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ROUGH ROAD

The Rutgers men’s basketball team travels to Cincinnati tonight for the first of three games against perennial Big East powers, before it returns to Piscataway to take on Louisville and Georgetown. SPORTS, BACK

GLOBAL WARNING An Environmental Protection Agency administrator examines the agency’s history and future in a world growing steadily hotter. UNIVERSITY, PAGE 3

CALLING FOR REFORM Wednesday columnists Matt Kuchtyak and Connor Montferrat argue the need for comprehensive immigration reform during Obama’s second term. OPINIONS, PAGE 8

Serving the Rutgers community since 1869. Independent since 1980.

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State debates lifting health care mandate University insurance cost expected to increase after Obamacare BY HANNAH SCHROER CORRESPONDENT

Students might see changes in the health insurance the University offers in 2014 once the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, takes effect. Assemblywoman Celeste Riley, D-3, said the University would not be able to offer low cost plans to students next year because the Affordable Care Act requires higher education institutions to offer full coverage. The New Jersey College Presidents Council, a consortium of N.J. college presidents including University President Robert L.

Barchi, addressed the Assembly Higher Education committee Jan. 14 with concerns of health care affordability for students following the Affordable Care Act. Current low-cost, limited plans offered to students cost $600, but prices could rise up to $2,000, according to the presidents’ testimony, Riley said. Sarah McLallen, vice president of the New Jersey Association of Health Plans, said the Affordable Care Act no longer allows N.J. colleges to set annual coverage limits. “You can’t get a bare bones policy because you’re young and SEE

MANDATE ON PAGE 5

Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman answers questions from the University community at the Rutgers Student Center on the College Avenue campus. She emphasized the importance of removing corporate sponsors from media, and pushed for more independent media sources, like her own. The show locally airs Tuesdays through Saturdays at 5 a.m. on WVPH 90.3 FM, The Core. TIAN LI

Goodman stresses nation’s need for independent media Democracy Now! talk show host says corporate money should not influence information, consumers BY JUSTINA OTERO CORRESPONDENT

According to Amy Goodman, the millions of people who consume mainstream media every day often do not consider how the information they process is controlled by a small group of powerful people. Goodman, host and executive producer of talk show “Democracy Now!,” explained this at the Rutgers Student Center last night on the College Avenue campus during her lecture about her independent station,

which she said diminishes mainstream media’s control by educating audiences with accuracy. Sources of information for the public should be independent from corporate funding so listeners can properly learn about society’s issues in a fair manner, she said. “We are not brought to you by the weapons manufacturers … the insurance companies … the pharmaceutical companies … the oil companies,” she said. “We SEE

MEDIA ON PAGE 5

Rutgers Student Union fights for equal tuition rights, funding Bills stem from President Barack Obama’s DREAM Act, looks to give undocumented students in-state tuition BY SHAWN SMITH CORRESPONDENT

MARKING MUGS

Amanda Chin, a School of Engineering first-year student, decorates a pot with Sharpie markers yesterday at the International Lounge in the Busch Campus Center. The Rutgers University Programming Association hosted the event and provided ceramics and permanent markers to students who attended. See more photos on PAGE 5. LIANNE NG, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Rutgers Student Union plans focus this semester on campaigning for legislation that would allow children of undocumented immigrants pay in-state tuition and qualify for financial aid. “There is a group of people being discriminated against for [an unjust] reason,” said Marios Athanasiou, a member of the Rutgers Student Union. State Sen. Teresa Ruiz, D-29, chair of the Senate Education Committee, said Senate bill S2479 and Assembly bill A3509 represent opportunity. State Sen.

Nellie Pou, D-35, and State Sen. Sandra Cunningham, D-31, are co-sponsors of the bill. “[These students] are Americans and New Jerseyans in their own right, many who have attended schools in this state nearly all of their lives,” Ruiz said. “Allowing the hard-working children of undocumented immigrants to have the same opportunity to get a college education … is the right thing to do.” Unlike other bills rejected from New Jersey’s legislature, the new bills include an amendment that states that the student must apply to become a U.S. citizen. SEE

UNION ON PAGE 6

TODAY, WEDNESDAY JAN. 30 IS THE LAST DAY TO ADD A CLASS FOR THE SPRING SEMESTER. VOLUME 144, ISSUE 68 • UNIVERSITY ... 3 • PENDULUM ... 7 •

OPINIONS ... 8 • DIVERSIONS ... 10 • CLASSIFIEDS ... 12 • SPOR TS ... BACK


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WEATHER OUTLOOK Source: Weather.com

JANUARY 30, 2013

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

HIGH 47

HIGH 34

HIGH 32

HIGH 38

LOW 25

LOW 20

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CAMPUS CALENDAR Wednesday, Jan. 30 Holly Metz talks about her book “Killing the Poormaster: A Saga of Poverty, Corruption and Murder in the Great Depression” at 6 p.m. at Alexander Library on the College Avenue campus. The event is sponsored by the Rutgers University Libraries and the New Jersey Historical Commission.

Thursday, Jan. 31 The Canterbury House at 5 Mine St. hosts GreenFaith, an interfaith organization in Highland Park, at noon to teach others about how to work with other religious groups to protect the environment. The event is sponsored by the Rutgers Protestant Campus Ministries and the Episcopal Campus Ministry at Rutgers. The 2013 Symposium on Microbiology takes place from 4:30 p.m. to Feb. 1 at 5 p.m. at the Douglass Campus Center in Trayes Hall. The keynote speaker is David Benson in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology from the University of Connecticut. The event is sponsored by the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences. Judah Friedlander of NBC’s “30 Rock” performs a comedy routine at 8 p.m. at the Rutgers Student Center multipurpose room on the College Avenue campus. Admission is free. The event is sponsored by the Rutgers University Programming Association.

ABOUT THE DAILY TARGUM

RECOGNITION

The Daily Targum is a student-written and student-managed, nonprofit incorporated newspaper published by the Targum Publishing Company, circulation 18,000. The Daily Targum (USPS949240) is published Monday through Friday in New Brunswick, N.J. while classes are in session during the fall and spring semesters. No part thereof may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without consent of the managing editor.

For years, the Targum has been among the most prestigious newspapers in the country. Last year, these awards included placing first in the Associated Collegiate Press National College Newspaper Convention Best of Show award category for four-year daily newspapers. Interested in working with us? Email Olivia Prentzel: managed@dailytargum.com.

OUR STORY “Targum” is an Aramaic term for “interpretation.” The name for the University’s daily paper came to be after one of its founding members heard the term during a lecture by then-Rutgers President William H. Campbell. On Jan. 29, 1869, more than 140 years ago, the Targum — then a monthly publication, began to chronicle Rutgers history and has become a fixture in University tradition. The Targum began publishing daily in 1956 and gained independence from the University in 1980. Scan this QR code to visit dailytargum.com

Friday, Feb. 1 The Opera Institute at Rutgers performs “Verdi’s Falstaff” at 7:30 p.m. through Sunday, Feb. 10. Performances are at the Nicholas Music Center on Douglass campus. Tickets are $15 for the general public, $10 for alumni, employees and seniors, and $5 for students. The event is sponsored by the Mason Gross School of the Arts.

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Wednesday, Jan. 30 “American Idiot,” the Broadway musical based on Green Day’s Grammy-award winning album of the same name, continues at the State Theatre through Thursday, Jan. 31. The show, which starts at 8 p.m., takes place at the theater located at 15 Livingston Ave. in downtown New Brunswick. Tickets start at $32. For more information, visit statetheatrenj.org.

Thursday, Jan. 31 The Winard Harper Quartet performs at Makeda Restaurant’s weekly jazz show as part of the New Brunswick Jazz Project. Located at 338 George St. in downtown New Brunswick, the event takes place from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. There is a $5 cover charge. Rich Vos performs at the Stress Factor y Comedy Club at 90 Church St. in downtown New Brunswick. The show starts at 7 p.m. (doors at 5 p.m.) and tickets are $20. For more information, visit stress factor y.com.

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JANUARY 30, 2013

UNIVERSITY

PAGE 3

EPA administrator says agency’s future questionable BY SIMON GALPERIN CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Even though environmental policy is at the forefront of President Barack Obama’s agenda during his second term, the future of the Environmental Protection Agency depends on confronting climate change for direct results. Judith Enck, the EPA’s regional administrator for New York, New Jersey, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands, relayed this message yesterday in the Cook Campus Center during her lecture on the past, present and future of environmental protection. “Carbon pollution, which is the release of what is commonly known as greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, [is undoubtedly] warming the Earth,” she said. Greenhouse gases become trapped in the atmosphere and cause the planet to warm. The two leading causes of carbon pollution are the burning of fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas and the carbon emissions that come from the transportation sector, she said. Enck said Obama’s acknowledgment of climate change in his inaugural speech is not enough. Federal and local governments are key to saving the environment in this nation, Enck said.

She said political rhetoric is disconnected from what is actually happening. “My experience, almost always, is that [Republican and Democratic] members of Congress want the EPA to be more active in protecting the environment and their community,” she said. But action on climate change will only come when students get directly involved, Enck said. “Whether you think global warming is legitimate or you think it’s a hoax — I think students have an obligation to voice their opinion and become active in these debates,” she said. Just 50 percent of the public votes and an even smaller percentage make contact with elected representatives, she said. “A smaller number of people can have a disproportionate impact,” she said. Enck said she works with Native American tribes living in New York. They understand climate change’s implications, she said, because they look to the future seven generations when making decisions. John Weingar t, associate director of the Eagleton Institute of Politics, said the EPA is in a difficult position politically. Its actions are often

Judith Enck, an administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency, discusses the future of her agency and the changing climate Tuesday at the Cook Campus Center. FIRAS SATTAR viewed as limiting an individual’s activity or informing concerned citizens that they cannot do anything about a particular environmental issue. He said he believes climate change would be an apolitical issue at any other time in the nation’s history. “Once you accept that something has to be done about climate change, there is room for compromise,” he said. Jennifer May, special projects coordinator with the EPA’s Public Affairs Division, said Enck is in charge of the second of the EPA’s ten divisions. “Before the EPA there was a hodgepodge of local regulations,” she said.

Enck said she recalls avoiding oily sheens from petroleum pollution while waterskiing on the Hudson River in upstate New York. The Cuyahoga River in Ohio caught fire in 1969 and the blaze reached a height of five stories and burned for at least 20 minutes because it was heavily polluted, she said. The Clean Air Act, which sets federal standards for air contamination, has prevented 360,000 premature deaths, which is 10 times the amount of the University’s full-time student population on the New Brunswick campus, Enck said. “The things that come out of the smoke stacks, whether it’s par ticulate matter or air

toxins, can make people sick,” Enck said. She said particulate matter triggers asthma attacks and causes respirator y and heart disease, while airborne toxins can cause cancer and neurological damage. Enck also said the standards for clean drinking water have risen over the past two decades because of a similar act, the Clean Water Act. In 1993, 79 percent of Americans had access to clean drinking water, she said. Today, the number is 92 percent. “To me, there is no doubt that the environment is cleaner than it would have been without these laws,” Weingart said. Enck’s appearance was in conjunction with “Documerica: Then and Now,” an ongoing EPA photo exhibit at the Cook Campus Center that documents changes in the environment over the last 40 years, said Mark Robson, Dean of Agricultural and Urban Programs at the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences. Enck said the exhibit is an examination of today’s environment in comparison to the environment at the time of the EPA’s founding. “I think photographs are a really powerful way to show progress,” she said.


UNIVERSITY PAGE 5

JANUARY 30, 2013

MEDIA Goodman says media can be greatest force for peace on earth CONTINUED FROM FRONT are brought to you by viewers like you in this country and around the world who are deeply committed to an independent media.” She said journalists have a responsibility to use grassroots efforts in their coverage and contact the immediate source connected to the issue they are covering. “It’s important for journalists like us to go to the inside, to go to the target end of U.S. foreign policy so we can reflect back on what happens, so people in this democracy can make a decision of how we want to be represented in the world,” Goodman said. She said approaching the media from a grassroots perspective allows those at the center of important issues to broaden the audience’s scope of opinion and understanding as opposed to outsiders looking in. “When you begin to understand where people are coming from, that is the beginning of peace,” she said. “I think the media can be the greatest force for peace on earth, instead it is wielded as a weapon of war and that has to be challenged.” Goodman also said the media coverage of Colin Powell’s 2003 speech about Saddam Hussein’s possession of weapons of mass destruction only featured three anti-war leaders out of the almost 400 people who were interviewed. Doing so misrepresented the population of people who were undecided on their position about the war in Iraq, she said. “That is no longer a mainstream media — that is an extreme media beating the drums for war. Five weeks later

the U.S. would invade Iraq,” she said. “That is doing a disservice to a democratic society.” Transparency in the media can control discourse on the issues and how people choose to view them, she said. Jack Bratich, chair of the department of Journalism and Media Studies, said independent media plays a vital role in presenting information in its correct context to people and offsets the narrow coverage of mainstream media. “One of the strengths is that this has outside sources, and the downsides of this is it depends on those sources too much,” he said. “They are beholden to those interests of their sources where independent media can have a different voice.” Goodman said media consumers should enforce agency by forcing those in charge of mainstream media to respond and take action. It is the role of the people and the media, she said, to expose what is happening around them. She ended her presentation with a quote by Frederick Douglass. “‘Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never has and it never will,’” she said. Carly Lachenauer, a School of Arts and Sciences junior, said she was the only person in one of her classes that had heard of Goodman, which she said sheds light on the lack of popularity of independent media. “She did not leave me disappointed. She is a very inspirational person who motivates me with her work,” Lachenauer said. She said she was happy that Goodman spoke to the students at the University to inform students about the biased information of mainstream media. “Not many people are informed and events like this help to expand the students to full and unbiased information,” she said.

About 35 people attended the “Sharpie Pottery” event hosted by the Rutgers University Programming Association yesterday. Students used multi-colored Sharpies to create their own pottery designs. LIANNE NG

MANDATE McLallen says uninsured students increases threat of outbreaks CONTINUED FROM FRONT healthy,” she said. But state politicians hope to ensure low costs by trying to remove state-mandated health care coverage in the wake of these potential price increases, Riley said. She is one of the sponsors of an assembly bill that would eliminate the requirement that New Jersey college students have health insurance in order to attend class. The bill, A3546, is designed with affordability in mind, she said. Universities could still require health care coverage as a college policy without the state mandate. If the mandate were lifted, colleges could offer better payment options to students, she said. New Jersey schools are also concerned that the cost of mandatory health care will raise tuition costs and make higher education unaffordable for many students, McLallen said. Riley said institutions plan to adjust their policies according to the Affordable Care Act during 2013, as it will not take effect until 2014. “We haven’t decided how we’re going to manage the Affordable Care Act,” Riley said. She said health care plans would be more affordable in the future, but for now insurers are telling universities that prices will increase. The theory behind the Affordable Care Act is that once everyone has health care the rates would decrease, she said. New Jersey lawmakers instituted mandatory student health

care legislation in 1991 after hospitals complained the number of uninsured college students flooding their emergency rooms exceeded the state’s budget for charity care, Riley said. “If you can’t prove you have your own health care, the colleges and universities had offered a very affordable policy,” Riley said. She said universities do not have the flexibility to make accommodations for students

“There are a lot of things that transfer easily on campus.” SARAH MCLALLEN Vice President of the New Jersey Association of Health Plans

who cannot afford to pay for health care. “I’m not saying you shouldn’t have health care,” Riley said. “In colleges and universities, the exposure rate to germ pools is very high.” McLallen said the initial public health reasons that influenced the mandate in the early ’90s are still relevant. Having sick students live in close quarters without access to primary health care or treatment increases the threat of influenza or meningitis outbreaks, McLallen said. “There are a lot of things that transfer easily on campus,” she said.

She said unexpected injuries also make a big impact. McLallen said students in emergency situations, such as appendicitis, often go to a hospital, but the bills for uninsured students are high. Without insurance, students can end up in charity care, which is funded by state taxpayers. If 1 in 5 students did not have health insurance, 88,000 of them would be uninsured in New Jersey, McLallen said. “That’s a problem we face as a state in terms of how to pay for those issues,” she said. Maha Zayed, a School of Arts and Sciences junior, said mandatory insurance is helpful because the University cares about its students’ health. She thinks the state should offer leeway for students who cannot afford insurance. Zayed, who buys health insurance from the University, said although everyone wants health insurance, it should be an option. “Not ever y family has the opportunity to get insurance,” Zayed said. She said she likes that bill A3546 would give students the chance to decide to buy insurance but said hospital and doctor visits might cause a bigger financial burden on families. “There should be alternate options for students,” she said. Zayed said the University could offer insurance using an exchange process in which students who cannot afford to pay are required to take an extra course or participate in a special program. “I’m fortunate enough not to get sick in the winter,” she said. Zayed said having a health insurance plan made her feel less stressed when she did get sick and needed a doctor.


JANUARY 30, 2013

UNIVERSITY PAGE 6

the bills would be a big step in a direction toward supporting undocumented immigrants. But other states are in the process of passing bills that will restrict the rights of undocumented immigrants. “In certain states, undocumented immigrants can be

№ 1.

№ 2.

№ 3.

attended high school in this state for

received

notified the university that he/she filed

Non-New Jersey residents living off campus pay $26,393 for tuition CONTINUED FROM FRONT President Barack Obama implemented the DREAM Act last year that allows young people who are pursuing an education to live in the country legally, Ruiz said. But one of the issues students still face is the inability to qualify for in-state tuition at public universities because of their residency status. “With a system in place at the federal level that allows for validation of a student’s residency status, there is no excuse not to act,” she said. For commuters at the University, the current cost for in-state tuition is $13,073 per year, according to the University’s Undergraduate Admissions website. The expenses can rise to $24,485 a year when room, board and an average meal plan are taken into account. Non-New Jersey residents living off-campus pay $26,393 a year

for tuition and those who live on campus pay $37,805 a year, according to the website. Spencer Klein, president of New Jersey United Students, said the bill has a list of requirements that students must meet to be eligible for in-state tuition. Qualified students must have attended an N.J. high school for a minimum of three years and possess a high school diploma or GED, said Klein, a School of Arts and Sciences senior. Candidates must also register or be enrolled in school, file an affidavit to become a lawful citizen, and submit a request for deferred action, he said. Senate Bill S2479 and Assembly bill A3509 have been introduced to New Jersey’s legislature in the past, but never garnered enough votes to pass through the Assembly. Although no one in Trenton has openly expressed opposition to the bill, Athanasiou, a School of Arts and

If passed, BILLS S2479 AND A3509 will allow PERSONS OF UNLAWFUL IMMIGRATION STATUS to pay IN-STATE TUITION if they meet THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA

Alex Gaigg, a School of Ar ts and Sciences junior, said he suppor ts the bill because the students af fected are still U.S. citizens. “They are U.S. citizens, they should have access to school,” he said. “It should not be based on their ability to prove their parents nationality, but on the ability to prove their own.” Meredith Reitz, a School of Environmental and Biological Sciences sophomore, said the lack of access to higher education is a moral issue. “It is unfair to deny someone access to education, especially when that education has become necessary in this century,” she said. Daniel Munoz, a School of Engineering senior, said that the issue of undocumented immigrants getting access to higher education is two-fold, just like applying for citizenship is a tedious process. “All they have to do is apply for documentation, and they will have access to public funding,” he said. “However, they have to basically jump through hoops to get documented. There are multiple parts to the issue.”

inspected at any time, for essentially not being white,” he said. “They don’t have big signs saying they are illegal.” Students of undocumented immigrants who need financial aid can only apply for private loans. But these rarely get approved, Klein said. “[Students] are not eligible for public loans, and private lenders will not touch them with a 10-foot pole,” he said. Klein said getting University President Robert L. Barchi to sign off on the bill would secure bipartisan support for the legislation. “Other state universities look to Rutgers and if we sign off on this, they might too,” he said. “With the backing of a public research university on this bill, it would be impossible not to pass. This would make massive strides in immigration reform.” Klein said many undocumented immigrants students pay federal and state taxes and should be eligible for their benefits. “They pay taxes, sometimes more than U.S. citizens,” he said. “This bill is just ensuring that they are able to reap what they sow.”

UNION

Sciences sophomore, said supporters of the bill should not feel too comfortable. “We’re speaking to legislators to not only inform them of the legislation but to receive their support so that it can do better this time,” he said. “The opposition is still unknown at the time, as it hasn’t presented itself.” Klein said New Jersey passing

“It should not be based on their ability to prove their parents nationality, but on the ability to prove their own.” ALEX GAIGG School of Arts and Sciences Junior

3 YEARS OR MORE

A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA or equivalent from the state

AN APPLICATION TO LEGALIZE

his/her immigration status or plans to file upon eligibility

GRAPHIC BY SHAODI HUANG, ASSOCIATE DESIGN EDITOR


PENDULUM

JANUARY 30, 2013

Q:

PAGE 7

How many University parking tickets did you receive this past semester? “It’s kind of like playing a casino game. It’s like you come up and think ‘alright, I’ll be here for 45 minutes, put in 30 and see what happens.’ So far, I’ve lost twice.”

Ari Weitzman University Graduate Student

CAMPUS TALK

BY SMARANDA TOLOSANO AND SHIRLEY YU Daniel Sanchez

Samantha Straus

Alexa Essenfield

Sarah Fayek

School of Arts and Sciences Junior

School of Environmental and Biological Sciences Senior

School of Arts and Sciences Senior

School of Arts and Sciences Senior

“Sometimes there are a lot of spots, and sometimes there are none. Then [to not get a ticket] you have to go wandering around and usually you have to be 10 minutes away and walk.”

“How could something possibly be $90 for parking in the wrong spot, one time?”

“[I’d like to see] more spaces if that’s possible, more spaces in really good spots, closer to the center, closer to bus stops.”

“As the person that’s actually purchasing the [parking pass], I wish I could just park anywhere at any time.”

$300 The amount a student has to exceed in

Money collected from tickets is used to fund the University bus system, including buses, drivers and maintenance The Department of Transportation Services uses Facebook search to see if students posted statuses about getting parking tickets as proof that they were the ones who parked the vehicle SOURCE: JACK MOLENAAR, DIRECTOR OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SERVICES

“They need to be more lenient with parking tickets, because college students don’t have money. They get all this money from us but I feel like they don’t use this money to do anything at Rutgers.”

ONLINE RESPONSE Total votes: 255

“I don’t drive on campus.”

24%

This Week’s Question:

>4

Do you opt out of the NJPIRG fee on your term bill?

18%

Cast your votes online at www.dailytargum.com.

School of Arts and Sciences Junior

? WAY US

unpaid parking tickets for their car to be towed on their next violation

SR DOE WAY ICH WH

Fast Facts

Ashley Ali

“None.”

27%

1-2 3-4

22%

9% PERCENTAGES MAY NOT ADD TO 100% DUE TO ROUNDING ERRORS


OPINIONS

OPINIONS PAGE 8

JANUARY 30, 2013

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THIS WEEK’S

PENDULUM QUESTION

Editor’s Note: Amy Goodman, host of “Democracy Now!”, visited the University last night in the Rutgers Student Center Multipurpose Room for a lecture hosted by the Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs. The Daily Targum’s Thursday columnist Joe Amditis had the opportunity to catch up with her and ask a few questions.

DT: A lot of us that are in the area are still suffering from Hurricane Sandy and the aftermath of that. It is really great to be able to hear things on WBAI and The Core — it’s great to have that — but what would you say to students who are still kind of looking for that light, I guess you could say? How would we be able to help? What are the kinds of things we could do?

DAILY TARGUM: So you’re on your 100-city book tour for “The Silenced Majority.” Can you tell us a little bit about what your book, “The Silenced Majority,” is about?

AG: It’s important that the media not move away from these critical issues, especially when people are still suf fering. People still can talk about what they’re experiencing so that the situation can improve, and that’s a media of the people, by the people, for the people.

AMY GOODMAN: Well the title of the book, we chose “The Silenced Majority” because I really do think that those who are deeply concerned about war, who are concerned about the growing inequality in this country, concerned about climate change, the fate of the Earth, are not a fringe minority — not even a silent majority, but the silenced majority — silenced by the corporate media, and we have to take it back. DT: You talk about, in your book, the “large kitchen table,” of which the media presents the forum to talk about these issues. Can you tell us a little bit about your experience with that and how you think we can change that and further the goal? AG: I see the media as a huge kitchen table that stretches across the globe that we all sit around and debate and discuss the most important issues of the day: war and peace, life and death, and anything less than that is a disservice to a democratic society. And so, everyday on our news hour, Democracy Now! on DemocracyNow.org, which also broadcasts here on The Core, we span the globe and we bring out the voices of people at the grassroots describing their own experiences, and there’s nothing more important. When you hear someone speaking for themselves, it breaks down barriers that fuel the bigotry and hate groups that fuel groups like the KKK. I really do think that the media can be the greatest force for peace on Earth.

DT: I wanted to talk about President Obama’s inauguration speech. I believe you talked about this in your column from the 24th. He made a specific mention of dealing with other nations more peacefully, yet at the same time, he’s appointing people, like you said, to the CIA, who are pro-interrogation. What can we gather from that, in the sense that we have this dual message? AG: I don’t think it’s up to one person in this country, even if he occupies the most powerful position on earth, the President of the United States. I really think, ultimately, it’s about movements. I mean, that’s why Mubarak was toppled, in Egypt. He didn’t willingly go, he was forced out by millions of people who felt, “enough is enough”. In this country, President Obama knows well what it means to make a demand. He was a community organizer himself. The question is, who does he hear those demands from? Certainly from the Tea Party, certainly from those in Congress who oppose him, but what about from, actually, his progressive base, which I think represents the majority of people in this country? People are for gun-control, overwhelmingly; they’re for cleaning up the environment, overwhelmingly; ending war, overwhelmingly. And these are the voices that need to be heard, and I think, when people organize, that is what ultimately changes policy, not one person changing their mind in the White House.

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JANUARY 30, 2013

OPINIONS PAGE 9

C A L L I N G

F O R

R E F O R M Obama must act on Bipartisan framework immigration issues only the first step close the gap between campaign rhetoric and reality. In his first term, the Obama Administration deported an astonishing 1.4 million people. He’s tearing families CONNOR MONTFERRAT apart. He recognized reform, but has failed to take responsibility. Who exactly was the President talking to when he said in his inauguration address that we need ne of my closest friends became a to find ways to “welcome” rather than naturalized citizen this year, after “expel” immigrants? How serious is the being in the country for 10 years. President on immigration reform? I Endlessly, he was working to help pay for believed he would have proposed a large school and studying one of the hardest reform during his first four years, but he majors in mathematics, all while becoming failed to do so. a citizen of the United States. Family is one Many illegal immigrants refer to themof the most important things in his life, and selves as undocumented Americans. it helped him come to this country. It’s They are American in every way except true that today, more than half of all immifor legal status. This is a president who grants and foreign nationals become legal won 71 percent of the Latino vote, and permanent residents as a result of family now presides over a cabinet with no reunification, rather than employment or Latinos ser ving on it since his latest humanitarian reasons. departures. The President’s policies and Flying in through Newark International record deportation numbers have marAirport in 2002, my friend cannot believe it ginalized these undocumented has been almost 11 years since he left the Americans. The President explained that Dominican Republic. He came a few America’s journey “is not complete until months after the Sept. 11 attacks and could we find a better way to welcome the strivnot apply for a long time, due to the expening, hopeful immigrants who still see the sive application fee and residency requireU.S. as a land of opportunity — until ment. It was not until the fee was waived, bright young students and engineers are due to his eligibility, that he was able to enlisted in our workforce rather than apply. He sent the expelled from our application this past countr y.” However, “In his first term, the August in his third he neglects to say year at the that his administraObama administration University, and tion is the one received notification expelling so many deported an astonishing and a letter in of these striving, 1.4 million people.” September. Another hopeful immigrants. letter in October With every cenconfirmed his applitury comes a new cation and required extensive background influx of immigrants into the land of opporchecks. In December, he received a date tunity, the U.S. It has always been a major for the citizenship exam and word that source of population growth and cultural they were processing his application in change throughout much of the history of full. Finally, on Jan. 17, just two weeks ago, the United States. The economic, social he passed the exam and became a citizen. and political aspects of immigration have Personally, I wish it had happened caused controversy regarding ethnicity, before Nov. 6, so he could have voted for economic benefits, jobs, upward social his candidate, President Barack Obama. mobility, crime and voting behavior. Voting meant having a say for the country Nearly 14 million immigrants entered the he lives in. He knows that in the U.S., United States from 2000 to 2010. everything is a step-by-step process. The President “must act,” as he “I can say something and it actually announced in his inauguration address on matters. It counts now. I matter,” he said. immigration reform. It cannot be another My friend believes the end result of immicampaign slogan. If his inaction continues, gration reform will be a good one, and that he will set the country back and further the DREAM Act will help both the governdisrupt the socio-economic status of all ment and the people. undocumented immigrants who wish to My friend plans to live here for the rest become citizens. It will continue to deeply of his life, and never wants to leave. He divide families who continue to come to views this whole process as a relief. With this country. I hope the Latino population better benefits and rights as a citizen, he that voted for Obama or Mitt Romney can now help his family members. I saw decides to take action as well, through one family member in particular stand out, nonviolent action as Dr. King called for in and that was his uncle, who is back in the his “Letter from Birmingham Jail.” I hope Dominican Republic. He works while raismy friend’s story also sheds light upon ing three children and studies at a univerwhat we sometimes take for granted in this sity. This is the person who taught my great country and allows us never forget friend mathematics and inspired him to where we came from. one day become a mathematics teacher at a middle school. Connor Montferrat is a School of Ar ts I tell you this story because Obama and Sciences senior majoring in politimust look toward people like my friend — cal science and criminal justice. His coland policies that worked in the past — to umn, “Best Par ty On Campus,” runs on tackle immigration reform. He needs to alternate Wednesdays.

BEST PARTY ON CAMPUS

O

tion numbers have declined noticeably. In fact, an April 2012 report of the Pew Research Hispanic Center estimates that net migration from MATT KUCHTYAK Mexico has fallen to zero and may, indeed, be negative. These statistics highlight a political environment where immigration has become a uring his recent Second Inaugural slightly less controversial issue, proAddress, President Barack viding an opportunity for genuine, levObama said, “our journey is not elheaded debate. complete until we find a better way to welThe political realities in the aftercome the striving, hopeful immigrants who math of the November elections also still see America as a land of opportunity, provide incentives for both parties to until bright young students and engineers address immigration policy in a legitiare enlisted in our workforce rather than mate and thoughtful way. expelled from our country.” For Democrats, victor y and the Despite his flowery rhetoric, however, presidential mandate with which it is Obama has not been welcoming to undocassociated afford them the chance to umented immigrants, deporting roughly tackle immigration issues with their 1.4 million illegal inhabitants of this counpreferred themes of inclusiveness and try during his first term. “justice for all” as the jumping-off It may be appropriate, then, that the point for any negotiations. The early legislative branch has taken the lead in proposal that came out of the Senate addressing immigration reform during Monday certainly appears to reflect Obama’s second term. this ideal. On Monday, the Bipartisan For Republicans, the election highFramework for Comprehensive lighted, once again, how out-of-touch Immigration Reform was released, with they are with Latino voters, who will the backing of eight members of the make up an increasingly large portion Senate, including: of the voting popSens. Charles ulation in the “Although the proposal is only future. Reforming Schumer, D-N.Y., John McCain, Rthe immigration the beginning, politicians Ariz., Marco Rubio, system with an R-Fla., and Robert should latch onto the hint of eye toward the Menendez, D-N.J. concerns of the bipartisanship and focus on members of this Notably, the fivepage document, reforming [...] in a respectful, voting bloc is a outlining the biparpolitical necessity politically inclusive manner.” for GOP polititisan plan for comprehensive immicians. McCain gration reform, echoed these appeared before the president’s speech, concerns Monday, explaining the scheduled for yesterday in Las Vegas for rationale behind Republican support for immigration reform. the Bipartisan Framework. Although the Bipartisan Framework is Whatever the reasons are that have merely the first step in a lengthy process made comprehensive immigration of overhauling the nation’s ailing immireform politically feasible, it makes gration system, it appears to be a very sense to seize the opportunity to promising initial outline. address one of the most pressing Calling for “a tough but fair path to issues facing our countr y while citizenship for unauthorized immigrants shifting the mood in Washington currently living in the United States,” the toward bipartisanship. Senate plan provides a mechanism by The proposed Senate plan has won which the estimated 11 million undocusupport from former Gov. Bill mented immigrants currently living in Richardson, R-N.M., The New York the United States can remain here, withTimes editorial board, and a wide out the constant fear of deportation. The range of figures across the political Framework also calls for expanded borspectrum. Although the proposal is der security, stronger employment verifionly the beginning, politicians should cation, and extended access to worklatch onto the hint of bipartisanship place visas. and focus on reforming the immigraWhile the plan leaves ample opportution system in a respectful, politically nity for potential roadblocks and partisan inclusive manner. Perhaps immigration bickering — the path to citizenship provireform, passed through successful sion is contingent upon stronger border compromise across party lines, can be patrol, for instance — the mere existence the first step in restoring some semof the document is a positive sign for blance of civility and bipartisanship reform advocates. inside the Beltway. For a number of reasons, the time is appropriate for a serious bipartisan discusMatt Kuchtyak is a School of Arts and sion of comprehensive immigration reform. Sciences senior majoring in economics Due to the economic downturn and and political science with a minor in genresulting decrease in available manufaceral history. His column, “State of the turing and construction jobs, immigraUnion,” runs on alternate Wednesdays.

STATE OF THE UNION

D

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PAGE 10

Horoscopes / LINDA C. BLACK

DIVERSIONS Pearls Before Swine

JANUARY 30, 2013 STEPHAN PASTIS

Today's Birthday (01/30/13). You're in for some fun! This next six months is a creative phase of exploration, fun and discovery. Write, record and communicate. Grow your partnerships. Set financial goals and prepare for when career levels up. Balance work and family. To get the advantage, check the day's rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 7 — Now and for the next few months, it's easier to find money for home improvements. It's better to maintain now than to fix it later (and cheaper). Your career moves forward joyfully. Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 9 — Your confusion at work is clearing up. Loved ones are even more supportive for the next few months. Allow yourself to be creative without concern for the end result. Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is a 9 — Get the house the way you want it, right now and over the next few months. A financial matter moves forward now. There's plenty of work coming in, so embrace it. Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is an 8 — You're lucky in love for the next few months. You have a lot to say, so say it with words, movement or pictures. Express yourself. Move forward on the basis of an agreement. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 7 — Advance a work project. It's easier to get the money now. You can really be lucky in love and lucky at games at the same time. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is a 9 — You've managed to swim through raging emotional waters and now you're rewarded. Your effectiveness increases. Others are listening.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is a 6 — Don't get impatient. You'll advance in strides, especially around personal finances. Give the eggs some time to hatch. Meditation brings peace. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is an 8 — You're gaining confidence each day. Projects that had been delayed will go for ward. Consider joining an organization that makes a difference. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is an 8 — Your dreams are prophetic. Exercise muscles you normally don't use, so they don't atrophy. Try something new. Increase your self-esteem and the influx of cash. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Today is an 8 — Career advancement is easier soon. You'll acquire wisdom with the assistance of your team. Be willing to listen to new ideas, and don't be afraid to take risks. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is a 6 — For the next few months, you'll meet important, interesting people with powerful ideas that will stretch your mind. Pay close attention. Use your time with them wisely. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is an 8 — It's all about your relationships. You can get farther than expected, together. Organize your time around the people you love.

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DIVERSIONS PAGE 11

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SPORTS PAGE 13

Senior 149-pounder Mario Mason’s injuries gave Ken Theobold a chance to participate in his true freshman season. NOAH WHITTENBURG, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER / MARCH 2012

Junior forward Wally Judge drives to the basket Jan. 9 at St. John’s. Judge last recorded more than six rebounds Dec. 28 against Rider. JOVELLE TAMAYO, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

STARTER

JEOPARDY

Injury forces coach to play freshman ealier than most rookies

Frontcourt scoring wanes as midpoint of league season nears CONTINUED FROM BACK Only four league teams are in the top 25, Connecticut is banned from postseason play and West Virginia left for the Big 12, leaving the conference with 15 members. The Knights, then, need urgency. “We just have to find whatever it takes, that X factor,” Seagears said. “When we get stops, our offense picks up.” Rutgers would likely prefer the missing link to come from its frontcourt. Only 14 of the Knights’ 54 points Sunday came from their forwards, which shot 35 percent from the field. Plagued by foul trouble, senior wing Dane Miller did not take a shot.

“We definitely do, but sometimes we want to get it into our bigs because that’ll make it easier for us,” Seagears said of Rutgers’ reliance on its guards. “If they’re hitting early, we just keep going to them early and see if we keep riding off of them the whole game, make it easy for us at the end.” But Rutgers’ options inside have their own limitations. Senior Austin Johnson averages only 16 minutes per game. Sophomore Kadeem Jack is still learning about post of fense. And junior Wally Judge, the Knights’ most viable inside scorer, takes only six shots per game. “We can’t have one or two players, we need four or five players,” said head coach Mike Rice on Sunday. “Our balance has gone out the window because guys are too inconsistent. I appreciate Jerome and his game, but you need more for victory in the Big East.”

Seagears said South Florida point guard Anthony Collins is the only other player he remembers playing with as much poise as Connecticut’s Shabazz Napier. Seagears was the primary onball defender against Napier, who shot only 2-for-7 in the second half. But Napier’s effect on the game spans several layers. Rice said sophomore guard Eli Carter, the Knights’ leading scorer, is still playing good defense despite a 14-for-63 shooting stretch in five of Rutgers’ last six games. “When your leading scorer struggles like that, you’re going to struggle at times,” Rice said. “Let’s say Napier was going through that, UConn would struggle. Let’s say Russ Smith, Louisville struggles. He’s pressing.” For updates on the Rutgers men’s basketball team, follow Tyler Bar to on Twitter @TBartoTargum.

CONTINUED FROM BACK Smith sat out last season even with a glaring hole at the position. He entered the individual rankings for the first time in his career yesterday, coming in as the No. 20 heavyweight in the AWR polls. Goodale felt dif ferently about Theobold. “It just wasn’t in the cards for him, and he will probably learn more from competing,” Goodale said. “Not everyone needs to redshirt right away, so he is probably going to learn a lot more of what it takes from the older guys and what it takes to be in a college season compared to a high school season.” The Toms River South (N.J.) High School product said Goodale never told him after he committed to the Scarlet Knights whether he would redshirt, as he saw benefits from either decision.

“I think a redshirt season as a freshman is good to get used to college at first,” Theobold said, “but to get thrown in there with the big dogs right away can be beneficial for me in the long run because I’m going to have more match experience and overall just getting better at technique.” Theobold saw action in the Knights’ second and third dual meets against Rider and Princeton on Dec. 8, when he split both matches. Shuffled in and out of the lineup, Theobold competed with the starters in Rutgers’ 19-15 loss to Iowa State on Jan. 11 and has not left since, going 3-3 in that span. Goodale pointed out that Theobold, along with fellow freshman 197-pounder Hayden Hr ymack have struggled recently in surrendering bonus points, but he said that comes with the territory. For now, Theobold can only improve in his current role. For updates on the Rutgers wrestling team, follow Bradly Derechailo on Twitter @BradlyDTargum.


JANUARY 30, 2013

SPORTS PAGE 14 SWIMMING, DIVING SCOTT BREAKS PROGRAM RECORD ON PLATFORM

Divers find success en route to Big East Championships BY IAN ERHARD STAFF WRITER

The Rutgers swimming and diving team started its season with a 7-1 dual- and tri-meet record and has shown consistency along the way. The diving team best exemplifies that consistency, so much so that it invokes a sense of déjà vu. The Scarlet Knights have swept the 1-meter dive in all but one meet so far this season. Senior co-captain Kate Kearney has led the way for the Knights in several diving events, finishing first in two of the last three 1-meter dives, both of which resulted in sweeps for the team. Junior Nicole Scott and sophomore Nicole Honey have been just as productive. Scott finished the Frank Elm Invitational on Nov. 18 with a school record in the platform dive. Honey recorded a careerbest mark Oct. 26 against Wagner in the 1-meter dive. Even during Rutgers’ only loss of the season to James Madison on Jan. 19, the divers took first and second in the 3meter event. Along with the team’s veterans, junior Olivia Harr y has emerged despite little collegiate experience as a diver. She started her career as a swimmer and is only in her first full season competing on the boards. Despite her lack of experience, Harry has managed to provide crucial points for the Knights on a weekly basis.

“I think [Harry] is the hero of the day because she’s just performing at an awesome level compared to the lack of experience that she has,” Kearney said Saturday. Harr y placed third in the 3-meter event that day against Fordham and Rider with 217.50 points and took four th in the 1-meter with 192.55 points. She also earned a qualifying spot in the Big East Championship next month. “She’s really shown tremendous growth on the boards,” Spiniello said. “Qualifying for the Big East Championship meet this year was a big stepping stone for her, and I think it’s just the first of many in her diving career here in the next couple of years.” Qualifying for the conference championship was one of Harry’s goals entering the season, but the feat came unexpectedly, she said. “One day coach [Spiniello] went up to me after the meet and said, ‘You made it to Big East,’ and I was so excited,” Harry said. “It was the greatest accomplishment I think I’ve ever made in my whole life.” Much of the Knights’ success on the boards is because of the team’s long-running diving coach, Fred Woodruff. This season marks Woodruff’s 20th year in the position. In his time at Rutgers, he has guided athletes to the finals of the Big East Championship, including a ber th in the NCAA

Junior Olivia Harry clinched a spot in next month’s Big East Championships under diving coach Fred Woodruff in her first full year diving. MARIELLE SOMERGIDO, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Championship meet by former Rutgers diver Jen Betz in 2011. “He’s had tremendous results on the boards for his whole career,” Spiniello said.

“Having a diving coach like that really allows the diving program to move for ward ever y year that he’s here. He gets good athletes and continues to make them better.”

Woodruff produced four Big East Championship scorers last season. The team has momentum entering next month’s championship that could help increase that total.

GYMNASTICS D’ELIA LEADS UNIT WITH 9.800 SCORES IN EVERY MEET

Rutgers flourishes on floor BY GREG JOHNSON STAFF WRITER

After the Rutgers gymnastics team’s home opener Jan. 12, when it barely notched a 48.000 overall score on floor exercise, it appeared as though some of the Scarlet Knights may have lost a step as per formers. Through two meets, floor exercise was statistically the Knights’ second-worst event. Head coach Louis Levine stressed the team could not continue leaving points on the floor if it expected success going for ward. The Knights have apparently received the message. As evidenced by its last two meets, Rutgers has quickly rediscovered its knack for historically performing well on the floor. During that time frame, the Knights are averaging a team score of 48.725 on floor exercise, by far their best event of late. As a core event that helped the Knights achieve their highest score at the EAGL Championships in program histor y last season, Rutgers made regaining its confidence on the floor a point of emphasis.

“I think a lot of it now is that ever yone knows they can hit their routines, so I think it’s less about going into the floor routine and being like ‘Alright, well am I going to stand up my passes or not?’” said junior cocaptain Alexis Gunzelman. “I think ever yone knows that they are capable of doing their passes, so it’s more about finding the landings, working on the dance and showing of f the

“It’s less about going into the floor routine and being like, ‘Alright, well am I going to stand up my passes or not?.” ALEXIS GUNZELMAN Junior Co-Captain

routines that we know we’re capable of doing. And I think that’s why floor has excelled in the past few weeks. So hopefully we can keep on building on that.” Senior Danielle D’Elia has led the team on floor as the

only Knight to eclipse 9.800 score performances in back-toback meets. She said it is an event that Rutgers strongly enjoys per forming. “With our team, if you watch us, ever yone has a lot of fun in the event,” D’Elia said. “That is something that is in our benefit and helps us, because if you’re having fun while doing it, it’s going to be that much better.” At Penn State on Saturday, the team’s season-high floor exercise score of 48.850 put them in prime position to upset EAGL foe No. 22 Pittsburgh. But a season-worst score of 47.825 on balance beam to end the meet cr ushed any hope of that. “There’s been a little bit of holding back on beam. I think it’s something we’ve just got to keep working on,” Levine said Saturday. “We’ll keep pushing and working on perfecting it. It was a box of little mistakes. There weren’t a whole lot of major mistakes — but little mistakes — and that’s what cost us.” For updates on the Rutgers gymnastics team, follow Greg Johnson on Twitter @GJohnsonTargum.


JANUARY 30, 2013

SPORTS PAGE 15 WOMEN’S BASKETBALL RUTGERS-MARQUETTE, TONIGHT, 8 P.M.

IN BRIEF

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utgers men’s track and field senior Kevin Bostick earned Big East Men’s Field Performer of the Week honors yesterday, the conference announced. Bostick led the Scarlet Knights to a second-place finish at the Metropolitan Championships last Thursday and Friday by taking first in both the high jump and the triple jump. He recorded marks of 2.07 meters in the high jump and 14.76 meters in the triple jump. Bostick currently holds the Big East’s best triple jump mark of 15.33 meters, which he achieved Jan. 4 at the Rutgers Invitational.

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more emphasis on proximity when divisions are realigned by 2014 following the additions of Mar yland and Rutgers to the conference, according to ESPN. Penn State Athletic Director Dave Joyner said officials within the league have had discussions about prioritizing travel issues and funding. Athletic directors will likely meet several more times before finalizing recommendations to the Council of Presidents and Chancellors for review in June, Big Ten spokesman Scott Chipman said. The current 12-team Big Ten split into two divisions for football in 2011 after Nebraska joined the league. PUT

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linebacker Ray Lewis denies a repor t by Spor ts Illustrated that he used a banned substance in a product to heal his torn triceps, according to ESPN. Sports with Alternatives to Steroids spoke to Lewis at the time of his injury Oct. 14, when he was prescribed Deer-Antler spray as treatment. The spray contains the substance IGF-1, which is on the NFL’s list of banned substances. Lewis denied the report yesterday when asked during Super Bowl media day. The NFL tests for IGF-1 at random times during the season. It can be assumed that Lewis “has been randomly tested multiple times for that substance,” according to a league source.

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turned down an offer to play for the Dallas Mavericks D-League affiliate, the Texas Legends, according to ESPN. The 37-years-old announced he remains hopeful of getting one last opportunity to play in the NBA, but is not willing to launch his comeback in the developmental league. The Legends moved to the front of the D-League’s waiver line Monday, continuing a season-long pursuit of Iverson. “I thank [general manager] Donnie [Nelson] and Dallas for the consideration, and while I think the D-League is a great oppor tunity, it is not the route for me,” Iverson said in a tweet. Iverson last played in the NBA during the 2009-2010 season with brief stints with the Memphis Grizzlies and Philadelphia 76ers.

Senior forward Monique Oliver’s numbers have dropped this season as she continues to play through an ankle injury that has limited her in practice. She averages only 4.9 rebounds per game after recording 7.3 per match last year. NISHA DATT

Knights lose time to turn year around BY JOSH BAKAN ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR

It has been some time since the Rutgers women’s basketball team has been elite. The Scarlet Knights last made it to the Sweet 16 in 2009. As the season ages, the Knights (11-8, 2-4), keep accumulating bad losses. The season is old enough to prove these losses are not flukes. If Rutgers fails to put away Marquette tonight in Milwaukee, it will be more evidence of how far the team has fallen. The Knights are 10-0 against Marquette since the Golden Eagles joined the Big East in 2006, but it is realistic that the Golden Eagles (109, 2-4) change that to 10-1. Rutgers’ recent 45-42 loss Sunday against Seton Hall helped put this season into perspective, as the Knights dropped their first game against the Pirates since 2002. With the loss to Seton Hall, who is now ahead of Rutgers in the Big East, the Knights cannot enter any game for the rest of the season as a clear favorite until they get back on track. Rutgers currently lacks an identity. Head coach C. Vivian Stringer says this is the tallest Knights team she has coached, and a lack of size has consistently been a problem in the past. The Knights have yet to take full advantage of that size, averaging only a plus-2.8 rebounding margin. Marquette surpasses them in that regard, recording plus-7.2 boards per game. For ward Katherine Plouffe leads the Golden Eagles with 7.7 rebounds per game.

Senior forward Chelsey Lee leads Rutgers with 5.1 rebounds per game. The frontcourt has yet to reach its potential on the boards, averaging only a plus-2.8 rebounding differential. NISHA DATT Senior forward Chelsey Lee leads the Knights with 5.1 boards per game, which are a dip from her past numbers. She averaged 7.2 in the 2009-2010 season and 7.5 in 2010-2011. Senior forward Monique Oliver’s rebounding numbers have dipped too, as she has not been completely healthy for most of the season. After averaging 7.3 rebounds per game without the sidelined Lee last season, Oliver is down to 4.9 boards per game. It would have been natural for the duo’s rebounding numbers to dip this season because Rutgers entered the year with such a deep frontcourt, meaning more teammates contending for rebounds. But since the Knights have not set themselves apart on the

boards, there is little excuse for the decline in individual rebounding numbers. Rutgers’ best chance at beating Marquette is exploiting a poor defense. The Golden Eagles are second-to-last in the Big East with a .406 field goal percentage allowed. They also stand secondto-last in 3-point defense, allowing .332 percent of shots to score from beyond the arc. The Knights have not scored more than 55 points in a game since Jan. 16 against Providence, when they scored a season-high 87. Even worse for Rutgers, it has not won on the road since Dec. 9 against Louisiana Tech — which took place at Madison Square Garden — and stands only 2-7 on the road.

To find a true road win, the Knights have to look back to Nov. 21 and a 66-50 win against Temple. Rutgers has struggled on the road in recent years, finishing 6-6 last year and 4-10 in the 20102011 season. Both teams made the NCAA Tournament, but the Knights have created a huge hole to get there again with struggles to put away some subpar opponents. Marquette is Rutgers’ soonest opportunity to climb out of that hole. There is a little more than a month left to do so. For updates on the Rutgers women’s basketball team, follow Josh Bakan on Twitter @JBakanTargum.


DREAM COME TRUE Junior Olivia Harry clinched her goal of qualifying for the Big East Championships in her first year of diving. PAGE 14 TWITTER: #TARGUMSPOR TS DAILYTARGUM.COM/SPOR TS TARGUMSPOR TS.WORDPRESS.COM

FLOORED The Rutgers gymnastics team thrives in the floor excericse, but needs to improve in other events such as the balance beam. PAGE 15

SPORTS

ALL DUE RESPECT The Rutgers women’s basketball team has few games to turn around its declining program. PAGE 15 QUOTE OF THE DAY “Our balance has gone out the window because guys are too inconsistent.” — Rutgers head men’s basketball coach Mike Rice on the team’s recent struggles

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013

WRESTLING

MEN’S BASKETBALL RUTGERS-CINCINNATI, TONIGHT, 7 P.M.

Freshman earns time as starter BY BRADLY DERECHAILO CORRESPONDENT

Rutgers head wrestling coach Scott Goodale did not hesitate when asked about what Ken Theobold brings on the mat. But he was also quick to point out how the freshman 149-pounder’s biggest asset has also led to some problems in his first year. “Energy. He wrestles really hard and never backs up,” Goodale said. “He goes forward, which can get him into trouble because he comes out of position a lot, so he needs to balance that. But he just brings a lot of energy because he wrestles so hard.” Theobold said he also had trouble with starting on top in matches this season, but freshmen are usually allowed to work those kinks out their first year on campus with a redshirt. Because of injuries to senior 149-pounder Mario Mason, Theobold has not experienced that luxury. “He definitely could have benefited from [a redshirt season],” Goodale said. “He needs to learn a lot and is very raw. He gets a lot of mileage out of hard work and dedication, but from a technique standpoint he needs to get a lot better and he knows that.” Goodale has not been afraid to use redshirts on younger grapplers even if they could benefit the lineup, as evidenced by redshirt freshman heavyweight Billy Smith. SEE

STARTER ON PAGE 13

Sophomore guard Jerome Seagears sets up the Knights offense Sunday at the XL Center as Connecticut’s Ryan Boatright defends. Seagears scored in double figures for the first time this season. NELSON MORALES, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Stretch puts hopes in jeopardy BY TYLER BARTO SPORTS EDITOR

Freshman 149-pounder Ken Theobold has filled in for an injured Mario Mason. ENRICO CABREDO, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Jerome Seagears exited the Rutgers men’s basketball team’s locker room Sunday at the XL Center with his hood up and stood innocently against a white-tiled wall. The sophomore guard had posted a career-high 21 points at Connecticut only minutes earlier, but talk after the game swirled around the Scarlet Knights’ scoring disparity. He answered questions about the Knights’ guard dependency. He heard

about the team’s offense down the stretch. And he looked to Rutgers’ upcoming schedule for support. He will not find much. “This is the most important right here because this next three-game stretch is going to be big for us,” Seagears said. “Although we’re 3-5, we still want to win these next three games so we can get a winning record and just tr y to push, because that’s going to be big time at the end of the season.” Three of the Big East’s top-seven teams await the Knights in an 11-day span, begin-

EXTRA POINT

NHL SCORES Philadelphia New York R.

1 2

New York I. Pittsburgh

4 1

New Jersey Boston

1 2

Winnipeg Montreal

3 4

Toronto Buffalo

4 3

Washington Ottawa

2 3

GRETA LEBERFINGER took first place Saturday in the 100-meter and 200-meter breaststroke last time out for the Rutgers swimming and diving team.

ning tonight at Cincinnati (16-4, 4-3). Should Rutgers (12-7, 3-5) drop all three games, it would need to win six of its final seven to finish at .500 in Big East play — nearly essential to enter consideration for the NCAA Tournament. Teams that finish two games under .500 rarely stand much chance, except when the league’s depth afforded it an NCAA-record 11 bids to the 2011 NCAA Tournament. The Big East’s climate is different this year. SEE

JEOPARDY ON PAGE 13

RUTGERS SPORTS CALENDAR MEN’S BASKETBALL

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

WOMEN’S TRACK

MEN’S TRACK

at Marquette

at New Balance Invitational

at New Balance Invitational

Tonight, 8 p.m. Milwaukee

Friday Bronx

Friday Bronx

at Cincinnati Tonight, 7 p.m. Cincinnati

The Daily Tagum 2013-01-30  

The Daily Targum Print Edition