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YEARS

The News Magazine for Public Education in Texas

Texas School Business

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

2018

Brian Woods Northside ISD

2018 Superintendent of the Year

Also in this issue: 2018 Outstanding Board Grapevine-Colleyville ISD 2018 TSPRA Key Communicator Charles Foster Johnson TCASE President Cynthia Peltier


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Texas School Business NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2018

18

2018 Outstanding Board

Grapevine-Colleyville ISD board members take state’s top honor by James Golsan

14

21 2018 Key Communicator Pastors for Texas Children founder Charles Foster Johnson named TSPRA’s 2018 Key Communicator

Cover Story

2018 Superintendent of the Year

Northside’s Brian Woods rises to the top thanks to mentorship, support By Dacia Rivers

25 TCASE President Profile Cynthia Peltier takes the helm in a volatile year for special education

Photo Features

10 THSCA holds 86th annual coaches convention in San Antonio 28 School administrators and trustees head to Austin for TASA/TASB 2018 Convention

Departments 6 Who’s News 30 Calendar 38 Ad Index

Columns

5 From the Editor by Dacia Rivers 9 The Law Dawg— Unleashed by Jim Walsh 11 Digital Frontier by Karen Fuller and Bryon Kolbeck 13 Game On! by Bobby Hawthorne 36 Regional View by Hector Gonzalez 38 The Back Page by Riney Jordan

The views expressed by columnists and contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or Texas School Business advertisers. The publisher also makes no endorsement of the advertisers or advertisements in this publication.


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From the editor

I

n this issue of Texas School Business, it’s my pleasure to introduce you to TASB’s 2018 Superintendent of the Year. I enjoyed getting to know Dr. Brian Woods of Northside ISD and learning a little bit about him, his work in schools and his advocacy for Texas public education. And Dr. Woods is just one example of the many hard-working folks we have leading our school districts. In this issue, you’ll also meet the members of TASA’s Outstanding School Board and TSPRA’s Key Communicator. Hopefully their achievements and their words will inspire you. Their dedication is proof that Texas public schools are worthy of our pride. That’s a fact that is in sharp focus for me right now, as I compile and prepare our annual Bragging Rights issue, where we highlight unique programs from diverse schools across Texas and give them a chance to shine. Look for that issue in your mailbox the first week of December. You might notice that this issue does not have a “Student Voices” or “The Arts” column — that’s because we need your help. We want to highlight your students and your fine arts teachers, but we need to hear about them first. Please drop me a line at drivers@texasschoolbusiness.com, or give my email address to your communications staff. I look forward to talking with you about how we can highlight your district on these pages, because truly, that’s what we’re all here for.

Texas School Business (ISSN 0563-2978 USPS 541-620)

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018 Volume LXV, Issue 6 406 East 11th Street Austin, Texas 78701 Phone: 512-477-6361 • Fax: 512-482-8658 www.texasschoolbusiness.com EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Dacia Rivers

Dacia Rivers Editorial Director

DESIGN

Phaedra Strecher COLUMNISTS

Karen Fuller Hector Gonzalez Bobby Hawthorne Riney Jordan Bryon Kolbeck Jim Walsh ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER

Ann M. Halstead

TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Kevin Brown

ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, SERVICES AND SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MEDIA RELATIONS

Amy Francisco

Texas School Business (ISSN 0563-2978) is published bimonthly with a special edition, Bragging Rights, in December, by the Texas Association of School Administrators, at 406 E. 11th St., Austin, TX 78701. Periodicals postage paid at Austin, Texas, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Texas Association of School Administrators, 406 East 11th Street, Austin, TX 78701. © Copyright 2018 Texas Association of School Administrators

Ann M. Halstead

Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

5


Who’s News Anna ISD Anna ISD announces its new superintendent, Michael Comeaux, former superintendent of Post ISD. An educator for 23 years, he also served as principal of Palmer High School in Palmer ISD and as an assistant principal in Lumberton ISD.

Argyle ISD The new principal of Argyle High School is John King, who has been with the district since 2007 as a teacher, coach and assistant principal.

Austin ISD Now serving as executive director of middle schools is Ty Davidson, who comes to his new position from Travis Early College High School, where he was principal. He has a bachelor’s degree in sociology from the University of Texas and a master’s degree in education administration from Texas State University. Sheila Henry, former principal of LBJ

Early College High School, now serves as the district’s executive director of high schools. Prior to her move to Austin, she was a school administrator in Palm Beach County, Fla. She holds a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Florida Memorial University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Nova Southeastern University. The district’s new associate superintendent of middle schools is Raul Moreno, previously an area director with Goose Creek CISD. He is a former employee of Austin ISD as well, having served as principal of Paredes Middle School and assistant principal of Travis and Johnston high schools and Webb Middle School. He received his bachelor’s degree and master’s degrees in education from Sul Ross State University.

Bastrop ISD Returning to Bastrop ISD, where she previously served as principal of Emile Elementary School, is Jennifer Hranitzky, new principal of Cedar Creek Intermediate School. She most recently worked in Austin ISD as an administrative supervisor, and also was Moulton ISD’s superintendent. Her

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Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

degrees, a bachelor’s in biochemistry and a master’s and doctorate in curriculum and instruction, were earned from Texas A&M University.

Bellevue ISD Bellevue ISD students began the new academic year with Cason Bennett as district principal. An alumnus of the district, he served three years as a Texas state trooper with DPS before becoming an educator. He began his career in Seymour ISD, then joined Bellevue ISD as a teacher and coach. Bennett is a graduate of Midwestern State University.

Bloomington ISD A new band director is in place at Bloomington High School. Paul Saenz is a 16-year educator who has 13 years of experience as a band director, most recently in Banquete ISD after having led bands from Ben Bolt-Palito Blanco and Falfurrias ISDs to state competitions. He is a graduate of Texas A&M University at Kingsville with a degree in music education.

Bluff Dale ISD Dean Edwards, who spent 30 years as

superintendent of Morgan Mill ISD, has come out of retirement to serve as interim superintendent of Bluff Dale ISD.

Bryan ISD Assistant career and technical education director Kevin Ross was named Texas Career and Technology Education Administrator of the Year by the Career and Technology Association of Texas, the award being presented in Fort Worth in July. He is a graduate of Stephen F. Austin State University and received his master’s degree in education administration from Texas A&M University.

Bullard ISD The Bullard ISD board of trustees has approved John Jones as director of school safety. This marks his first public schools assignment, as he previously served with the FBI and the U.S. Army National Guard. He holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from Pennsylvania State University and a master’s degree in business administration from West Virginia Graduate College.

Calhoun County ISD Larry Nichols has returned to CCISD as

superintendent. He previously led the district from 2000 to 2010, then held the top

position in Galveston ISD before retiring in 2016. The new principal of Port O’Connor Elementary School, Kelly Wehmeyer, is a graduate of CCISD schools and an 18-year veteran educator. She was most recently assistant principal of Seadrift School and Port O’Connor Elementary.

Carthage ISD After serving as district superintendent since 2008, Glenn Hambrick will retire in January.

Cleburne ISD Cinthia Green has been promoted from her position as accountant to the district’s senior accountant.

Cleburne High School’s newest assistant principal is Richard Leck, formerly an agriculture teacher at the school. The new chief financial officer is Sarah Taylor, who had been serving as CISD’s senior accountant. Chad Van Winkle,

previously an assistant principal at Cleburne High School, is now the district’s transportation director.

Cleveland ISD Ashley Boothe has been promoted from

assistant principal of Cleveland Middle School to principal. An educator for 10 years, she earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in child development from Stephen F. Austin State University.

The district’s new director of child nutrition, Jennifer Leos, has worked for 11 years in Texas public schools. She earned her bachelor’s degree in family and consumer sciences from Texas State University and her master’s degree in nutrition from Sam Houston State University. Now serving as principal of the district’s DAEP (Disciplinary Alternative Education Program) is Steven Sherrouse, former assistant principal of Cleveland Middle School. He has been an educator for 28 years and holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas of the Permian Basin as well as a master’s degree in education administration from Lamar University.


Clint ISD (El Paso) In July, Clint ISD’s athletic director, Rene Aguilar, was inducted into the Hall of Honor of the Texas High School Athletic Directors Association (THSADA) at the organization’s annual convention in San Antonio. He has served in his current position for 20 years.

College Station ISD Omar Espitia is the

new principal of A&M Consolidated Middle School. A graduate of A&M Consolidated High School, he spent six years in the Marine Corps before becoming an educator, most recently working as an assistant principal at his alma mater.

Coppell ISD Newly appointed safety and security coordinator Rachael Freeman is a Coppell ISD police officer, slated to retire from the force in 2019, and was the school resource officer for Coppell Middle School North and Victory Place@Coppell since 2014. She received her bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and sociology from Sam Houston State University and her master’s degree in criminal justice from the University of North Texas. The new director of accounting,

Tilisa Stubbs, comes to Coppell ISD from

California, where she was chief business officer at the Di Giorgio School District in Arvin and an accountant for the Kern County Superintendent of Schools in Bakersfield. Her bachelor’s degree in business administration was awarded from DeVry University and her master’s degree in accounting from the University of La Verne. The Coppell ISD Board of Trustees has approved Jennifer Villines as director of student and staff services. Most recently with Eagle Mountain-Saginaw ISD in the same position, she has 16 years of experience as an educator, including work as a special education teacher, assistant principal and principal. She received her bachelor’s degree from Amberton University and her master’s degree in education from the University of North Texas.

Cypress-Fairbanks ISD Melissa Martin has been promoted from assistant principal to principal of Francone Elementary School. She has spent the past 13 years with CFISD,

six of those as an administrator. She holds a bachelor’s degree in education from Baylor University and a master’s degree in educational leadership and policy studies from the University of Texas at Arlington. Bill Powell, former director of transportation, has been named assistant superintendent of support services. After graduating from West Texas A&M University, he joined Boles ISD, then accepted the position of director of transportation of Canyon ISD in 1996. He served in the same capacity in Magnolia ISD and came to CFISD in 2001 as assistant director of transportation for human resources. He took his most recent position in 2013. He holds a master’s degree from Abilene Christian University.

Decatur ISD The new assistant superintendent for operations is Steve White, who previously served as superintendent of Granger, Alpine, Aspermont and Thrall ISDs.

Dripping Springs ISD Katharine Muller has been approved to serve as director of special services. An educational specialist with ESC Region 13 since 2014, she also worked as a special education administrator in Florence, Austin and Del Valle ISDs. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas and her master’s degree in educational assessment from Houston Baptist University.

Duncanville ISD Chavela Hampton has been chosen to lead the district’s new department as chief of police. She brings almost 30 years of law enforcement experience to the role, having most recently served as a deputy chief in the Arlington police department. She holds a bachelor’s degree in science, business administration and computer science and a master’s degree in human relations.

Duncanville ISD’s new director of curriculum and instruction is Silvia Martinez, a 20-year educator who has been a Spanish teacher, assistant principal, principal, dean of instruction and assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction.

Oscar Rodriguez, newly appointed director

of technology, comes to Duncanville from Dallas ISD, where he worked in educational technology and staffing. He has a bachelor’s degree in operations management and a master’s degree in business administration. Newly hired chief academic officer Cathy Sewell comes to Duncanville from serving as chief of secondary education in Everman ISD. She spent 19 of her 24 years as an educator in that district.

Eagle Mountain-Saginaw ISD Now serving as director of secondary student services is Kenneth Anderson, a 26-year education veteran who comes to his new position from Keller ISD, where he was principal of New Directions High School for 12 years. He is a graduate of Tarleton State University with a master’s degree in education from Sul Ross State University. Jennifer Stark, the new assistant principal of Creekview Middle School, spent the past two years as a sixth-grade math teacher at the school. Her degrees in curriculum and instruction and educational leadership were awarded from Lamar University.

Prairie Vista Middle School’s new assistant principal, Jennifer Thomas, was previously girls’ athletics coordinator at Highland Middle School. Prior to that, she taught and coached track and volleyball in Lake Worth ISD. She received her bachelor’s degree from West Texas A&M University and her master’s degree in education administration from Lamar University. The new assistant principal of Elkins Elementary School, Kathleen Weilby, arrived from Ector County ISD, where she served in the same capacity. An educator for 17 years, she received her bachelor’s degree from the University of North Texas and her master’s degree in education administration from Lamar University. Andrea White now serves

as director of compliance and policy. Most recently a middle school assistant principal in Northwest ISD, she has 23 years of

> See Who’s News, page 12 Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

7


WE ARE A TEAM OF EXPERTS, EACH FOCUSED ON A UNIQUE ASPECT OF EDUCATION, STANDING BESIDE YOU AS WE WORK TOWARD A COMMON GOAL: THE SUCCESS OF ALL STUDENTS.

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THE LAW DAWG – UNLEASHED

T E X A S C O M P U T E R C O O P E R AT I V E

TCC KNOWS TEXAS Over 875 Local Education Agencies rely on TCC products and services

You have to be careful by Jim Walsh

I

n the heat of the 2016 presidential campaign, the school board in San Diego, California, directed the superintendent to “bring back to the board a plan to address Islamophobia and the reports of bullying of Muslim students … at a future date.” Boom. Lawsuit. You might think that any proactive effort by a school board to address the bullying of students would be greeted favorably. But a couple groups in San Diego saw a dark motive behind the board’s action. The suit was filed by Citizens for Quality Education San Diego, the San Diego Asian Americans for Equality Foundation and six parents. The plaintiffs alleged that the board was engaged in a “subtle discriminatory scheme” to promote Islam at the expense of other religions. Much of the focus of the suit was on the district’s relationship with CAIR — the Council on American-Islamic Relations. According to the court, the original complaint filed by the plaintiffs “contained multiple allegations attempting to link CAIR with ‘terrorist organizations.’” The plaintiffs subsequently modified their complaint, but the court noted that it still contained inflammatory language: “CAIR prioritizes public school districts as ground zero to advance its religious mission.” A federal judge in California recently issued a 54-page decision denying the request of the plaintiffs for a preliminary injunction. The organizations lacked “standing” to pursue the matter, as did most of the individual plaintiffs. The court did allow one plaintiff to proceed with the case based on allegations that a parent and child were “‘spiritually affronted’ by [the school’s] conduct, which has chilled

their participation in District activities; additionally, one Plaintiff alleges that [the school’s] conduct will cause the Plaintiff to remove the Plaintiff ’s child from the District.” The district tried to avoid a lawsuit. When the plaintiffs complained of the board’s original directive to the superintendent and threatened legal action, the district took corrective action. The board took subsequent action to remove references to any specific religious group and to more generally prohibit bullying of any student on religious grounds. But the district still collaborated with CAIR and purchased materials recommended by CAIR. So the suit was filed. This entire episode would provide an excellent case study of how culture wars come into play in public schools. In the era of “identity politics,” those who govern are confronted with accusations of favoring one group at the expense of others. In this case, the plaintiffs alleged that the district “‘lavishes’ Muslim students with ‘benefits’ not received by students of other religions.” The judge rejected this “zero-sum view of who ‘benefits’ from the District’s efforts to address Islamophobia and anti-Muslim bullying.” As the court noted, the effort to address the bullying of this particular group of students “accrues to all of the students at the School District by learning about the world.” We all want public schools to reflect our values. As soon as we all agree on those values, things will be a lot easier. As Citizens for Quality Education SanDiego v. Barrera demonstrates, that day is a long way off.

CareerPortal With over four decades of service to our Texas education communities, the TCC truly knows Texas. • • • • • • • • • • • •

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texascomputercooperative.net JIM WALSH is an attorney with Walsh Gallegos Treviño Russo & Kyle PC. He can be reached at jwalsh@wabsa.com. You can also follow him on Twitter: @jwalshtxlawdawg. Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

9


Photo Feature

THSCA HOLDS 86TH ANNUAL COACHES CONVENTION IN SAN ANTONIO This summer, the Texas High School Coaches Association (THSCA) welcomed more than 13,500 coaches, athletic directors, exhibitors and athletic fans to the group’s 2018 Texas High School Coaches Association Convention and Coaching School in San Antonio.

▲ Directors work the packet pick-up area at the Coaching School.

▲ The THSCA general meeting was held in the Lila Cockrell Theatre.

▲ Executive Director D.W.

Rutledge addresses THSCA members.

▲ THSCA’s new president-elect, Rodney Webb, Rockwall High School.

▲ The THSCA Head Coaching Academy.

▲ Assistant Executive Directors Glen West and Joe Martin with Texas Christian University head coach Gary Patterson.

▲ All THSCA past presidents and their spouses pose at the Past President’s Reception honoring D.W. Rutledge as he prepares to retire in December.

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Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018


DIGITAL FRONTIER

Where is your student and staff data being kept, and is it secure? by Karen Fuller and Bryon Kolbeck

A

s schools continue to adopt technology to support learning, one of the biggest concerns for schools and parents is the online security and privacy of students and staff. Specifically, the security and privacy of student and staff data is at the forefront of school technology leaders’ minds. The old days of storing data in a file cabinet are over. Just as private sector businesses require technology to operate, over the past few decades schools have also moved in that direction and are now very much dependent on technology systems to operate and support instruction. Data exists in numerous electronic forms and in complex networks of systems, some of which are stored on systems maintained by school districts, and some through online cloud service providers. According to CoSN’s 2018 K-12 IT Leadership Survey Report, privacy and security are the number-one concern of IT leaders. Considering this, it may come as no surprise that there has been a national movement to ramp up data privacy and security efforts by K-12 schools and higher education institutions. While school districts have been working in isolation related to these issues, the good news is there are opportunities to learn from other schools, to fast track your understanding related to student data privacy and security, and to elevate data privacy and security expectations across the EdTech landscape. As part of a national student data privacy initiative, the Texas K-12 CTO Council joined the national Student Data Privacy Consortium (SDPC). The consortium is governed by the nonprofit Access4Learning, and is designed to address the day-to-day, real-world multifaceted issues that schools,

states, territories and vendors face when protecting learner information. SDPC’s vision is to develop common activities, artifacts, templates, tools and effective practices that can be leveraged through a unique collaborative of end users and marketplace providers working together. This sounds great, but how does this impact Texas schools?

With the development of the newly approved agreement, Texas schools can benefit by adopting the agreement and using it with online vendors. This is important because the agreement has been deeply vetted with diverse expertise. Once executed, the agreement is a contract defining data privacy and security expectations between schools and vendors.

As the Texas affiliate, the Texas K-12 CTO Council formed the Texas Student Privacy Alliance (TxSPA), and the council pays the annual consortium dues to the national SDPC. This membership can benefit all K-12 schools in Texas. One of the goals of TxSPA was to develop a Data Privacy Agreement (DPA). In simple terms, a DPA details what data is being used and where it is being stored, and assures online vendors are using industry best practices related to data privacy and security.

As a state affiliate, TxSPA provides a website resource that allows Texas schools to inventory data systems being used and identify data being shared with online vendors. It also provides a tool to manage vendor agreements. Another benefit of the Texas agreement is that it allows vendors to extend to other school districts the same privacy protections in place as the original school district executing the agreement. This should greatly reduce the overhead of schools and vendors developing and negotiating unique agreements for each district or online service.

As part of the national SDPC, the TxSPA affiliate has benefited from the work of other states working on similar initiatives. TxSPA reviewed other statewide agreements, reviewed recent Texas legislation, such as HB 2087, and reviewed Texas school districts’ data agreements already in place with online vendors. The result was the development of a statewide DPA approved in June 2018 by the Texas K-12 CTO Council. The development of this agreement was the compilation of several months of work with many stakeholders involved. This includes leaders and legal representatives from state organizations such as TASA, TASB, TASBO and TEA, as well as local school district legal staff and technology leaders.

The Texas K-12 CTO Council believes that by adopting the statewide DPA and utilizing the TxSPA web resource positions schools will have better insight into data systems being used and to manage data agreements with vendors. To learn more about this initiative, please visit the Texas K-12 CTO Council webpage related to the Texas Student Privacy Alliance, join the Texas K-12 CTO Council to participate in work groups related to this topic, and sign up to attend the Texas K-12 CTO Council Fall Meeting.

KAREN FULLER is senior manager of IT Network Engineering in Houston ISD and is a past-chair of the Texas K-12 CTO Council. BRYON KOLBECK is the CTO at Lewisville ISD and currently serves as the current chair of the Texas K-12 CTO Council. Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

11


Who’s News > Continued from page 7

experience and has worked as a teacher, ARD (Admission, Review and Dismissal) facilitator and assistant director of special education. She is a graduate of Abilene Christian University with a master’s degree in education administration from Dallas Baptist University.

Ector County ISD Amy Anderson is now director of the district’s AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) program. Most recently the principal of the Hays STEAM Academy, she has been with the district for 18 years. She holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from the University of Texas of the Permian Basin.

December will mark the close of superintendent Tom Crowe’s career as he retires from a long career in Texas public education, the past five years leading Ector County ISD. The ECISD Board of Trustees has approved Bruce McCrary as executive director of athletics. Coming to his new job from San Antonio ISD, where he was assistant athletic director, he previously worked as head athletic trainer, safety compliance officer and football operations director at Midland ISD. The district’s new literacy director, Jamie Miller, is a 17-year employee. Previously a teacher, academic language therapist, curriculum facilitator, and reading specialist, she spent the past four years as principal of Ireland Elementary School. Jim Nelson has agreed to serve as the district’s interim superintendent. A product of ECISD schools, he is an attorney and former Texas commissioner of education. He previously served on the district’s board of trustees.

Recent assistant principal appointments include: •

Michael Hicks, Travis Elementary School;

Mayra Leyva, Downing Elementary

Josie Mata, Fly Elementary School.

School;

Ft. Sam Houston ISD (San Antonio) After spending the past four years as superintendent of Goodrich ISD, Gary Bates has accepted the top position in Ft. Sam Houston ISD. An educator for 18 years, he has been a teacher, coach, athletic coordinator, assistant principal and principal. His master’s degree was conferred by Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi and his doctoral degree in educational leadership from Prairie View A&M University.

Galena Park ISD Galena Park ISD’s new senior director for student support services, Seretha Augustine, is a 23-year veteran educator, previously serving as director for student support services. She is a graduate of the University of Houston-Downtown with a master’s degree from Prairie View A&M University. Kenneth Bryant, newly named principal of North Shore Tenth Grade Center, was most recently lead assistant principal of North Shore Senior High. He received his bachelor’s degree from Texas Southern University and his master’s degree from Concordia University.

A new executive director for operations has been appointed for the district. He is Paul Drexler, who had been serving as senior director for operations. A graduate of Texas Tech University, he holds a master’s degree from the University of Texas at San Antonio. Christopher Eckford has been promoted from assistant principal of North Shore Ninth Grade Center to principal of North Shore Middle School. The 15-year educator earned his bachelor’s degree from Texas Southern University and his master’s degree from the University of Phoenix. His doctorate in educational leadership was awarded from Sam Houston State University.

Newly appointed assistant superintendent for business services Dina Edgar was most recently executive director of business and finance in Fort Bend ISD. She received her bachelor’s degree from the College of St. Rose. Newly appointed assistant superintendent for student support services Mechelle Epps was the district’s executive director for

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Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

student support services. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston and a master’s degree in counseling from Texas Southern University, where she also received her doctorate in educational leadership. In addition, she holds a second master’s degree, in educational administration, from Prairie View A&M University. Tony Gardea, a 23-year employee of the district and most recently principal of Galena Park High School, is now senior director for recruitment and retention. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston and a master’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University.

Havard Elementary School’s new principal, Lisa Hamblen, was previously Galena Park High School’s coordinator for student learning. She received her bachelor’s degree from Sam Houston State University and her master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Houston-Clear Lake. David Harris, assistant superintendent for educational support and administration, has joined the district from DeSoto ISD, where he was superintendent. The 27-year education veteran has a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and a master’s degree from Prairie View A&M University. His doctorate was conferred by Lamar University.

Now serving as associate superintendent for education and academic support is Elizabeth Lalor, an employee of the district for 27 years and most recently assistant superintendent for educational and academic support. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Southern Mississippi and her master’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University. Jerid Link, newly appointed

executive director for human resource services compliance and hearings, was previously senior director of human resource services. The 16-year education veteran holds a bachelor’s degree in English and a master’s degree in educational administration, both from Sam Houston State University. > See Who’s News, page 22


GAME ON!

Informed civic engagement trumps winning ball games by Bobby Hawthorne

I

’ve largely abandoned Facebook. Not because I don’t have anything to say, but because I have little to add. Fact-checking for people who refuse to acknowledge fact is a waste, and serial offenders are often the most staunchly certain of their own inerrancy.

tion. How is that possible? And how can we expect uninformed citizens to understand checks and balances, advise and consent, the role of a free press, the implications of the Emoluments Clause or the long-term effects of the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

This observation is neither original nor astute, and Western civilization in general and the English language in particular will likely evolve and survive, although in what permutation I can’t imagine, given that millennials prefer hieroglyphics over the mystifications of subject/verb agreement. :(

According to a 2017 article published by the Brookings Institute, teachers who specialize in social studies constitute roughly 9 percent of the total teacher workforce. About 40 percent of these teachers come into the classroom with an undergraduate major in history, and then slightly fewer come in from other social science majors such as political science, economics or sociology. About 30 percent have degrees in either elementary or secondary education or some other degree.

My greatest fear arises from the fact that presumably educated Americans will not embrace and fulfill their obligations as informed citizens. They confuse party affiliation with civic engagement, which leads to gridlock and/or balkanization. Political parties seek power, while civic engagement requires informed principle, and schools must do a better job teaching this. To that end, we must assign the best teachers available, which means we must employ more of them. We must provide them whatever time, training and materials they require. If it means higher pay and better work conditions, so be it. We must understand that their job is not merely guilt-tripping eligible voters into casting a ballot. It’s training them to analyze, dissect, deduce and vote intelligently, based on verifiable fact instead of partisan bromides and bumper sticker slogans. Here’s a scandalous tidbit: In 2016, the Annenberg Public Policy Center found that only a quarter of Americans could name all three branches of government, the poorest showing on that question in a half-dozen years. One in three could not name any of the three branches of government. The Annenberg researchers also found that, despite massive media coverage, only 84 percent of those surveyed could name the Republican presidential candidate — Donald Trump — two weeks after the GOP conven-

So, what’s this have to do with “Game On”?

The authors of the article, Michael Hansen and Diana Quintero, found that nearly 34 percent of social studies teachers coach an athletic team, lead a physical education class, or do both. This is about 13 percentage points more than the rate at which mathematics teachers take on these extra duties, and even further above the rates for teachers of other subjects. This too is no great revelation, and I’m not suggesting in any way that athletic coaches are inadequate or dispassionate classroom teachers. I am suggesting that, while they’re paid to teach, they’re employed to coach, and they continue to be employed so long as they win, and so it is unreasonable to expect them to devote as much time to grading essays and polishing lecture notes as they do drawing up X’s and O’s. I read an article on the challenges of teaching and coaching that stated, “Coaches teach all day and then coach after hours,” which suggests that other teachers punch in at 8 a.m. and finish up at 3 p.m. This has not been my experience. I may catch grief for writing this, but I fear that, in this precarious moment, the survival of our democratic republic is more important than any ballgame.

BOBBY HAWTHORNE is the author of “Longhorn Football” and “Home Field,” published by UT Press. In 2005, he retired as director of academics for the University Interscholastic League.

Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

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y Gary Gallivan, vice president of Balfour, which underwrites the TASB Superintendent of the Year program, and Lee Lentz-Edwards, TASB first vice-president and Kermit ISD board president, present Brian Woods with a plaque recognizing him as 2018 Superintendent of the Year.

2018 Superintendent of the Year

W

hen Brian Woods heard his name called as the 2018 TASB Superintendent of the Year, his first reaction was surprise. “I hope my remarks didn’t come off as terribly surprised … but they may have,” Woods says of his acceptance speech.

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Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

Northside’s Brian Woods rises to the top thanks to mentorship, support by Dacia Rivers

While he was honored to receive the recognition, he believes that he owes his success to his support team in Northside ISD, notably his school board and staff members. “This is not all about me, this is about we,” Woods says. “Without my great board and

incredible staff, I would not have been on that stage that afternoon.” While Northside is a large district, educating more than 100,000 students in the San Antonio area, Woods believes that in any district, no matter the size, success isn’t just about who the superintendent


2018 Superintendent of the Year happens to be. To him, it’s about a unified team working together to build a better district.

A supportive environment Woods moved to Texas when he was in the second grade and received the bulk of his education in Texas public schools. He received a bachelor’s in political science from the University of Texas at Austin and master’s and doctoral degrees in educational leadership from the University of Texas at San Antonio. The Alamo city has been Woods’ home ever since. In 1992, he began working in public schools, teaching government, economics and U.S. history — the subjects where his passions lay. “I had some really outstanding teachers when I was in high school in that general area, government and economics,” Woods says. “I loved it and saw the subject matter and teaching as a real possibility for me because of some great teachers I had.” Woods enjoyed every minute of his time spent teaching, and says he would still be happily in a teaching role today, but his administration had other plans for him. The assistant principal at the school where Woods taught saw something in him and encouraged him to look at administration as a path. Woods went back to school, based on his mentor’s advice, and started working in administration roles in Northside. “I am fortunate she still works in the district,” Woods says of his mentor. “I absolutely credit her for showing me that pathway.” In 1998, when a new high school opened in the district, Woods took the reigns as assistant principal. Two years later, he took the vice principal position at another high school, eventually moving into the principal’s office in 2004. Woods made the jump to district leadership in 2006, serving as Northside’s deputy superintendent. He was working directly under John Folks at the time, a man who was also once named TASB superintendent of the year and spent 42 years working in Texas public education. When Folks retired in 2011, Woods took his place in the district’s top leadership spot and has served as superintendent in Northside ever since.

Community culture Northside ISD might employ some 14,000 employees, but Woods makes it his top goal to maintain a close-knit, family oriented culture in the district. It’s what makes him most proud of Northside, the way everyone contributes to an intimate, small-school feel, even as district enrollment climbs into sixdigit numbers. It’s a big accomplishment, one Woods says the district maintains by having open and ongoing dialogue about the goal. “When people see we’re not meeting the goal, they’ll say, ‘I feel like I’m being treated in a bureaucratic way,’” Woods says. “Then we stop and review what we’re doing and get better.” Communication is key to keeping this community culture in Northside, and Woods stresses that it goes beyond district employees and extends to promoting that same personal feeling with parents and community members. By communicating district goals with parents and other area residents and businesses, Northside overcomes its size and helps everyone understand what’s going on in the district and why. Having a common goal and communicating it to everyone has helped make it a reality. Wood’s communication efforts extend beyond his San Antonio district — he credits John Folks with sparking his passion for advocacy. “Anybody who knows John Folks knows that he just saw the world that way — that we have a responsibility in successful systems to advocate not just for our own system, but for all Texas schoolchildren,” Woods says. “I really admired his willingness and ability to do that.” Advocating for public schools takes time and energy, and Woods says it can feel thankless, but he believes that it’s not only important, it’s part of his responsibility as a district administrator. From conversations with local policy makers to sitting down with politicians at the state level, Woods goes beyond his own legislative delegates and works to advance the cause of Texas public education as a whole. “We don’t always agree, and sometimes I feel like we rarely agree, but at least we’re in the room as these conversations are happening,” Woods says.

“We have a responsibility in successful systems to advocate not just for our own system, but for all Texas schoolchildren.” It’s no surprise to hear Woods say that the believes finance is the biggest challenge facing Texas public schools right now. “I don’t think you’d find a district anywhere in the state that would tell you their budget situation is great in the short-term or the immediate term,” Woods says. “Folks are struggling to make ends meet.” Woods says large urban and suburban districts face a difficult situation, where they are seeing more competition than ever before, but lack the budgets necessary to create innovative programming that allows them to compete. It’s hard for districts to make progress in other areas without an improvement when it comes to finance. But he’s not giving up. Woods says he is “cautiously optimistic” about the work the finance commission is doing and he hopes to see more progress on that front over time. For now, he plans to keep on keeping on in Northside, where he finds energy and inspiration in watching children learn. He makes sure to schedule time to pop into classrooms and watch firsthand the positive impact teachers have on their students, and it’s those images that keep him going when the job gets tough. “It’s the why,” Woods says. “In spite of all the policy changes and political changes and all those things, when you go see an incredible teacher make a difference in kids’ lives, it reinforces why you’re doing what you’re doing, and then you can fight through the rest of the stuff.” DACIA RIVERS is editorial director of Texas School Business. Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

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2018 Superintendent of the Year Finalists

MARK PORTERIE has served as an administrator for two decades and has led Port Arthur ISD for four years. The TASB selection committee cited Porterie’s efforts to stay in touch with both district staff and the community and his willingness to roll up his sleeves and tackle any job. Last year Porterie led his district of around 8,300 students through the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, enabling Port Arthur schools to bring the hard-hit community together. Porterie earned his bachelor’s degree at Lamar University, master’s degree at Prairie View A&M University and doctorate at Nova Southeastern University.

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Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

At the helm of Willis ISD for five years, TIM HARKRIDER serves about 7,400 students. He has eight years of administrative experience. The committee noted Harkrider’s commitment to putting students first when making decisions and his efforts to share the district’s story with the community. Committee members also cited Willis ISD’s mentor program for sixth-grade students, which pairs them with business partners through graduation. Harkrider received his bachelor’s degree from Stephen F. Austin University and master’s degree from The University of Texas at Arlington.


2018 Superintendent of the Year Finalists

KENNETH BORDER has 18 years of administrative experience. He has been superintendent of Shallowater ISD for three years and serves approximately 1,700 students. His desire to see students enjoy their education was cited by the committee, as well as his belief that children are more than their test scores. Border also extends his compassion to his community with a program to support local senior citizens. Border received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The University of Texas of the Permian Basin and his doctorate from Baylor University.

JUAN MARTINEZ serves a population of about 11,500 students. He has been in education administration for 24 years and has served as superintendent of Clint ISD for five years. The committee noted Martinez’s sense of accountability for the district’s success and his view of his role as one of service. The committee also noted the district’s Cradle to College program through which the district reaches out to new parents with gifts to start their child off on the right foot. Martinez earned his bachelor’s degree, master’s degree and doctorate from The University of Texas at El Paso.

Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

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y

The Grapevine-Colleyville ISD Board of Trustees are: Superintendent Robin Ryan, Becky St. John, Jorge Rodriguez, Lisa Pardo, Louie Sullins, Mindy McClure, Doug Noell, and Jesse G. Rodriguez.

2018 Outstanding Board

“I

f you do what’s right for your kids, do what’s right for your staff, and do what’s right for your community, you’re gonna win.” These are the words of GrapevineColleyville ISD School Board member

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Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

Grapevine-Colleyville ISD board members take state’s top honor by James Golsan

Jesse G. Rodriguez, as he and his fellow board members accepted TASA’s Outstanding Board Award for 2018. It’s at once a mission statement and a governing philosophy, and speaks to the student- and community-centric approach to leadership employed by GCISD. It’s an

approach that’s benefited thousands of GCISD students in the form of innovative education initiatives, and this year has landed GCISD the highest honor a school board can receive in the state of Texas. However, while GCISD may have picked up TASA’s top honor just this year, board


2018 Outstanding Board

member Louie Sullins emphasizes that the approach is not new. “This award is more than a one-year accomplishment,” Sullins says, and points to the board’s LEAD (Leading Excellence, Action Driven) 2021 initiative, kicked off in 2011, as a major component of the district’s success. LEAD 2021 is a district-wide strategic plan, which, per GCISD’s website, seeks to “transform education in GCISD [to] better [prepare] students for the world that awaits them now and in the future.” But having a plan alone isn’t enough. Executing such a plan takes buy-in from all concerned stakeholders, which is why GCISD works to involve their community in shaping and achieving the district’s initiatives and goals. “We have a very involved community [here in Grapevine-Colleyville],” says 2018-19 Board President Lisa Pardo, and emphasizes that open, meaningful discussion with students, staff and parents are a major part of all decision-making processes in GCISD. Sullins adds that those conversations are so effective in shaping board initiatives because of a culture of respect GCISD works to foster both between the board and the community, and within the board itself. “Respect is paramount in board culture,” Sullins says. “We are willing to have open discussion where opinions and thoughts can be shared. Once a board vote happens, we promote and stand behind the decision, even if not everyone agrees.” Grapevine-Colleyville ISD’s approach to school governance has proved fruitful. “How long do you have for the interview?” Pardo jokes when asked to name some of the achievements the board is most proud of. One she was quick to name was Grapevine-Colleyville’s Collegiate Academy, which will have its first graduating class at the end of the 2018-19 school year. “Every graduate who crosses the stage this year will attend college, and every one of them will be a first-generation college student in their family.” Pardo says that many of those students are first-generation high school graduates as well.

Implementing learning technologies is another of GCISD’s major successes. Sullins says the board recognized a need for better technology integration in their district at the start of LEAD 2021, began supplying their students with devices six years ago, and at the time of this writing, supplies every single student in the district with either a laptop, Chromebook or tablet, dependent on the student’s grade. Pardo adds that wireless hotspots are distributed to students who don’t have internet access at home, to ensure all GCISD students receive equitable access to the benefits of the district’s learning technology initiatives. GCISD now seeks to build on the successes of LEAD 2021. The board is already gearing up for LEAD 2.0, which will go into effect after LEAD 2021 concludes at the end of the 2020-21 school year. It should come as no surprise that GCISD is going about designing LEAD 2.0 with the same formula for success that earned them the Outstanding Board Award: plenty of community involvement and a heavy emphasis on student engagement. Naturally, district leadership will have a major voice in designing LEAD 2.0 as well, and Sullins made sure to emphasize that they deserve a major share of the credit for the district’s current successes as well. “Our success starts with the culture implemented by [Superintendent] Dr. Robin Ryan,” Sullins says, and adds that, if he were asked to advise other boards on mirroring GCISD’s success, hiring a strong superintendent is the place to start. “Hire [the right person], and give him or her the leeway, ability and support they need to run the district. Give them what they need to lead and get out of the way.” Pardo added that her advice for other Texas school boards would be to learn to work together as a group. “A school board should work with its district as a unified force,” she says, “and remain positive as much as you possibly can. Board members should be role models for students.”

“A school board should work with its district as a unified force and remain positive as much as you possibly can. Board members should be role models for students.” -Lisa Pardo

in which everyone — students, staff, leadership and parents — all have a voice, and in which each voice is treated with respect. It is this approach that has made GCISD’s board one of the best in the state, and one that other districts, if they’re listening to the advice from Pardo, Sullins and others in GCISD, would be wise to emulate in pursuit of similar success. JAMES GOLSAN is a writer and education professional based in Austin.

Pardo’s comments are one more reflection on the emphasis on community and culture that drive Grapevine-Colleyville ISD’s award-winning school board. It’s a district Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

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2018 Honor Boards Brenham ISD Tommie Sullivan; Kelvin Raven; Mark Schneider; Susan Jenkins, secretary; Melvin Ehlert, vice president; Natalie Lange, president; and Dr. Walter Jackson, superintendent.

Community ISD Sean Walker; Mike Shepard, president; Dr. Roosevelt Nivens, superintendent; Jana Hunter, Randy McCuistion, vice president; Jeff Pendill, secretary; and Marc Stanfield.

Lamar CISD Melisa Roberts; Joe Hubenak; Mandi Bronsell; James Steenbergen, president; Kay Danziger, vice president; Kathryn Kaminski, secretary; Dr. Thomas Randle, superintendent; and Dr. Tyson Harrell.

Medina Valley ISD Shannon Beasley; Darren Calvert; Jennilea Campbell, secretary; Beth Zinsmeyer, vice president; Bruce Haby, president; Terry Groff; Mario De Leon; and Dr. Kenneth Rohrbach, superintendent.

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Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018


2018 KEY COMMUNICATOR

Texas School Public Relations Association

Pastors for Texas Children founder Charles Foster Johnson named TSPRA’s 2018 Key Communicator

T

he Texas School Public Relations Association (TSPRA) has named Rev. Charles Foster Johnson, founder of Pastors for Texas Children, as the recipient of the association’s 2018 Key Communicator Award. Johnson receives the award in recognition of his work as a champion for public schools and adequate school funding. Johnson received his award, sponsored by West (SchoolMessenger solutions), from TSPRA President Kristin Zastoupil at the 2018 TASA/TASB Convention. “Rev. Johnson has worked tirelessly recruiting and leading advocates who know that a strong public education system is a moral imperative,” said Zastoupil. “His unwavering defense of Texas students and educators makes him a deserving recipient of this award.” Johnson founded Pastors for Texas Children in 2013 with the mission of providing “wraparound care and ministry to local schools, principals, teachers, staff and schoolchildren; advocating for children by supporting our free public education system to promote social justice for children and advancing legislation that enriches Texas children, families and communities.” Most prominently, Johnson and his organization have been outspoken opponents of legislative attempts to divert funds from public schools via voucher schemes, believing them to be antithetical to the goal of providing a free publication for all Texas children.

“For years, our schools have been somewhat alone in their advocacy for fair funding and programming,” said Mike Moses, former Texas Commissioner of Education. “Thanks to Rev. Johnson, they have engaged in the debate regarding appropriate support for public schools. Rev. Johnson and the organization have made strong arguments that have been warm and welcomed by Texas educators.” Johnson has spread that message through his use of social media, speaking appearances at conventions and on university campuses and television appearances. He has also amplified it by recruiting his fellow religious leaders to help spread the message of Pastors for Texas Children in their communities. Johnson is the founder and co-pastor of Bread, a faith community in Fort Worth. He has served churches in Mississippi, Kentucky and Texas during his career, including Second Baptist Church of Lubbock and Trinity Baptist Church of San Antonio. He spent two years as a visiting professor of preaching at Mercer University’s McAfee School of Theology. “Rev. Charles Foster Johnson is one-ofa-kind,” said Barry Haenisch, executive director of the Texas Association of Community Schools. “He is a most effective

public speaker, he is a man of action, he is generous with is time, and he cares passionately about Texas and the 5.3 million school-aged children who populate it. He is definitely the most effective communicator for public education in our state today.” Since 1981, TSPRA has recognized a Key Communicator for outstanding contributions to public education through effective communications. The recipient may be a legislator, educator or a professional in another field who has improved school communications, or a member of TSPRA who has contributed outstanding service to the profession of school communications. Recipients have included leaders from business, media, PTA, politics and education.

Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

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Who’s News

> Continued from page 12

The new principal of Galena Park High School is Kimberly Martin, former associate principal of North Shore Senior High. The GPISD alumna holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston and a master’s degree from the University of Houston-Clear Lake. John Moore has accepted the position of associate superintendent of operations after having most recently served as assistant superintendent of operations. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from McNeese State University and his doctorate from Lamar University.

The district’s new executive director for budget and financial services is Ida Schultze, former director of accounting and financial reporting in Humble ISD. She is a graduate of Texas A&M University with a bachelor’s degree in accounting. After serving in the district for eight years, most recently as director for payroll services, Amicha Williams has been promoted to senior director for payroll services. She is a graduate of the University of Central Arkansas.

Garland ISD The following new principal assignments have been announced: •

Cheryl Alexander, Handley Elementary

School;

Salina Allen, Shugart Elementary School;

Michael Bland, Lyles Middle School;

Aishley Cohns, Lister Elementary School;

Lakisha Culpepper, Watson Technology

Jennifer Fowler, Southgate Elementary

Center for Math and Science;

School;

Jade Hobbs, Giddens-Steadham

Amber Hope, Beaver Technology Center

Chris Nester, Couch Elementary School;

• •

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Elementary School;

for Math and Science:

Clyde Schilling, Club Hill Elementary

School;

Tobi Schmidt, Schrade Middle School; Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

Kerresha Strickland, Toler Elementary

School

Tammy Sullivan, Kimberlin Academy for

Excellence;

Kelly Williams, Abbett Elementary School.

Georgetown ISD Hope Scallan joins the district as coordinator for advanced academics, coming from Round Rock ISD, where she was coordinator of the department of advanced academics enrichment. An educator since 2003, she has also worked in Austin and Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISDs. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas and her master’s degree in elementary education from Texas State University.

Granbury ISD The 2018-19 school year began with Jeremy Glenn as superintendent of Granbury ISD. He was superintendent of Waxahachie ISD since 2013 and, prior to that, of Central Heights ISD. Now serving as an assistant principal at Acton Elementary School is Ross Green, an employee with Cleburne ISD since 2010. He earned his bachelor’s degree in English and rhetoric from St. Edward’s University and a master’s degree in education.

Hardin-Jefferson ISD Dru Mushlian has agreed to serve as interim superintendent. An employee of the district for 40 years, she has spent the past 15 as assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction.

Harris County Department of Education Lowell Ballard, now serving as

director of technology support services for HCDE, has more than 25 years of technology experience, most recently as chief information officer at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin. He is a graduate of Virginia Tech University with a master’s degree in information systems from George Mason University. HCDE’s new chief communications officer, Danielle Clark, comes to Houston from Fort Collins, Colo., where she was executive director of communications for the Poudre School District.

She received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Southern California and worked in television and print media before beginning her career in school public relations. She completed her master’s degree at the University of Tennessee. Keith Oliphant, a 20-year educator, is the new principal of the Academic and Behavior School East. Most recently assistant principal of the Academic and Behavior School West, his career has included stints in Alief, Fort Bend and Houston ISDs. He has a bachelor’s degree from Sam Houston State University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Prairie View A&M University.

Hays CISD The district’s new director of student services is Jesus Gomez, who has spent his career since 1996 with Lufkin ISD, most recently as Lufkin Middle School principal. He earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in education from Stephen F. Austin State University. Hays CISD has created a new department and hired Phillip Taylor as director of safety and security. The Hays High School graduate has two decades of law enforcement experience, serving as a sergeant with the Hays County sheriff ’s office and overseeing the school resource officer program for three districts within Hays County.

Hearne ISD The new principal of Hearne High School is Bruce Hill, who joins the district from Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, where he was director of instruction. He has been an educator for 20 years.

Highland Park ISD (Dallas) Jaime Callahan, who was a STEAM instructional and design coach, is now serving as a curriculum specialist and ESL director. She has been with the district since 2006. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas State University, a master’s degree from Southern Methodist University, and a doctorate in educational leadership from Dallas Baptist University.


The new director of food services is Lynn Pritchard, who comes to HPISD with more than 25 years of experience in food service management in the private sector and both public and private schools. She most recently spent six years as the Aramark Food Service director at Gainesville ISD. She holds a bachelor’s degree in nutrition and dietetics from the University of Cincinnati.

Cox Elementary School as principal. He comes to Leander from Castleberry ISD, where he was a principal, and previously worked in Keller ISD as a teacher, summer school principal and assistant principal.

Keller ISD

Lockhart ISD

The Keller ISD Education Foundation announces the appointment of Cameka Crawford as executive director. She has more than 15 years of experience in the corporate and nonprofit sectors and holds a bachelor’s degree in public relations from Texas Tech University and a master’s degree in administrative sciences from Fairleigh Dickinson University.

Matthew Altman has been promoted from assistant principal to associate principal of Lockhart High School. He joined the district in 2016 after working as a math teacher and department chair in Del Valle ISD. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at Tyler and a master’s degree in educational administration from Concordia University.

Kemp ISD Newly appointed superintendent Lisa Gonzales most recently held the top position in Odem-Edroy ISD.

Kilgore ISD Former Gladewater ISD superintendent Mike Morrison has been named Kilgore ISD’s interim superintendent. A graduate of East Texas Baptist University, he began his career in Marshall ISD, going on to serve in Garrison and Jefferson ISDs before joining Gladewater.

Killeen ISD Kara Trevino, former assistant principal and principal of Patterson Middle School, now leads Killeen High School as principal. She also worked as a teacher, coach, AVID specialist and instructional specialist at Killeen High School.

both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas A&I University (now Texas A&M University at Kingsville).

Leander ISD Charlie Rodriguez has been tapped to lead

The new principal of Pride High School and the Lockhart Discipline Management Center is Barry Bacom, coming to the district from Manor ISD, where he was director of career and technical education and innovative programs. An educator for 20 years, he has also worked in Hays CISD and Round Rock and Austin ISDs and in the public schools of Holyoke, Mass. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Abilene Christian University and a master’s degree in educational administration from the University of Texas. Christina Courson came to LISD in 2016 as public information officer and has now been promoted to executive director of communications and community services. She earned a bachelor’s degree in international studies from The American University in Washington, D.C., and a master’s degree in leadership and change from St. Edward’s University.

Kingsville ISD

Now serving as assistant principal of Lockhart High School is Terence Gahan, who most recently was coordinator of the Lockhart Discipline Management Center. A graduate of Texas State University with a master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University, he previously was a teacher, coordinator and principal with the Conservation Corps.

Former district administrator Rudy Calderon has accepted the position of interim superintendent. The 45-year educator earned

Victor Hernandez, new assistant principal of Lockhart Junior High, received his bachelor’s degree from Texas State University and

Shoemaker High School now has Micah Wells as principal. He led Rancier Middle School since 2015 and served as co-director of summer school at Eastern Hills and Manor Middle School.

master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University. An educator for more than a decade, he comes to Lockhart from Hays CISD. Newly appointed Strawn Elementary School principal Analeasa Holmes was most recently assistant principal of Navarro Elementary School. She received a bachelor’s degree in music education and two master’s degrees, in teaching and school leadership, from Trinity University. Clear Fork Elementary School welcomed Rebecca Leonard as its new principal in August. She has been an educator for 23 years, previously serving in Del Valle and Dickinson ISDs and, most recently, as an assistant principal in Hays CISD. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas and her master’s degree in early childhood education from the University of Houston Clear Lake. Plum Creek Elementary School announces the appointment of Sheila Parker as assistant principal. Most recently a high school pre-AP and AP English teacher in Wimberley ISD, she has also worked in Hutto, Paris and Del Rio ISDs. Her bachelor’s degree was awarded from Texas State University and her master’s degree in educational leadership from Sul Ross State University. Amelie Sanchez has been chosen to serve as director of secondary education after spending the past five years as associate principal of North Shore Senior High School in Galena Park ISD. She previously worked in Austin and Weslaco ISDs. A graduate of the University of TexasPan American (now the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley) with a master’s degree in educational administration from Concordia University, she is a doctoral student at the University of Houston.

Former district bilingual programs coordinator Cristina Vasquez is now director of bilingual/ESL/ federal programs. She received both her bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in elementary education from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University). Michelle Wylie, who had been serving as an accountant for the district, is now director of finance. She began her career in LISD in 1990 and has a > See Who’s News, page 24 Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

23


Who’s News > Continued from page 23

bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Texas at Arlington and a master’s degree in interdisciplinary studies from Texas State University.

Lufkin ISD Amy Fain, an employee of the district for 12 years, is now principal of Anderson Elementary School. She has worked as an instructional coach at Trout Primary and Brandon Elementary schools, and served as the district’s K-4 summer school principal for two years. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Stephen F. Austin State University. Cindy Tierney has been selected to serve as director of middle school curriculum and instruction. She was principal of Anderson Elementary School for the past five years, having begun her career as a teacher at Dunbar Primary School in 2000. She earned her bachelor’s degree and two master’s degrees, in reading and educational administration, from Stephen F. Austin State University.

Lufkin Middle School began the new school year with Danny Whisenant as principal. An employee of the district for 13 years, he was principal of Slack Elementary for the past four years. He is a graduate of Stephen F. Austin State University, where he also earned his master’s degree in educational leadership.

McKinney ISD The district’s new senior director of guidance and counseling services is Jennifer Akins, an employee of MISD since 1999. Initially a classroom teacher, she joined the McKinney High School counseling department in 2006 and was chosen to the lead the department in 2011. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at Dallas and a master’s degree in school counseling from Dallas Baptist University. Mike Allen has accepted the

position of assistant principal of Finch Elementary School. He joins the district from Dallas ISD, where he has spent the past four years as assistant principal of Hexter Elementary. An educator for nine years,

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Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

he earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of North Texas and a master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University. The district’s new coordinator of professional development, Wendy Dutton, began her career in the district and rejoins it from Garland ISD, where she was the AVID secondary coordinator. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas Woman’s University and a master’s degree from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Jennifer Frazier is the new

associate director of athletics. Formerly the assistant director of athletics, she began her career in 1997 as head girls’ basketball coach at Lake Highlands High School, coming to MISD in 2012. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Abilene Christian University and her master’s degree in school counseling from Lamar University. Sonja Harrison has accepted

the position of senior director of administrative services. An educator for 26 years, she spent 14 years with Plano ISD and the past 12 years with McKinney ISD as director of administrative services. She is a graduate of Georgia Southern University with a master’s degree in counseling from Amberton University. Former McKinney High School social studies teacher and soccer coach Joshua Helms has moved into the position of assistant principal of McKinney Boyd High School. He received his bachelor’s degree from Tusculum College and his master’s degree in educational leadership from Lamar University. Evans Middle School has welcomed David Hodum as its newest assistant principal. An employee of the district for nine years, he holds a bachelor’s degree in biomedical science from Texas A&M University and a master’s degree in educational administration from the University of Texas at Tyler. Shelly Kramer is the newly appointed assistant principal of McKinney High School, coming to her new job from serving as the school’s special education team lead. A graduate of Ohio State University, she earned her master’s degree in social work from the University of Texas at Arlington.

The new assistant principal of Lawson Early Childhood School, Veronica Muizers, was

previously an instructional coach at the school. An employee of the district since 2000, she earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at El Paso and her master’s degree in educational leadership from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Wilmeth Elementary School’s new assistant principal is Cari Owens, an educator for 20 years who most recently served in the same position in Frisco ISD. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Louisiana at Monroe and her master’s degree in educational leadership from Concordia University. Jeremy Pryor, the new assistant principal of Walker Elementary School, was McKinney ISD’s Teacher of the Year for 2014-15. He is a graduate of the University of North Texas with a master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University.

Minshew Elementary School has Karime Terrazas as assistant principal. Transferring to the district from Lewisville ISD, she has been an educator for 11 years. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of North Texas and her master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of Texas at Arlington. Kristi Ward, new assistant principal of Glen Oaks Elementary School, has spent the past 20 years with McKinney ISD, most recently as an instructional coach at Dowell Middle School. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Oklahoma and a master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University.

Mesquite ISD Angela Wiggins has been named principal of Berry Middle School.

Mission CISD Carol Perez has accepted the

position of superintendent of Mission CISD, coming to her new job from leading Kingsville ISD. The 31-year educator holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Texas Pan-American (now the > See Who’s News, page 34


PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas Council of Administrators of Special Education

TCASE President Cynthia Peltier takes the helm in a volatile year for special education by James Golsan

N

ew Texas Council of Administrators of Special Education (TCASE) President Cynthia Peltier views her organization as the voice of Texas’ special education community, parents, students, and educators alike. In what has proven to be a volatile year for special education in the Lone Star State — the U.S. Department of Education (DOE) directed the TEA to overhaul the manner in which it funds and supports special education — that voice has never been more important. Such circumstances demand strong, experienced leadership, and Peltier brings that in spades to her young TCASE presidency.

at Dickinson High School. By then Peltier’s career had progressed substantially; she had become dean of instruction for Dickinson. While she’d already demonstrated herself to be a more-than-capable administrator, it was her performance as a special education inclusion teacher that her principal remembered. When Dickinson’s director of special education position opened, Peltier was offered the job, and she accepted.

Some educators know precisely what field they wish to dedicate their careers to, and some find it along the way. Peltier is in the latter camp. A native of Clear Creek, and a graduate of Sam Houston State University, Peltier began her career as an 11th-grade English teacher at Pearland High School. Stops at her alma mater in Clear Creek ISD and Dickinson ISD followed, but it would be her first stop in Pearland that would ultimately shape Peltier’s career.

“I must have looked like a deer in the headlights,” she says, and credits the mentorship she received from other TCASE members with much of the success she’s achieved working in the special education field.

In addition to teaching English at Pearland High, Peltier also taught a special education inclusion class. Years later, Peltier would end up working under one of her student's mothers, who was her principal

Shortly thereafter, a colleague suggested Peltier join TCASE. It only took one of the organization’s meetings for more experienced special education directors to take Peltier under their wing.

Now back in Clear Creek ISD, Peltier is beginning her ninth year as a director of special education and her first as TCASE president. She says one of her priorities as president is to expand and increase the sort of mentorship opportunities she received during her first years with the organization.

Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

25


“I want to formalize and systemize the great mentorship work TCASE is already doing,” Peltier says. “The mentorship I received during my first years as a TCASE member were a huge boon to my career, and I want to create a system where new, young special education administrators have the same opportunities for support that I did.” Another major goal Peltier has for her presidency is creating an online platform specifically for special education professionals in Texas, something she terms a “Facebook for TCASE members.” “We’re in the process of constructing an online resource platform for special education professionals,” she says, and hopes the platform will serve as a mechanism for connecting special education veterans with those who are new to the field, as well as a means for SPED professionals across Texas to share tips and best practices. In addition to her internal goals for TCASE, Peltier will be shepherding her organization through a busy 2018-19 school year, as she contends with both a Texas legislative

session and the TEA’s efforts to improve funding and support for Texas special education students and educators at the direction of the DOE. On the legislative side, Peltier highlights several goals for the 86th Texas Legislature, including a request that the Legislature allocate funds to support the proposed Corrective Action Plan TEA is implementing in response to the DOE’s directive. Other TCASE legislative goals include support of an equitable school funding system, especially for special education students, improved continuing education requirements for teachers working with special education populations, and repeal of some of the high-stakes testing requirements implemented during the 85th Legislature. That legislative agenda, which is generated by a broad survey of TCASE members, is also informed by TEA’s corrective action plan mentioned above. Peltier believes that while TEA’s initial response to the federal directives were “a little knee-jerk,” she feels the agency has done a good job of soliciting feedback from TCASE members.

“TEA has done a good job of keeping us informed of developments with the corrective action plan as they learn them from the DOE,” Peltier says, and acknowledges that the situation is difficult for everyone involved. She has high hopes for the corrective action plan’s implementation and impact on Texas’ special education population, but notes that until the DOE finalizes approval of TEA’s plan, the path forward regarding the corrective action plan remains uncertain. Education is a demanding field, and special education comes with its own many unique challenges. Those challenges increase with policy uncertainty at the state and federal levels. Fortunately for special education professionals across Texas, Cynthia Peltier and TCASE are in their corner, working to provide every resource they can and making certain that when those policy decisions are made, the voice of the special education community is heard. JAMES GOLSAN is a writer and education professional based in Austin.

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Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018


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Photo Feature

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS AND TRUSTEES HEAD TO AUSTIN FOR TASA/TASB 2018 CONVENTION TASA and TASB held their annual convention in Austin in September, welcoming administrators and school board members from across Texas.

y TSPRA Executive Director Linsae Snider (left) and president Kristin Zastoupil (right) present Rev. Charles Foster Johnson with the 2018 Key Communicator Award.

yTASA President Gayle Stinson addresses attendees.

<Convention attendees enjoy quick 20-minute sessions focusing on advocacy and community engagement in the Learning Lounge.

yHeath Orth and Bill Meuth, Floresville ISD board members

>Outgoing TASB President Teresa Flores speaks to the crowd. 28

Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018


yBertha Roldan, board secretary; Eva Orona, board vice president; Jose Moreno, superintendent; Loria Ann Flores-Garza and Baldemar Torres, Robstown ISD.

yJames Keeton, board president in Liberty-Eylau ISD; Randy Hawkins, board vice president in Winona ISD; and Jacob Makuvire of Code to the Future.

yStudents from Ingleside ISD perform at Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general session.

yTASA Executive Director Kevin Brown and TASB Executive Director Jim Crow are interviewed on the TASB Talks podcast live at the convention.

y Being the live music capital of the world, the Austin convention welcome reception featured a live band.

yPage Rander, school board president in Clear Creek ISD, takes a break in the exhibit hall. Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

29


Calendar Professional development & events

S TA N D O U T F R O M T H E C R OW D ! Get premium placement and get noticed! For a nominal fee, you can showcase your conference, workshop or seminar on the opening page as a Featured Event. Contact Ann Halstead at ahalstead@tasanet.org for more details. DEC EM BE R December 3 TASBO Workshop: Project Management for School Business Professionals TASBO offices, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $390; nonmembers, $440. December 3-4 TASA Curriculum Management Planning Workshop TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $450; nonmembers, $500. December 4 TASB Class for Asbestos Designated Person ESC Region 1, Edinburg For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. TASBO Course: Handling School Risks Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Houston For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org December 4-5 Texas ASCD Academy: Creating a Culture of Authentic Formative Assessment in the Mathematics Classroom (session 2 of 3) M.O. Campbell Center, Houston For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org December 4-6 TASPA Workshop: Human Capital Leaders in Education Elgin ISD, Elgin For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org

30

December 5 TASB Class for Integrated Pest Management Coordinator ESC Region 1, Edinburg For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. TASSP Region 14 Fall Meeting Offices of ESC Region 14, Abilene For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org TEPSA Region 14 Fall Meeting Location TBA, Abilene For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org December 5-7 TASA Curriculum Writing Workshop TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $450; nonmembers, $500. December 6 TASB Class for Indoor Air Quality Coordinator ESC Region 1, Edinburg For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. December 6-7 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 1 of 4) Georgetown ISD, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,995 for all four sessions. Texas Association of Mid-Size Schools Annual Legislative Conference Lakeway Resort and Spa, Austin For more info, (512) 346-2177.

Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

www.midsizeschools.org Cost: TAMS districts: $150 for first participant, $100 for all others from same district. All other districts: $200 per participant with $100 rebate for joining TAMS.

January 11 TASA Leadership Forum: Every School a STEM School Texas Medical Center, Houston For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $65.

December 11 Learning Forward Texas Workshop: Tips, Tools and Techniques Garland ISD, Garland For more info, (512) 266-3086. www.learningforwardtexas.org

January 15 TASA Budget Boot Camp Region 11 ESC, White Settlement For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $145

December 12 TASPA/Legal Digest Personnel Law Conference for School Administrators Renaissance Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Cost: Early payment, $195; regular registration, $225. December 12-14 TASPA Winter Conference Renaissance Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org December 17-19 Learning Forward Texas Workshop: Tips, Tools and Techniques Northside ISD, San Antonio For more info, (512) 266-3086. www.learningforwardtexas.org

JANUARY January 9-10 TASBO Workshop: Project Management for School Business Professionals ESC Region 19, El Paso For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $390; nonmembers, $440. January 10-11 TASB XG Summit Location TBA, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (512) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASB Class for Asbestos Designated Person TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. TASBO Workshop: Internal Audit Plano ISD, Plano For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $205; nonmembers, $255. January 15-16 TASBO Workshop: Bud to Boss ESC Region 7, Kilgore For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $490; nonmembers, $540. January 16 TASB Class for Integrated Pest Management Coordinator TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. TASBO Academy: Budget Boot Camp Courtyard Austin, Pflugerville For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $215; nonmembers, $265.


January 16-17 Texas ASCD Academy: Creating a Culture of Authentic Formative Assessment in the Mathematics Classroom (session 3 of 3) For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org January 17 TASB Class for Environmental/ Facility Regulatory Compliance Coordinator TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425.

January 27-30 TASA Midwinter Conference Convention Center, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: Members, $295; nonmembers $345 (early bird) January 27-30 TASA Aspiring Superintendents Academy Austin Convention Center, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $125

FE B RUA RY

TASPA Workshop: Certification Fundamentals ESC Region 8, Mt. Pleasant For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org February 7-9 TASB Conference for Administrative Professionals TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: $165. February 8 TASBO Course: Purchasing Standards and Specifications Offices of ESC Region 1, Brownsville For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $170; nonmembers, $220.

February 18-20 TCASE Great Ideas Annual Convention Location and city TBA For more info, (512) 474-4492 or (888) 433-4492. www.tcase.org February 18-21 TSPRA Annual Conference Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort, Cedar Creek For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org Cost: TSPRA members, $470. February 19-21 TASA Curriculum Management Audit Training, Level 1 TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: Members, $750; nonmembers, $850.

TASBO Budget Academy Courtyard Austin, Pflugerville For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $295; nonmembers, $345.

February 4-5 TASBO Workshop: Bud to Boss Allen ISD, Allen For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $490; nonmembers, $540.

January 18 TASBO Course: Functions and Duties of School Business Administrators Offices of ESC Region 1, Brownsville For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $170; nonmembers, $220.

February 5 TASB Class for Asbestos Designated Person Victoria ISD, Victoria For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425.

January 22-23 TASBO Workshop: Bud to Boss Midland ISD, Midland For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $490; nonmembers, $540.

February 6 TASB Class for Integrated Pest Management Coordinator Victoria ISD, Victoria For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425.

February 11-13 TASA Curriculum Management Audit Training, Level 1 TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: Members, $750; nonmembers, $850.

February 6-7 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 3 of 4) San Angelo ISD, San Angelo For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,995 for all four sessions.

February 12-13 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 2 of 4) Georgetown ISD, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,995 for all four sessions.

February 21-23 TASB Winter Governance and Legal Seminar Galveston Island Convention Center, Galveston For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

February 7 TASB Class for Indoor Air Quality Coordinator Victoria ISD, Victoria For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425.

TASBO Workshop: Project Management for School Business Professionals ESC Region 20, San Antonio For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $390; nonmembers, $440.

February 25 THSCA Texas Coaches Leadership Summit Lila Cockrell Theatre, San Antonio For more info, (512) 392-3741. www.thsca.com

January 23 TASBO Course for CSRM: Fundamentals of Risk Management Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Houston For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org January 26-27 TCWSE Annual Conference Hilton Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tcwse.org January 27 TASA Budget Boot Camp Austin Convention Center, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $145.

February 10-12 TASSP Assistant/Aspiring Principal Workshop Location TBA, Austin For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org TCA Annual Professional School Counselor Conference Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio For more info, (512) 472-3403. www.txca.org

February 20 TASBO Workshop: Investment Training Lubbock ISD, Lubbock For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $205; nonmembers, $255. February 20-21 TASA First-Time Superintendents Academy (session 4 of 4) Austin Marriott North, Round Rock For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: All four sessions: TASA members, $695; nonmembers, $795. Any one session: Members and nonmembers, $250.

> See Calendar, page 33 Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

31


Let’s bridge the

WEALTH GAP

At TCG Advisors, we are on a mission to deliver a comprehensive workplace financial wellness program that fights the socioeconomic wealth gap and provides financial literacy for all.

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of American families have ZERO or NEGATIVE net worth1

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% %

18% 12

%

AVERAGE U.S. HOUSEHOLD WEALTH White

Black

Latino

$200,000 $161,400

$150,000

of wealth among Black families is projected to DECREASE by 20243 of wealth among Hispanic families is projected to DECREASE by 20243

Forecast $122,366

$102,200

$100,000

$50,000

$10,400

$6,800

$10,200

$4,000

0 ‘83

1990

2000

2010

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2020

2024

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> Continued from page 31 February 26 TASA/TASB Legislative Conference Sheraton Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasanet.org February 27-March 1 TASA Curriculum Writing Workshop TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $450; nonmembers, $500.

M ARC H March 3-5 TASSP Conference: Making Middle School Matter Airport Hilton, Austin For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org March 4-5 TASBO Workshop: Bud to Boss Marriott Riverwalk, San Antonio For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $490; nonmembers, $540. TASBO Course for CSRM: Fundamentals of Risk Management Grand Hyatt, San Antonio For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org March 8 TASBO Course for CSRM: Funding School Risks Grand Hyatt, San Antonio For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org March 20-21 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 4 of 4) San Angelo ISD, San Angelo For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,995 for all four sessions. March 24-27 THSADA State Conference Convention Center, Waco For more info, (512) 832-623-7803. www.thsada.com

March 26 TASB Class for Asbestos Designated Person ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. TASBO Academy: Bonds, Buildings and Beyond Marriott Town Square, Sugarland For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $215, nonmembers, $265. March 26-27 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 3 of 4) Georgetown ISD, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,995 for all four sessions. March 27 TACS Regional Conference Hardin-Simmons University, Abilene For more info, (512) 440-8277. www.tacsnet.org TASB Class for Integrated Pest Management Coordinator ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. March 28 TASB Best Practices Training: Construction Fundamentals ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425.

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Who’s News > Continued from page 24

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley). Her doctorate was awarded from Texas A&M University at Kingsville.

Mumford ISD A new superintendent greeted Mumford ISD students at the beginning of the school year. Blayne Davis has been with the district for the past four years, first as athletic director, then an assistant principal and, most recently, assistant superintendent. Prior to that, the Tarleton State University graduate worked in Plains, Throckmorton and Millsap ISDs. He earned his master’s degree in education administration from Lamar University.

New Caney ISD Former Conroe High School (Conroe ISD) principal Mark Weatherly has accepted the role of director of secondary instruction at New Caney ISD. An educator for 25 years, 17 of those as a principal, he holds a doctorate from the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor.

Ore City ISD The Ore City ISD board of trustees has hired Dale Ann Mizell as assistant principal of Ore City Elementary School. She comes to her new position from Hallsville ISD, where she taught for 25 years. The new dean of school services at Ore City Elementary School is Elyse Patterson.

Pecos-Barstow-Toyah ISD A new superintendent has been named for the district. Jose Cervantes most recently held the same position in La Villa ISD and previously led Alpine ISD and Edgewood ISD in San Antonio. An educator for 28 years, he earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Sul Ross State University and his doctorate in education from the University of Texas.

Pine Tree ISD Former Pine Tree High School football coach Kenneth Morris is now assistant principal of Pine Tree Middle School. Prior to joining PTISD, he worked in Mineola, New Diana, Sabine, Jefferson, Keller and Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISDs as a teacher and coach. He holds a bachelor’s degree from

34

Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

Arkansas Tech University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Lamar University. Donald Patrick, who was Greenville ISD’s director of operations, has agreed to serve as an assistant principal of Pine Tree Junior High. A graduate of East Texas State University with a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas A&M University at Commerce, he also served as a teacher and coach in Lone Oak, Sulphur Springs, Mount Vernon and Winnsboro ISDs.

Plano ISD Selenda Anderson has accepted the position of executive director of school improvement and innovation. She began her career in North Carolina, joining Garland ISD in 1997 and moving to Plano in 2002, where she held her first administrative positions. She has a bachelor’s degree from Radford University and a master’s degree from Texas A&M University at Commerce.

The new director of adult transition services is Shelley Crowder, who has been with Plano ISD since 2009 as a teacher and behavior instructional specialist. She received her bachelor’s degree in music education from the University of Louisiana and her master’s degree in education from the University of Cincinnati. Newly appointed principals for the district are: • • •

Pamela Clark, Clark High School; Kristen Fislar, Beaty Early Childhood

School;

Jen Haugh, Pearson Early Childhood

School;

Mark Letterer, Wilson Middle School;

Jana Sandall, Bird Special Programs Center;

Melanie Schulte, Frankford Middle

School.

Post ISD Now serving as superintendent is Heath Dickson, who comes to his new job from Roby ISD, where he also was superintendent. A graduate of Angelo State University with a master’s degree in education from Sul Ross State University, he also previously worked as a teacher, coach and principal in Highland and Westbrook ISDs.

Robinson ISD Former Robinson Junior High principal Shelly Chudej now leads Robinson Elementary School as principal. She has spent her 24-year career with the district, working as a teacher and assistant principal. A graduate of Baylor University, she has a master’s degree from Lamar University. Robinson High School began the new academic year with Lamar Collins as principal. He joins the district from Temple ISD, where he was an assistant principal. He is a graduate of the University of Mary Hardin Baylor, where he also completed his doctorate, and holds a master’s degree from Texas State University. The new secondary curriculum coordinator is Kati Dietzman, who is in her 16th year with the district, having served as a teacher, counselor and principal. She has a bachelor’s degree from Angelo State University and a master’s degree from Tarleton State University. Michael Herring, an employee of Robinson ISD for 21 years, is now assistant principal of Robinson Primary and Elementary schools. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Baylor University and a master’s degree from Tarleton State University.

Robinson Junior High’s new principal is Cynthia McCoy, who has been with the district for 27 years as a teacher, drill team director and assistant principal. She is a graduate of Baylor University with a master’s degree from Tarleton State University. Now serving as assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction is Colette Pledger, the district’s former chief academic officer. An employee of RISD for eight years, she received her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and her master’s degree from Tarleton State University. Tammy Scott, former assistant

principal and content support and test coordinator at Tennyson Middle School in Waco ISD, is now an assistant principal at Robinson High School. She earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Lamar University. The district’s new deputy superintendent, Tim VanCleve, has also served RISD as an assistant principal, principal and, most recently, assistant superintendent. His bachelor’s degree was awarded from the University of Mary Hardin Baylor and his master’s degree from Tarleton State University. Krystal Wilson is now serving as an assistant

principal at Robinson High School, coming to her new position from the Greater Waco


Advanced Health Care Academy, where she was assistant director. She has a bachelor’s degree from Sam Houston State University and a master’s degree from Tarleton State University.

Robstown ISD The Robstown ISD board of trustees announces the hiring of Jose Moreno as superintendent. An educator for 22 years, he has worked as a bilingual teacher, assistant principal, principal, senior executive director of curriculum and instruction, assistant superintendent of leadership and, most recently, superintendent of La Vernia ISD. Moreno’s bachelor’s degree was conferred by the University of Texas, his master’s degree in educational leadership from Texas A&M University at Kingsville, and his doctorate in the same field from Lamar University.

Round Rock ISD McNeil High School’s new principal, Amanda Johnson, served as principal of Westview Middle School in Pflugerville ISD since 2015 and, prior to that, was dean of instruction and an assistant principal at Leander ISD’s Vista Ridge High School. She received her bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in educational administration from Texas State University.

Teyan Page has been promoted from

Sharyland ISD A new superintendent is in place for Sharyland ISD. Maria Vidaurri is a 33-year education veteran who has previously served in Alice, Hidalgo and La Feria ISDs, as well as working in Sharyland from 2008 to 2010 as the district’s federal programs director. Her last 10 years have been spent as superintendent of Robstown ISD.

Socorro ISD (El Paso) The new principal of Cooper Elementary School, Alicia Miranda, began her career in 2007, joining Socorro ISD in 2016 as an administrator at Vista del Sol Elementary. Now serving as principal of Slider Middle School is Manuel Rios, who began his career as a teacher at El Dorado High School in 2005. He was most recently director of Rams Early College High School. Jacqueline Salas, principal of Rojas Elementary School, comes to her new position from the Drugan School, where she was assistant principal. An educator for 23 years, she has also worked in United ISD.

assistant principal of Spicewood Elementary School to principal. She previously worked in Pflugerville and Austin ISDs and holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas State University.

South Texas ISD (Mercedes)

The new principal of Brushy Creek Elementary is Jenny Strong, an employee of the district since 2003 and former assistant principal of Voigt Elementary School Arts Integration Academy. Her bachelor’s degree was awarded from the University of Texas and her master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University.

Waxahachie ISD

Royse City ISD The district has welcomed Jim Lawson as executive director of facilities and operations. A graduate of Texas A&M University with more than 20 years of experience in school construction, maintenance and facilities management, he previously worked in Rockwall and Amarillo ISDs.

After leading the district for 17 years, Marla Guerra has announced her upcoming retirement. She has been an educator for 40 years, serving as a teacher, principal and assistant superintendent.

Former Waco ISD superintendent Bonnie Cain has agreed to serve as interim superintendent of Waxahachie ISD. With more than 25 years as a public school administrator, she led Waco ISD from 2011 to 2017. She holds a doctorate in education from the University of Houston.

Whitesboro ISD The district has hired D.M. Hampton to serve as its safety and security director. Recently retired from the Sherman Police Department following a 22-year career in law enforcement, he holds an associate degree in criminal justice from Grayson College.

Ysleta ISD (El Paso) Loma Terrace Elementary School began the 2018-19 school year with Alex Armendariz as principal. He most recently led Valley

View Middle School. He is a graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso with a master’s degree in educational leadership from Sul Ross State University. Formerly principal of Slider Middle School in El Paso’s Socorro ISD, Enrique Herrera now leads Hanks High School. He earned his bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in educational administration from Sul Ross State University and a second master’s degree, in middle grades education, from the University of Texas at El Paso. Craig Lahrman is now

director of support personnel after serving as director of secondary personnel. He joined the district in 1994. He has a bachelor’s degree in education from DePauw University and a master’s degree from Indiana University. Lisa Lopez has accepted the position of principal of the Ysleta Pre-K Center, coming to her new job from serving as principal of Del Valle Elementary School. A graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso with a master’s degree in educational administration from Sul Ross State University, she has been with YISD since 1997.

The district’s newly-appointed director of guidance and counseling, Celina Munoz, is the former assistant principal of Eastwood Middle School. She began her career in YISD in 1999. She is a graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso with a bachelor’s degree in interdisciplinary studies and a master’s degree in guidance and counseling. Ida Perales is now serving as principal of both Camino Real and Valley View middle schools, which will be consolidated in January at the new Del Valle Middle School. She began her career in 2001 at Ysleta High School, then worked in El Paso and Socorro ISDs for six years before returning to YISD in 2008.

Del Valle Elementary School welcomed Sandra Perez as its new principal at the beginning of the school year. She is the former principal of the Ysleta Pre-K Center. An educator for 19 years, she earned her bachelor’s degree in bilingual education and her master’s degree in educational administration from the University of Texas at El Paso. Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

35


REGIONAL VIEW

Education service center programs & practices

San Elizario High School senior Genesis Robles uses Rh factors to determine blood types in her serology unit for Forensic Science.

San Elizario ISD provides pathways to post-secondary success by Hector Gonzalez

T

he San Elizario Independent School District (SEISD) is pleased to announce the creation of the College Credit Pathway Initiative to support the various opportunities for postsecondary success offered at San Elizario High School (SEHS). This initiative will help SEISD to incorporate the new Texas higher education plan, 60x30Tx, by streamlining those goals within the post-secondary decision making of SEHS students. The College Credit Pathway Initiative is a bold plan, as it hopes to ensure 100 percent of SEHS students are on track to earn a certificate, license or degree by 2030. “A campus that provides any type of college credit opportunity for their students is a good school,” said Maribel

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Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

Guillen, SEHS principal. “We have the best of both worlds at our school. We are still a comprehensive high school with sports and extracurricular activities, while at the same time a dual credit institution.” Students will be afforded the opportunity to enroll in one of four distinct college credit pathways offered at SEHS:

Dual Credit (DC) Academy The Dual Credit Academy at SEHS is a comprehensive program that prepares students for continued success at a postsecondary institution. Students accepted into the academy are provided with an opportunity to earn as many as 43 dual credit hours. These college credits are

based on a focused concentration of courses aligned with El Paso Community College’s (EPCC) core curriculum plan (SB 1091). For the 2017 school year, dual credit students saved an estimated $70,000 in tuition.

Advanced Placement (AP) Pathway The Advanced Placement Academy enables willing and academically prepared students to pursue college-level studies while still in high school. SEHS offers 17 AP courses along with an opportunity to take the AP exam. A qualifying exam score helps students earn credit or placement at most four-year colleges and universities in the U.S. For the 2017 school year, SEHS students who took and achieved a qualifying score on an AP exam saved an estimated $605,000 in tuition.


coordinator. Julietta Rojas is the campus college and career readiness specialist at SEHS who will facilitate the launch and development of the Dual Credit Academy. She believes the academy will guide students in the right direction with the support of campus teachers. “The course trajectory was carefully planned for students who qualify, apply and get accepted into the Dual Credit Academy to have great potential of graduating from SEHS with enough credits to be classified as a sophomore in college,” Rojas said. Most students turn away from going to an early college high school because their extracurricular activities are severely constrained.

San Elizario High School video production students queue up the next segment in their broadcasting lineup.

APDC3 (Advanced Placement / Dual Credit Hybrid) APDC3 allows students to take both dual credit and AP courses to achieve a tailored college-ready experience. Students will be allowed the flexibility to select courses based on post-secondary goals while learning the skills to succeed in the workplace. Research shows that students who take either a dual credit or AP course are much more likely to complete a college degree on time, thus saving tuition.

“We have started with HVAC as a partnership with Western Technical College. San Elizario ISD is the only district in the region offering associate degrees to students, and we are currently in conversations to expand this opportunity to include nursing, diesel mechanics and electronic engineering,” said Michael Rodriguez, career and technical education

“This is a great opportunity to reach those same academic goals while still being able to participate in most extracurricular activities,” she added. “The College Credit Pathway Initiative will transform the high school experience for our students by laying out a sequence of courses that students will follow while simultaneously being advised and monitored to ensure student success,” said Dr. Tomas Sigala, college and career readiness facilitator for SEISD. HECTOR GONZALEZ is the communications officer in San Elizario ISD.

Western Technical College Associate Program This partnership between Western Technical College and SEISD will give SEHS students the opportunity to graduate from high school while at the same time obtaining an associate degree from Western Technical College in the area of refrigeration, heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC). The cost of this program is usually $36,000, but because this is a dual credit instructional offering, this cost is being subsidized by local scholarships from Western Tech and a reduced tuition rate that will be paid for by SEISD. This financial support ensures that this opportunity will not impact the students’ future federal financial aid and will be offered at zero cost to the families and students participating in the program.

San Elizario R-HVAC students Angel Rodriguez and Heaven Soria test electrical load on small motors alongside Western Tech's R-HVAC Technology Director Javier Zavala.  Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

37


THE BACK PAGE

You’ve got to have HEART Part two: Be empathetic by Riney Jordan

F

or years, I have talked about the importance of educators having a “heart” for their students, for their profession, and for each other. Each column for the next several months will expound on one of the characteristics of having a heart. You will be introduced to an acrostic for “HEART” that will help remind us of five critical virtues. The previous column focused on being “happy.” It’s such a simple and obvious quality, yet so often we don’t see evidence of it in the faces and actions of school employees. Being happy and expressing that joy can easily be the first step in reaching out to another individual. This month we focus on the “E,” and although I could have chosen any number of good qualities starting with that letter (e.g. “enthusiasm,” “encouragement,” “efficient”), I have settled on “empathetic.” Think about the meaning of this powerful word for a moment. Merriam-Webster defines it as “understanding, being aware of, being sensitive to, and vicariously experiencing the feelings, thoughts, and experience of another.” You are so involved in the other person that you are practically “walking in their shoes.” I recall a teacher a few years ago who was so empathetic toward her students that she often gave them lunch money, brought them healthy food items to take home for the weekend, and provided clean clothing when needed. I remember one of her students in particular. This young girl’s home life was so bad that it was practically non-existent. There was no father in her life. Her mother was a drug addict. There was no food in the apartment, and this young girl was going home to those deplorable conditions every day. When her grades began to suffer, the teacher pulled her aside to offer some help. Immediately, the student broke into tears and unashamedly told her teacher about her home conditions. With the help of Child Protective Services, the teacher offered to let her live in

her home and the authorities approved. She lived with this empathetic teacher and her family for more than a year. She became a part of their family as they took vacations, celebrated holidays and lived their lives. After graduation, the young lady got a job, found a place of her own, and became a responsible adult, thanks in large part to the empathy shown to her by a teacher. I haven’t found any statistics to prove it, but I have no doubt that this sort of intervention and compassion from educators for their students happens far more frequently than any of us could imagine. Today, look at the students you serve with “new eyes.” Get to know them. Watch for signs that exhibit a change in a student’s behavior, dress and demeanor. It could signal a much larger problem hovering over his or her head. Each of us who reads this column can identify a teacher, principal or other school employee whose empathy and compassion for us made an incredible difference in our lives. In my own life, I vividly remember a teacher who remembered me long after I left her sixth-grade classroom. She knew I wanted to be a teacher, so when I reached high school, she would call me and ask me to stop by and pick up teaching materials that she no longer needed. She would load me down with teacher magazines that she had saved. “They’re full of good teaching ideas,” she said. “I thought you might use them when you start teaching in a few years.” Empathy. It’s reaching the heart of another and understanding their needs. What a meaningless world if it were not for empathy. Simply stated, it’s the Golden Rule for living: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” Today, focus on being more empathetic. You’ll discover that your most effective and life-changing lessons happen when you do.

RINEY JORDAN is the author of two books and a frequent public speaker. To invite him to speak at your convocation, graduation or awards banquet, visit www.rineyjordan.com.

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Texas School Business NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018

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TSB—November/December 2018  

In this issue of Texas School Business, it’s my pleasure to introduce you to TASB’s 2018 Superintendent of the Year. I enjoyed getting to kn...

TSB—November/December 2018  

In this issue of Texas School Business, it’s my pleasure to introduce you to TASB’s 2018 Superintendent of the Year. I enjoyed getting to kn...

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