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FLYING SOLO: EURO EXCURSION

Columnist Katie Bryck gives her account of her travel experience between London and Dublin for the Thanksgiving holiday. / OPINIONS, PAGE 8

RESEARCH TIES

A new collaboration between the Byrne Seminars and the Aresty Research Center gives first-year students an opportunity to meet and work with new professors. / UNIVERSITY, PAGE 3

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WEATHER Mostly Cloudy High: 46 Nighttime Low: 35

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY—NEW BRUNSWICK

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2012

ONLINE AT DAILYTARGUM.COM

ORANGE CRUSHED

Students in the stands react to Rutgers’ 20-17 loss to Louisville last night at High Point Solutions Stadium. For the second season in a row, the Knights failed to win the games they needed to secure a berth in the Orange Bowl, dropping their final game last season to Connecticut, as well as their final two games this season. Instead, the Cardinals earned another BCS berth under head coach Charlie Strong while the Knights must wait until Sunday in order to find out which bowl they will be going to. Likely candidates are the Russell Athletic Bowl and the Belk Bowl. See BACK for full game coverage. NOAH WHITTENBURG, PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

RUSA questions U. contract with student debt collector

Empire State acknowledges Scarlet Knights

Sallie Mae’s General Revenue Corporation gets paid to accrue unpaid tuition

Building lights up red for Rutgers, Louisville Big East title game

BY DOMENIC RUGGERI STAFF WRITER

BY MARISSA OLIVA STAFF WRITER

The tip of the Empire State Building in New York City glowed scarlet red last night in honor of Rutgers’ Big East Championship football game against Louisville at High Point Solutions Stadium. This was the second time the Empire State Building was lit in support of the Scarlet Knights. The building turned scarlet in 2006 after the University’s 28-25 victory over Louisville. “The reason then, and the reason now is because we really are the most followed college team in this area,” said Tim Pernetti, athletic director, before the game. “We have a great following in New York City. We don’t SEE

KNIGHTS ON PAGE 3

The Empire State Building shines scarlet with a new state-of-the-art LED lighting system that allows a selection of more than 16 million colors. A live feed of the tower was displayed in the stadium. NELSON MORALES, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

While the Rutgers University Student Assembly members were drafting an in-state tuition bill in early October they found out the University pays a company to collect student debt. John Connelly, president of RUSA, said the University has a contract with the General Revenue Corporation, a subsidiar y of Sallie Mae, which collects unpaid student tuition, last night in the Student Activities Center on the College Avenue campus. “We pay them to collect our debt,” said Connelly, a School of Arts and Sciences senior. “It doesn’t make sense.” RUSA introduced a resolution for a “Student Debt Teach-In” on Dec. 3 at the Douglass Campus Center, which will be a session that educates students on student debt, Sallie Mae and the rising cost of education.

Marios Athanasiou, co-author of the resolution opposing the contract, said GRC is allowed to keep 25 percent of outstanding tuition collected. “We see this as very corrupt and outside the interests of students,” said Athanasiou, a School of Arts and Sciences sophomore. GRC has several lawsuits regarding the violation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and has received 343 complaints from the Better Business Bureau since June 2012 because of their aggressive collection practices, Athanasiou said. He said the corporation will call, mail and email students relentlessly with threats about future credit ratings if they do not pay. “Of course we believe students should be paying tuition. We want to make it a less threatening environment,” he said. David Bedford, co-author of the resolution and a member of the Rutgers Student

VOLUME 144, ISSUE 54 • UNIVERSITY ... 3 • OPINIONS ... 8 • DIVERSIONS ... 10 • CLASSIFIEDS ... 12 • SPOR TS ... BACK

SEE

RUSA ON PAGE 5


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WEATHER OUTLOOK Source: Rutgers Meteorology Club

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

HIGH 49

HIGH 58

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CAMPUS CALENDAR Sunday, Dec. 2 Women Helping Women at Rutgers hosts “The Myths and Realities of Depression: What You Need to Know” at 3 p.m. at the Center for Applied Psychology, Suite C on Busch campus.

Monday, Dec. 3 RU Turkish hosts its first “Turkish Coffee Night” at 8 p.m. at the Rutgers Student Center Multipurpose Room on the College Avenue campus. There will be free Turkish coffee, desserts and baklava, accompanied by live music.

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The Daily Targum is a student-written and student-managed, nonprofit incorporated newspaper published by the Targum Publishing Company, circulation 18,000. The Daily Targum (USPS949240) is published Monday through Friday in New Brunswick, N.J. while classes are in session during the fall and spring semesters. No part thereof may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without consent of the managing editor.

For years, the Targum has been among the most prestigious newspapers in the country. Last year, these awards included placing first in the Associated Collegiate Press National College Newspaper Convention Best of Show award category for four-year daily newspapers.

OUR STORY

Tuesday, Dec. 4 The Association of Mediterranean Organizations at Rutgers University (AMOR) hosts its first “Persia to Portugal” mixer at 7 p.m. at the Rutgers Student Center on the College Avenue campus. There will be food, dancing and many activities.

Thursday, Dec. 6 Nayan Shah, professor at the University of Southern California, speaks at 2 p.m. on her book “Stranger Intimacy: Contesting Race, Sexuality and the Law in the American West” at the Institute for Research on Women on Douglass campus. The event is part of the IRW and Collective for Asian American Studies’ “Disorientations” lecture series. Oxfam Rutgers will hosts its annual “Fashion Beyond Borders” at 7:30 p.m. at the Busch Campus Center Multipurpose Room. There will be food and performances from many University cultural organizations. Tickets are $7 before the event, $10 at the door.

Monday, Dec. 10 The Women’s Center Coalition hosts “SCREAM Against Gender Violence” at 5 p.m. at Brower Commons on the College Avenue campus as part of the 16 Days of Action Against Gender Violence campaign..

METRO CALENDAR

“Targum” is an Aramaic term for “interpretation.” The name for the University’s daily paper came to be after one of its founding members heard the term during a lecture by then-Rutgers President William H. Campbell. On Jan. 29, 1869, more than 140 years ago, the Targum — then a monthly publication, began to chronicle Rutgers history and has become a fixture in University tradition. The Targum began publishing daily in 1956 and gained independence from the University in 1980. Scan this QR code to visit dailytargum.com

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Friday, Nov. 30 Drew Carey performs at 7 p.m. at the Stress Factory Comedy Club at 90 Church St. in downtown New Brunswick. This event is sold out, so call (732) 545-4242 for any last-minute availability. The Monkees perform at 8 p.m. at the State Theatre at 15 Livingston Ave. in downtown New Brunswick. Tickets start at $35. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit statetheatrenj.org.

Sunday, Dec. 2 “The Velveteen Rabbit,” a life-sized puppet show, will be performed at the State Theatre at 15 Livingston Ave. in downtown New Brunswick at 1 p.m. Tickets are $15. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit statetheatrenj.org.

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N OVEMBER 30, 2012

UNIVERSITY

PAGE 3

Seminars provide first-years research opportunities Byrne-Aresty collaboration to debut in spring 2013 BY HANNAH SCHROER CORRESPONDENT

First-year students will be able to get hands-on research experience this spring through a collaboration of Byrne Seminars and the Aresty Research Program. The new Byrne-Aresty seminars, available for spring 2013, aim to make the relationship between research inquiry and ongoing research more explicit, said Charles Keeton, faculty director of the Aresty Research Center. Byrne seminars are small, one-credit interdisciplinar y courses open to first-year students that are graded on a pass/no-credit basis. Because the course does affect grade point average, students are provided a low-pressure learning environment and an opportunity to develop alongside a faculty member, said Angela Mullis, director of Byrne Seminars. “Just from pure word of mouth and talking to seniors who have taken Byrne seminars on their way out … they’re a way to establish community early on and find a faculty mentor,” Mullis said.

The new Byrne-Aresty seminars teach students research skills and give them hands-on experience through the Aresty program, Mullis said. Students can then apply to work for their professors as a part of the Aresty Research Assistant Program, said Keeton, associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. “From the students’ standpoint, this is a great introduction to the research side of the research university,” Keeton said. Mullis said the program makes students more comfortable when seeking out faculty during office hours or just talking about what they want to research. Byrne Seminars, a part of the Transformation of Undergraduate Education initiative, began in 2007 after University alumnus John J. Byrne and his wife donated $2 million to the University, Mullis said. Angela O’Donnell, a professor in the Graduate School of Education, said Byrne seminars are a way to make her research more relatable while teaching students she normally would not reach.

KNIGHTS Pernetti says lighting went viral through social media CONTINUED FROM FRONT only view ourselves as a New Jersey college team, but also as New York’s.” Kathleen Conlin, assistant to associate athletic director, submitted an online application a few weeks ago for the Empire State Building to be lit scarlet for last night’s game. “We had to explain how Rutgers will put this out there, how we are going to help promote the Empire State Building — through flyers, email blasts, publications, Twitter, Facebook,” Conlin said. “They are looking for exposure.” The applications are run past a board that determines whether or not the applicant fits their criteria for lighting, she said. Conlin and her team received news Tuesday that their request had been granted. She said she believes the lighting will give both the football team and the University a great deal of attention. “Ever yone knows the Empire State Building. The whole world knows of it.” Conlin said. “When you have the Empire State Building lit up, you’re special.”

The Empire State Building’s custom innovative LED lighting system installed Monday will help the scarlet shine even brighter. The state-of-the-art lighting system is unique to the Empire State Building and allows customized light from a selection of more than 16 million colors,

“When you have the Empire State Building lit up, you’re special.” KATHLEEN CONLIN Assistant to Associate Athletic Director

according to an Empire State Building press release. Pernetti said the University received a tremendous amount of publicity when University Athletics broke the announcement. “It has gone viral pretty quickly through social media,” Pernetti said. “We are seeing it in print and Internet coverage of the game.” High Point Solutions Stadium displayed a live-feed of the scarlet-lit Empire State Building for fans to see at yesterday’s game.

All five Byrne-Aresty professors will be taking on Aresty research assistants in the fall 2013 semester, he said. Through the Byrne Seminars, students can get into the classroom with a tenured faculty member right away. Otherwise, they might have to wait until their junior year. Students self-select their Byrne seminars, so they can explore their major or look into an outside interest, Mullis said. Keeton said Byrne seminars are fun because he can design a course around interesting topics that students would not see until advanced astrophysics courses. During a previous semester, he taught a course focused on studying technology found in science fiction that discussed how light sabers and invisibility cloaks would work — if they were possible, Keeton said. “These are topics on which I’m not an expert, [so] we learned a lot together,” he said. Keeton said several of his former Byrne students became Aresty research assistants and went on to become peer instructors. “The level of enthusiasm is refreshing,” Keeton said. “It’s invigorating to hear students come in and go, ‘That’s so cool,’ to see the light bulb go off over their heads.”

She said the seminars result from the task force’s general orientation toward getting more students in touch with the research aspect of the University, she said. Four of O’Donnell’s former Byrne students, now in their final semester towards obtaining a master’s degree, are returning to help her teach her spring seminar, she said. “Getting access to faculty and some of the experience faculty

have is helpful [for new students],” O’Donnell said. “It sort of breaks down the very large system into reasonable context.” She said the seminars were a good opportunity for students to have access to the School of Education faculty who can teach them what they need to know and how to apply it to the teacher education program. “[It’s a] very unusual experience for me to have students both in the beginning … and the end of their years,” O’Donnell said. O’Donnell referred two former Byrne students to colleagues to find work using research grants. Others maintained their connection to the School of Education and entered the school’s five-year master’s program during their junior year, she said. “In my own case, there have been lots of hidden benefits to the students,” O’Donnell said. The University provides a tremendous opportunity for students, but it can feel overwhelming. The Byrne seminars give first-year students a chance to see a new side of the University, he said. “A lot of students don’t know what [research] means,” Keeton said. “They don’t know what their professors do outside of class.”

Olivia Mastrodonato, a School of Arts and Sciences senior, said she appreciates the University’s large fan base in its surrounding areas. “I think it made the entire Rutgers community proud to be a part of something so large and exciting. I loved it,” she said. Mastrodonato said her father, a University alumnus from the class of 1980, was the first to tell her about the lighting of the Empire State Building in honor of the game. “We were both so excited for the Rutgers name to be so widely spread,” she said. “I think it just brought everyone together and heightened the excitement for the game even more.” Habeeba Husain, a School of Arts and Sciences junior, said she feels that the game, combined with the lighting of the Empire State Building, unifies the University community. “It’s pretty cool that New York City is recognizing the final game and wearing scarlet like the rest of us,” she said. “It is beautiful against the night sky, overlooking the rest of the city. It’s awesome.” Pernetti said the culmination of the football game and the lighting of the Empire State Building was great for the University, New Jersey and all fans. “Having the Empire State Building lit scarlet is a great testament regarding how much the area supports Rutgers football,” Pernetti said.

The Empire State Building lights up red for the first time after Rutgers beat Louisville in 2006. GETTY IMAGES / NOVEMBER 2006

“I normally teach an undergrad junior level course, so the opportunity to teach first-year students was really pleasant for me,” O’Donnell said. O’Donnell, whose Byrne seminar focuses her collaborative learning research, is involved with the University’s Task Force on Undergraduate Education and has been a part of the program since it started.

“They’re a way to establish community early on and find a faculty mentor.” ANGELA MULLIS Director of Byrne Seminars


THE DAILY TARGUM IS HIRING FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS FOR THE 2013–2014 ACADEMIC YEAR: Build your resume with a truly unique opportunity to run an entire department of a prestigious not-for-profit company! Prior experience in sales and marketing a plus but not a necessity. Detailed training provided. Must be enrolled as a student for the 2013 – 2014 academic year. Responsibilities include: • Setting and reaching monthly revenue goals. • Overseeing the Advertising and Classifieds department. • Training, managing, and evaluating a sales staff. • Setting advertising rates for both print and online advertising. • Setting commision and bonuses for sales staffs. • Preparing bi-weekly Marketing Payroll reports. • Creating promotional campaigns. • Communicating directly with the Productions Department regarding advertisements. Flexible around class schedule during the school year, 40 hours a week during the summer, 2 weeks and spring break paid vacation, 1/2 pay over winter break! Expenses paid training at the CNBAM Conference 4/3 – 4/7 in San Diego, CA! Please submit a cover letter and resume via email to: Anna Drootin Marketing Director marketing@dailytargum.com

Seeking a motivated, hard-working, result-oriented individual who has excellent organizational, communication, and time mangement skills, along with the ability to manage and lead people. Experience using Microsoft Excel, Word, and Outlook preferred. Prior experience in organization management a plus. Detailed training will be provided. Must be enrolled as a student for the 2013 – 2014 academic year. Responsibilities include: • Ensuring successful operation of the company. • Constructing and overseeing the fiscal budget. • Setting wages for the entire organization. • Negotiating contract terms with vendors. • Managing 5 business departments. • Overseeing a staff of 70+ employees. • Hiring professional staff. • Approving all expenses. Flexible around class schedule during the school year, 40 hours per week during the summer, 2 weeks and spring break paid vacation, 1/2 pay over winter break! Expenses paid training at the CNBAM Conference 4/3 – 4/7 in San Diego, CA! Please submit a cover letter and resume via email to: Ashley Magno Business Manager business@dailytargum.com

DEADLINE TO APPLY FOR BOTH POSITIONS WILL BE DECEMBER 12, 2012.


UNIVERSITY PAGE 5

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

RUSA Connelly says RUSA hopes to follow RUSAS victory CONTINUED FROM FRONT Union, said the eventual goal of the resolution is the creation of an in-house department, which would help students with debt rather than just bully them. “People aren’t made aware of options like payment plans,” said Bedford, a School of Arts and

Sciences sophomore. “Not only do we want the University to disaffiliate [from the GRC] but create an in-house operation that helps students through the process rather than threatening [them].” Athanasiou said Sallie Mae is consistent in lobbying against the interests of higher education and currently holds about $150 billion’s worth of national student debt. He said a large number of institutions hold contracts with GRC, but none have disaffiliated yet. Athanasiou said he hopes RUSA is able to follow the example

of United Students Against Sweatshops, which managed to get the University to revoke its contract with Adidas in the past week. He said the University should handle student debt collection instead of an outside corporation. “What will make them stop is us … saying ‘we will stand against this,’” he said. The contract is annual, so it could be revoked as soon as this year, Athanasiou said. Bedford said the main reason no universities have disaffiliated yet is because not enough people know about the corporation.

RUSA members found out about the contract accidentally when they were working on the in-state tuition bill and University representatives were hesitant to come forward about it, he said. Bedford filed an Open Public Records Act request for the contract in early October. “The University claimed they didn’t know about it at first,” he said. “After a while they changed their stor y, which makes us believe they were aware.” Also on the agenda was a resolution to show solidarity with universities in the Middle East,

which have been affected by the conflict in Israel. The resolution, which is largely symbolic, is a call for peace in the region, said Jacob Neiman, a School of Arts and Sciences sophomore. He said some universities in the area have been directly affected by violence and had to cancel classes and evacuate students. “We commend the recent cease-fire announced Nov. 22, 2012 as a step in the right direction,” he said. “But more needs to be done.” Both resolutions passed unanimously.

Jamila White, a School of Arts and Sciences sophomore, accepts her new position as recording secretary in Rutgers University Student Assembly. Ian Wolfe and Jacob Nieman, School of Arts and Sciences juniors, talk about a resolution in solidarity with university students in the Middle East, whose studies were interrupted by airstrikes. LIANNE NG, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

IN BRIEF POLL FINDS SANDY AFFECTED MOST NJ RESIDENTS A Rutgers-Eagleton Poll found that Hurricane Sandy affected twothirds of New Jersey residents. Only 35 percent of those polled reported that they were not touched by the storm. Ninetyfour percent of residents lost power for at least some amount of time during and after the storm, according to University Media Relations. One-fifth of residents who were affected by the storm were

forced to leave their house, 6 percent of which said they have not yet returned home. David Redlawsk, director of the Rutgers-Eagleton Poll, said the poll showed the distinct impact of the hurricane. “What we get from these numbers is a clearer sense of its disruptive effects on nearly all New Jerseyans, whether near the shore or much further inland,” he said.

FIVE U. PROFESSORS BECOME FELLOWS The American Association for the Advancement of Science selected five University professors to reach the rank of fellows. These professors were chosen for this distinction based on their efforts made in the advancement of science and encouraging scientific or socially distinguished applications, according to Media Relations. Monica Driscoll, a School of Arts and Sciences professor in the Department of Molecular

Biology and Biochemistr y, explores the fundamental biology of aging and ways in which to protect against the neurological damage that occurs from diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. Yogesh Jaluria, a School of Engineering professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, focuses on thermal science and engineering. His findings have been useful in understanding environmental phenomena and the spread of fires in small spaces, like elevators. Jing Li, a School of Arts and Sciences professor in the

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, creates materials that can be used for clean and renewable energy. Manish Parashar, a School of Engineering professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, has made advancements in computing and computational science. Mark Gregory Robson, dean of Agricultural and Urban Programs in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, focuses on the interaction of human beings and pesticides and the policies that regulate pesticide use.


NOVEMBER 30, 2012

UNIVERSITY PAGE 7

Alumnus strives to promote peace through music-making Heartbeat co-director says students can make difference from home BY JUSTINA OTERO STAFF WRITER

A collective is hoping to unite young people at the heart of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict to find a solution through the power of music. Heartbeat, an IsraeliPalestinian youth music community founded in 2007 and based in Jerusalem, plans to go on tour throughout U.S. universities for first time in November, said Ami Yares, University alumnus and co-director of Heartbeat. He said a musical setting provides an outlet for people to meet each other and voice their ideas. “Through this music-making experience, their narratives are heard and respected, and they can become leaders in their own communities because of what they are talking about,” said Yares, a singer and songwriter from Israel. Shoshana Gottesman, communications and development associate for Heartbeat, said the project could give hope to U.S. students watching the conflict from overseas by letting them know they can still make a difference from home. “It’s hard to … feel so far away and question [whether] things

will get better and [if it’s possible to] make a difference,” she said. “By bringing our youth to the States, they see how they are affecting the situation by challenging the status quo. We are making a difference together.” Aaron Shneyer, executive director and creator of Heartbeat, said music has an effect on people that can change how they interact with each other. “I’m a musician, so I am really fascinated about the power of music. I really believe that music is a physical force that shapes the way we feel, and it can open people up to one another,” Shneyer said. When looking at politicians and the media, Shneyer said there is often a top-down approach where all of the responsibility and focus is on leaders, who try to control the conflict through treaties and coercive negotiation. “We see that it doesn’t work,” he said. “I deeply believe that a lasting peace with justice will come when the people on the ground build trust with one another and they understand that they do have partners for peace on the other side.” Yares said group members hope to remove the notion of fear, which he said stops people from

getting to know each other and establishing stable relationships in Israel and Palestine. “We want to make sure that while we are engaging these kids that we [also provide] them [with] a safe space to exist and create,” he said. “We want to make sure that it’s a space to give them the tools to confront reality around them.” Yares said music could help establish a sense of community among Israelis and Palestinians. “The musical experience is very multi-faceted because you have that moment of creating music together and actually performing,” Yares said. “In order to make good music, you have to work together.” Isaac Woodward, a School of Arts and Sciences junior, said he would like to see the group come to the University after seeing its music videos online. “I think this is encouraging, so I’d love to see it come here. It’s cool just on the surface level, to see [Jews and Palestinians] singing,” he said. “It was awesome to see that. It would go back and forth between Arabic and Hebrew which I found really cool.” Shneyer said this first U.S. tour is a chance to introduce the Heartbeat youth program to a new audience. He hopes the group can spread awareness and create relationships while bringing people together. “We want … to deliver meaningful programs to the students

Members of Heartbeat, an Israeli-Palestinian youth community, perform to bring peace in the Middle East. COURTSEY OF AARON SHNEYER

in the places that we visit, to offer the tools and ideas that can help the communities here work to improve intercultural relations, and to inspire people to create creative approaches to making change in the world,” he said. Shneyer said the suffering he sees around the world inspired him to help create the project. “It’s needless. Once people have a chance to meet each other and connect [they realize] the person I used to fear, I used to hate, is exactly like me,” he said. “Once trust is built then the need for violence and the impulse for committing injustice is wiped away.” Despite the ongoing presence of conflict, Shneyer said he still sees potential for change in Israel.

“[The performers] are able to open up their hearts and share difficult things and [have] meaningful relationships and most importantly create good music together. I see the possibilities for the whole region,” he said. Yares said students who are interested can get involved and make a difference not only within the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but other issues they are passionate about. “If you’re already asking [what you can do] then you are already doing it. Just turn your question into action,” he said. “So if you’re ready to ask the question, then you are ready to find the answer.” Heartbeat is working with the University with tentative plans to perform on campus.


OPINIONS

OPINIONS PAGE 8

N OVEMBER 30, 2012

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Cramped quarters? No study time? Procrastination nation? We’ve all been there, but the University is not to blame. Between an impromptu “Frankenstorm” weeklong break and ample study time in the weeks leading up to finals, the consensus remains: Facilities are fair. Even Tillett Hall has remained open, despite recent plans for renovation by spring 2013. If you’ve got finals problems, we’ve got a dart for you, son. We got 99 problems, but a study space ain’t one.

Gov. Chris Christie announced his bid for reelection this week amid an ongoing state recovery following Hurricane Sandy. While we won’t go so far as an endorsement, Christie’s decision is all right by us. The Garden State’s relatively smooth, gradual recovery had a lot to do with the man’s shining leadership, after all. Christie and his reelection bid get a laurel.

Livingston Island is, slowly but surely, shaping up to be a small paradise of pristine apartments, shipshape student center and a new face to Tillett. The only thing still lacking is this alleged Livingston Plaza shopping center the University keeps telling us about. The University receives a dart for its deceitful foundations: Fall 2012 does not equal spring 2013.

New Jersey, following a previous ban on bath salts in the state, permanently banned synthetic marijuana this week. Really, the ban is no serious loss to us — though apparently the stuff was big among high schoolers. Allegedly, it’s also pretty dangerous stuff. So purely as a safety precaution, the ban deserves a laurel. All-natural is the way to go anyway, but don’t take it from us. Just ask Colorado and Washington.

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Win or lose, yesterday’s game was one for the Scarlet histor y books. A sold-out stadium, a reinvigorated Knights team and the chance at a share of the BCS berth and Big East title fame made for the perfect storm. New York City even lit the Empire State Building scarlet red for us. We don’t need to say it — a laurel to the Scarlet Knights for a spectacular season. Good ol’ Col. Rutgers would be proud.

So ends another installment of “No Shave November.” Guys and girls (yes, ladies have been known to participate as well) can finally take a sharp razor to the thick plumage they’ve been working on for the past month. While we’ll miss the grizzly beards and hairy underarms, we’re also glad it’s finally over. A laurel to all the men and women who railed against the hygienic companies, and a laurel to the furry month for keeping our faces warm since who-knows-when. Now go shave.

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THIS WEEK’S

PENDULUM QUESTION

The Daily Targum’s editorials represent the views of the majority of the 144th editorial board. Columns, cartoons and letters do not necessarily reflect the views of the Targum Publishing Company or its staff.

How do you feel about the University’s move to the Big Ten?

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NOVEMBER 30, 2012

OPINIONS PAGE 9

PostcardsfromAbroad

If traveling solo, remember where your bus is going LETTERS FROM LONDON KATIE BRYCK

N

othing is more gratifying than arriving in a country you have never been to before and knowing that you got there all on your own. However, this gratification would not be half as fulfilling if it were not for the extreme amount of preparation one must do prior to taking a trip. One must foresee the many mishaps one may encounter traveling alone for the first time. I took my first solo trip from London this past weekend to spend Thanksgiving in Dublin, Ireland. I find it important to note that they do in fact offer full-blown Thanksgiving dinners — stuffing, turkey and cranberry sauce included — in Ireland to appease the American celebrators. Having covered much ground traveling Europe this semester I saw my trip to Ireland as a test of my confidence as a traveler. I started my journey on Thursday by taking two buses to get to Stansted Airport, and I made sure to allot myself more than enough time to do so. I arrived at the airport for my 8:15 a.m. flight at

6 a.m. giving myself enough time go through security, get my passport checked and even to take a nap in the terminal. As every money-conscious study abroad student does, I flew luxuriously on Ryanair, managed to get a window seat and landed in Dublin five minutes prior to our supposed time of arrival. After arriving in Dublin and going through border control where they stamped my passport with green ink, I used my map of Dublin — which was probably bigger than me — to navigate my way to meet my friends at our hostel. I hopped onto another bus to the city center and rather effortlessly found my way. I felt so proud of myself that not even a hostel with no towels could bring me down. In true college-kid style, I hadn’t slept Wednesday night before my travels because I was up writing an essay I had put off to the last minute. Needless to say, my first day in Dublin was a bit of a sleepy blur. We visited the Guinness brewery, wandered the city and ate a delicious Thanksgiving dinner at a beautiful restaurant. With two glasses of wine in me and a belly of turkey and stuffing, I headed off to bed and prepared for an early 6:45 a.m. start on Friday to travel the countryside of Ireland.

On Black Friday when everyone was camping out, preparing for a day of shopping, I climbed the Cliffs of Moher, saw green hills that seemed to go on forever and hung out on the rocky seashore of the Galway Bay. This was definitely the most worthwhile bus tour I have taken in Europe thus far. We spent my last day in Ireland on the west side of the country frolicking about Galway and enjoying the beauty of the homey feeling city. We visited a Christmas market, ate the best seafood chowder and saw the sunset over the Galway Bay. It was simply breathtaking. At night we went to a few pubs, crashed a stag party and had plans to catch a bus back to Dublin at 9:15 p.m. This is where the travel plans went sour. We ended up having so much fun enjoying the nightlife of Galway that we unanimously decided that we would take the 11:15 p.m. bus back, which we were told was the last bus back to Dublin for the night. We arrived at the coach station around 10:45 p.m. and after about 10 minutes of sitting there, I realized the bus schedule board said that the next coach going to the city center wasn’t until 1:45 a.m. After talking to attendant, of course this proved to be true, so my friends and I decided to take

shelter in a nearby pub for the next three hours of waiting. When 1:30 a.m. rolled around, we headed back to the station to catch our bus, which arrived at 1:40 a.m., and before boarding I figured I would double-check that it was actually headed to the city center of Dublin. The driver replied with, “No, we only go to the Dublin Airport, looks like you’ll have to catch the 3:45 bus.” This wasn’t a feasible solution considering the bus back to Dublin took close to three hours, and I had a plane to catch at 7:45 a.m. We ended up having to take the bus back to the airport to take a cab back to the city center. From there I had to gather my belongings at the hostel and get back on a bus to go back to the Dublin Airport. Never was Murphy’s Law truer. Nevertheless, I had an amazing trip to Ireland and made it back in one piece so for that, I’m happy. Next time I will think twice before assuming it is a good idea to take the last bus home. Katie Bryck is a School of Arts and Sciences senior majoring in journalism and media studies and studying abroad in London. Her column, “Letters from London,” runs on alternate Fridays.

Condemnation and disgust do not solve problems JOE AMDITIS

T

he United States — and by that I mean the U.S. government — seems to get a substantial amount of pleasure out of constantly broadcasting our enduring commitment to things like human rights, democracy and the rule of law. The U.S. is usually the first to point out when other countries violate these lofty egalitarian ideals, and our good old democracy-spreading leaders have been dropping big fat bombs of freedom all over the Middle East — and sometimes even Europe — since the end of the Cold War. In fact, since 1990 there have been at least 17 different countries that have been unfortunate enough to get a taste of liberty in the form of good old humanitarian intervention. (Don’t tell Kosovo and Iraq, but liberty tastes just like depleted uranium). Meanwhile, when the tables are turned and the finger points back at the United States, there always seems to be a convenient loophole or creative defense waiting to clear our dear leaders of any actual liability under international or domestic law. Of course, this isn’t news to anyone who has bothered to glance at a history book (see: Native American genocide, slavery, My Lai, the Iran-Contra affair, Augusto Pinochet, the Pentagon Papers,

QUOTE OF THE DAY

myself. Looking back, I find them replaced by feelings of disbelief and betrayal, especially as I watch my younger brothers line up at the recruiting stations so they can afford a college education. Condemnation and disgust may not solve problems, but actions do. There are things we can do to help put a stop to the despicable tyrants who continue to sully the name of the American people by using the American government as their weapon of choice. The first thing we must do is demand a more independent media and a free flow of information. Without independent media and free access to information, we allow those who would detain, torture and kill their own citizens to dictate the limits of public discourse and suppress legitimate dissent. Those who are sent overseas to do the bidding of Donald Rumsfeld and his golfing buddies aren’t afforded the luxury of having these discussions on military bases while they await their next — and possibly last — deployment. Every second we let the media distract us with mindless lamentations or stories of mourning over the death of the Twinkie, we are doing a disservice to those who are sent to kill and be killed in the name of “U.S. interests.” Joe Amditis is a School of Ar ts and Sciences senior majoring in criminal justice and political science with minors in psychology and criminology. His column, “Swimming Upstream,” normally runs on alternate Thursdays.

SWIMMING UPSTREAM

the Church Committee Reports, Abu ment facility known as Camp Cropper, Ghraib, etc.). where they were subjected to the infamous Eventually, when someone finally gets “enhanced interrogation techniques” caught and backed into a corner, the authorized by Donald Rumsfeld and the media swoops in and chalks it up to “a Bush administration. The court, in a public few bad apples,” puts on a judicial dog- display of capitulation that flies in the face of and-pony show, and ever y once in a while both international law and common decenif we’re lucky we get a resignation out of cy, handed down a decision that, according the deal. For the most part, however, the to Judge David Hamilton’s dissent, provides “bad apples” are simply swapped out for immunity “not only to former Secretary an equally nauseating and misused Rumsfeld but to all members of the military, metaphor, while the system remains including those who were literally hands-on unchanged and the offending patriot gets in torturing these plaintiffs.” promoted to Supreme Allied Commander The decision underlines the fundamental of NATO (see: General L yman Lemnitzer hypocrisy that lies within the beloved myth and Operation Northwoods for a particu- of “American exceptionalism.” If we are at all larly unsettling example). exceptional, it is certainly due at least in part For those who to our exceptional are quick to dismiss ability to condemn these claims as the the leaders of the “Don’t tell Kosovo and Iraq, unfortunate conse“uncivilized” world but liberty tastes just like quences of earlier for violating the generations and sanctity of human depleted uranium.” uncertain times, I rights, while allowwould ask that you ing our own leaders direct your attention to tap dance across to the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals. Earlier this the Constitution and our own human rights month, the court ruled by a vote of 8-3 in favor without so much as batting an eye. of Donald Rumsfeld, granting him immunity Michael Stohl once wrote, “Condemnation from the unlawful detention and torture of two and disgust do not solve problems; they are U.S. citizens who alleged they were held cap- merely a luxury of the distant noncombatant.” tive in 2006 after they became suspicious that As it happens, I enlisted in the U.S. military at their employer, a private security contractor the age of 17 and I’ve spent almost a third of operating in Iraq, was involved in illegal my life at the mercy of the U.S. government. bribery or other corruption activities. At first, I was proud of my service and I felt Upon notifying U.S. authorities, they that by enlisting and deploying to Iraq, I were detained and transported to the intern- was a part of something bigger than

Everyone knows the Empire State Building. The whole world knows of it. When you have the Empire State Building lit up, you’re special.

Kathleen Conlin, assistant to associate athletic director, on getting the Empire State Building lit scarlet red in honor of the University’s game against Louisville last night. See the story on FRONT.

YOUR VOICE The Daily Targum welcomes submissions from all readers. Due to space limitations, letters to the editor must not exceed 400 words. Guest columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 700 words. All authors must include name, phone number, class year and college affiliation or department to be considered for publication. Anonymous letters will not be considered. All submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity. A submission does not guarantee publication. Please submit via email to oped@dailytargum.com by 4 p.m. to be considered for the following day’s publication.


PAGE 10

Horoscopes / LINDA C. BLACK

DIVERSIONS Pearls Before Swine

NOVEMBER 30, 2012 STEPHAN PASTIS

Today's Birthday (11/30/12). Treat yourself to health and wellness this year. Family is your priority, surrounding you with delicious fun. Stay organized, and work and finances will stay balanced. Prepare for a busy summer. Exercise keeps you grounded.To get the advantage, check the day's rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 9 — There's a lot of energy available. Your home base is waiting to be inspired. After meditation and re-evaluation, fire them up with everything you've got. Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 7 — Don't push yourself or your good luck too hard. Or do, but accept the risk with all its consequences. Trust your instincts when going for the big prize. Accept the compliments. Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is a 8 — A clear vision of the future opens up. Access your confident side. Double-check your work to avoid errors. Hope is triumphant. Focus on finances for a couple of days. Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is a 9 — For a few days, you're the king of the mountain. Put on your leadership hat and your work gloves, and get in action. You have the resources you need. Figure it out. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 9 — Watch out for surprises. Send somebody else ahead, and let them take the risks for now. You can pay them back later with your creative ideas. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is a 6 — Your friends are your inspiration. Schedule meetings and parties. Accept a challenge if it pays well. Create clear ideas out of the confusion. You're very attractive now.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is a 9 — Career matters most now. Find a relaxing place away from distractions where you can be most productive. Focus on what you believe in and what you're passionate about. You're in love. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is a 7 — Should you go or should you stay? Romance may be challenging, but it's well worth the effort. Dress for a special event. Don't play any con games. Honesty is your best weapon. You gain clarity. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is a 8 — Review your budget, and focus on work. What you discover enlightens. Set team goals, and get into the research. It's getting fun. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Today is a 9 — Be more willing to share the load. Look for the pieces that don't fit. Find a need and fill it. Get ready to make your choices. Imagine a brighter future. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is a 7 — Hold on to your cash, and focus on your work for the next couple of days. The best things in life are free. Personal creations elevate your self-esteem. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is a 7 — Do what you can to help the others stay relaxed and calm. Think fast but not recklessly. Stay close to home and replenish stocks. The perfect solution may be an uncomfortable situation.

Dilbert

Doonesbury

Happy Hour

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SCOTT ADAMS

GARRY TRUDEAU

JIM

AND

PHIL


NOVEMBER 30, 2012

DIVERSIONS PAGE 11

Stone Soup

Get Fuzzy

JAN ELIOT

Pop Culture Shock Therapy

DOUG BRATTON

DARBY CONLEY

Non Sequitur

WILEY

Jumble

H. ARNOLD & M. ARGIRION THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

RAWEY Brevity

GUY & RODD ©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

TIBRO

PANEWO

Over the Hedge

T. L EWIS

AND

M. F RY

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

HACTED Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: Yesterday’s

Sudoku

© PUZZLES BY PAPPOCOM

Solution Puzzle #18 11/29/12

Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: GOOSE CURVE WEAKEN MANNER Answer: The children’s birthday party turned every section of the house into a — “WRECK” ROOM


CLASSIFIEDS

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INTERNSHIP

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HELP WANTED needed for legal assistant position in New Babysitter wanted for 12-year old.

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a whiz at photoshop to work on set and

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work can be done on your flexible schedule. E-mail goodphotostudio@yahoo.com for

terrace. Beautiful, original woodwork.

more info.

Floor. Possible Part Time Summer

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Research. Kindergarten through graduate!

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with Renewable Energy Company in BlueHill Marketing and Public Relations is Piscataway. looking for qualified and determined No experience necessary, positive attitude candidates from Rutgers University either needed, hourly+commission. Potential in Junior or Senior years seeking long-term, flexible scheduling.

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SPORTS PAGE 13

NOVEMBER 30, 2012 WRESTLING RINDALDI COULD FACE TOP WRESTLER IN WEIGHT CLASS

High-profile matchups await RU at Penn State BY BRADLY DERECHAILO CORRESPONDENT

Rutgers head wrestling coach Scott Goodale knows how valuable open tournaments are to the program. They provide an opportunity for the whole roster, including redshirting wrestlers, to gain valuable experience they would otherwise only receive on the practice mat. But to Goodale, the Scarlet Knights’ trip this weekend to State College, Pa., to participate in the Penn State Open is more than that. “The expectation should be to win the tournament,” Goodale said. “Realistically for our younger guys, the goal should be to advance as far as you can in the tournament, but we have some really good guys on this team that are going to get tested by the best in the country.” Goodale said besides a pair of 197-pounders in junior Dan Seidenberg and freshman Hayden Hr ymack, the rest of his wrestlers will compete in the open. Penn State, which the Knights face Feb. 24 in dual action, send eight ranked wrestlers, according to Intermat, providing plenty of opportunity for any one of Goodale’s grapplers to pull off victories against higher-ranked opponents. Goodale feels that chance is very important in the early portion of the season. “Right now you want to knock off one of those nationally ranked guys no matter where they are from because it sets

Senior 184-pounder Dan Rinaldi gains position on Army’s Derek Stanley last season at the NCAA Tournament in St. Louis. Rinaldi spent last season at 197 pounds, but moved down a class like Scott Winston. NOAH WHITTENBURG, PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR / MARCH 2012 you up for the rest of the season,” Goodale said. “So right now those are the expectations — put yourself in a situation to knock of f somebody that’s ranked higher than you.” If senior 184-pounder Dan Rinaldi advances far into the tournament, he will likely see one of the open’s highestranked opponents in Penn State’s Ed Ruth. Ruth is ranked No. 1 in the 184-pound weight class and boasts a national championship from when he wrestled last season at 174 pounds.

Rinaldi is No. 13 in his weight class, and a win against Ruth would prove valuable as the season continues. The Lodi, N.J., native’s chance for an upset is only one of many for Rutgers, and Goodale only sees that as a positive. “It’s a great opportunity and one of the best opportunities going on this particular weekend,” Goodale said. “It is a great opportunity for our guys to wrestle some highly ranked guys.” But Goodale does not want to face the possibility of the team’s

wrestlers losing in earlier rounds, losing a chance to enhance their bodies of work for the NCAA Tournament. A loss by any individual in the early goings results in wrestling in the losers’ bracket, a move that features an added workload during the course of a day. “The one thing I worry about is getting too many matches,” Goodale said. “You don’t want to get on that losers’ side because once you get there, you are wrestling seven to eight times, and I don’t necessarily believe we need that. So you want to stay on

the front side of the bracket so you continue to win and put yourself in a situation to wrestle nationally ranked guys.” While the competition is prevalent throughout the weight classes, Goodale would not want it any other way. “We have oppor tunities to wrestle some of the best in the country,” Goodale said. “That’s what we are looking for.” For updates on the Rutgers wrestling team, follow Bradly Derechailo on Twitter @BradlyDTargum.


SPORTS PAGE 14

NOVEMBER 30, 2012 KNIGHT NOTEBOOK TANDEM OF QUARTERBACKS OVERWHELMS RU DEFENSE

Bridgewater revives stalled Cardinal offense BY JOEY GREGORY ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR

The Rutgers football team’s defense had its way with Louisville quarterback Will Stein in the early going. But from the second quarter on last night, the Knights struggled on that side of the ball, showing shades of last Saturday’s loss at Pittsburgh. Much of that is thanks to Cardinals normal star ter Teddy Bridgewater relieving Stein and picking apar t the Rutgers defense. The Knights noticed the differ-

ence between the two, falling to Louisville, 20-17. Stein helped generate only 64 yards of offense. After the first quarter, Bridgewater took over and the highest-scoring offense in the conference emerged. “[The Cardinals] trust Bridgewater more,” said senior safety Duron Harmon. “They take more shots downfield. Stein was just a changeup. [The Cardinals] knew exactly what they were going to do when they made the switch.” Louisville added 96 yards of offense before the first half was over.

In the second half, the difference between the two quarterbacks was as glaring as ever and the defense failed to adjust. Harmon said it came down to a lack of execution and the defensive players not doing their jobs well enough to stop the Cardinals. While Stein failed to progress the offense significantly in the time he spent under center, Bridgewater took control and found the same holes Panthers quarterback Tino Sunseri did. “When you see some of the throws he made, I don’t think there’s anybody else in the league that can make those throws,” said

head coach Kyle Flood. “The only other quarterback we saw all year that could make those throws was [Arkansas quarterback Tyler Wilson].” Rutgers defensive backs could not find open receivers fast enough. In that time, Stein rarely returned to the field and was relegated to a mainly third-down role. The defensive line, which had one of its best performances of the season a game removed from failing to be a significant factor, was the Knights’ biggest source of defensive consistency. “I thought we played really well up front,” said senior defensive

Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater consistently found holes in the Rutgers defense, leading the Cardinals on all four of their scoring drives en route to last night’s 20-17 win against the Knights. NOAH WHITTENBURG, PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

ARMS Third-quarter scores prove costly for RU, conference title hope CONTINUED FROM BACK A fourth-quarter threaded pass to senior wide receiver Tim Wright fell instead into the hands of Louisville linebacker James Burgess. An earlier downfield heave to Wright bounced out his control and instead dribbled onto the High Point Solutions Stadium turf. And an interception return to Louisville’s 42-yard line never materialized. Rutgers’ troubled past in meaningful games had surfaced, and again, it proved insurmountable. “It’s OK to hurt,” said head coach Kyle Flood. “When you pour as much of your life into it like they do, when you don’t get it, it’s OK to hurt. There’s nothing wrong with that. What’s not OK is to stop.” Following a Monday announcement that Cardinals (10-2, 5-2) quarterback Teddy Bridgewater would play, Flood said he did not plan to prepare for two quarterbacks. He did not need to.

Senior linebacker Khaseem Greene walks off the High Point Solutions Stadium field following Rutgers’ three-point loss last night to Louisville. NOAH WHITTENBURG, PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Senior backup Will Stein played, as well, but Bridgewater joins a growing list of names in the last seven seasons Piscataway will not soon forget. Clearly hobbled by a sprained ankle and fractured left wrist he suffered Saturday, Bridgewater

operated almost exclusively out of shotgun. Each of his movements — affected by less than a week of recovery time — appeared forced. He did not even enter the game until the start of the second quarter. And yet, following two touchdowns that spanned 16 seconds,

Bridgewater had given Louisville its first lead. He did so with ingenuity — a scrambling shovel pass led to a 14-yard touchdown. And he followed it up with precision, connecting on 71 percent of his passes despite near-constant duress.

tackle Scott Vallone. “I thought we won the battle up front.” The front four rarely ended the play on the same side of the line of scrimmage they started on, finding their way into the backfield more often than not. Defensive linemen combined for nine tackles for loss, including 1.5 sacks. Vallone led the charge, dropping Cardinals behind the line for a total loss of 15 yards.

OFTEN THE KNIGHTS depend on special teams to help sway the game in their favor. That did not happen against Louisville. The Rutgers kickoff return unit, which boasts a top-10 average nationally, was far from a positive for the Knights in last night’s contest. Junior returner Jeremy Deering had four attempts, averaging less than 20 yards per return, and had one fumble on the Rutgers 20-yard line, which led to a go-ahead score from Louisville. His long was a 23-yard return and added a 22-yard return. The next longest return came courtesy of sophomore Miles Shuler, who went for 17 yards. In addition, a penalty on senior tackle Devon Watkis negated a fake field goal pass that resulted in a touchdown. “I’m disappointed we had a turnover on special teams,” Flood said. “I’m disappointed we had a penalty on special teams that ended up bringing a touchdown pass. … My disappointments are in things we didn’t execute.” As a result, Rutgers had several long fields, most of which it failed to conquer. For updates on the Rutgers football team, follow Joey Gregory on Twitter @JGregoryTargum.

“He’s one of the best quarterbacks in the countr y in my opinion,” Vallone said. “Some of the throws he made were unbelievable.” Rutgers, meanwhile, could do nearly no wrong earlier. A pair of Louisville missed tackles led to 153 combined yards and two first-half touchdowns. Nova’s 186 yards through 30 minutes equaled or surpassed his totals from the last three games. And the availability of sophomore Jawan Jamison, the team’s leading rusher, proved inconsequential. Jamison earned seven rushes in a first half defined by insistence on the pass. Rutgers’ decision was by choice — Nova went untouched nearly each time he took a snap. Louisville’s, meanwhile, was forged from necessity. A one-dimensional offense forced the Cardinals to the air, where both Bridgewater and Stein were competent but not nearly as effective. Until it mattered. “Unfortunately, we didn’t do it well enough,” Flood said. “That was the reality of today. The effort and the emotion that was pored into that game, right now, their hearts have been ripped out.”


NOVEMBER 30, 2012

SPORTS PAGE 15 FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP SCENARIO LIKELY LEAVES RUTGERS OUT

Senior linebacker Steve Beauharnais closes in last night on Louisville running back Jeremy Wright. Rutgers impressed him in the first college football game he attended, the Knights’ win against Louisville in 2006. Beauharnais said the result of this game should not hinder recruiting. CONOR ALWELL, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Chance at first BCS berth eludes RU BY JOSH BAKAN ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR

Rutgers head football coach Kyle Flood made his way to the Scarlet Knights locker room to console several of his players after yesterday’s 20-17 loss to Louisville. As he hugged Steve Beauharnais, it was the only smile the senior linebacker let out after the defeat. Flood plans to meet with players again Sunday for a bowl selection show, and he has a different message to emphasize. “Then at that point, it’s time to look at the whole season as a body of work,” Flood said. “This one hurts, and it’s going to hurt, but we’re going to get through it as a football team.” The final judgment of the BCS voters and computers will likely force the Rutgers football team out of the BCS bowl it wanted. Neither the Scarlet Knights nor Louisville are in the current BCS poll, but the Cardinals are most likely to get the nod after beating Rutgers. Rutgers clinched a share of its first Big East title Saturday after Connecticut beat Louisville, but the Knights wanted much more. Even Flood publicly took blame for the loss.

“We weren’t ever really able to swing the momentum back [once Louisville led], and that’s my job, so I take responsibility for that,” Flood said. “We didn’t seem to be able to find a way to swing the momentum back in our favor.” When Rutgers’ victory against Louisville in 2006 sparked the crowd to storm the field, several of the Knights’ future commits touched the High Point Solutions Stadium field, including Beauharnais, attending his first college football game. Louisville’s victory instead sent potential recruits to the parking lots rather than the field, which is not as positive a selling point for Rutgers recruiting. It also affects Rutgers’ chances of landing future recruits who watched the game on ESPN. The Knights would have also helped their recruiting case with a victory if future recruits could watch them in a BCS bowl. But Beauharnais is not worried about the effects. “We have the share of the Big East title. I think everybody’s definitely forgotten that,” he said. “The stands were packed today, and we have a share of the Big East title. That means we’re coBig East champions. I’m not worried about recruiting.”

Since Rutgers did not win the Big East outright, BCS voters and computers will decide which team makes it into a BCS bowl. It might be none of the teams, since no team clinched an automatic bid that comes with winning the conference outright. Rutgers, Louisville and Syracuse have each clinched a share of the Big East title with 5-2 conference records. Cincinnati can obtain that record with a victory tomorrow at Connecticut. The Cardinals remain the most valid candidate for a BCS bowl, but the Knights and the Orange both have cases to make it. Each team split its two games among the other two teams currently holding a share of the Big East title with Louisville beating Rutgers, Rutgers beating Syracuse and Syracuse beating Louisville. Cincinnati is the most outside contender at the moment because of losses to Louisville and Rutgers. But it likely hurts the Big East’s chances of earning a BCS bid if four teams currently ranked outside of the BCS current poll share a conference-winning tie. Only 10 teams receive a BCS bid, and the MAC currently has a

Rutgers Football: The BIG EAST A quick look back at how Scarlet Knights football has performed in the past seven years, 2006-2012, within its conference.

Head coach Kyle Flood reacts to a call last night in the Knights’ season-ending loss to Louisville, which likely earns a BCS bid. NOAH WHITTENBURG, PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

better case to earn one than the Big East. No. 17 Kent State, which handed Rutgers its first loss this season, and No. 21 Northern Illinois face off tonight in the MAC Championship. But no matter what the selection show says, Flood likes where the program is going.

Two losses by a combined 10 points

Triple overtime loss at WV costs BCS berth, (tie)

8th 2010 (1-6)

2nd 2008 (5-2), 2006 (5-2)

Tied 1st in Big East at 5-2

2012

“We’re proud of a football team that won nine game and won a share of the Big East title for the first time in the history of this University,” he said. For updates on the Rutgers football team, follow Josh Bakan on Twitter @JBakanTargum.

Had opportunity ortu to clinch title itle in season finale f

4th(T) 2011 (4-3), 2009 (3-4)

5th h 2007 (3-4)


FALL FROM GRACE Sophomore quarterback Gary

BAD OMEN Four opportunities in the last seven seasons

DOUBLE TROUBLE Louisville’s pair of

Nova and the Rutgers football team’s offense scored two early touchdowns before converting only three points in the second half. / PAGE 14

have evaded the Rutgers football team in its search for its first outright Big East Championship, including its banner 2006 season. / PAGE 15

quarterbacks found ways to drive on the Rutgers football team’s defense in the second half. / PAGE 14

TWITTER: #TARGUMSPOR TS DAILYTARGUM.COM/SPOR TS TARGUMSPOR TS.WORDPRESS.COM

QUOTE OF THE DAY

SPORTS Louisville 20 vs. 17

“There comes a point when you want to get there, [and] we have to do it.” —Senior defensive tackle Scott Vallone on Rutgers’ season-ending troubles

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2012

Rutgers

Senior wide receiver Tim Wright watches as a pass intended for him floats in the air before Louisville linebacker James Burgess intercepts it, setting up a field goal that clinched the Cardinals’ 20-17 win. The Knights’ scored only three second-half points in the season-ending loss. NOAH WHITTENBURG, PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

UP IN ARMS Knights squander early 11-point lead in loss to Louisville, add to history of letdowns on conference’s biggest stage BY TYLER BARTO SPORTS EDITOR

C

onfetti floated through the frigid Piscataway air last night at High Point Solutions Stadium. But instead of a post-game celebration, the Rutgers football team found 8:44 remained in the third quarter against Louisville, and its fake field goal touchdown had been called back. The confetti hung inside the smoke-filled stadium a while longer, but no well wishes followed, no BCS aspirations lingered and the second-largest crowd in school history had emptied. Instead, a 20-17 loss to the Cardinals ser ved as an eerie reminder of the program’s shor tcomings. BY THE NUMBERS

Louisville held the ball nearly 25 more minutes than the Rutgers football team last night at High Point Solutions Stadium. Head coach Kyle Flood said two quick touchdown drives skewed the statistics, but so did a nearly eight-minute Cardinals drive that resulted in a third-quarter touchdown, bringing Louisville within four points before ultimately taking the lead.

“It wasn’t something that snuck up on us,” said senior defensive tackle Scott Vallone. “There comes a point where you want to get there, [and] we have to do it.” Rutgers (9-3, 5-2) had embraced its of fensive philosophy. A week after managing only 207 total yards at Pittsburgh, the Knights entered halftime with 219. They scrapped run-heavy formations for five-receiver sets. They tweaked a run-first mentality to take shots down the field. And for the first time in the team’s recent memor y, they looked comfor table doing so. That was until it mattered. “Just keep scoring,” thought sophomore quar terback Gar y Nova following a 14-3 second-quar ter lead. “I don’t think we got complacent. For whatever reason, we just couldn’t execute.”

EXTRA POINT

SCORE BY QUARTER

KYLE FLOOD dropped to 0-2 in the Rutgers football team’s final two regular season games after a 9-1 start. The Knights needed to win only once during that span to win the Big East.

FIRST QUARTER

SECOND QUARTER

THIRD QUARTER

FOURTH QUARTER

Louisville

0

Louisville

3

Louisville

14

Louisville

3

RUTGERS

7

RUTGERS

7

RUTGERS

0

RUTGERS

3


The Daily Targum 2012-11-30