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CHRISTIE CRUSHES

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Wrap Page 2

November 6, 2013

Gov. Chris Christie retains seat in landslide victory ASBURY PARK, N.J. — Gov. Chris Christie was re-elected with ease Tuesday, demonstrating the kind of broad, bipartisan appeal that will serve as his opening argument should he seek the Republican presidential nomination in 2016. With 83 percent of precincts reporting, Christie had 60 percent of the vote to Democratic state Sen. Barbara Buono’s 39 percent, putting him en route to become the first Republican in a quarter-century to receive more than 50 percent of the New Jersey vote. This, in a state that President Barack Obama carried a year ago by more than 17 points, his biggest margin in the nation. “Thank you, New Jersey, for making me the luckiest guy in the world,” Christie said in a victory speech late Tuesday in the shore town of Asbury Park. After a campaign that centered more on his record and personality than his agenda for a second term, he told supporters that he has big plans for education reform and tax cuts, among other issues. “I did not seek a second term to do small things,” he said. “I sought a second term to finish the job. Now watch me do it.” Buono told supporters in her hometown of Metuchen, on the fringes of the New York area, shortly after polls closed that she had called Christie to congratulate him. She noted they had their differences but added, “when it comes down to it, we’re just two parents who want to see the best for our children’s future.”

Christie performed strongly across the political spectrum. Interviews with voters as they left polling places found Christie re-elected with broad support among whites, independents, moderates, voters over 40 and those opposing the health care law, among others. He did well among groups that typically lean Democratic, carrying a majority of women and splitting Hispanics with Buono. And Christie improved on his share of the vote among blacks in 2009 by more than 10 percentage points. The interviews were conducted for the AP and television networks ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN and Fox News by Edison Research. Backed by soaring approval ratings for his leadership after Superstorm Sandy, the tell-it-like-it-is governor built a winning coalition by aggressively courting constituencies that often shun the GOP: minorities, women and even Democrats, who outnumber Republicans among registered voters by more than 3 to 2. Christie, who is openly considering running for president, has said his success offers a template for broadening the GOP’s appeal after the disastrous 2012 election cycle and the party’s record-low approval ratings following the recent government shutdown. In his victory speech, some of the biggest cheers came when he said Washington could learn from what he has done in New Jersey. Christie will take over later this month as chairman of the Republi-

can Governors Association, a position that will further raise his national profile. Christie becomes his party’s biggest winner on a night in which Democrat Terry McAuliffe was elected Virginia’s next governor, defeating conservative firebrand Ken Cuccinelli. Christie, in contrast, painted himself as a pragmatic leader who worked with Democrats to get the job done during his four years in office. It was a picture that largely went unchallenged during a campaign whose outcome was never really in doubt. The Obama administration declined to deploy its best political weapons against Christie, while Buono struggled to earn the support of her party’s most devoted supporters. The Democratic Governors Association spent less than $5,000 on the contest while pouring more than $6 million into the Virginia election. “The Democratic political bosses, some elected, and some not, made a deal with this governor, despite him representing everything they are supposed to be against,” Buono said in her concession comments. Christie built a national fundraising network, dramatically outspending Buono on the airwaves and improving his organization beyond New Jersey. The Christie campaign spent $11.5 million on TV and radio ads, compared with Buono’s $2.1 million, according to SMG Delta, a Virginia-based firm that tracks political spending.

Gov. Chris Christie stands with his daughter, Sarah Christie, in the Asbury Park Convention Hall after learning of his victory. GETTY IMAGES

Buono repeatedly tried to use Christie’s presidential ambitions against him, accusing him of putting his interests ahead of New Jersey’s. She supported gay marriage and abortion rights, while Christie opposes both. When it became clear last month that the New Jersey Supreme Court would rule in favor of gay marriage, Christie dropped an ap-

peal, allowing the practice to become legal in the state. During a debate less than a month ago, Christie admitted he might not serve out his full second term should he launch a White House bid. “I won’t make those decisions until I have to,” he said. — The Associated Press

Buono blames political machine for overwhelming defeat By Erin Petenko Associate News Editor

METUCHEN, N.J. — Barbara Buono may have lost the race, but in her concession speech last night, she asserted her determination to continue advocating for the causes she ran for. “Tonight, we will not look back with regret, because this will not deter us from our momentum,” she said, standing on a small stage in the Novita Bistro in Metuchen, N.J. Gov. Chris Christie defeated Buono 61 percent to 39 percent. With news anchors careening to see her, she thanked her many supporters, including the young interns and many female campaign workers who advocated for her cause. They had stood with her for 10 months, going door-to-door and making phone calls from the sweltering heat of her New Brunswick offices, she said. They had also stood with her in the face of what she called “the betrayal of her own political party.” “We rose above the political system, of people doing backroom deals,” she said. “We rose above the bosses, elected and not elected, who had a greater desire to help themselves politically than to help the people.” New Jersey represented the last vestiges of the old political machine that once dominated the entire country, she said. She worried potential residents, business owners and honest political campaigners would be discouraged by the system in place.

Buono named several causes she hoped to keep fighting for in the future, from the 400,000 unemployed to the students of Trenton Central High School who suffered from moldy walls in their building. “Education is the great equalizer. … They are all dreamers who want nothing more than a fair shot,” she said. She said she had celebrated the recent same-sex marriages taking place, but also remembered families still living in trauma in trailers a year after Hurricane Sandy. “For them, we took on the bosses and the political machine,” she said. She blamed the political bosses for blocking her choice for the state party chair, Jason O’Donnell, who objected to their inability to control him. “I decided to take one for the team,” she said. “But what I realized too late was that there was no team.” Buono said she had faced opposition from men who looked down upon her for changing the status quo for women in politics. As the first Democratic female nominee for governor, she and her running mate Milly Silva looked to past female trailblazers Hilary Clinton and Shirley Chisholm, the first black woman in Congress, as inspiration. “We knew they weren’t going to let us into the old boys’ club, so we have to kick down the door,” she said. She said a young woman she met on the campaign trail surprised her with their abilities and determination. She was so far be-

Barbara Buono, who was defeated in yesterday’s election, stands with Milly Silva, her running mate, and Silva’s family at Novita Bistro in Metuchen, NJ. SHIRLEY YU / ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR yond where Buono had been at her age. When men questioned the intelligence, athleticism and qualifications of women, she said they should stand up to name calling based on what they were rather than who they were. “Their attempts to dismiss you are no excuse for you to back down,” she said. In the end, she still wants to hold elected officials accountable to the people, she said. “I hope my journey will inspire more women, because we need women’s determination more than ever,” she said. “I hope the purpose we began 10 years ago will still stand.” Before Buono’s speech, supporters gathered at the bistro and

bought drinks from its cash bar. Hetty Rosenstein, a Communications Workers of America member, said her organization had spent the day knocking on 1,000 doors and making 100,000 phone calls encouraging people to vote. “We tried to turn out the vote of the working people. … Buono stands for the working class families,” said the South Orange resident. Other supporters came from Emily’s List, the International Association of Firefighters and the United States Student Association to cheer Buono’s effort. Jamir Gaston, from the 1199SEIU Healthcare Workers East Union, expressed his frustration with Christie’s policies. “He’s a magician,” he said. “He hides the truth from everybody

else. … He’s not going to stay, he’s going to go for president in two years.” After CNN projected Christie as the winner, Rep. Rush Holt, D-12, said he had heard for weeks people were going to vote for Christie. “They are voting for reasons that are not grounded in Christie’s behavior and performance,” he said. “Buono and I want to continue to advocate for principles that you hope will succeed in the end.” David Turner, the communications director for Buono’s campaign, said they had fought an honorable and courageous fight. After Buono’s speech ended, the interns led a chant for Buono. One intern shouted, “No more goddamn phone calls!” He was met with cheers.


November 6, 2013

Wrap Page 3

State Senate Results District 1

Van Drew, Jeff (Dem)

District 2

Whelan, Jim (Dem)

District 3

Sweeney, Stephen (Dem)

District 4

Madden, Fred (Dem)

District 5

Norcross, Donald (Dem)

District 6

Beach, James (Dem)

District 7

Allen, Diane (GOP)

District 8

Addiego, Dawn (GOP)

District 9

Connors, Christopher (GOP)

District 10

Holzapfel, Jim (GOP)

District 11

Beck, Jennifer (GOP)

District 12

Thompson, Samuel (GOP)

District 13

Kyrillos, Joe (GOP)

District 14

Unavailable at press time

District 15

Turner, Shirley (Dem)

District 16

Bateman, Christoper (GOP)

District 17

Smith, Bob (Dem)

District 18

Barnes, Peter (Dem)

District 19

Vitale, Joseph (Dem)

District 20

Lesniak, Raymond (Dem)

District 21

Kean, Thomas (GOP)

District 22

Scutari, Nicholas (Dem)

District 23

Doherty, Michael (GOP)

District 24

Oroho, Steven (GOP)

District 25

Bucco, Tony (GOP)

District 26

Pennacchio, Joe (GOP)

District 27

Codey, Richard (Dem)

District 28

Rice, Ronald (Dem)

District 29

Ruiz, Teresa (Dem)

District 30

Singer, Robert (GOP)

District 31

Cunningham, Sandra (Dem)

District 32

Sacco, Nicholas (Dem)

District 33

Stack, Brian (Dem)

District 34

Gill, Nia (Dem)

District 35

Pou, Nellie (Dem)

District 36

Sarlo, Paul (Dem)

District 37

Weinberg, Loretta (Dem)

District 38

Unavailable at press time

District 39

Cardinale, Gerald (GOP)

State Assembly Results District 1

Andrzejczak, Bob (Dem)

District 2

Unavailable at press time

District 15

Coleman, Bonnie (Dem) Gusciora, Reed (Dem)

District 16

District 3

Ciattarelli, Jack (GOP) Simon, Donna (GOP)

District 4

Egan, Joseph (Dem) Chivukula, Upendra (Dem)

District 5

Diegnan, Patrick (Dem) Pinkin, Nancy (Dem)

District 6

Wisniewski, John (Dem) Coughlin, Craig (Dem)

District 7

Cryan, Joseph (Dem) Quijano, Annette (Dem)

District 8

Bramnick, Jon (GOP) Munoz, Nancy (GOP)

District 9

Green, Jerry (Dem) Stender, Linda (Dem)

District 10

Peterson, Erik (GOP) DiMaio, John (GOP)

District 11

McHose, Alison (GOP) Space, Parker (GOP)

District 12

Bucco, Anthony (GOP) Carroll, Michael (GOP)

Burzichelli, John (Dem) Riley, Celeste (Dem) Moriarty, Paul (Dem) Mosquera, Gabriela (Dem) Fuentes, Angel (Dem) Wilson, Whip (Dem) Greenwald, Louis (Dem) Lampitt, Pamela (Dem) Conaway, Herb (Dem) Singleton, Troy (Dem) Brown, Christopher (GOP) Rodriguez-Gregg, Maria (GOP) Rumpf, Brian (GOP) Gove, DiAnne (GOP) Wolfe, Dave (GOP) McGuckin, Gregory (GOP) Angelini, Mary Pat (GOP) Casagrande, Caroline (GOP) Dancer, Ronald (GOP) Clifton, Robert (GOP)

District 13

Handlin, Amy (GOP) O’Scanlon, Declan (GOP)

District 14

DeAngelo, Wayne (Dem) Unavailable at press time

District 17

District 18

District 19

District 20

District 21

District 22

District 23

District 24

District 25

District 28

Caputo, Ralph (Dem) Tucker, Cleopatra (Dem)

District 29

Spencer, Grace (Dem) Marin, Eliana (Dem)

District 30

Kean, Sean (GOP) Rible, David (GOP)

District 31

O’Donnell, Jason (Dem) Mainor, Charles (Dem)

District 32

Prieto, Vincent (Dem) Jimenez, Angelica (Dem)

District 33

Garcia, Carmelo (Dem) Mukherji, Raj (Dem)

District 34

Oliver, Sheila (Dem) Giblin, Thomas (Dem)

District 35

Wimberly, Benjie (Dem) Sumter, Shavonda (Dem)

District 36

Schaer, Gary (Dem) Caride, Marlene (Dem)

District 37

Vainieri Huttle, Valerie (Dem) Johnson, Gordon (Dem)

District 38

Unavailable at press time

District 39

District 26

Schepisi, Holly (GOP) Auth, Robert (GOP)

District 27

Rumana, Scott (GOP) Russo, David (GOP)

DeCroce, BettyLou (GOP) Webber, Jay (GOP) McKeon, John (Dem) Jasey, Mila (Dem)

District 40

SOURCE: THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

District 40

O’Toole, Kevin (GOP)

SOURCE: THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NJ approves wage hike, veteran funding question By Julian Chokkattu News Editor

Sixty-one percent of New Jerseyans voted to raise the minimum wage yesterday from $7.25 to $8.25, according to The Associated Press. New Jersey has also overwhelmingly voted yes to the second ballot question allowing veteran organizations to use games of chance to raise funds for building upkeep. The vote was 82 percent yes to 18 percent no at press time, according to The Associated Press. Ramon Becerra, who works at N.J. Worker’s Voices, said the raise to the minimum wage was long overdue. “It was the right thing for voters to do,” he said. “I hope we can take this motto and apply it to all over the country.” He said in Newark alone, N.J. Worker’s Voices put out around 350,000 flyers, knocked on around 85,000 doors and made around 75,000 phone calls. He said nearly 7 million flyers

were distributed in the whole state. “We believe the message has saturated all over the state,” he said. “You build a machine and let the machine do the work.” The approved ballot question will take effect in January and will amend the state Constitution, according to The Star-Ledger. The other amendment to the Constitution will permit veteran organizations to invite recognized members of the community to play games of chance at their events. The money raised at these events will be used to finance veteran organization expenses such as roof repairs, rent and building utilities. Stephen Abel, director of Veteran and Military Programs and Services at Rutgers, said that he would like to see a percentage of the money raised go to other organizations in the community, such as local children’s sports teams or charities. Danielle Gonzalez contributed to this story.

Barbara Buono gave her concession speech last night at Novita Bistro in Metuchen, NJ, after Gov. Chris Christie defeated her 60 percent to 39 percent, according to The Associated Press. SHIRLEY YU / ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR


Gubernatorial election results by county

SOURCE: POLITICO.COM

GRAPHIC BY: ENRICO CABREDO / EDITOR-IN-CHIEF AND MARIELLE SUMERGIDO / SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR

Election 2013-11-06  

The Daily Targum Election Wrap

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