teachers — are greater than they’ve ever been too,” he says. “We get it right a lot more often than we get it wrong — and certainly a lot more often than people think we do.”

Fun facts about Kevin Brown –

First music concert: Honestly, I don’t remember. I used to go to clubs in Austin to hear music, so it was probably someone no one has ever heard of. As far as the big concerts, it was probably U2. They were my favorite band. Last vacation: Estes Park, Colo. I have gone nearly every year of my life. I love the mountains, hiking and fly fishing there. Also, I love the outdoors. I would love to do the Pacific Crest Trail with my daughters. My daughter and I finished a 106-mile backpack hike last summer in Colorado. What most people don’t know about me: I was president of the UT Longhorn

band and got to perform at the presidential inauguration in 1989. I also got to perform with Willie Nelson at the Cotton Bowl.

Getting it right is essential, he adds, because the stakes today are high.

Early bird or night owl? Early bird. I get up

“We’re not just preparing people for the business world,” he says. “We’re preparing citizens who can conduct objective and intelligent conversations and who can apply critical thinking to the important issues facing us today. If you don’t have an educated citizenry, then you don’t have democracy. I

think we’re at a critical place as a nation, and we have to get this right.”

at 4:30 and work out until 6:15.

BOBBY HAWTHORNE is a Texas School Business columnist.

Ensure Your New Principals are Prepared for the Complexities of the Principalship New Principal Mentor Program: Certified Mentor Trainers, Ongoing Access and Support

Fifty percent of unmentored principals are not retained beyond their third year.* This turnover rate comes at a tremendous cost for your students and district. New principals often struggle with serving as the instructional leader, creating school culture, ensuring all stakeholders have a voice, and leading the priorities that ensure academic success while managing the day-to-day details of the job. Designed for principals with three years or less experience, TEPSA’s Transformational Leadership Community (TLC) offers principal mentoring tailored to meet the needs of your district and campus. The yearlong mentorship is designed to address the new T-PESS Standards of Instructional Leadership; Human Capital; Executive Leadership; School Culture; Strategic Operations; and Professional Practices and Responsibilities. Visit www.tepsa.org to learn more or email Pam (pam@tepsa.org) or Kimmie (kimmie@tepsa.org). *Source: CHURN: The High Cost of Principal Turnover, School Leaders Network, 2014 Texas Elementary Principals & Supervisors Association

Serving Texas School Leaders Since 1917

www.tepsa.org Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

33


> Student Voices, continued from page 16

team to win the first state championship in our school’s history.

Join us! Summer Conference: July 13-16, 2016 Fall Conference: September 25-26, 2016 Winter Conference: Nov 30-Dec 2, 2016 The conferences are all at the Westin-Domain in Austin.

Texas School Business THE News Magazine for Public Education in Texas!

Since 1954, Texas School Business has published positive school news about and for Texas educators and the districts they serve. Considered an institution among public school administrators for its insightful writing and positive message, the magazine is a must-read for K-12 leadership teams in Texas.

Annual subscription rate: $24/year Subscription includes 6 bimonthly issues, plus our annual Bragging Rights special issue

Subscribe online today at www.texasschoolbusiness.com Reminder: Active, Associate and Student members of the Texas Association of School Administrators receive a copy of Texas School Business magazine as a membership benefit. Subscribe now for board members and other members of your leadership team.

34

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

In my high school, that meant connecting the classroom to the real world. Our career technical education program offered students the opportunity to take career-centered courses, such as accounting, agricultural science and manufacturing. The program also operationalized the curriculum through internships in the field. With the support of our administration, I started a school-based enterprise through DECA, earning $10,000 during my high school career to help subsidize the cost for students to attend out-of-town competitions. In my high school, that meant fostering avenues for creativity. Whether it was a commitment to the arts in the face of budget cuts or investment in student-driven projects in robotics, entrepreneurship and science fairs, learners were taught to reject limits and dream big. With the guidance of my teachers, I was able to win gold medals at the International ISWEEP Science Fair three times. Looking back, I am immensely grateful to have had dedicated educators who went the extra mile for their student learners. Instead of emphasizing the memorization of facts or the regurgitation of statistics, my teachers challenged me to embrace a global perspective, become proficient with multimedia and extract the practical applications of what I was learning. Those skills are what got me into college and have become a platform for my academic growth at the university level. But the biggest impact that my learner-centered high school had on me was helping me to develop my voice as a student. I learned early on that education is a two-way street. Although I have been blessed with phenomenal teachers and mentors, at the end of the day, it will be up to me to make the most of the opportunities that I have been given. Knowing that I have the agency to shape the process and outcome of my education has been transformative. As I approached the end of my high school career, I wanted to find a way to give back to a school system that had given me so much. So, when I heard that 40,000 seniors across the state of Texas were ineligible for graduation because of standardized testing, I chose to speak up. I worked with my superintendent, Greg Smith, to share these students’ stories and advocate for reform before 10 state legislators at the 2014 Bay Area Schools Consortium. Our efforts

worked. In May 2015, the governor signed a new law offering a second chance to our students. That June, I was proud to walk the stage at graduation with my peers. CCISD had helped me find my voice, opening the doors to my future. Since coming to college, I have been able to overload on classes, take on advanced research opportunities, and serve in student government and on the honor council. My achievements are a testament to the foundation that my teachers and I developed together. Engaging in handson science fair projects in high school eliminated my fear of taking risks, helping me win multiple fellowships in molecular biology as a freshman in college. Learning to analyze and synthesize a wide range of information while on my high school debate team cultivated a strong work ethic, helping me get research opportunities in health care policy and international law. All of this and more have been possible because of the teachers who stretched me, parents who believed in me and friends who supported me. Remembering my roots, I went back to visit my old high school after I finished my first semester of college. My high school certainly looked different from college; there was peeling paint instead of pristine marble, overgrown bushes instead of manicured lawns. But the building still felt like home, with students crowding the familiar hallways and teachers standing outside of their classrooms welcoming learners with open arms. As I walked out the double doors of my high school, I smiled fondly at the inscription on the walls: “Once a Falcon, always a Falcon.” Not a day goes by in college that I do not think of my time at Clear Lake High School. My school’s educational environment has shaped me into the student, friend and person I am today. Thanks to that community, I am a learner for life. Editor’s note: This article originally appeared in issue 15 of Pioneering, a publication of Education Reimagined (www. education-reimagined.org). KUSHAL KADAKIA, a 2015 graduate of Clear Lake High School in Clear Creek ISD, is an Angier B. Duke Scholar at Duke University. In high school, he served on Superintendent Greg Smith’s Advisory Council. At Duke, Kadakia researches the genetic causes of heart disease as a POWER and Huang Fellow. He also conducts research on neglected tropical diseases and international health systems. He has been recognized with the United Nation’s Inspirational Peace Prize.


Texas Reads One Book Once again, we are proud to offer this unique opportunity in Texas...

Jason Garrett

Head Coach of the Dallas Cowboys

leads the charge with a huge Texas style kick-off this coming spring as

Texas Reads One Book!

Coach Garrett reads the first chapter via exclusive video cast - then each of the families in your district reads a chapter each night.

Jason Garrett

Head Coach of the Dallas Cowboys

*

KICKOFF : April 3, 2017

*

FALL SPECIAL

Register early by October 31st to receive special pricing.

Choose one title for your custom One District, One Book® reading event in the fall or winter… then read The Lemonade War for Texas Reads One Book in the spring - all for $8.95. General registration continues through March 1st. You’ll receive books for every student as well as in-school activities, assembly ideas, teacher resources, and family engagement tools. Tens of thousands of families across the state will read together in this celebration of literacy.

TASA TASA

Send an e-mail to sign up your district! texasreads@readtothem.org

Texas Association of School Texas Association ofAdministrators School Administrators

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

35

®

Creating a Culture of Literacy in Every Home

TM


Photo Feature

UT, TASA CO-HOST 68TH ANNUAL SUMMER CONFERENCE “The Science of Learning” was the focus of this year’s UT/TASA Summer Conference, held in Austin in July. The strand of sessions examined the latest brain research as it relates to school transformation initiatives.

Jim Knight of Lamesa ISD and Kyle Wargo of ESC Region 17.

Jodi Duron of Elgin ISD with sponsors Kyle Bacon and Laura Sachtleben.

Sponsor Kerri Ranney with Bruce Gearing of Dripping Springs ISD and Suzanne Marchman of Georgetown ISD.

Elena Hill of Dallas ISD and Annie Wolfe of Houston ISD.

Taryn Bailey and Blanca Garcia of El Paso ISD.

Rodney Cavness of Port Neches Groves ISD and Tommy McEwen of Alvin ISD.

Dax Gonzalez and Marisha Negovetich of TASB.

Harper Stewart of Midlothian ISD and Roy Watts of Life Schools in Red Oak.

Mary Patin of Lake Travis ISD and Beth Nicholas of Mesquite ISD.

Stanton Lawrence of San Antonio ISD and Jharrett Bryantt of Houston ISD.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016


REGIONAL VIEW

Education service center programs & practices

Region 4 workshops help educators meet needs of diverse learners by Anne Douglas

E

very year when STAAR results are released, we at ESC Region 4 examine student performance data to celebrate the gains, as well as to identify where professional development is needed. This past year, we took a different approach to professional development altogether, combining efforts across departments with the goal of modeling for teachers how to meet the needs of the entire child. Three years ago, a team of Region 4 specialists and directors attended a national institute on Universal Design for Learning (UDL). Upon their return, the Region 4 team created content-specific workshops to guide teachers on removing curriculum barriers by implementing UDL guidelines that address the why, what and how of learning. These workshops were successful, but upon closer examination, we felt something was missing. As we studied the data, we saw many students with disabilities were not meeting standards. When we overlaid that finding with discipline data, we noticed a disproportionately high rate of exclusionary disciplinary practices on students with disabilities. Because most students with disabilities are served in the general education setting, we realized we were asking teachers to attend separate workshops to address different concerns — such as behavior and academics — and then expecting them to seamlessly integrate the learned concepts in the classroom. Offering separate workshops on content, UDL and behavior was not as effective as desired. We then asked: Why not model best practices in one easy-to-digest package? The TEAMS workshops were born. Teaching Engaging Academics and Motivating Success (TEAMS) workshops are designed for teams of campus educa-

tors representing different disciplines. A triad of ESC Region 4 specialists created the professional development series by integrating targeted UDL principles with Positive Behavior Interventions and Support (PBIS) in content-specific lessons aligned to the state standards (TEKS). Workshops unique to each of the four core content areas were created with the following common goals: • provide an overview of both UDL and PBIS; • allow educators to experience a high-quality Tier 1 model lesson using either the 5E or the gradual release model (depending on the content area); • engage participants in an analysis of the lesson to highlight barriers to the content and the solutions implemented; • use interactive “notebooking” effectively; • require participants to develop and implement an action plan so they are accountable for applying the content and strategies in their classrooms; and • model UDL and PBIS principles within the implementation of the lesson. Knowing that an elementary math teacher and a high school English teacher would benefit from different model lessons, we provided multiple TEAMS offerings to differentiate for content areas and grade-level bands. Providing these customized workshops required many teams of presenters who worked together to present the same message, yet tailored to the four content areas. Previously, teachers were trained on each model in a separate workshop. Unfortunately, this process forced the teachers to integrate the UDL principles without having seen them cohesively modeled.

Of course, time is a premium for any teacher. In the TEAMS workshops, teacher-participants learn how to put all the pieces together, so they can implement these practices to more effectively meet the needs of their students.

‘He was still getting the attention he craved, but it was positive attention and provoked him to do more of whatever it was he and others were getting praised for. I have used this in the past and can’t believe I had allowed myself to trail back to mostly only calling on the negative behavior.’ —TEAMS workshop participant The inaugural TEAMS workshops were designed as a series of three days spread out over a period of about three months. Teachers needed to have time to try new strategies, report back with evidence of implementation and then receive feedback on their progress. The goal was to support their learning, similarly to how they support their students’ learning. At the end of each workshop day, teachers were asked to develop an action plan: How would they implement what > See Regional View, page 38 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

37


> Continued from page 37

they learned in their classrooms? Drawing upon the same PBIS strategies that teachers use with their students, the workshop facilitators rewarded teacher-participants for returning with student artifacts that provided evidence of classroom application. After the first sharing experience of classroom implementation, it was obvious we needed a way to capture the teachers’ successes so they could learn from each other. This required a system for sharing. Using a digital feedback tool, teachers responded to four prompts: The barrier I anticipated was… . I planned… . I incorporated it by… . My student outcomes… . Teachers were able to share their implementation stories, get feedback from three ESC Region 4 specialists leading the trainings and learn from their peers’ experiences. To measure how well the series worked, we asked teachers to rate the TEAMS

workshops using a five-point scale to respond to the statement: “I am likely to implement the knowledge and skills learned in my classroom.” The total average rating was 4.9. Here is one testimony from an elementary teacher:

back to mostly only calling on the negative behavior.

“I know it takes more than a day, but yesterday I really focused on pointing out all the positives that were going on in our classroom. I teach fourth grade science and social studies and have three rotations of students. It can become hard to see anything positive after a long day! Yesterday, I planned to focus on three students, one in each class, to really try to elicit positive behavior from them without having to point out their undesirable behavior. I am an extremely positive teacher, but I decided to ONLY allow myself to point out positive behaviors to my students, if possible, all day. In one hour, one of my students who has been acting out transformed into an entirely new person. I chose to point out every positive thing I could and he swelled with pride. He was still getting the attention he craved, but it was positive attention and provoked him to do more of whatever it was he and others were getting praised for. I have used this in the past and can’t believe I had allowed myself to trail

What are the next steps?

“I just wanted to let you three know that I feel like I have learned a great deal from the two days we have spent together so far and am excited for our final day.” ESC Region 4 is offering the TEAMS workshops again for the 2016-2017 school year (www.esc4.net/pd; search keyword “TEAMS”) to empower more teachers. In addition, ESC Region 4 is working on designing a session specifically for school administrators to help them understand the blending of content, UDL and PBIS so they can support their teachers and provide quality feedback. There is no silver bullet in education. However, this experience has led to the conclusion that through deliberate collaboration, we have a better chance of fostering successful classrooms for all students. ANNE DOUGLAS is the director of science solutions at ESC Region 4.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016


Calendar Professional development & events (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

S TA N D O U T F R O M T H E C R OW D ! Get premium placement and get noticed! For a nominal fee, you can showcase your conference, workshop or seminar on the opening page as a Featured Event. Contact Ann Halstead at ahalstead@tasanet.org for more details. O C TO BE R October 3 Legal Digest Back to School Workshop with Jim Walsh ESC Region 2 office, Corpus Christi For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigestevents.com Cost: Regular registration: $155. See website for early registration discounts. October 3-4 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 1 of 4) ESC Region 10 office, Richardson For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: See TASA website for rates for School Transformation Network members and nonmembers. October 4 Build Your Bookshelf Series: Using Young Adult Literature to Grow Reluctant Readers Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston www.hcde-gtexas.org For more info, (713) 696-8223. Cost: $130. TASBO Internal Audit Academy Marriott South, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org October 4-5 TASBO Internal Audit Academy Marriott South, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $290; nonmembers, $340. Texas ASCD Academy: Rigorous Assessment Strategies for Mathematics and STAAR, Grades 3-8 (session 2 of 3) Richardson ISD Professional Development Building, Richardson

For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org October 4-6 TASA Curriculum Management Audit Training, Level 1 (session 1 of 2) TASA office, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $750; nonmembers, $850. October 5 Digging Deeper: Applying Webb’s Depth of Knowledge to the Science Classroom Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston For more info, (713) 696-1306. www.hcde-texas.org Cost: $75. Legal Digest Back to School Workshop with Jim Walsh ESC Region 10 office, Richardson For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigestevents.com Cost: Regular registration: $155. See website for early registration discounts. Make Texas History Come Alive: Grades 4 and 7 Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston For more info, (713) 696-8223. www.hcde-texas.org. Cost: $125. October 5-6 TASA Central Office Academy (session 1 of 4) Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $1,895; nonmembers, $1,995. Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy XVII (session 3 of 3) Georgetown ISD, Georgetown For more info, (512) 476-8200 or

TASPA Workshop: Personnel Skills for Supervisors of NonExempt Staff Little Elm ISD, Little Elm For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Cost: Members, $95; nonmembers, $115. October 6 Integers, Equations and Algebraic Reasoning in Grades 6-8 Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston For more info, (713) 696-1306. www.hcde-texas.org Cost: $150. October 7 TASPA Workshop: Personnel Skills for Administrators Little Elm ISD, Little Elm For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Cost: Members, $95; nonmembers, $115. October 10-11 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 1 of 4) Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: See TASA website for rates for School Transformation Network members and nonmembers.

TASA First-Time Superintendents Academy 2: Engaging in Leadership (session 1 of 2) Marriott North, Round Rock For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $395 for both sessions; nonmembers, $495 for both sessions. October 13 Building Conceptual Understanding in Grades 3 and 4 Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston For more info, (713) 696-1306. www.hcde-texas.org Cost: $250. TASBO Certified School Risk Managers Workshop Irving ISD, Irving For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org October 13-14 TASB Conference for Administrative Professionals TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org October 16-18 TEPSA Assistant Principals Conference Omni Southpark, Austin For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org Cost: Members, $272; nonmembers, $332.

October 11 Visible Learning with John Hattie Katy ISD Education Support Complex, Katy For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

October 17-18 TASBO Operations Academy Marriott Town Square, Sugar Land For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: $200.

October 12 TASPA Documentation Workshop Frisco ISD, Frisco For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Cost: $245.

October 19-20 TASBO Accounting and Finance Symposium Marriott Town Square, Sugar Land For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $290; nonmembers, $340.

October 12-13 TASA First-Time Superintendents Academy (session 2 of 4) Marriott North, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $695 for all four sessions; nonmembers, $795 for all sessions.

October 20 Supporting Struggling Readers and Writers Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston

> See Calendar, page 40 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

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> Continued from page 39 For more info, (713) 696-8223. www.hcde-texas.org Cost: $125. What Great Educators Do Differently Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston For more info, (713) 696-1308. www.hcde-texas.org Cost: In county, $225; out of county, $230. October 24 ESC Region 4 Business/ Education Forum Berry Center, Cypress Fairbanks ISD, Houston For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org October 25-26 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 2 of 4) Klein Multipurpose Center, Klein For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: See TASA website for rates for School Transformation Network members and nonmembers. October 27 TASBO Certified School Risk Managers Workshop: Fundamentals of Risk Management Pasadena ISD, Pasadena For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org TASPA Documentation Workshop Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Houston For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Cost: $245. October 27-28 TASBO Purchasing Academy Embassy Suites, San Marcos For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $290; nonmembers, $340. October 30-November 1 Texas ASCD Annual Conference Location TBA, Dallas For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org October 31-November 1 TASB/TASPA HR Administrators’ Academy Marriott North, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

N OV E M B E R November 1 EOC Fiction: Examining and Planning with Readiness Standards, Grades 9-10 Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston For more info, (713) 696-8223. www.hcde-texas.org Cost: $60. November 2-3 TASA Engaging the Net Generation Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center, Georgetown For more info, (512)477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: Individuals from member districts of the School Transformation Network, $595; others, $695. November 2-5 Texas School Counseling Association Annual Professional Growth Conference Sheraton Hotel, Dallas For more info, (512) 472-3403. www.txca.org Cost: See website for professional, new professional, retired and student rates. November 3 Biology EOC: A Closer Look at Cell Structure and Function Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston For more info, (713) 696-1306. www.hcde-texas.org Cost: $60. Board2Board Education Foundation Conference Frisco ISD, Frisco For more info, (512) 535-2046. www.foundationinnovation. biz/board2board Cost: $45. TASB Fall Legal Seminar Texas A&M University, Commerce For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

www.tasanet.org Cost: See TASA website for rates for School Transformation Network members and nonmembers. TASBO Personnel and Payroll Academy TCEA Conference Center, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $290; nonmembers, $340. November 9 TASB Fall Legal Seminar Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TEPSA Evaluation Summit Convention Center, Irving For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org November 9-10 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 2 of 4) ESC Region 10 office, Richardson For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: See TASA website for rates for School Transformation Network members and nonmembers. November 10 HCDE Literacy Collaborative: Literacy Workstations Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston For more info, (713) 696-8223. www.hcde-texas.org Cost: $225. Social Studies Strategies for English Language Learners Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston For more info, (713) 696-8223. www.hcde-texas.org Cost: $125.

November 7 TASB Fall Legal Seminar TASB office, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

Workstation Make and Take for Comparing Numbers for Pre-K and Kindergarten Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston For more info, (713) 696-1306. www.hcde-texas.org Cost: $175.

November 7-8 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 2 of 4) Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361.

November 12 TASB Fall Legal Seminar Hilton Garden Inn, South Padre Island For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

November 15 Prioritizing for Powerful Results: Five Levers to Improve Learning Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston For more info, (713) 696-1308. www.hcde-texas.org Cost: $175. TASB Fall Legal Seminar Offices of ESC Region 14, Abilene For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org November 15-16 TASBO Accounting and Finance Symposium Courtyard Marriott, Allen For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $290; nonmembers, $340. November 15-17 TASA Curriculum Management Audit Training, Level 2 (session 1 of 2) TASA office, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $750; nonmembers, $850. November 16-17 TASA First-Time Superintendents Academy (session 3 of 4) Marriott North, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6816. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $695 for all four sessions; nonmembers, $795 for all four sessions. November 17 TASB Fall Legal Seminar ESC Region 16 office, Amarillo For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org November 30 TASPA/Legal Digest Personnel Law Conference for School Administrators Westin Hotel at the Domain, Austin For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org November 30-December 1 TASA Central Office Academy (session 2 of 4) Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $1,895 for all sessions; nonmembers, $1,995 for all sessions.


November 30-December 2 TASPA/TAEE Winter Conference Westin Hotel at the Domain, Austin For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented Annual Conference Sheraton Hotel, Dallas For more info, (512) 499-8248. www.txgifted.org Cost: See TAGT website for one-, two- and three-day registration options. November 30-December 3 TAHPERD Annual Convention Moody Gardens Hotel and Convention Center, Galveston For more info, (512) 459-1299. www.tahperd.org Cost: Early bird registration by Oct. 1: $105; preregistration by Nov. 1: $125; late registration after Nov. 1: $145.

DECE M BE R December 2 Raising the Bar: Literacy Strategies in Science Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston For more info, (713) 696-1306. www.hcde-texas.org Cost: $85. December 5-6 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 3 of 4) Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: See TASA website for rates for School Transformation Network members and nonmembers. December 6 Model Drawing for Grades 2-5 Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston For more info, (713) 696-1306. www.hcde-texas.org Cost: $125.

TASBO Certified School Risk Managers Workshop: Handling School Risks Cypress-Fairbanks ISD Instructional Support Center, Houston For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org December 7 Texas ASCD Academy: Rigorous Assessment Strategies for Mathematics and STAAR, Grades 3-8 (session 3 of 3) Richardson ISD Professional Development Center, Richardson For more info, (512) 4778200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org December 7-8 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 3 of 4) ESC Region 10 office, Richardson For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: See TASA website for rates for School Transformation Network members and nonmembers. December 9 Digging Deeper: Applying Webb’s Depth of Knowledge to the Science Classroom Harris County Dept. of Education, Houston For more info, (713) 696-1306. www.hcde-texas.org Cost: $75. December 9-10 Texas Association of Mid-Size Schools Annual Legislative Conference Hyatt Lost Pines, Bastrop For more info, (512) 346-2177. www.midsizeschools.org

JA N UA RY January 9-10 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 4 of 4) ESC Region 10, Richardson For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: See TASA website for rates for School Transformation Network members and nonmembers.

January 23-24 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 4 of 4) Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: See TASA website for rates for School Transformation Network members and nonmembers. January 25-26 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 3 of 4) Klein Multipurpose Center, Klein For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: See TASA website for rates for School Transformation Network members and nonmembers. January 28-29 Texas Council of Women School Executives Annual Conference Hilton Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tcwse.org Cost: Active members, $130; student members, $85; Saturday only, $95. January 29-February 1 TASA Midwinter Conference Convention Center, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org January 31 TASA Central Office Academy (session 3 of 4) Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center, Georgetown (Austin area) For more info, (512) 4776361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $1,895 for all sessions; nonmembers, $1,995 for all sessions. â—„

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

41


Photo Feature

TEXAS ASCD HOSTS TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE IN IRVING The Texas Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development's ignite16 was a three-day event in July that offered attendees an opportunity to network and learn how technology can transform curriculum.

▲Amy Frank of CypressFairbanks ISD goes on a Google "expedition."

▲Keynote speaker Josh Stumpenhorst, awardwinning teacher and author.

▲Texas ASCD President Roy Garcia (center) with ignite16 award recipients Elias Rangel Jr. (left) and Miguel Moreno, both of Socorro ISD.

▲Keynote speaker Dr. Martha Burns, director of neuroscience education at Scientific Learning.

►Della Taylor of Harlandale ISD with Javier Aguilera, Ana Franco, Israel Galindo, Estefania Amaya and Cesar Aguayo of Ysleta ISD.

►Special presenter Toni Robinson (front row, third from left) with the Texas ASCD Board of Directors.

▲Corporate partners Peter Bencivenga and Brett Felten of IO Education.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016


THE ARTS

News in fine arts education

Texas’ shining example lies in vertical alignment

▲Forney ISD’s vertical alignment meetings were responsible for reviving the district’s All-City Elementary Honor Choir.

by Mario Luna

O

ver the summer, I had the privilege to attend the Conn Selmer Institute at Bethal College in Mishawaka, Ind. The professional development conference brought together close to 50 fine arts directors and program leaders from across the country to see how we could help each other. Each day offered keynote presentations and interactive breakout sessions on best practices and program challenges. It was not too long into the week when I noticed a recurring pattern. Comments such as, “In Texas, they do...” or “If we did it like Texas, we would…”, seemed to pepper the group discussions. There was a marked interest in understanding how Texas K-12 fine arts programming works. As a result, the nine of us who hailed from Texas schools had ample opportunity to share our successes — how we have attracted some of the best fine arts teachers, received adequate funding and built state-of-the-art facilities.

professional trade associations, and they host conferences that create a place for teachers to engage, share, discuss and problem-solve with one another. In these spaces, fine arts educators can discuss class management strategies, available resources, curriculum scope and sequence, and preparedness and mastery — all while establishing deeper lines of communication and collaboration. The Forney ISD Fine Arts Department partakes in vertical alignment meetings every spring and fall. District-wide band, choir, cheer, dance, elementary music and theater directors have the opportunity to discuss their respective programs, share challenges and evaluate curriculum goals on a much larger scale. The meetings also allow for new and existing bonds to strengthen among our growing staff.

Now in my third year as the director of fine arts, I have discovered that the conversations We are fortunate to live in a state that supat these semiannual meetings continue to ports the arts, and that is reflected in the high reveal important insights that prove useful in achievement of our K-12 fine arts programs. developing and executing student programI credit Texas’ success in part to our focus ming. Take, for example, when our school on professional development and curricudistrict brought back the All-City Elemenlum alignment around the state. Many Texas tary Honor Choir two years ago. The all-city districts have implemented vertical alignment choir is composed of fifth and sixth graders strategies that utilize team-teaching tactics and representing all nine elementary campuses in emphasize cross-collaboration tools. Other Forney ISD. The students are chosen through states do similar things, but Texas’ commitment auditions, and they perform at community to the vertical alignment approach has demon- events. strated above-average success. We have strong This choir had faded away several years ago music, art, cheer, theater and dance education due to a lack of direction. However, with the

help of our elementary music teachers at one of our vertical alignment meetings, we were able to retool the program and give it the focus it needed, addressing its processes, procedures and policies. The vertical alignment meeting gave us the space to capitalize on the experiences of seasoned teachers, while gaining fresh perspective from our newly hired teachers. The result was a new and improved all-city choir program. While it certainly helped with student recruitment and enrollment, the rebirth of the all-city choir more importantly brought teachers and students from all nine elementary campuses together to perform as one. The choir gave students an opportunity to read and sing more-challenging music, and it exposed them to different teaching styles. It also created an opportunity for our elementary music teachers to collaborate on a project with secondary level teachers, which built camaraderie among the staff. A vertical alignment approach in our district brings staff together to work toward common goals. It has empowered our teachers to effectively and creatively meet the needs of our students. Moreover, it has inspired our teachers to initiate more collaborative meetings — a sign of deeper engagement and commitment, which, in the end, benefits our students. MARIO LUNA is the director of fine arts in Forney ISD.

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

43


Who’s News > Continued from page 22

Lamesa ISD

David Rodriguez is the district’s new

assistant superintendent of finance and operations, having served as executive director of that department for the past two years. Rodriguez received his bachelor’s degree from Texas Tech University and his master’s degree from The University of Texas of the Permian Basin.

Lampasas ISD

The new district superintendent, Chane Rascoe, has 19 years of experience as a teacher, assistant principal, high school principal, superintendent and adjunct professor.

Laneville ISD

Teresa Shelton has been approved as the district’s superintendent, having served as district principal for the 2015-2016 school year. Shelton, who received a bachelor’s degree in interdisciplinary studies from Texas State University, holds a master’s degree in education from Walden University.

Leander ISD

Laurelyn Arterbury has joined the district from Round Rock ISD, where she was principal of Westwood High School. The new executive director of college and career pathways earned her bachelor’s degree from The University of Texas and her master’s degree from Texas State University. She is completing her doctorate at Texas A&M University.

Liberty-Eylau ISD

New Superintendent Ronnie Thompson previously held the top position in Hooks ISD. In addition, he has been an assistant superintendent in Texarkana ISD, where he also taught and worked as an assistant principal.

Little Elm ISD

David Gallagher been selected to serve as the district’s assistant superintendent for elementary services. He comes to Little Elm from Eagle Mountain-Saginaw ISD, where he was director of elementary services. Doug Sevier has been chosen to serve as principal of Chavez Elementary School, coming to his new post from Northbrook Elementary in Eagle Mountain-Saginaw ISD. He has 10 years of experience as a principal in that district and Irving ISD.

Lubbock ISD

Mark Ball, executive director of athletics, has announced his retirement. He came to the district in 2010 from Wylie ISD, where he was head football coach and athletic

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

director. He also coached in several Texas districts in addition to serving as a director and consultant for Glazier Coaching Clinics. Christy Gillespie, now leading Wolffarth Elementary School as principal, has been an assistant principal at the school since 2012. She received her bachelor’s degree from Harding University and holds two master’s degrees, in special education and in educational leadership, from Lubbock Christian University. Slaton Middle School welcomed Damon McCall as principal. He comes from Roosevelt ISD, where he was junior high principal. A graduate of the University of North Texas, McCall received his master’s degree in educational administration from Wayland Baptist University and is at work on his doctorate in educational administration from Texas Tech. Elsa Montes is now principal of Hodges Elementary School. An educator for 33 years, she was principal of Wolffarth Elementary for the past four years. Montes earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from West Texas A&M University. The new principal of Irons Middle School, Philip Riewe, has spent the past 11 years as an associate principal of Coronado High School. An educator for more than 20 years, he earned a bachelor’s degree from Texas Tech University and a master’s degree from Wayland Baptist University. Angelica Roman is principal of Estacado High School, where she served as an assistant and associate principal for the past five years. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas Tech University and master’s degrees in educational leadership and special education.

Lufkin ISD

Previously from New Diana ISD, George

Little is the new band director.

McKinney ISD Former Evans Middle School Principal Todd Young, who led that campus for 12 years, is now the district’s senior CTE director. The veteran administrator with more than 30 years of experience — 16 of those in McKinney ISD — holds a bachelor’s degree in education from Central Michigan University and a master’s

degree in mid-management from the University of North Texas. Longtime McKinney North High School Associate Principal Jae Gaskill has been promoted to principal. She came to McKinney ISD nine years ago from Allen ISD, where she also was a principal. Gaskill earned her bachelor’s degree in biology from Stephen F. Austin State University and a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas A&M University at Commerce, where she is pursuing a doctoral degree in the same field. Holly Rogers is principal of Dowell Middle School. She was assistant principal there for the past three years. The East Texas State University graduate has been with the district for 14 years. She earned her master’s degree in educational administration from Dallas Baptist University.

McLean ISD Former Coolidge ISD high school Principal Oscar Muniz is the new superintendent.

Mansfield ISD

Philip O’Neal is the new athletic director. With more than 30 years of experience in education and athletics, he most recently held the same position in Fort Bend ISD. He is a graduate of Wayland Baptist University and holds a master’s degree in educational leadership from Tarleton State University.

Marshall ISD

The new special education director, Jessica Bayless, comes from Tyler ISD’s Cumberland Academy, where she was special programs director. She holds a bachelor’s degree in audiology and speech pathology from Brigham Young University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from The University of Texas at Tyler. Marshall ISD has hired Jerry Gibson as superintendent. He comes to Marshall from Coldspring ISD, where he was superintendent since 2013. He is a graduate of East Texas Baptist University and earned his master’s degree in education from Lamar University. His doctorate in education was awarded from the University of Houston.

Mesquite ISD

Keyur Bhatt is assistant principal of West

Mesquite High School. He has spent 14 years as an educator in Dallas, Plano and Tyler ISDs and in Del Valle ISD, where he was director of the Early College High School. He earned his bachelor’s degree from The University of Texas at Dallas and his master’s degree from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Michael Coffey, assistant superintendent of administrative services since 2001, has retired after 44 years with the district. He


began as a science teacher at McDonald Middle School, going on to serve as an assistant principal, principal and in several central office administration positions. The new assistant principal of Motley Elementary School is Amanda Martin, who has spent all her 15 years as an educator in Mesquite ISD. She was most recently a district-level math facilitator. She earned her bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees at Texas A&M University at Commerce. Berry Middle School’s former assistant principal has stepped up as principal. Gerald Sarpy also has served as assistant principal at North Mesquite High School. Sarpy has a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and a master’s degree from The University of Texas at Arlington. Now serving as assistant principal of Rutherford Elementary School is Casy Wilburn. Most recently an instructional specialist at Cannaday Elementary, she holds bachelor’s and graduate degrees from Texas A&M University at Commerce.

Mineral Wells ISD

New Superintendent John Kuhn comes to the district from Perrin-Whitt CISD, where he also served in the top job. He is a previous employee of Mineral Wells ISD, where he worked as a high school principal before joining Perrin-Whitt in 2010. Kuhn is a graduate of Tarleton State University. David Tarver, who for the past year has been principal of Perrin High School in Perrin-Witt CISD, has returned to Mineral Wells ISD as assistant superintendent. He was previously assistant principal of Mineral Wells’ Travis Elementary and also worked as an assistant football coach and offensive coordinator for the district. Tarver obtained his bachelor’s degree from Tarleton State University and completed his master’s degree in education at Lamar University. Assistant Superintendent Jay Walsworth has announced his upcoming retirement, closing a three-decade career in Texas public education. He began his time with Mineral Wells ISD in 1987, working in Millsap ISD for several years before returning to his original district as principal of Mineral Wells High School in 2002. He has served as assistant superintendent since 2012.

Moody ISD

New Superintendent Gary Martel most recently held the top position in Diboll ISD, where he worked for 17 years.

Nacogdoches ISD

Sandra Dowdy is the new interim superin-

tendent. Also, the following assignments were made at Nacogdoches High School: Cotina Evans, head volleyball coach; David Greer, head baseball coach; Gary Hall, boys’ basketball head coach; and Michael O’Guin, principal.

North Hopkins ISD

Darin Jolly is the district’s new superinten-

dent.

Northside ISD Now leading Knowlton Elementary School as principal is Maricela Alcaron, former vice principal of Northwest Crossing Elementary. She began her career in Northside ISD in 2005 as a bilingual teacher, going on to serve as vice principal of Mead Elementary. She received her bachelor’s degree from Rice University, her master’s degree from Our Lady of the Lake University, and her doctorate from The University of Texas at San Antonio. Lisa Baker, previously vice principal of Northside Alternative High School, has been promoted to principal of Communications Arts High School. She also worked at O’Connor High as a special education campus and department coordinator, vice principal of summer school and assistant principal. She holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The University of Texas at San Antonio. The new principal of Scarborough Elementary is school is Mirella Campbell, who most recently was vice principal of Locke Hill Elementary. She came to Northeast ISD in 2002 as a teacher at Hull Elementary, leaving the district to work in Katy ISD. She is a graduate of The University of Texas at San Antonio, where she earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Robert Harris, former principal of Jay High School, is now first principal of Harlan High School, a new campus scheduled that opened in August. He joined Northside ISD in 2000 as assistant principal at Jay. Harris received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Midwestern State University. The new principal of Valley Hi Elementary School is Andrew Morris, who was the campus vice principal. After a career in the Air Force, he joined Northside ISD in 2004 as a special education teacher at Knowlton Elementary. He earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The University of Texas at San Antonio. Los Reyes Elementary School began the new school year with Erika Pruneda as principal. She was formerly the vice principal of Beard Elementary. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The University of Texas at San Antonio. Jay Sumpter has moved from serving as principal of Jay Science and Engineering Academy to leading Jay High School. He was a science and AP psychology teacher

at the Academy for nine years before being named its assistant director in 2006. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Indiana State University and a master’s degree from Lamar University. The former principal of Nimitz Elementary School in Kerrville ISD is now principal of Timberwilde Elementary. Wendy Tieman began her career in Waller ISD, going on to teach and serve as an administrator in McKinney ISD and in Broken Arrow, Okla. She received her bachelor’s degree from Sam Houston State University and her master’s degree in educational administration from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Northeast ISD has made 11 additional administrative appointments. They are: Valerie Arce, vice principal, Cole Elementary School; Erika Avila, vice principal, Villarreal Elementary School; Frank Bayardo, director of maintenance and operations; Ann Marie Devlin, academic dean, Folks Middle School; Frank Johnson, vice principal, Valley Hi Elementary School; Rick Lane, academic dean, Stinson Middle School; Gabriela Menchaca, vice principal, Fields Elementary School; Paul Ramirez, vice principal, Jones Middle School; Christina Sanchez, assistant principal, Jefferson Middle School; Renee Stanley, director of special revenues and compliance; and Gregory Wright, vice principal, Glass Elementary School.

Northwest ISD

John Booles is principal of

Sendera Ranch Elementary School, where he was serving as assistant principal. He holds a bachelor’s degree from The University of Texas at Arlington and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Lamar University. Additionally, he has a post-graduate degree in education from LeTourneau University. Micah Gierky, the district’s special education supervisor for the past four years, is now director of special education. Prior to that, she was a special education support teacher. She is a graduate of the University of North Texas, with a bachelor’s degree in rehabilitation studies. She earned her master’s degree in education from Texas Christian University. > See Who’s News, page 46 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

45


Who’s News > Continued from page 45 Suzie McNeese is the new di-

rector of student services. She has been with Northwest ISD since 2002 and was principal of Sendera Ranch Elementary School since it opened eight years ago. She completed her undergraduate degree at the University of North Texas and her master’s degree in education from Texas Woman’s University. She earned her doctorate in education from Nova Southeastern University.

Pearland ISD

Larry Berger has taken the reins as director

of maintenance, operations and facilities. The former principal of Pearland High School is a two-time district Secondary Principal of the Year and the recipient of HEB’s 2015 Excellence in Education Secondary Principal Award.

Petersburg ISD

Drew Howard, who was a principal in Peaster ISD, is now Petersburg ISD’s superintendent.

Pettus ISD Jaime Velasco, who formerly led Italy ISD,

is the new superintendent.

Pflugerville ISD

The new principal of Windermere Elementary, Kate Shaum, comes to Pflugerville from Austin ISD, where she was principal of Galindo Elementary since 2013. Prior to that, she was the administrative supervisor for the district’s area 2 associate superintendent and assistant principals at two Austin schools. Nathan Steenport, former assistant principal of Pflugerville and River Oaks elementary schools, is now principal of Northwest Elementary School.

Pine Tree ISD

Kerry Lane has been hired as the district’s head football coach and assistant athletic director. He comes from Gilmer ISD, where he was the passing coordinator and wide receivers coach for the past four years. The new principal of Pine Tree Primary School is Cristi Parsons from Hallsville ISD. During her time in Hallsville, where she graduated high school, she was twice a principal and was named a National Distinguished Principal by the Texas Association of Elementary Principals and Supervisors Association. Most recently, she was director of elementary curriculum and instruction.

Plano ISD

Katie Brittain, new principal of Haggar El-

ementary School, has been with the district since 2003, most recently as an assistant principal at Centennial Elementary. She is a graduate of Iowa State University and holds a master’s degree from Baker University.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

Antreshawn Buhl, former assistant principal of Boggess Elementary, is now principal of Aldridge Elementary School. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The University of Texas at San Antonio and a second master’s degree from the University of North Texas at Dallas. Mitchell Elementary School’s new principal, Bob Farris, has spent his career in Plano ISD, most recently as an assistant principal at Forman Elementary. He holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Northwest Missouri State University and a master’s degree in education from Concordia University. Matthew Frey, now serving as executive director of instructional technology, comes to Plano from Brevard Public Schools in Florida, where he worked since 1993, most recently as the manager of instructional technology. He received his bachelor’s degree from Lycoming College and his master’s degree from Nova Southeastern University. The new principal of Forman Elementary School is Talle Gomez, formerly assistant principal of Boyd Elementary in Allen ISD. She received her master’s degree from the University of North Texas. The district’s new assistant superintendent for employee services is Matthew Gutierrez, who has served as an administrator in Austin, Fort Worth, Northside and Round Rock ISDs. He most recently was deputy superintendent in Little Elm ISD. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Angelo State University, a master’s degree from Schreiner University and a doctorate from Texas Tech University. Sara Stewart, newly appointed principal of Centennial Elementary School, has been with the district as a teacher and assistant principal, most recently at Brinker Elementary, since 2001. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Baptist Bible College and her master’s degree from Texas Woman’s University. The following assistant principal appointments also were made: Treesia Brannon, Bowman Middle School; J.D. Dearing, McMillen High School; Kenny Johnson, Frankford Middle School; Paul Meredith, Carpenter Middle School; Kennitra Robertson, Otto Middle School; and Melody Schulte, Otto Middle School.

Poth ISD

Paula Renken, who was the interim superin-

tendent, is now the superintendent.

Prairie Valley ISD

Tim West, a former principal in the district, is the new superintendent.

Red Oak ISD

Following 23 years with the Irving Police Department, Kevin Denney is the district’s new police chief. The recipient of 42 commendations during his law enforcement career, Sgt. Denney has a bachelor’s degree in sociology

from Texas A&M University. He is completing his master’s degree in criminal justice from Tarleton State University.

Richardson ISD

Chris Goodson is now assistant superintendent of human resources. He has been with Richardson ISD for 23 years, most recently serving as assistant superintendent of elementary schools. He is a graduate of the University of North Texas. He has a master’s degree in educational administration from The University of Texas at Arlington and a doctorate in educational administration from the University of North Texas. Now serving as assistant superintendent of elementary schools is Brenda Payne, former chief executive director of curriculum and instruction, K-12. She has been an educator for 27 years, all of those with Richardson ISD. Her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in education were earned from Texas Tech University and Texas Woman’s University. Jeannie Stone, former deputy superintendent of curriculum and instruction, is now serving as interim superintendent. With 26 years in education, she joined the district last summer from Wylie ISD. She holds a bachelor’s degree in English from The University of Texas at Arlington, a master’s degree in education from Texas A&M University at Commerce and a doctorate in educational leadership from Nova Southeastern University. Veteran educator Kay Waggoner, superintendent of Richardson ISD for six years, has retired. She spent 35 years serving in Texas public schools.

Rockdale ISD

Kelly Blair, former Elgin ISD junior high assistant principal, is now principal of Rockdale Junior High. She holds an associate’s degree from Temple College and a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Sam Houston State University. Her master’s degree in educational administration was awarded from Lamar University. Former Rockdale Intermediate School Assistant Principal Alesha Eoff has been promoted to principal of Rockdale Elementary. She received her bachelor’s degree in multidisciplinary studies from McMurry University and her master’s degree in education from Tarleton State University.

Round Rock ISD

Round Rock ISD has named Arnoldo Barrera director of secondary staffing. He

came to the district in 2013 from Corpus Christi ISD to take the position of principal of Purple Sage Elementary and was most recently principal of Callison Elementary. He is a graduate of Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi, where he also received his master’s degree in guidance and counseling and his doctorate in educational administration.

> See Who’s News, page 48


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Who’s News > Continued from page 46

San Angelo ISD Dustin Faught has been hired to lead the

Central High School Bobcats basketball team. He comes to his new job from six years at Brownfield High School in Brownfield ISD, where he was last year’s coach of the 3A boys’ basketball champions. He is a graduate of Wayland Baptist University and McMurry University.

San Marcos CISD Elena Villanueva is principal of De Zavala Elementary School. A former counselor and bilingual teacher, she was most recently principal of Haltom High School in Birdville ISD. She earned an associate’s degree in criminal justice from Del Mar College in Corpus Christi, followed by a bachelor’s degree in the same field from Texas A&M International University. In addition, she holds two master’s degrees — one in curriculum and instruction and school leadership and another in school counseling — from Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi.

Seguin ISD Stan Mauldin is the new Seguin High

School band director. He has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston and more than 20 years of experience teaching band in schools across Texas. He was recognized in 2003 by the John Phillip Sousa Foundation as one of the top 10 band directors in the country and was recently named a quarter-finalist for the Grammy Foundation’s Educator Award.

Socorro ISD Gabriela Elliott has joined the Bill Sybert School as principal. A graduate of Socorro High, she went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in biology from Colorado University and a master’s degree in administrative education from The University of Texas at El Paso. Fernando Miranda is the new

principal of Hilley Elementary School. A veteran of the U.S. Navy, he has been an educator for 15 years, working in Socorro ISD as a counselor and bilingual teacher. He is a graduate of Southern Illinois University and holds a master’s degree from The University of Texas at El Paso.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

Pebble Hills High School began the 2016-2017 academic year with a new principal. Malessa Parham began her career 16 years ago as a teacher in Ysleta ISD. She has been principal of the Bill Sybert School since 2011. The new principal of Socorro High School is Federico Tovar, coming to his new position from Ysleta ISD, where he was an assistant principal at Bel Air High.

Spring ISD Shametha Dillard now leads Major Elemen-

tary School as principal. An educator for 13 years, she had been serving as assistant principal at Durkee Elementary. In addition to working as a teacher and administrator, Dillard was also employed by Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt as a trainer for Dallas ISD third grade teachers.

The district’s new director of social improvement, Pamela Farinas, was principal of Dekaney High School since 2015. Initially a math teacher in Houston ISD, she also was deputy head of KIPP Schools. Bammel Elementary School began the school year with Becky Hernandez-Owolabi as principal. She has been with Spring ISD since 2004, working as a director of professional learning and as principal of Link and Eickenroht elementary schools and Claughton Middle School. Now serving as director of academic support services, H.P. Hyder III was most recently principal of Bammel Middle School. An administrator for 13 years, he was also an assistant principal for the district and a principal in Sheldon ISD. Peg Sherwood has joined the district as

executive director of special education after spending three months as co-interim director of that department. After retirement, she worked as a consultant before re-entering public education. Denise Zimmerman has been named director of guidance and counseling, joining Spring ISD with 20 years of experience as a teacher and counselor. She was most recently Clear Creek ISD’s prevention services coordinator.

Three Rivers ISD A new superintendent will greet students at the beginning of the 2016-17 academic year. Mary Springs is the former superintendent of Santa Gertrudis ISD.

Tyler ISD Sheri Barberee has been chosen to serve as

a principal in a school yet to be assigned. She joins the district from Eagle Mountain-Saginaw ISD, where she held teaching and administrative positions for 21 years. The Angelo State University graduate holds a master’s degree in school administration from Texas Christian University.

Now at the helm of Three Lakes Middle School as principal is Christopher Blake. He was most recently an elementary principal in Sheldon ISD and, additionally, was an adjunct professor at San Jacinto College. He received his bachelor’s degree from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University) and has master’s degree from the University of Houston-Clear Lake. He is pursuing his doctorate in educational leadership from Lamar University. Dan Crawford has been hired to lead Lee High School as principal. He comes from Kaufman High School in Kaufman ISD, where he held the top position since 2014. He holds a bachelor’s degree in history and secondary education from Williams Jewell College and a master’s degree in education administration from Texas A&M University at Commerce, which also awarded his doctorate in educational leadership.

Former Dallas ISD Lincoln High School head girls’ basketball coach Carlesa Dixon is now leading the Tyler High Lady Lions basketball program. Other newly appointed principals include:

Zach Cazares, Bonner Elementary School; Brandy Holland, Austin Elementary School;

and

Tremayna Thomas, Ramey Elementary

School.

Weatherford ISD Tra Hall has been approved as

principal of Wright Elementary. The Texas Tech graduate has been an educator for nine years after spending 12 years in private sector management. He holds two master’s degrees — one in history education from Eastern New Mexico State University and another in educational leadership from Wayland Baptist University. Now leading Crockett Elementary School as principal is Marie Hernandez, who joined the district six years ago. She holds a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Northwest Missouri State University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Lamar University. Jessica Shugart is the new

principal of Seguin Elementary School. She previously served in the same position at Crockett Elementary since 2012. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Sam Houston State University and her master’s degree from the University of North Texas. She is at work on her doctor-


ate in education administration at Texas A&M University.

Wellman-Union ISD The district’s new superintendent, Aaron Waldrip, was most recently principal of Brownfield Middle School in Brownfield ISD.

Wichita Falls ISD Now serving as girls’ basketball coach for Hirschi High School is KraTaura Buckner, who spent the past eight years as girls’ athletic director and coach at Uplift North Hills Preparatory, a charter school in Irving. Rider High School will begin the new season with Laura Holmes as the girls’ basketball coach. The new girls’ basketball coach for Wichita Falls High School, Amber Wiley, previously worked at Connally High in Pflugerville ISD.

Wylie ISD Wylie East High School now has Angela Arp as dean of students. She has spent her 15-year career in Wylie ISD, working as a teacher, mentor and department chair. She is a graduate of the University of North Texas and is completing her master’s degree at Texas A&M University at Commerce. Now serving as the district’s director of academic and career connections is Jason Hudson, who began his academic career in Mesquite ISD as an industrial technology teacher. He was named that district’s CTE director in 2011 and was 2015’s CTE Director of the Year for the North East Texas Career and Technical Consortium. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas A&M University. Keith Kirkpatrick is the new assistant principal and truancy officer at Achieve Academy. An educator since 1990, he joined Wylie High School in 2006, moving to Wylie East High as an assistant principal in 2011. He holds a bachelor’s degree from East Texas State University and a master’s degree from Texas A&M University at Commerce.

Wylie ISD’s director of fine arts, Glenn Lambert, comes to his new position from Wylie East High School, where he was, initially, band director and, most recently, Fine Arts Department chair. He received his bachelor’s degree from Texas Tech University and his master’s degree from Texas Christian University. The new school year began with Michelle Lindsay as assistant principal of Burnett

Junior High. She has been with the district since 2006. Lindsay earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and her master’s degree from Lamar University.

A second new assistant principal of Burnett Junior High is Justin Mork, an educator since 2009. He has been at Burnett since 2013 as a history teacher and girls’ bas-

ketball coach and, in 2014, was promoted to girls’ campus athletic director. Mork received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Oklahoma and his master’s degree from Lamar University. Akin Elementary School’s new assistant principal, Magan Porter, spent seven years with Bryan ISD before joining Wylie in 2013 as a counselor at Akin. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and a master’s degree from Sam Houston State University. Sara Roland has been named director of special education and health services. She has been with Garland ISD since 1997, most recently serving as interim director of special education. She is a graduate of Stephen F. Austin State University and earned her master’s degree from Texas A&M University at Commerce.

Ysleta ISD The new principal of Vista Hills Elementary School is Judith Calderon, who comes to her new position from serving as an assistant principal of Ysleta High School. She has been with Ysleta ISD for 17 years. Both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees were earned from The University of Texas at El Paso. Former Ranchland Hills Middle School Principal Carmen Crawford now serves in the top position at Sageland Elementary. She has spent her career with the district. She received both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The University of Texas at El Paso. Bel Air High School welcomed Charlie Garcia as principal. He was formerly principal of Camino Real Middle School.

Leticia Gutierrez, former Lancaster Elementary School assistant principal, has been promoted to principal of Hulbert Elementary. An educator since 1992, she holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The University of Texas at El Paso. Beth Harbison has moved from serving as

principal of Scotsdale Elementary School to the same position at Desertaire Elementary. She has been an employee of the district since 1994 and holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The University of Texas at El Paso.

Fernando Marquez has been promoted

from interim director of career programs to director. He earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The University of Texas at El Paso and a second master’s degree from the University of Phoenix. Glen Cove Elementary School welcomes

Margarita Mendoza as principal. She was

most recently assistant principal at North Star Elementary after beginning her career in 2004 in Socorro ISD. She is a graduate of The University of Texas at El Paso, where she earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees. The new principal of Eastwood Heights Elementary School is Raul Mendoza, former principal of Lundy Elementary in El Paso ISD. The 23-year educator has a bachelor’s degree from The University of Texas and a master’s degree from The University of Texas at El Paso.

Now serving as principal of Desert View Middle School is Mary Ann Olivas, former principal of Desertaire Elementary. She is a 28-year veteran of the district, beginning as a special education teacher. Olivas received her bachelor’s degree from The University of Texas at El Paso and her master’s degree from Sul Ross State University. Ida Perales, a former assistant principal at Ysleta High School, is the new principal of Camino Real Middle School. She began her career in Ysleta ISD, then worked in El Paso and Socorro ISDs before returning to Ysleta in 2008. She has bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The University of Texas at El Paso. Lorraine Quintela has returned to Ysleta ISD as director of risk management from Socorro ISD, where she was benefits coordinator since 2014. She received her bachelor’s degree in business management from the University of Phoenix. Jonathan Valdez, former principal of So-

corro Middle School in Socorro ISD, is now principal of Riverside Middle School. The former teacher and administrator with El Paso ISD earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The University of Texas at El Paso. ◄

Lourdes Hinojosa, former Edgemere Elementary assistant principal, is now principal of Loma Terrace Elementary. The former bilingual, dual language and special education teacher received bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The University of Texas at El Paso.

Former Desert View Middle School Principal Michelle Kehrwald is now director of advanced academics. Kehrwald, who has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Oklahoma and a master’s degree from the University of Nebraska, has been an educator for 29 years. Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

49


THE BACK PAGE

‘You mean, it’s not all about me?’ by Riney Jordan

I

was recently asked, “Why did you want to become a teacher?

Well, my decision to become a teacher came early in life when I was placed as a student in the room of a remarkably kind and compassionate sixth grade teacher. This teacher made me feel important. She made me feel like she cared. And this teacher made me feel that I could do anything in the world that I wanted to do. It’s difficult to explain to someone who isn’t passionate about their life’s work, but I couldn’t wait to become a teacher. And when I did, I just couldn’t get enough of it! I wanted to talk to other teachers. I wanted to read magazines about good methods of instruction. I wanted to spend every dime I could afford on teaching aids for my classroom. Simply stated, I was addicted to teaching. “But you don’t make enough money teaching school. You could make so much more money doing other things.” It’s true that you’re not going to get rich teaching, but I have yet to meet a great teacher who became an instructor solely for the money. It’s good to be reminded that if we are only teaching for the money, we’re in the wrong profession anyway. I believe that we are in a critical time in public education. It’s not an easy thing to admit, but those of us who support public education need to wake up and realize that we are no longer the only game in town. Our schools need to be places where the students’ best interests are foremost! Anything less is doomed for failure. Nel Noddings, an American educational theorist who has done extensive research and study in the role of caring about students, expressed my beliefs perfectly: “The student is infinitely more important than the subject matter.” “What?!” some teachers might scream. “Nothing is more important that my subject matter!”

Oh, how sad. How tragic on so many fronts. I remember reading the story of a young kid named Guy. He was overweight, had low self-esteem and came from a broken home. Kids made fun of him at school, and he compensated by overeating. His grades were failing, and it was apparent that he had given up on everything. His parents were alcoholics, and he often had to care for himself. In eighth grade, however, he met a teacher who showed him that he had value. Bolstered by his teacher’s encouragement and genuine interest, Guy’s grades improved. A few years later, he graduated near the top of his class and started college to become a teacher himself. In 1986, Guy Doud was named National Teacher of the Year, receiving his award from President Ronald Reagan. Doud credits that eighth grade teacher for believing in him, encouraging him and for being someone who truly cared. Until those of us who love public education realize we are there, first and foremost, to meet the needs of our students, we will never earn the respect and the support of the community at large. Whether we like it or not, it not about us fellow educators. It is about reaching out and communicating, connecting, listening, serving and caring deeply about each of our students. Too many kids come to us today who are troubled, confused, neglected, abused, humiliated, ridiculed and rejected. Yet, we expect them to be as excited about our subject matter as we are. Forget it! Until a caring relationship exists between teacher and student, little or no learning will take place. This school year, more than ever, strive to get to know your students. Earn their trust and their respect. I can’t promise you more money, but I can promise that you’ll feel better than ever about your role as a teacher.

RINEY JORDAN’S “The Second Book” is now available at www.rineyjordan.com, along with his other

publications. You can contact him at (254) 386-4769, find him on Facebook or follow him on Twitter: @RineyRiney.

50

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

Texas School Business Advertiser Index

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