Page 1

SEGREGATION N.J. must make changes that ensure equity for all youth

SEE OPINIONS, PAGE 6

LIVE-ACTION REBOOTS Growth in CGI means

WRESTLING Meet the Knights that can’t seem

SEE SPORTS, BACK

a new generation will view cartoons in a new light SEE INSIDE BEAT, PAGE 8

to lose

Weather Sunny High: 41 Low: 29

Serving the Rutgers community since 1869. Independent since 1980.

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY—NEW BRUNSWICK

THURSDAY DECEMBER 6, 2018

ONLINE AT DAILYTARGUM.COM

RBHS workshops will research NJ opioid issue BRENDAN BRIGHTMAN STAFF WRITER

The first workshop held by Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences focused on pain management and addiction, managing addictions in special populations and training the workforce. It also discussed new clinical and educational initiatives. AIR FORCE MEDICAL SERVICE

Researchers in Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences (RBHS) will be forming a new series of workshops to address the opioid epidemic that kills approximately 3,000 people in New Jersey every year, according to Rutgers Today. “Opioid abuse is an epidemic and a public health crisis, and both its economic and social cost make it a

priority for us,” RBHS Chancellor Brian L. Strom said. The workshops will discuss novel research, as well as clinical and educational initiatives at the University that can help address the major health crisis, according to the article. The first workshop addressed pain management and addiction, managing addiction in special populations SEE ISSUE ON PAGE 4

2 new Rutgers seminars will discuss life on Mars ELIZABETH KILPATRICK CONTRIBUTING WRITER

While the stereotypical green men may not be what inhabits Mars, two Rutgers professors will be teaching Byrne seminars on the prospects of life on the planet. Katherine Dawson, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, will be teaching a Byrne seminar called Life on Earth, Mars and Beyond this upcoming spring semester, which aims to cover how life on Mars could be possible. Her colleague Max Häggblom, a professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, will be instructing a different Byrne seminar, Is There Life on Mars?, with a similar objective. For both professors, this spring will be the first time their seminars are offered. Häggblom said that he wanted to teach the course because of the favorable conditions Mars and some moons in the solar system possess for hosting life. Dawson had a similar response. She said that she hopes to get students interested in the work and research she does regarding microbes, or microorganisms, that

may be able to survive in the harsh environment of Mars. She said she is hoping to find some gems in the freshman class, so she can start having them do some work, potentially in the summer or fall. Both Dawson and Häggblom research microbe samples on Earth to infer what might be happening on Mars. Häggblom said that by studying how microbes survive on Earth, scientists can understand how liquid water, carbon, nutrients and suitable environmental conditions work elsewhere. Häggblom said key ingredients for life are needed for the study, including nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus and others. Liquid water is particularly important because it is required for life and can contain signatures of past or present water. Dawson offered two possibilities for life on Mars — either the organisms are still alive, or they were alive at one point, but not anymore. In the first case, samples of DNA would be taken back to Earth so that the organism’s genes could be analyzed. In the second scenario, SEE LIFE ON PAGE 4

Curiosity is a car-sized rover launched as part of NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory mission to explore the surface of the red planet. The rover has identified traces of methane in the atmosphere, a gas usually produced by living things. NASA

­­VOLUME 150, ISSUE 117 • UNIVERSITY ... 3 • OPINIONS ... 6 • INSIDE BEAT... 10 • DIVERSIONS ... 11 • SPORTS ... BACK


December 6, 2018

Page 2

Weather Outlook TODAY

High of 41, Sunny

TONIGHT

Low of 29, Cloudy

Thurs

Source: Weather.com

Sat

Fri

THE DAILY TARGUM 204 NEILSON ST. NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901 PHONE: FAX: E-MAIL: WEB:

Hi 41 Lo 29

Hi 38 Lo 21

BUSINESS DIRECTORY:

(732) 932-7051 (732) 247-3670 business@dailytargum.com www.dailytargum.com

Business Manager Isabeau Touchard Marketing Director Jennifer Kim Advertising Classifieds Productions

x101 x102 x103 x104 x107

Hi 36 Lo 23 THE 150TH EDITORIAL BOARD

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KHAULA SAAD // EIC@DAILYTARGUM.COM • x 108 MANAGING EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SAIGE FRANCIS // MANAGED@DAILYTARGUM.COM • x 109

BUSINESS MANAGER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISABEAU TOUCHARD // BUSINESS@DAILYTARGUM.COM

NEWS EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHRISTIAN ZAPATA // NEWS@DAILYTARGUM.COM

MARKETING DIRECTOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JENNIFER KIM //MARKETING@DAILYTARGUM.COM

NEWS EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RYAN STIESI // UNIVERSITY@DAILYTARGUM.COM

OPERATIONS MANAGER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ELIZABETH KATZ // LIZ@DAILYTARGUM.COM

OPINIONS EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .STEPHEN WEISS // OPED@DAILYTARGUM.COM

CONTROLLER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SIMONE KRAMER // SIMONE@DAILYTARGUM.COM

SPORTS EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ROBERT SANCHEZ // SPORTS@DAILYTARGUM.COM

CLASSIFIEDS MANAGER VICTORIA YOFFEE // CLASSIFIEDS ASSISTANT AMANDA GIRELLO

SPORTS EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . COBY GREEN // SPORTS@DAILYTARGUM.COM COPY EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHEYENNE R. TERRY // COPY@DAILYTARGUM.COM PHOTO EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DECLAN J. INTINDOLA // PHOTO@DAILYTARGUM.COM VIDEO EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NICOLE LAGOS // VIDEO@DAILYTARGUM.COM

PRODUCTIONS DEPARTMENT

FEATURES EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CLARISSA GORDON // INSIDEBEAT@DAILYTARGUM.COM

PRODUCTIONS DIRECTOR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MICHELLE KLEJMONT // PRO@DAILYTARGUM.COM

ASSOCIATE VIDEO EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HENRY STREHLO // VIDEO@DAILYTARGUM.COM

SENIOR PRODUCTION ASSISTANT MARIELLE SUMERGIDO PRODUCTION ASSISTANT DEXTER CHENG, ALEXANDRIA DOMINICK, KAYLIN VIRONE

©2018 TARGUM PUBLISHING CO. The Daily Targum is a student-written and student-managed, non-profit incorporated newspaper published by the Targum Publishing Company. Circulation is 10,000. The Daily Targum is published Monday through Friday in New Brunswick, New Jersey, while classes are in session during the fall and spring semesters. No part thereof may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the consent of the business manager.

Campus Calendar THURSDAY 12/6 Rutgers University Libraries present “Data 101” from 10 to 11 a.m. at Alexander Librar y on the College Avenue campus. This event is free and open to the public. Institute for Research on Women and Rutgers—New Brunswick Chancellor’s Office present “Oral Histor y & Activism Workshop” from 10:30 a.m. to noon at Ruth Dill Johnson Crockett Building on Douglass campus. This event requires registration. South Asian Studies Program and the Depar tment of African, Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Literature present “Reason: Film Screening with Anand Patwardhan” from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Rutgers Academic Building on the College Avenue campus. This event is free and open to the public. Ecology and Evolution Graduate Program presents “Dr. Katherine Dawson — ‘Biogeochemistr y and Ecology: Charismatic microbial and macrofaunal studies’” from 4 to 5 p.m. at

the Marine Sciences Building on Cook campus. This event is free and open to the public. FRIDAY 12/7 Department of Animal Sciences presents “Using Caenorhabitis elegans to Understand the Molecular Basis of Fertilization and Egg Activation” from 9:15 to 10:30 a.m. at Foran Hall on Cook campus. This event is free and open to the public. Mason Gross School of the Arts presents “First Fridays” from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. at Civic Square Building on the College Avenue campus. This event is free and open to the public. Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation presents “Visiting Filmmaker Series: Quest” from 10 a.m. to noon at Rutgers Cinema on Livingston campus. This event is free and open to the public. Rutgers Recreation Department presents “Wellness Treats” from noon to 3 p.m. at Cook Douglass Recreation Center on Cook campus. This event is free and open to the public.

If you would like to submit an event for the Campus Calendar section, please email marketing@dailytargum.com. For more information please visit www.dailytargum.com. Due to space limitations there is no guarantee that your event will be listed.

ASSOCIATE COPY EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DARASIA BRATTON // COPY@DAILYTARGUM.COM

CORRESPONDENTS ANDREW PETRYNA, JORDAN LEVY, ALMIER MCCOY, ELIZABETH LEOCE, MATTHEW HOWE, ALEXANDRA FABUGAIS-INABA, JACKSON THOMPSON, JAKE SCHMIED STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS CASEY AMBROSIO, GARRETT STEFFE, DUSTIN NILES EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS REBECCA BRIGHT, PRIYANKA BANSAL, BRENDAN BRIGHTMAN, LUKE HINRICHS, JACKSON THOMPSON, TAYLOR DUA, DUSTIN NILES, GARRETT STEFFE, JORDAN LEVY, CATHERINE NGUYEN, JAKE SCHMIED, ANDREANA LOUKIDIS, MONICA DIAS, RIA MALATESTA

CORRECTIONS The Daily Targum promptly corrects all errors of substance. If you have a comment or question about the fairness or accuracy of a story, send an e-mail to eic@dailytargum.com.


December 6, 2018

UNIVERSITY

Page 3

Rutgers student organizations fight local starvation problem BRIANNA ROSARIO CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Rutgers University is not an anomaly in the face of starvation in the United States. “There is this joke, ‘oh the starving college student who goes to things for free food.’ It is not a joke at all. It is very serious. And it is very real,” said Lauren Errickson, who oversees the Rutgers Against Hunger (RAH) initiative. RAH was established in 2008 to deal with hunger within the Rutgers community. The intiative partners with Rutgers Athletics to organize a series of food and donation drives. RAH is included in the weekly athletic promotional emails sent to alumni, students, faculty and staff. This year RAH did its first collection at a volleyball game in hopes that, in the spring semester, it will receive donations at both women’s and men’s basketball games as well as wrestling matches. Ever y year at Rutgers’ annual homecoming football game, RAH organizes a donations’ drive with the help of the Student-Organized Rutgers Against Hunger (SO RAH). SO RAH Treasurer Janelle Taliaferro, a Rutgers Business School sophomore, said the organization was established in 2011 as a student-involved extension of RAH, which is comprised of Rutgers faculty, alumni and staff. The two organizations “work together toward the common goal of trying to alleviate hunger with-

in New Brunswick and the local New Jersey communities,” Taliaferro said. Currently RAH is working on its Adopt-A-Family program. Errickson said the program partners with University sponsors to help families in need. RAH finds the families through social ser vice agencies. Each agency has somewhere between 3 to 40 families working with them. It then finds sponsors who would like to buy food, gifts and clothing for those families during the holiday season. “One time through Adopt-A-Family we collected donations for a family here in New Brunswick. The daughter of the family was really excited about Rutgers and her goal was to go to Rutgers some day. Some of the things she wanted were Rutgers t-shirts and Rutgers hats,” said Errickson. Monday, Dec. 3 was the first day of deliveries for the program. The program will end its deliveries on Dec. 19. Both SO RAH and RAH partner with the Rutgers University Student Food Pantry located on 39 Union St. in New Brunswick. The food pantry opened in Fall 2016, in light of the recognition of hunger on college campuses. Anyone with a student ID can go to the food pantr y and access dr y goods, she said. The pantr y is run by a combination of volunteers and part-time staff. Students can stop by the pantr y on the weekdays between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Errickson is also the senior program coordinator of New

Brunswick Community Farmers Market. She does a collaboration between RAH and the farmers market. “In the summer, students who go to the pantr y can get all of their dr y goods that they stock at the pantr y, but they also get vouchers called ‘market bucks’ which they can then bring to the farmers market and

use to buy foods and vegetables of their choice. The choice model is really nice because students can then get what they like, and they are going to be more likely to eat the food if they can actually get things that they want,” Errickson said. Errickson said RAH also collects monetar y donations for places such as Elijah’s Promise,

a New Brunswick soup kitchen. “One of the things we do with them is that we can sometimes offer matching support for different groups here at the university. For example, if a sorority is holding a food and monetar y donation drive for Elijah’s Promise, we can sometimes match donations that are raised,” Errickson said.

The Rutgers University Food Pantry, located on 39 Union St., opened in fall of 2016 in recognition of hunger on college campuses. Any student with their ID can go to the pantry and access dry goods. GOOGLE MAPS

The Rutgers Against Hunger initiative works with Rutgers Athletics to organize food and donation drives. The program is included in weekly promotional emails from the Athletics Department. CURSTINE GUEVARRA / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER


Page 4

December 6, 2018

ISSUE During 2017, drug overdoses killed approximately 70,000 people in America CONTINUED FROM FRONT

Chancellor of the Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences (RBHS) Brian Strom said that the opioid epidemic is a public health crisis. RBHS will be forming new workshops to discuss and collaborate on solutions to the problem. RUTGERS.EDU

LIFE

SLAVE

Dawson hopes her course will teach students how to make scientific arguments CONTINUED FROM FRONT

scientists would look for chemical indicators that show how life survived, an example being carbon dioxide. “For instance, when we eat an apple and then breathe out carbon dioxide, there is a little bit of an imprint of the apple on the carbon dioxide that we breathe out,” Dawson said. Curiosity, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, has also discovered signs of life while exploring the planet. Curiosity identified traces of methane in Mars’ atmosphere, which is mostly produced by living things.

Dawson said she and her colleagues hope the course will also teach students about making sound scientific arguments that can be applied to real-world issues, in addition to the study of life on Mars. Häggblom’s course will similarly provide students with a scientific foundation to follow discoveries not only from Mars, but also from other places of the solar system. “This is an exciting time of exploration, both on Mars and other planets, moons and our own Earth. If there is life on places other than Earth, it will probably be discovered in your lifetime,” he said.

and workforce training. Workers should be prepared to aid in patients’ prevention, early intervention and recovery, according to the article. “While the rest of the nation is plateauing or declining, New Jersey is among the few places where the numbers continue to go up with 3,000 projected deaths from opioid overdoses in this year,” said RBHS Vice Chancellor for Research and Research Training Kathleen Scotto. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released statistics that stated drug overdoses reached a new high in 2017, killing more than 70,000 Americans nationwide, according to the article.

This is strongly related to the increased usage of synthetic opioids know as fentanyl, CDC officials said at the time of the statistics’ release. This is why the multidisciplinary approach is necessary to solve health issues, Scotto said. She highlighted workshops like the ones now run by RBHS, as they bring together experts across many fields to work on solutions. “The working group made some recommendations that can be acted upon immediately,” Scotto said. “We look to continue this conversation within Rutgers and with our hospital and state partners, so we can approach this crisis from new angles and make a positive impact in our state and beyond.”

Max Häggblom, a professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology and Katherine Dawson, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science (right), both conduct research using microbe samples from Earth. RUTGERS.EDU

CRIME PARAMUS Brian M. Bates, 47,

of Spring Valley, N.Y., was arrested after police found him masturbating in front of women at a doctor’s office on Ridgewood Avenue in Paramus. Bates was charged with criminal open lewdness on Friday after police responded to a report of a man exposing himself to patients. Upon arrival, officers found him in the bathroom with the door open masturbating and attempting to penetrate his anus with the handle of a toilet bowl scrubber. Bates has a history of public exposure — in October 1997 and February 1998 he was seen exposing himself to children outside of a Barnes & Noble.

ATHLETIC ANECDOTE The Rutgers Athletic Center is home to the Scarlet Knight basketball team. The next home game is scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 8. THE DAILY TARGUM / MARCH 2018

DEPTFORD TOWNSHIP Wayne J. Moruzin, 64, of Westville, was convicted on charges that he robbed a business at gunpoint, tied up employees and used a stun gun on one of them. Moruzin went to Document Concepts in Deptford Township in June 2014 and pulled a handgun on the owner. He assaulted a worker with a stun gun, forced employees to tie each other up and stole personal belongings from the victims. He was convicted on 21 counts last month, following his indictment

on charges including armed robbery, aggravated assault, criminal restraint and terroristic threats.

MERCER COUNTY David Lamar

V, 22, of West Windsor, is facing a charge of vehicular manslaughter for the death of Michael Sot, a 20-year-old The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) sophomore, who was the driver involved in the head-on crash with Lamar. Lamar was trying to pass other vehicles when he crossed into oncoming traffic and collided into a car with six college students. Lamar is being held in Mercer County Correction Center in Hopewell Township on seven counts of assault by auto, one count of driving under the influence and several motor vehicle charges.

LAKEWOOD A man broke a 20-year-old Lakewood woman’s car window, shoved her into the passenger’s seat and sped away in her vehicle. The woman told police that the man beat on her window with his hands until it broke, then got inside the car. The woman was able to escape from the moving vehicle, but suffered minor injuries. The man has not been identified and is still on the loose.


Page 5

December 6, 2018

Email urges U. students to receive flu vaccine CATHERINE NGUYEN STAFF WRITER

As the holiday season and winter break approaches, Rutgers reminds students to also take care of their health and get vaccinations for the upcoming flu season. In an email to the Rutgers community, Chancellor of Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences (RBHS) Brian L. Strom said the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) designated this week as “National Influenza Vaccination Week.” The CDC estimated that the flu caused 48.8 million illnesses, 959,000 hospitalizations and 79,400 deaths during last year’s peak season. To most effectively prevent the flu and decrease its symptoms and spread, Strom encouraged students to receive vaccinations. He said since the immunity took two weeks to take effect, students should get vaccinated as soon as possible. “As an epidemiologist, teacher, clinician and former professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, I strongly encourage you to get the flu vaccine,” he said in the email. In order to make the flu vaccine more accessible, Strom said the University is making it available to employees, faculty and staff on most campuses. RBHS employees can walk in to the Employee Health Clinic on Busch campus at the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, or call the Occupational Health

Department for an appointment. Rutgers also has annual flu clinics for students and staff. According to Rutgers Student Health, the next clinics are open at the start of the Spring 2019 Semester on Jan. 29 at the Livingston Student Center and Sojourner Truth Apartments. Throughout this fall, the clinics have been open at various times as well. Students need to bring their Rutgers IDs and insurance cards. Strom outlined possible symptoms of the flu and ways for the Rutgers community to stop the infection from spreading. Some symptoms to look out for include coughing, a sore throat, headaches or fatigue, according to the email. Ways to prevent spreading include covering coughs and sneezes with tissues, washing hands frequently and avoiding contact with sick people, he said. “People who receive (the) flu vaccine, who also contract the flu, tend to experience milder symptoms and be less contagious,” he said. “Many people mistakenly believe they are too healthy to get the flu or are too busy to heed its warning signs.” For those experiencing symptoms of the flu, Strom said people should call their primary care’s office to get the best treatment options. He also encouraged those in the Rutgers community to stay home if they are sick. “I wish everyone in the Rutgers community a happy and safe holiday season and a healthy 2019,” he said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that the flu caused 48.8 million illnesses, 959,000 hospitalizations and 79,400 deaths during last year’s peak season. Ways to prevent spreading include covering coughs and sneezes. FLICKR

CAMPUS COVERAGE The kissing bridge is a hidden gem on Douglass campus. THE DAILY TARGUM / MARCH 2018


OPINIONS

Page 6

December 6, 2018

Moralizing markets will worsen gridlock TAMING TRIBALISM CONNER O’BRIEN

A

s far as economic policy is concerned, the American ideological compass has become frustratingly one-dimensional and inflexible. As income and wealth inequality have risen to levels not seen in nearly a century, the Left has cried foul, proposing numerous solutions to reduce inequality, typically through income transfers to those at the bottom or various regulations. Simultaneously, while conservative elites have rallied against what they perceive as burdensome economic regulations, they have also sought to justify any market outcomes and portray attempts to question or alter them as immoral and greedy. But to what degree does this dynamic make sense? The Left remains focused on improving outcomes for the poor and middle class above all else. Progressive and liberal leaders would like to see incomes, health benefits and working conditions improve for those in the middle class and below. Intuitively, they tend to view markets, by their very nature, as imperfect systems whose apparent excesses need to be trimmed. Hence, when attempting progressive reform aimed to disproportionately help those at the bottom, they often resort to “anti-market” strategies, such as command-and-control regulations or mandates. In contrast, conservatives have far more faith in markets, but also fall into the trap of asserting that their outcomes are inherently just, rather than viewing markets as a means to an end. Conservative writer Ben Shapiro, for example, argues inequality is both moral and necessary for growth. While this is true in a very broad sense, it is an uninsightful platitude for those seeking policy answers as it fails to defend our specific levels of inequality here and now. This line of thinking is not a defense of the current American distribution of income or wealth, but rather it is a defense of market outcomes anywhere and everywhere. In fact, this artificial barrier to questioning the fairness of our market outcomes deeply undermines American conservatives’ goal of economic deregulation. Property rights, rule of law and regulations create for markets the “rules of the game,” or structure by which participants must abide. While conservatives want to change these rules in pursuit of more economic freedom, rethinking them with an eye toward economic inequality leaves them blindly defending the morality of current economic outcomes. Of course, if outcomes from the economy as it is constituted are just, conservatives in pursuit of deregulation do the same thing for which they criticize the Left: alter the market to reflect their own moral vision. Maybe this paradigm need not exist at all. Progressives can go on seeking to better the financial standing of those at the bottom and middle, but there is no reason why this pursuit must always require a uniform hostility toward markets. In truth, liberalizing developing economies has proven immensely fruitful to the global poor. Expanding markets can and very often produce progressive outcomes. At the same time, there would be no ideological contradiction in conservatives touting the distribution of benefits from their deregulatory efforts. But, conservatives are held back by a need to equate a defense of markets’ existence with a defense of our present market outcomes. There is a plethora of concrete policy examples in which progressivity and economic liberalization are complementary rather than mutually exclusive. Economists have long been interested in the phenomenon of “rent-seeking,” which consists of the manipulations of the “rules of the game” by interest groups to artificially boost profits above their natural levels. Rent-seekers use the political system, often through unelected agencies, to erect barriers to competition that slow overall growth and implicitly redistribute income and wealth to those at the top. For example, while copyright law is a cornerstone of any capitalist economy, drug manufacturers have strengthened it far beyond what is necessary to promote innovation, resulting in skyrocketing prices and profits for firms. Deregulatory steps — such as shortening the length of time a drug patent is protected — would be a form of indirect redistribution down the income scale. Similarly, homeowners have made it nearly impossible to build new housing in many of America’s growing cities through restrictive zoning and permitting laws. Reducing the scope and strength of these regulations to allow the supply of housing to expand when demand rises, while potentially damaging to the net worth of those near the top, would be a huge help to working-class families tr ying to pay rent. Nobody is expecting an economic consensus, but conservatives and progressives are preventing themselves from accomplishing mutual goals by stubbornly refusing to speak a common language. We are instead left with gridlock and ideologies ridden with internal inconsistencies and contradictions. If leaders spent less time moralizing markets and more time individually weighing the nuances of each issue, perhaps we would have an economy that is both more progressive and less constrictive. Connor O’Brien is a School of Arts and Sciences senior majoring in economics. His column, “Taming Tribalism,” runs on alternate Thursdays.

UNIVERSAL UCLICK

EDITORIAL

Segregation continues its hold on NJ Settlement must ensure changes are made

B

orn in this nation of promise and progress, which is segregation by circumstance. Even though civic and political power are inalienable the state is unique in this quality, de facto segregabirthrights that require provision and nur- tion is rampant and requires confrontation. From the 2010 to 2011 school year and the 2016 to turing. Yet they are placed in the hands of some and beyond reach for others. Institutions of learning are 2017 school year, the number of students attending designed to be the grand guardians of democracy, schools that are at least 99 percent non-white grew. wielding education as a great leveler of inequities. Since 1989, the percentage of New Jersey students They function as ladders descending down to those attending “apartheid schools,” schools where only born into circumstances beyond their control, ready between 0 and 1 percent of the students are white, for their ascension. Yet “our education system rou- has nearly doubled from 4.8 percent to 8.3 percent. tinely fails urban, rural, low-income and minority stu- Of the 622,359 white students in the state’s public schools, “43 percent attend schools that are at least dents,” according to The Civic Mission of Schools. New Jersey is the United States’ sixth most segre- 75 percent white,” according to The New York Times. Change is both needed and beneficial for New gated state for Black students and the seventh most segregated for Latinx students, according to a 2017 Jersey. On the 64th anniversary of the landmark Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court deanalysis by the Civil Rights Project at UCLA. cision, Christian EsTogether North tevez, president of the Jersey’s 2015 Fair Latino Action Network, Housing & Equity “The children of New Jersey are the state’s together with approxAssessment Report a dozen other found “significant future and deserve the justice, inclusion and imately plaintiffs, filed a lawlevels of segregasuit against the state. tion for Black, Hisdiversity that promotes growth To rectify the dampanic and Pacific Isand mobility.” ages and remedy the lander populations.” problem plaguing the Because of decades education of New Jerof residential segregation, poverty and state laws that require students to sey children, the lawsuit suggested the creation of attend the schools in their hometowns, rampant de facto magnet schools, which would draw from multiple towns and districts and tax incentives that encourage racial segregation has taken hold of the state. “With segregation, with the isolation of the in- the establishment of more diverse schools. Gov. Phil Murphy (D-N.J.) indicated that his adminisjured and the robbed, comes the concentration of disadvantage. An unsegregated America might see tration would settle rather than defend the present pervapoverty, and all its effects, spread across the coun- siveness of segregation in the state’s education system. try with no particular bias toward skin color. Instead, Yet, both the settlement and the enforcement of reforms the concentration of poverty has been paired with a went unfollowed by media outlets and the public eye. Without oversight, claims of progress and reforms concentration of melanin,” said Ta-Nehisi Coates of can prove to be hollow with time. The children of The Atlantic. The New Jersey constitution prohibits both “de New Jersey are the state’s future and deserve the jure” segregation in which there is a formal law justice, inclusion and diversity that promotes growth requiring segregation and “de facto” segregation, and mobility. The Daily Targum’s editorials represent the views of the majority of the 150th editorial board. Columns, cartoons and letters do not necessarily reflect the views of the Targum Publishing Company or its staff. Twitter: @Daily_Targum Instagram: @dailytargum facebook.com/thedailytargum youtube.com/targummultimedia


December 6, 2018

Opinions Page 7

Changes to Title IX undermine justice for victims ALL THAT FITS JULIA DEANGELO

I

n the shadow of recent President Donald J. Trump-land chaos, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos proposed a new federal policy that gives more freedoms to those accused of sexual assault on college campuses — be they men or women — citing that former President Barack Obama-era regulations “lacked basic elements of fairness.” At first glance, the Title IX reforms seem to oddly adhere to liberal and feminist principles. But, the policy’s details prove the reform to be more of an imposter than anything. Under the Obama administration, Title IX rules, which famously protect people from discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs or activities, have reportedly stirred wrongful convictions — especially of innocent minority men involved in interracial engagements. Last year, a controversial article in The Atlantic outlined how wrongful accusations can impede an accused student’s entire college education. Moreover, on Dec. 4, The New York Times published an opinion piece slated with a hypothetical scenario in which DeVos’s proposed reforms fixed the above

problems existing under Title IX. The example followed a theoretical young Black man enrolled at a state university on a scholarship. He and a friend’s white exgirlfriend matched on Tinder and the two eventually had consensual sex. But weeks later, the young woman reconciled with her boyfriend and claimed her Tinder match raped her instead. While both the boyfriend and the accused said that she was lying, the Title IX investigator concluded the accuser was

often labeled as “false” if there is not enough corroborating evidence. By no means does this imply that false accusations do not occur. But, taking context and agency away from potential victims and giving it to the accused is not a proper way to solve the issue. That is not real equality. Policies must deal with both sides in a way that does not pit one against the other on paper. Most importantly, DeVos’s changes could discourage survivors from coming

“What is considered more given ‘freedom’ in this case is actually allowing for a lawful blind eye.”

credible. There was no chance for the accused to cross-examine and his college career and scholarship could be rescinded. This imaginary situation is unjust as it does not exactly mirror what happens in reality. False reporting accounts for 2 to 10 percent of cases, according to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center. Plus, these rates are frequently inflated, as pointed out by the resource center, since reported rape claims are

forward. There are many cases of victims who were assaulted but did not have any hard-line evidence to prove it “beyond a reasonable doubt.” Under Obama-era Title IX, this victim could still confront their attacker and receive justice. Now, that may not be possible. Furthermore, the recent proposal relieves universities and institutions of responsibility, as to protect them from being sued by victims. What is considered

more given “freedom” in this case is actually allowing for a lawful blind eye. Almost immediately after the midterm elections, congressional House Democrats announced they would fight this proposal on school sexual assault. With their newfound majority, DeVos could see some legislative pushback. “Survivors of sexual assault deserve better — starting with the same protections as accused students in sexual assault proceedings, and to live and learn in a community free of sexual violence,” said Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.), who is on par to become the next chairwoman of the subcommittee that writes the Education Department budget. Still, it is ironic that DeVos wants to roll back protections of assault victims when her own around-the-clock security from the U.S. Marshals Service may cost taxpayers nearly $20 million. Weirdly enough, no other cabinet member is provided the same, or even a similar, detail. The idea of innocent until proven guilty is fair, impartial and judicially American. Nevertheless, the court process in applying that right should not be copied and pasted across all boards, especially when that board is a university where a safe learning environment is both promised and essential. Julia Deangelo is a School of Arts and Sciences senior majoring in journalism and media studies. Her column, “All That Fits,” runs on alternate Thursdays.

YOUR VOICE The Daily Targum welcomes submissions from all readers. Due to space limitations, letters to the editor must not exceed 500 words. Guest columns and commentaries should be between 700 and 850 words. All authors must include name, phone number, class year and college affiliation or department to be considered for publication. Anonymous letters will not be considered. All submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity. A submission does not guarantee publication. Please submit via email to oped@dailytargum.com by 4 p.m. to be considered for the following day’s publication.

How to Place an Ad: 1. Come to 204 Neilson St.

CLASSIFIEDS

Rates:

Small classified: up to 20 words, each additional word 30¢ per day

2. Email your ad to classifieds@ dailytargum.com

DEADLINE: 12:00 p.m. one (1) business day prior to publication

3. CHARGE IT! Use your credit card over the phone or by coming to our business office 204 Neilson St. Monday-Thursday 9 a.m.-5p.m., Friday 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

DEADLINE: 12:00 p.m. one (1) business day prior to publication

Large classified: up to 25 words, $8.50 each additional inch (11 words) Display classified: Typeset with border; contains graphics, logos, etc.

Cash Rate–$10.15/column inch • Billed Rate–$12.15/column inch DEADLINE: 3:00 p.m. three (3) business days prior to publication

1 day

3 days

5 days

10 days

$8.00 $7.50/day Student rate­– $4.00 per day

$7.00/day

$6.00/day

$21.00 $19.00/day Student rate­– $10.00 per day

$16.00/day

$14.00/day

THE DAILY TARGUM 204 Neilson St. New Brunswick, NJ 08903 732-932-7051, x104


Join Us At the

Sadia Abbas, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - English • Michael Peter Acquafredda, Graduate Asst Cal Yr, SEBS - Haskin Shellfsh Rsrch Lab • Vikrant Advani, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Ayushi Agra Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Psychology • Mehmet Aktas, Graduate Asst Acd Yr, Engn - Elec & Computer Engn • Zainab Alam, Graduate Asst Acd Yr, SAS - Political Science • Myriam H. Alami, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SAS - French • Lu Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Women’s & Gender Studies • Zahra Ali, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Sociology & Anthropology • Nermin Allam, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Political Science • Michael Allen, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SE - Chem & Chemical Biology • Melissa Aronczyk, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Journalism & Media Stds • Marc Aronson, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SC&I - Library & Info Science • Anne-Catherine Aubert, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS Affairs & Admin • Prosenjit Bagchi, Professor I Acd Yr, Engn - Mech & Aerospace Engn • Brittney Bailey, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Art History • Elizabeth F. Ballare, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Anthropology • Joseph Barbar - NB Libraries • Heather Batson, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - Sociology • Kristin August Bauer, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, FASC - Psychology • Armani Beck, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Sociology • Nicholas J. Belkin, Distinguished Profe Studies & Empl Rels • Keesha Benson, Part Time Lecturer, School of Social Work • Jason W. Bergman, Part Time Lecturer, RBS - PTL’s - Nwk • Francois Berthiaume, Professor I Acd Yr, Engn - Biomedical Engineering • Gyan V. Bhanot, Pr I Acd Yr, Engn - Materials Science & Engn • Holly V. Blackford, Professor I Acd Yr, FASC - English • Kathryn Blakely, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - English • Paul Blaney, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SAS - English • Robert S. Boikess, P Boucher, Asst Professor Acd Yr, FASC - Foreign Languages • Nada N. Boustany, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, Engn - Biomedical Engineering • Harry Claude Boutin, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - English Writing Program • Brigid Boyle, Teaching A Yr, SAS - Africana Studies • Seth H. Bromagen, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - DLS-Undergrad Instruction • James J. Brown, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, FASC - English • William Brucher, Teaching Instructor Ay, SMLR - Labor Studies & Emp re, Part Time Lecturer, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Karen D. Caplan, Assoc Professor Cy-Chair, SASN - History • Susan Caplan, Asst Professor Acd Yr, Sch of Nursing-Nwk - College of Nursing • Linda Carelli, Part Time Lecturer, SAS Women’s & Gender Studies • Jordan Casteel, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Katrina Catalano, Graduate Asst Acd Yr, SEBS - Eco,Evol& Natrl Resources • Karen A. Cerulo, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Sociology • Korn Part Time Lecturer, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Chan Choi, Professor I Cy-Chair, RBS - Marketing • Erin Christie, Teaching Instructor Ay, SC&I - Communication • Elizabeth H. Clancy, Part Time Lecturer, MGSA - Theater Arts • Cy guished Professor Ay, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Cathleen M. Coe, Professor I Acd Yr, FASC - Sociology • Ed Cohen, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Women’s & Gender Studies • Emily G Cohen, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, School of Social Program • Ashley Conway, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Kimberly Cook Chennault, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, Engn - Mech & Aerospace Engn • James M. Cooney, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SMLR - Labo ish & Portuguese Stds • Kaitlin Light Costello, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Library & Info Science • William Craelius, Professor I Acd Yr, Engn - Biomedical Engineering • Dylan W. Crawford, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Psychology Science • Harriet A. Davidson, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • Heather De Bel, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - English Writing Program • Melissa L. De Fino, Librarian Of Practice Iii - Cy, Univ Libraries - Tech & Automated Services Dechiara, Part Time Lecturer, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Benjamin Deibert, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - Chem & Chemical Biology • Ferhunde D. Demir, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - Sociology • Lynda Dexheimer, Asst Teaching Pr Zaire Z. Dinzey, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Latino & Hispan Carib Stds • Marya Doerfel, Professor I Acd Yr, SC&I - Communication • Maureen M. Donaghy, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, FASC - Political Science • Mingwen Dong, Part Tim - Library & Info Science • Ned C. Drew, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Travis Dubose, Teaching Instructor Ay, FASC - English • Christopher Robert Duncan, Assoc Professor Cy-Chair, SASN - Sociology & Anthropolog Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Philosophy • Eric English, Part Time Lecturer, SC&I - Communication • Anne T. Englot, Professor Prof Pract Ay, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Richard L. Epstein, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, FASC - English • Mehm Practice Iv - Cy, Univ Libraries - Paul Robeson Library-Cmd • Wei Fang, Librarian Ii Cal Yr, Sch of Law-Nwk - Law Library • Kathleen Elizabeth Farley, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SASN - Biological Sciences • Gary D. Farney, Assoc Professo & Anthropology • Patricio Ferrari, Part Time Lecturer, SASN - Spanish & Portuguese Stds • Lynn M. Festa, Assoc Professor Cal Yr, SAS - English • Janice R. Fine, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Chantal Fis Professor I Acd Yr, FASC - English • William T. Fitzgerald, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, FASC - English • Sandra Flitterman-Lewis, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • David Floyd, Part Time Lecturer, MGSA - Music • Julie Flynn, Teach Foster, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - English Writing Program • Kurt Fowler, Teaching Instructor Ay, FASC - Sociology • Lauren Frazee, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SEBS - Eco,Evol& Natrl Resources • Joseph Freeman, Assoc Professor Ac - English • Thomas Fulton, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • Zoran Gajic, Professor I Acd Yr, Engn - Elec & Computer Engn • Janice K Gallagher, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Political Science • William H. Galperin, Distinguishe Professor I Cy-Chair, SASN - Earth & Environmental Sci • Ian Gavigan, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - History • Judith M. Gerson, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Sociology • Jane Piore Gilman, Distinguished Professor Ay, SASN - Math & - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Martin J. Gliserman, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • Ashutosh Goel, Asst Professor Acd Yr, Engn - Materials Science & Engn • Michael Goetjen, Part Time Lecturer, MGSA - Music • Janet L. Golden, Prof Pract Ay, SC&I - Journalism & Media Stds • James E. Goodman, Distinguished Professor Ay, SASN - History • Benjamin Gordon, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Chem & Chemical Biology • Tony Gore, Part Time Lecturer, FASC - F Grodstein, Professor I Acd Yr, FASC - English • Rita L. Grunberg, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SEBS - Eco,Evol& Natrl Resources • Charles Hacihaliloglu, Asst Professor Acd Yr, Engn - Biomedical Engineering • Anna Louise Haley, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, School of Social Work Maeen A. Hasan, Part Time Lecturer, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Mary E. Hawkesworth, Distinguished Professor Ay, SAS - Women’s Professor Ay, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Samantha Heintzelman, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Psychology • Alexa Rose Higer, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - Political Science • Alexander L. Hinton, Distinguished Professor Ay, SASN - Sociology & Anthropology • Time Lecturer, SC&I - Dean’s Office • Jennifer Ann Hoey, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - DLS-Undergrad Instruction • Tyler B. HoffAssoc Professor Acd Yr, FASC - English • Alison Renee Howell, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Political Science • Nan Hu, Teaching Assis- English • Elizabeth Anne Hull, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Political Science • W. Phillip Huskey, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - ChemIsseks, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, GSE - Dean’s Office • Howard Jacobowitz, Professor Ii Acd Yr, FASC - Mathematics • Colin Jager, Teaching Instructor Ay, SASN - Math & Computer Science • Walton R. Johnson, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Africana Studies • Hazel-Anne SASN - African Amer&African Stds • Tristan Jones, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - English Writing Program • Amy Jordan, Professor Instructor Ay, SAS - English Writing Program • Ann L. Jurecic, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • Joanna Kallan, Part Time LecCy-Chair, SC&I - Journalism & Media Stds • Erin Kelly, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - English Writing Program • Joanna L. Kempner, AsMGSA - Visual Arts • Yasmine Khayyat, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Afri,Mdle E&So Asn Lng&Lit • Michael K. H. Kiessling, Professor - Library & Info Science • Hoon Kim, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - Spanish & Portuguese • Jung Ook Kim, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, - Library & Info Science • Dennis C. Kim-Prieto, Librarian Ii Cal Yr, Sch of Law-Nwk - Law Library • Sharon B. Kinsey, County Agent Ii lock, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Germn,Russ&E Euro Lang&Lit • Lisa Carol Klein, Distinguished Professor Ay, Engn - Materials Science Ariel Kruger, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SEBS - Eco,Evol& Natrl Resources • Douglas L. Kruse, Distinguished Professor Cy, SMLR - Human - Journalism & Media Stds • David S. Kurnick, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • Adam B. Kustka, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN Professor Acd Yr, SEBS - Human Ecology • Elena Lahr-Vivaz, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Spanish & Portuguese Stds • Renee B. Professor Ay, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Ellen Malenas Ledoux, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, FASC - English • Catherine Y. Lee, Leon-Roosevelt, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Latino & Hispan Carib Stds • Tamra Lepro, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - English • Jamie Liang, Graduate Asst Cal Yr, Engn - Mech & Aerospace Engn • Hao Lin, Professor I Acd Yr, Engn - Mech & Aerospace Engn • Wan Lin, Professor Acd Yr, FASC - English • Mei Ling Lo, Librarian Of Practice Iii - Cy, Univ Libraries - NB Libraries • Laina Lockett, Teaching AsAssoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • John T. Lynch, Professor I Cy-Chair, SASN - English • Jinpeng Ma, Professor I Acd Yr, FASC - Psychology • Jennifer S. Mandelbaum, Professor I Acd Yr, SC&I - Communication • Adrian B. Mann, Professor I Acd Yr, Engn - MateriAcd Yr, GSC - Grad Public Policy & Admin • Gary Margulis, Part Time Lecturer, Camden School of Nursing • Emily Marker, Asst ProfesProfessor I Acd Yr, SAS - Italian • Henry J. Martin, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Kirsten Martin, Teaching Assistant FASC - English • Carmen Martino, Asst Professor Prof Pract Ay, SMLR - Extension & Pub Svcs Prog • Carter A. Mathes, Assoc Professor Yr, Engn - Materials Science & Engn • Estelle Mayhew, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - Psychology • Joan M. Mazelis, Assoc Professor Acd of Social Work • Meredith Mcgill, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • Michael Mckeon, Distinguished Professor Ay, SAS - English • Paul D Mclean, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Sociology • Michelle L. Meloy, Professor I Acd Yr, FASC - So Michael Merrill, Professor Prof Pract Cy, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Scott T. Miccio, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - English Writing Program • Lisa Mikesell, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Communication • Hyacinth Miller, Teaching glish Writing Program • Emma Mack Millon, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - English Writing Program • Konstantin M. Mischaikow, Distinguished Professor Ay, SAS - Mathematics • Sean T. Mitchell, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Soci Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Political Science • Alexandre V. Morozov, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Physics & Astronomy • Deborah C. Morrison-Santana, Part Time Lecturer, SASN - History • Alexander J. Motyl, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Politi James Nichnadowicz, County Agent Ii Cal Yr, SEBS - 4-H Youth Development • Fereydoun Nikpour, Assoc Teaching Professor Ay, BSPPP - Dean’s Office • Marialaina Nissenbaum, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Psychology • Andrew N. Engn • Ulrich Oertel, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Math & Computer Science • Paul O’Keefe, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - Geography • Ronke M. Olabisi, Asst Professor Acd Yr, Engn - Biomedical Engineering • Lark M. Omura, Teachin Geography • Tugrul Ozel, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, Engn - Industrial Engineering • Ana Pairet Vinas, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - French • Periklis Papakonstantinou, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, RBS - Mgmt Science & Info Systems • Gregor V. Pavlik, Professor I Acd Yr, SC&I - Journalism & Media Stds • Lilia Pavlovsky, Assoc Teaching Professor Cy, SC&I - Library & Info Science • Keith Perkins, Graduate Asst Acd Yr, SAS - Psychology • Bo Torleif Persson, Teaching Instructo History • Erin Lynn Pfarr, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SEBS - Plant Biology • Jason B. Phillips, Teaching Asst Cal Yr, SAS - Sociology • Julie A. Phillips, Professor I Cy-Chair, SAS - Sociology • Matthew J. Phillips, Teaching Instructor Ay, S James G. Pope, Distinguished Professor Law Ay, Sch of Law-Nwk - Dean’s Office • Kisha Porcher, Asst Professor Prof Pract Ay, GSE - Learning & Teaching • Arthur Powell, Professor I Cy-Chair, SASN - Urban Education • Shari Anne Prevos sor I Acd Yr, SAS - Art History • Robert I. Puhak, Teaching Professor Cy, SASN - Math & Computer Science • Bridget M. Purcell, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - Anthropology • Lydia Quayson, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - Afri,Mdle E& Edward Ramsamy, Assoc Professor Cy-Chair, SAS - Africana Studies • Kavitha Ramsamy, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SAS - Africana Studies • John D. Randall, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Math & Computer Science • Timothy F. Rap Assoc Teaching Professor Ay, FASC - Sociology • Maria Trinidad Rico, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Art History • Kathleen C. Riley, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - Anthropology • Richard Riman, Distinguished Professor Ay, Engn - Mater Rogers, Teaching Instructor Cy, SASN - Social Work • Isaias Rojas-Perez, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Sociology & Anthropology • Jacob Romanow, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - English • Patrick Rosal, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, FASC Engn • Gary Roth, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SASN - Sociology & Anthropology • Heinz D. Roth, Distinguished Professor Ay, SAS - Chem & Chemical Biology • Julia S. Rubin, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, BSPPP - Dean’s Office • Saul A. R Saad, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Psychology • Alan R. Sadovnik, Professor I Acd Yr, School Public Affairs & Admin • Ahmad Safari, Distinguished Professor Ay, Engn - Materials Science & Engn • Ioannis Sakellaridis, Assoc Professor - Sociology • Greg Salyer, Part Time Lecturer, FASC - Philosophy & Religion • Selim Samah, Associate Professor, SAS-Afri,Mdle E&So Asn Lng&Lit • Liliana E. Sanchez, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Spanish & Portuguese • Beryl E. Satter, Pr • Karina Vera Schafer, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Biological Sciences • Antoinette Schenk, Part Time Lecturer, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Kurt Schock, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Sociology & Anthropology • Kyla C. Schulle & Empl Rels • Marcy E. Schwartz, Professor I Cy-Chair, SAS - Spanish & Portuguese • William M. Schwartz, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - English Writing Program • Julia M. Schwenkenberg, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Economics • Ka Scott, Assoc Professor Cal Yr, SAS - Anthropology • Tamara Sears, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Art History • Mary C. Segers, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Political Science • Alexandra Seggerman, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Arts Cult Astronomy • Charles Senteio, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Library & Info Science • Jane A. Sharp, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Art History • Mary Lewis Shaw, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - French • Brian Shevory, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - Eng SASN Sociology & Anthropology • Evelyn E. Shockley, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - English • Robert Shoup, Teaching Instructor Ay, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Mara S. Sidney, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Political Science • Daniel J Pharm - Pharmacy Practice&Admin • Vivek Kumar Singh, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Library & Info Science • Carol J. Singley, Professor I Acd Yr, FASC - English • Andrew W. Singson, Professor I Acd Yr, Waksman Inst of Microbiol Instruction • Brittany Rae Smutek, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Political Science • Marilyn G. Sneiderman, Professor Prof Pract Cy, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Robert W. Snyder, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Arts Culture & Me Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Asian Language & Cultures • Kurt Spellmeyer, Professor I Cal Yr, SAS - English Writing Program • Anselm Spoerri, Assoc Teaching Professor Ay, SC&I - Library & Info Science • Richard Stansfield, Asst Profes Katharine Stevens, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Classics • Lea P. Stewart, Professor I Acd Yr, SC&I - Communication • Matthew Sumpter, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - English Writing Program • Wendy Swartz, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS Sciences • John W. Taylor, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Chem & Chemical Biology • John Kuo Wei Tchen, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Price Institute • Bruce Tesar, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Linguistics • Jennifer A. Theiss, Professor I Cal Y Acd Yr, School of Graduate Studies • Kumar Tiger, Graduate Asst Cal Yr, HGINJ - Human Genetics Inst NJ • Lilyana N. Todorinova, Librarian Iii Cal Yr, Univ Libraries - NB Libraries • Maria S. Tomassone, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, Engn - Ch Natrl Resources • Audrey A. Truschke, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SASN - History • Meredeth Turshen, Professor I Acd Yr, BSPPP - Dean’s Office • Aaron Tussing, Part Time Lecturer, School of Social Work • Andrew T. Urban, Assoc Professor Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Sociology & Anthropology • Robrecht Van Der Wel, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, FASC - Psychology • Joella Van Donkersgoed, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - English Writing Program • Julia Van Etten, Teaching A Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Art History • Antonio Vazquez-Arroyo, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Political Science • Edin Velez Alvelo, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Estefania Velez Rodriguez, Part Time Lectur - Italian • Erin Vogel, Assoc Professor Cal Yr, SAS - Anthropology • Paula Voos, Professor I Cal Yr, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Brendon Votipka, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SAS - English Writing Program • Niina Vuolajaervi, Te Acd Yr, SAS - English • Thomas Wallerberger, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Germn,Russ&E Euro Lang&Lit • David Walsh, Lecturer (Instructor) Acd Yr, MGSA - Music • Alexander E Walter, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - English Writin Weigert, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Art History • Lucia Weinman, Graduate Asst Cal Yr, SEBS - Eco,Evol& Natrl Resources • Rhiannon Welch, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Italian • Arminda Wey, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - Mathematics • C Yr, SAS - English • Ellen Williams, County Agent Ii Cal Yr, SEBS - 4-H Youth Development • Naomi R. R. Williams, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Catherine Wineinger, Graduate Asst Acd Yr, School of Gradu Libraries - NB Libraries • Jun Xiang, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Economics • Carla Yanni, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Art History • Jasmine Y. Young, Research Professor I Cal Yr, Proteomics • Nancy Yousef, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS

President Barchi & the Rutgers Board

We stand with Rutgers AAUP-AFT in o

We stand with Rutgers AAUP-AFT in our fig raises, job security for all faculty and grads, affordable tuition and healthcare and higher regardless of their immig

Dec 6 | Winants Hall | 11:30 AM | Rutgers


e BOG Meeting

pl Rels • Ayushi Agrawal, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - Chem & Chemical Biology • William D. Aguado, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Anthropology • Craig Agule, Asst Professor Acd Yr, FASC - Philosophy & Religion • John R. Aiello, Ay, SAS - French • Luisa F. Alatorre, Graduate Asst Cal Yr, SASN - CMBN • Analia Albuja, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Psychology • Celeste N. Alexander, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - English Writing Program • Nikol Alexander-Floyd, ng Assistant Acd Yr, SEBS - Eco,Evol& Natrl Resources • Ross Allen, Teaching Instructor Ay, FASC - Sociology • Carolina Alonso, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - Latino & Hispan Carib Stds • Christine Altinis, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SAS ng Instructor Ay, SAS - French • Jennifer B. Austin, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Spanish & Portuguese Stds • Salvador Ayala Camarillo, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - English • Jeffrey Backstrand, Assoc Teaching Professor Cy, School Public ogy • Joseph Barbarese, Professor I Acd Yr, FASC - English • Jason M. Barr, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Economics • Frances Bartkowski, Professor I Cy-Chair, SASN - English • Stephanie Bartz, Librarian Of Practice Iii - Cy, Univ Libraries in, Distinguished Professor Ay, SC&I - Library & Info Science • Rudolph M. Bell, Distinguished Professor Ay, SAS - History • Ana N. Bennett, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Psychology • David Bensman, Professor I Acd Yr, SMLR - Labor • Gyan V. Bhanot, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - DLS-Molecular Bio&Biochem • Rebecca Biebel, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - Political Science • Jason Daniel Patrick Bird, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Social Work • Dunbar P. Birnie, Professor • Robert S. Boikess, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Chem & Chemical Biology • Galina B. Bolden, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Communication • Maryam Borjian, Assoc Teaching Professor Ay, SAS - Afri,Mdle E&So Asn Lng&Lit • James R. gid Boyle, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Art History • Timothy D. Bransford, Graduate Asst Acd Yr, School of Graduate Studies • Jack Bratich, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Journalism & Media Stds • Akissi Britton, Asst Professor Acd - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Keiko Brynildsen, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - Psychology • Matthew Buckley, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • Kim D. Butler, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Africana Studies • Emanuele J. Cacciatort Time Lecturer, SAS - Sociology • Louis E. Carlat, Assoc Research Professor Acdyr, SAS - Thomas A. Edison Papers • Tara Carr-Lemke, Graduate Asst Acd Yr, GSC - Grad Public Policy & Admin • Tyler Carson, Part Time Lecturer, SAS AS - Sociology • Kornel S. Chang, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - History • Cleopatra Charles, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, School Public Affairs & Admin • Ali R. Chaudhary, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Sociology • Li-Chan Chen-Maxham, A - Theater Arts • Cynthia M. Clark, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, FASC - Sociology • Rene Clark, Graduate Asst Cal Yr, SEBS - Eco,Evol& Natrl Resources • Geoffrey Clarke, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - Economics • Dorothy S. Cobble, Distincd Yr, School of Social Work • Ira J. Cohen, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Sociology & Anthropology • Sandrine Colard, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Thomas Conte, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - English Writing essor Ay, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Brittney Cooper, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Women’s & Gender Studies • Francois Cornilliat, Distinguished Professor Ay, SAS - French • Jason Cortes, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Spand Yr, SAS - Psychology • Marija Dalbello, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Library & Info Science • Mary M. D’Ambrosio, Asst Professor Prof Pract Ay, SC&I - Journalism & Media Stds • Cynthia R. Daniels, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Political & Automated Services • Hylke De Jong, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - Anthropology • Elizabeth Dean, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - English • Carlos U. Decena, Assoc Professor Cy-Chair, SAS - Latino & Hispan Carib Stds • Peter D. imer, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SAS - English Writing Program • Elin F. Diamond, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - English • Miguel Andres Diaz, Graduate Asst Cal Yr, SASN - CMBN • Richard Dienst, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • gwen Dong, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - Psychology • Donald W. Dow, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SAS - English Writing Program • Jeffrey Dowd, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - Sociology • Michael Doyle, Lecturer (Instructor) Cal Yr, SC&I iology & Anthropology • William Dwyer, Teaching Instructor Ay, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Belinda J. Edmondson, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - English • Erica R. Edwards, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • Andrew Egan, ASC - English • Mehmet Yarkin Ergin, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Psychology • Bradley Evans, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • Michael H. Eversman, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Social Work • Bart H. Everts, Librarian Of Farney, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - History • Lauren Feldman Rogers, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Journalism & Media Stds • Ruth Feldstein, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - History • Brian Ferguson, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Sociology pl Rels • Chantal Fischzang, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Robin Fisher, Asst Professor Prof Pract Ay, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Shanyn Fiske, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, FASC - English • Christopher J. Fitter, • Julie Flynn, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - English Writing Program • Barbara Clare Foley, Distinguished Professor Ay, SASN - English • Benjamin R. Foley, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - English Writing Program • Frederick Robert an, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, Engn - Biomedical Engineering • Wilma Friedman, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Biological Sciences • Diane Shane Fruchtman, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Religion • Joanna Fuhrman, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS Galperin, Distinguished Prof Cy - Chair, SAS - English • Nakeefa Garay, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SASN - Urban Education • Stephen H. Garofalini, Distinguished Professor Ay, Engn - Materials Science & Engn • Alexander Edward Gates, sor Ay, SASN - Math & Computer Science • Gregory Gilmore-Clough, Part Time Lecturer, FASC - Philosophy & Religion • Ashley Gimbal, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, FASC - English • Rebecca Kolins Givan, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SMLR ic • Janet L. Golden, Professor Emeritus-Fttrp, FASC - History • Andrew Goldstone, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • Roseli Golfetti, Lecturer (Asst Professor)Acdyr, SAS - DLS-Undergrad Instruction • Juan D. Gonzalez, Professor Time Lecturer, FASC - Fine Arts • Ann Brooks Gould, Assoc Extension Spec Cal Yr, SEBS - Plant Biology • Marya Green, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SASN - History • Kathryn L. Greene, Professor I Acd Yr, SC&I - Communication • Lauren P. G. Haberl, Assoc Professor Cy-Chair, SAS - Afri,Mdle E&So Asn Lng&Lit • M. A. Rafey Habib, Professor I Acd Yr, FASC - English • Ilker • Karelle Hall, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Anthropology • Christopher Hann, Part Time Lecturer, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • & Gender Studies • Christopher Hayes, Teaching Instructor Ay, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Charles Heckscher, Distinguished Hepburn, Research Professor I Acd Yr, SC&I - Communication • Carolyn Hickey, Part Time Lecturer, GSE - Learning & Teaching • Amy J. Paul J. Hirschfield, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Sociology • Leslieann Hobayan, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - English • James Hodges, Part man, Professor I Acd Yr, FASC - English • Lauren E. Holm, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - English Writing Program • Aaron K. Hostetter, tant Acd Yr, SAS - Anthropology • David M. Hughes, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Anthropology • Emily W. Hughes, Part Time Lecturer, SAS istry • Christopher P. Iannini, Assoc Professor Cal Yr, SAS - English • Olabode Ibironke, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • Jerald Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - English • Sebastian Rainer Jilke, Asst Professor Acd Yr, School Public Affairs & Admin • Abini Cross John Cross, Michelle Johnson-Marcus, Assoc Teaching Professor Cy, SMLR - Human Resource Management • James R. Jones, Asst Professor Acd Yr, I Acd Yr, SC&I - Journalism & Media Stds • Jyl Josephson, Professor I Cy-Chair, SASN - Political Science • Jordanco Jovanoski, Teaching turer, FASC - Sociology • Carla Katz, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Susan M. Keith, Assoc Professor soc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Sociology • John F. Kenfield, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Art History • Bo-Won Keum, Part Time Lecturer, I Acd Yr, SAS - Mathematics • Mark Killingsworth, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Economics • Goun Kim, Teaching Instructor Ay, SC&I SMLR - PhD Program • Sunhee Kim, Part Time Lecturer, GSE - Education Psychology • Sunyoung Kim, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SC&I Cal Yr, SEBS - 4-H Youth Development • Zoe Kitchel, Graduate Asst Acd Yr, SEBS - Eco,Evol& Natrl Resources • Chloe S. Kitzinger-Shed& Engn • Tadzio Koelb, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - English • Rachel B. Kremen, Teaching Instructor Ay, SC&I - Journalism & Media Stds • Resource Management • Gabriela Kuetting, Professor I Cal Yr, SASN - Political Science • Deepa Kumar, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Earth & Environmental Sci • Lynn Kuzma, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Sociology & Anthropology • Naa Oyo A. Kwate, Assoc Larrier, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - French • Amy Elizabeth Lawless, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - English • Sheila M. Lawrence, Asst Teaching Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Sociology • Tamara Lee, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Kenneth Sebastian Lew, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Sociology & Anthropology • Laurie Lewis, Professor I Acd Yr, SC&I - Communication • Tongfen Graduate Asst Acd Yr, SAS - Physics & Astronomy • Nathan W. Link, Asst Professor Acd Yr, FASC - Sociology • Paul Lisicky, Assoc sistant Acd Yr, SAS - DLS-Undergrad Instruction • John C. Loftin, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Math & Computer Science • Dana Luciano, - Economics • Norah A. Mackendrick, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Sociology • Melanie R. Maimon, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS als Science & Engn • Regina M. Marchi, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Journalism & Media Stds • Patrice M. Mareschal, Assoc Professor sor Acd Yr, FASC - History • Anne Michelle Marsden, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • David R. Marsh, Acd Yr, SAS - English • Marlaina H. Martin, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Anthropology • Timothy P. Martin, Assoc Professor Cal Yr, Acd Yr, SAS - English • Matthew Matsaganis, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Communication • Michael J. Matthewson, Professor I Acd Yr, FASC - Sociology • Virginia Mcbride, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Art History • Judith L. Mccoyd, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, School sor I Acd Yr, FASC - Sociology • Michael V. Mendonez, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - English Writing Program • Denise Mercado, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Anthropology • Joseph E. Meredith, Part Time Lecturer, FASC - Dean’s Office • inth Miller, Teaching Instructor Ay, SASN - African Amer&African Stds • Richard E. Miller, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - English • Susan L. Miller, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SAS - English • Maggie Millner, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - Enor Acd Yr, SASN - Sociology & Anthropology • Jennifer L. Mittelstadt, Professor I Cal Yr, SAS - History • Jawid Mojaddedi, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Religion • Lyra Monteiro, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SASN - History • Domingo Morel, Asst I Acd Yr, SASN - Political Science • Rachel M. Mundy, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Connie Murray, Teaching Instructor Ay, SASN - Political Science • Renana Neuman, Part Time Lecturer, MGSA - Art & Design • chology • Andrew N. Norris, Distinguished Professor Ay, Engn - Mech & Aerospace Engn • Seraphine Nzue Agbadou, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - French • Deirdre Marie O’Carroll, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, Engn - Materials Science & k M. Omura, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SASN - English • Colleen Gutwein O’Neal, Part Time Lecturer, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Chinyere K. Osuji, Asst Professor Acd Yr, FASC - Sociology • Ariel Otruba, Part Time Lecturer, SAS nfo Systems • Gregory A. Pardlo, Asst Professor Acd Yr, FASC - English • Biju Parekkadan, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, Engn - Biomedical Engineering • Shaheen Parveen, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SAS - Afri,Mdle E&So Asn Lng&Lit • John on, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - English Writing Program • Julie Peters, Librarian Of Practice Ii - Cy, SMLR - Library • Caitlin Petre, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Journalism & Media Stds • Svanur Petursson, Part Time Lecturer, SASN aching Instructor Ay, SAS - English Writing Program • Danielle Pieloch, Part Time Lecturer, BSPPP - Dean’s Office • Lorraine M. Piroux, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - French • Flisadam Pointer, Part Time Lecturer, SC&I - Dean’s Office • • Shari Anne Prevost, Assoc Teaching Professor Ay, SAS - Mathematics • Melanye T. Price, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Africana Studies • Jasbir K. Puar, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Women’s & Gender Studies • Catherine R. Puglisi, ProfesAy, SAS - Afri,Mdle E&So Asn Lng&Lit • Dominique L. Raboin, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Anthropology • Marie Radford, Professor I Acd Yr, SC&I - Library & Info Science • Carie Rael, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - History • ce • Timothy F. Raphael, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Omar Rashed, Part Time Lecturer, School of Social Work • Rebecca B. Reynolds, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Library & Info Science • Harry M. Rhea, essor Ay, Engn - Materials Science & Engn • Blake Ritchie, Part Time Lecturer, MGSA - Music • Stephane P. Robolin, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English • Yana Rodgers, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Women’s & Gender Studies • Kaleena Professor Acd Yr, FASC - English • Maria F. Rosales Rueda, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Economics • Keary R. Rosen, Teaching Instructor Cy, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Charles M. Roth, Professor I Acd Yr, Engn - Chem & Biochem an’s Office • Saul A. Rubinstein, Professor I Acd Yr, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Sandra L. Russell, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SAS - History • Francis Ryan, Asst Teaching Professor Cy, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Laura aridis, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Math & Computer Science • Daniel Salerno, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - English Writing Program • Zakia Salime, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Sociology • Cynthia Saltzman, Part Time Lecturer, FASC • Beryl E. Satter, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - History • Saed Sayad, Assoc Professor Prof Pract Ay, SAS - Computer Science • Jillian J. Sayre, Asst Professor Acd Yr, FASC - English • Lawrence Scanlon, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - English ogy • Kyla C. Schuller, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Women’s & Gender Studies • Tobias Schulze-Cleven, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Susan J. Schurman, Extension Spec (Prof Ii) Acdyr, SMLR - Labor Studies SN - Economics • Kathleen Sclafani, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - Comparative Literature • Craig R. Scott, Professor I Cy-Chair, SC&I - Communication • Latisha Scott, Teaching Instructor Ay, SAS - DLS-Kinesiology And Health • Robert S. d Yr, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Blair A. Seidler, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Mathematics • Samah Selim, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Afri,Mdle E&So Asn Lng&Lit • Anirvan M. Sengupta, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Physics & me Lecturer, SAS - English Writing Program • David Chen Yu Shih, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - New High Energy Theory Center • Troy Shinbrot, Professor I Acd Yr, Engn - Biomedical Engineering • Kurt Shock, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, cal Science • Daniel J. Sidorick, Part Time Lecturer, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Harold I. Siegel, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Psychology • Jane A. Siegel, Professor I Ay-Chair, FASC - Sociology • Jesse Siegel, Post Doctoral Assoc, sman Inst of Microbiology • Lee Slater, Distinguished Professor Ay, SASN - Earth & Environmental Sci • Elizabeth Sloan, Assoc Professor Cy-Chair, SASN - Social Work • Colleen Smith, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - DLS-Undergrad N - Arts Culture & Media • Federica Soddu, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Italian • Genese M. Sodikoff, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Sociology & Anthropology • Eunkyung Song, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - Sociology • Weijie Song, Stansfield, Asst Professor Acd Yr, FASC - Sociology • Arlene J. Stein, Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - Sociology • Isabel Stern, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - English • Paul S. Sternberger, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • rofessor I Acd Yr, SAS - Asian Language & Cultures • Kimi Takesue, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Jennifer Tamas, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SAS - French • Zainab Tanvir, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SASN - Biological Theiss, Professor I Cal Yr, SC&I - Communication • Anna Fredrika Thelandersson, Part Time Lecturer, SC&I - Journalism & Media Stds • Karen Thompson, Part Time Lecturer, SAS - English Writing Program • Marian Thorpe, Graduate Asst ssor Acd Yr, Engn - Chem & Biochem Engn • Christien P. Tompkins, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Anthropology • Jill Tracey, Graduate Asst Acd Yr, SAS - Chem & Chemical Biology • Ashley Trudeau, Graduate Asst Cal Yr, SEBS - Eco,Evol& Urban, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - American Studies • Todd E. Vachon, Post Doctoral Assoc, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Joyce Kasman Valenza, Asst Teaching Professor Ay, SC&I - Library & Info Science • Melissa M. Valle, Asst Van Etten, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SEBS - Biochem & Microbiology • Michelle Van Noy, Asst Research Professor Cal Yr, SMLR - Dean’s Office • Gregg G. Van Ryzin, Professor I Acd Yr, School Public Affairs & Admin • Sara Varanese, guez, Part Time Lecturer, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Saunjuhi Verma, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SMLR - Labor Studies & Empl Rels • Mark V. Versella, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Psychology • Alessandro Vettori, Professor I Ay, SAS Niina Vuolajaervi, Teaching Assistant Acd Yr, SAS - Sociology • Faye Nina Wacholder, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Library & Info Science • Pamela Nicole Walker, Graduate Asst Cal Yr, SAS - History • Rebecca L. Walkowitz, Professor I r, SAS - English Writing Program • Emma J. Wasserman, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Religion • Ian D. Watson, Professor I Ay, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Daniel Weaver, Professor I Acd Yr, RBS - Finance & Economics • Laura J. AS - Mathematics • Carolyne White, Professor I Acd Yr, SASN - Urban Education • David Allan Wilder, Professor I Cal Yr, SAS - Psychology • Amber N. Wiley, Asst Professor Acd Yr, SAS - Art History • Carolyn Williams, Professor I Acd Acd Yr, School of Graduate Studies • Julie A. Winokur, Instructor Prof Practice Ay, SASN - Arts Culture & Media • Todd Adam Wolfson, Assoc Professor Acd Yr, SC&I - Journalism & Media Stds • Ryan P. Womack, Librarian Ii Cal Yr, Univ Professor I Acd Yr, SAS - English • Melanie Yu, Graduate Asst Acd Yr, School of Social Work • Jeffrey D. Zahn, Professor I Acd Yr, Engn - Biomedical Engineering • Lisa Alison Zeidner, Professor I Ay-Chair, FASC - English • Andres M.

rchi & Members of oard of Governors

UP-AFT in our fight for a fair contract!

AFT in our fight for pay equity, cost-of-living y and grads, more diversity in faculty hiring, e and higher wages for all Rutgers students, their immigration status.

gers AAUP-AFT | equitysecuritydignity.org


Page 10

December 6, 2018

Live-action reboots are new norm, add depth to original films RHEA SWAIN CONTRIBTING WRITER

When the teaser trailer for the live-action adaption of "The Lion King" dropped two weeks ago on Thanksgiving, fans of the original animated film certainly felt grateful for Disney and could hardly hold back their excitement for 2019. Many were moved when they heard the voice of James Earl Jones — the actor who voiced Mufasa in Disney's 1994 film — echo over the surreal visuals of wildlife in African grasslands and Pride Rock: “Everything the light touches is our kingdom.” This particular dialogue is not only touching and nostalgic, but also subtly parallels Disney’s monopoly over the entertainment industry today as it continues to explore the world of animation and live-action movies. "The Lion King" is certainly next year’s most anticipated release due to an outstanding cast that includes talents like Donald Glover as Simba, Beyoncé Knowles-Carter as Nala, John Oliver as Zazu and Seth Rogen as Pumbaa. From its Shakespearean origins to its stellar soundtrack, the story is powerful, and audiences will flock to cinemas with high expectations set by the original animated film as well as the Broadway play. The film’s director is Jon Favreau, the creative mind behind films like "Iron Man" and 2016’s "The Jungle Book." From just a glimpse of "The Lion King," au-

The trailer for Disney's "The Lion King" redux dropped on Thanksgiving, racking up more than 52 million YouTube views. Fans are clamoring to see the CGI-driven adaptation. INSTAGRAM diences are riding the hype. The teaser is now the most watched trailer of 2018, and the second-most watched trailer of all time after Marvel’s "Avengers: Infinity War." With revolutionary developments taking shape in the field of computer-generated imagery (CGI) in film, production houses

like Disney are cleverly capitalizing on opportunities to create stylish live-action remakes of films from our childhood that we still love and cherish today. Live-action films give audiences a chance to relive the magic of classic animated films and see their favorite actors portray beloved characters.

Movies that involve animals interestingly, may be more authentic and fantasy elements have poi- to Kipling’s telling, which was not exgnant stories and celebrity plicitly meant for a younger readernames attached to the voices of ship when it was published in 1894. its characters. Emma Watson as The dark qualities of "The JunBelle in "Beauty and the Beast" gle Book" remakes give us insight and Angelina Jolie as Malefi- into how evocative next year’s cent in "Maleficent" are some "The Lion King" and "Dumbo" examples of iconic actors taking may be. The tendency of live-acon iconic roles in live-action re- tion remakes to be more raw, makes. Next year’s "Aladdin" emotional and pessimistic sparks includes Will Smith, who will mixed reviews among idealistic revive Robin Williams’ hilarious audiences, whose viewing is bicharacter, Genie, from the 1992 ased based on the standards set animated Disney film. by their childhood memories of Rudyard Kipling’s novel "The the animated films. Jungle Book" inspired two live-ac“It’s weird seeing movies from tion remakes: Disney’s "The my childhood being so different Jungle Book" (2016) and War- than I remember. I can’t imagine ner Bros.’ darker adaptation, kids growing up thinking of live-ac"Mowgli" (2018). Both films have tion films when remembering amazing casts, particularly in 'Beauty and the Beast' or 'Aladdin,'” the role of Basaid Daniel gheera, voiced Boehm, a by Ben Kingsley School of Arts and Christian and Sciences “Live-action remakes Bale, and Shere first-year. add a new layer Khan, voiced Live-action by Idris Elba remakes add of dimensionality to and Benedict a new layer C umber ba t c h, of dimenalready brilliant, respectively. sionality to well-loved stories.” While these already briltellings of liant, wellKipling’s classic loved stories. are compelling, its They adapt intended audience extends beyond these same stories to our curchildren. The jungles of colonial rent cinematic experiences and India are portrayed as frightening contemporary methods of storyrather than friendly and fun, as in telling. These modern narratives Disney's 1967 animated adaptation. are made possible with evolved The realistic CGI and mature un- technology and broaden the audertones of these films establish an dience of classic films to today’s ominous tone for the story. This, younger generations.

Trailblazing Supreme Court justice hits silver screen EAMONN O'NEILL CONTRIBUTING WRITER

On Tuesday, Rutgers Cinema hosted a free early screening of Mimi Leder’s new film, “On the Basis of Sex.” The movie, set to be released this holiday season, follows a young Ruth Bader Ginsburg as she grows from college professor to American icon. “On the Basis of Sex” is not a great film, maybe not even a good one, but it's a definite crowd-pleaser — fun for anyone looking for a sense of triumph. Starring Felicity Jones as the trailblazing lawyer and future Supreme Court Justice, the movie zips through her tribulations in the male-dominated law sector. Ruth begins her law studies at Harvard Law School and is peppered with macro and microaggressions from professors, fellow students and passer-bys. Dean of Harvard and later Solicitor General Erwin Griswold, played by Sam Waterston, is her main foil. After excelling at Harvard Law and a brief stint at Columbia Law School, Ruth sets out to

join a prestigious firm. She's denied time and time again, either pointed to apply for a secretarial position or looked up and down by a male boss. Disappointed, she settles for a professorship at Rutgers, hoping to nurture the

next generation of great lawyers — even though she set out to be one herself. Meanwhile, her husband Martin Ginsburg, played by a dreamy Armie Hammer, takes care of the home. He cooks

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who spent time teaching at Rutgers in the 1960s, is being played by Felicity Jones in the new biopic called "On the Basis of Sex." INSTAGRAM

(Ruth's specialty is a ghastly tuna casserole), cleans, takes care of their two kids and practices tax law. Ruth is subjected to be arm-candy at Martin’s work functions even though she, time and time again, proves herself to be academically superior. Finally, Ruth finds an outlet for her gifts. While bitterly grading papers in the middle of the night, Martin brings Ruth a tax case. Initially reluctant to read it, Ruth quickly realizes this case has the power to upend the entire legal system. The case posits that a man is being discriminated on the basis of his gender. She aims to represent him and change the countr y. Ruth brings the case to her friend at the ACLU, Mel Wulf, played by a wonderfully mustachioed Justin Theroux. Wulf transforms from casual misogynist, telling Ruth to smile and criticizing her law skills, to praising her. This is a classic trope in all biopics. It works because it gives the audience a redemption arc — it's hammy but occasionally delightful. Together Wulf,

Ruth and Martin head to the Colorado Court of Appeals to argue their case. Obviously, they end up winning and transforming the U.S. Constitution. It's pandering, but it’ll make any liberal smile. “On the Basis of Sex” is nowhere near as good as this year’s documentary “RBG,” which provided a life-spanning look at Ruth. But that's fine. It's not meant to do anything but make the audience cheer, shout and laugh. It succeeds at that. Seeing the movie at a sold-out screening enhanced the experience greatly. I was tepid about this movie, I wasn’t even sure I would see it. But the joy in the room at viewers seeing a young Ruth overcome entrenched misogyny and sexism while literally changing the country was gratifying. I predict “On the Basis of Sex” will be a perfect holiday movie, and will do well at the box office. It's barely a passable biopic, aiming for cheers rather than facts and cliché over innovation. But that won't take the smile off the face of anyone leaving the theater.


DIVERSIONS

December 6, 2018

Mark Tatulli Horoscopes

Lio

Page 11 Eugenia Last

Happy Birthday: Emotions will take over this year, sending you on all sorts of adventures that can bring good and bad results, depending on how gullible and trusting you are. Don’t be too eager to take anyone’s word as gospel. Take action based on what you know is factual, and you will build a positive and solid future with dreams of progress. Your numbers are 4, 13, 18, 25, 31, 44, 47.

Over The Hedge

T. Lewis and M. Fry

Non Sequitur

Wiley

Pearls Before Swine

Stephan Pastis

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Look for a way to make your money grow. Get your investments in order before the end of the year. Don’t let someone mislead you when dealing with your financial affairs. Take care of personal business yourself. 5 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Let the changes going on around you inspire you to get things done. Taking action now will lead to greater stability as you head into next year. Make improvements to important relationships by extending a helping hand, good advice and honesty. 3 stars GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t be anyone’s fool. Assess situations and do your due diligence to ensure you have your facts straight. Situations will spin out of control easily if you aren’t current on what’s true and what isn’t. 3 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Stay on course and get things done. Once you feel satisfied with what you’ve accomplished, you’ll enjoy downtime with friends. A change of pace toward the end of the day will be relaxing and give you something to look forward to. 3 stars LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You can get your gift-buying out of the way if you hit the online shops or head to the mall. Have a budget in mind and a well-thought-out list that will please all the people you want to spoil. 5 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Problems at home will mount if someone is overspending or playing emotional mind games with you. Ask someone you know you can confide in for suggestions, and you’ll find a solution that works well for you. Positive change is apparent. 2 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Learn from mistakes, and don’t fall for a sales pitch that is built on empty promises. If you want to make physical improvements, start with revising your diet and exercise routine. Good health leads to greater vitality. 4 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Love is on the rise, but that doesn’t mean you don’t have to be careful. Emotional vulnerability can put you in an awkward position. Don’t be too revealing or move too fast. Make romance meaningful and lasting. 3 stars SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Look over your options carefully and decipher what’s fact and what’s fiction. Don’t let emotions interfere with the decisions you make about what you should be doing. Listen to reason and avoid indulgent behavior. A change of attitude is apparent. 3 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Evaluate what’s transpired and consider what you would like to see unfold. An unexpected change will turn out to be in your best interest. Keep a close watch over what others do, and if something doesn’t feel right, distance yourself. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Focus on getting things done. How you earn your living should be your priority. Don’t make physical changes or back yourself into a corner when dealing with someone who is manipulative. Put your responsibilities and your health first. 4 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Stick close to work or home. Travel will be met with unexpected expenses or delays. If you want to do business, use technology to converse. A problem with an authority figure, institution or government agency will set you back. 2 stars

©2018 By Eugenia Last distributed by Universal Uclick

Universal Crossword ACROSS

69 “Satyagraha,” for one

1 General meaning

70 Rewarding coal site

5 Extract forcibly 10 All the ___ (nevertheless)

DOWN

14 Subject of study

1 Stare at

15 Gold quantity

2 Links choice

16 Lot developer’s map

3 Plagued by drought

17 Like active general managers

4 Director’s reshoots

20 Prepare to be knighted

5 Beat everyone

21 Most nimble (var.)

6 It may be swept under?

22 Yarn lump

7 Noted space chimp

25 Bank deposit

8 Porgies in pans

26 Erie Canal mule

9 Some tropical fish

29 Airport guesses

10 Place for racing

31 Human waste

11 Pitiful me word

35 Amazement

12 Brewery supply

36 Axes

13 Little aliens?

38 Approached retirement

18 Most sick

39 Be oh so obvious

19 Celebrate Thanks-giving

43 Comparable

23 Beehive state

44 Civil Rights org. since 1909

24 Eggs complement

52 Arrange

45 Be prone

26 Long, drawn-out tales

54 Set of guiding beliefs

46 Six-line poem

27 Opened one’s eyes

55 Shoe part

49 Instant or sec kin

28 Late comic Jerry

56 Defendant’s answer

50 Suffix with “command”

30 Gull relatives

57 Force unit

51 Is regretting

32 Like acrobats

59 Very lightly cooked

53 Capped body part

33 Lamp dweller

60 Peru natives

55 Rejected and how

34 Lawn tool

61 Comedian Sandler

58 Hotels’ sun providers

37 Reeked

62 Fumbling verbal hesitation

62 “OK, kid, here’s a treat”

40 Unwelcome guest

63 Blade in the lake

65 Sailing direction

41 Check the price

64 Place in crusade?

66 Salad fishes

42 Become visible

67 Predatory whale

47 Continental dollar

68 Sport or don

48 Musical note held full time

Yesterday’s Solution

Yesterday’s Solution


Page 12

December 6, 2018

US gymnastics team files for bankruptcy following scandal THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The embattled organization filed a Chapter 11 bankruptcy petition on Wednesday in an effort to reach settlements in the dozens of sex-abuse lawsuits it faces and to avoid its potential demise at the hands of the U.S. Olympic Committee. USA Gymnastics filed the petition in Indianapolis, where it is based. It faces 100 lawsuits representing over 350 athletes in various courts across the country who blame the group for failing to supervise Larry Nassar, a team doctor accused of molesting them. Nassar, 55, worked at USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University for decades. He is serving effective life sentences for child porn possession and molesting young women and girls under the guise of medical treatment. Kathryn Carson, the recently elected chairwoman of USA Gymnastics’ board of directors, said the organization’s goal is to speed things up after mediation attempts failed to gain traction. “Those discussions were not moving at any pace,” Carson said. “We as a board felt this was a critical imperative and decided to take this action.”

The filing does not affect the amount of money available to victims, which would come from previously purchased insurance coverage, she said. Carson said the insurance companies “are aware we’re taking this action and our expectation is they will come to the table and pay on our coverage.” Carson added: “This is not a liquidation. This is a reorganization.” John Manly, an attorney representing dozens of women who have pending lawsuits against USA Gymnastics, chastised the organization for continuing to “inflict unimaginable pain on survivors” and encouraged law enforcement officials to “redouble” their investigative efforts. “Today’s bankruptcy filing by USA Gymnastics was the inevitable result of the inability of this organization to meet its core responsibility of protecting its athlete members from abuse,” Manly said in a statement. “The leadership of USA Gymnastics has proven itself to be both

morally and financially bankrupt.” USA Gymnastics insists that’s not the case, stressing that the filing is based on legal expediency, not fiscal distress. While Carson acknowledged that sponsorship is down since the first women came forward against Nassar in the fall of 2016, she described the financial condition of USA Gymnastics as “stable.”

“This is not a liquidation. This is a reorganization.” KATHRYN CARSON USA Gymnastics Board of Directors Chairwoman

USA Gymnastics reported assets in a range of $50 million to $100 million and a similar range of liabilities, with 1,000 to 5,000 creditors. The organization said its largest unsecured creditor is former president and CEO Steve Penny, who is owed $339,999.96. USA Gymnastics is disputing Penny’s claim, though attorney Cathy Steege declined to get into the

specific nature of the dispute. Penny resigned under pressure from the USOC in March 2017. Two other presidents — Kerry Perry and former U.S. Rep. Mary Bono — have followed in what has become a revolving door amid the organization’s hierarchy. It’s that chaos at the top that led the USOC to initiate the process of removing USA Gymnastics as the sport’s national governing body at the Olympic level — a step that’s taken only under the most extreme circumstances. In an open letter to the gymnastics community in November, USOC CEO Sarah Hirshland said “you deser ve better,” and that the challenges facing USA Gymnastics were more than it was capable of overcoming as currently constructed. Carson said the legal maneuvering Wednesday delays the USOC’s efforts to strip its designation as a national governing body. “We always have a dialogue going with them and intend to make it clear with them we have a lot to talk about and we want to keep that going,” she said. USOC spokesman Patrick Sandusky said the committee is reviewing the filing’s potential effect on decertification. “Financial stability and viability are essential for a national governing body to operate in the best interests of the athletes,” Sandusky said. USA Gymnastics believes bankruptcy protects it from having opportunities or assets taken away by a debtor. Carson acknowledged that being a national governing body “is a big part of how we raise our revenue.”

Carson, who replaced Karen Golz as chairwoman last week, said she accepted the position because she believes in the direction of USA Gymnastics, which she said doesn’t need money but rather time. “We think we’re changing the dynamic and we certainly believe that we will tr y to remain the NGB,” Carson said. “To be clear, it is our lawyers’ firm belief that the bankruptcy will automatically stay (decertification) ... and we will work with the USOC to regain credibility.” Nicholas Georgakopoulos, a bankruptcy expert and law professor at the Indiana University’s Indianapolis campus, said USA Gymnastics is “hoping for a miracle” with its legal maneuvering. “The USOC says you violated this relationship, here are the consequences and USA Gymnastics is saying it filed for bankruptcy, there are no consequences,” Georgakopoulos said. “This is like a gambling addict who goes to the casino and gambles ever y day and one day the casino says you can’t come anymore, you’ve lost too much, and addict says, I filed for bankruptcy, you can’t stop me from coming to the casino.” If the USOC wants to go forward with decertification, it must now go to court. USA Gymnastics has no timetable on how long the bankruptcy process will take and did not offer a ballpark on how much it expects to pay in settlements. Its doors, however, remain open for business. “We are continuing to pursue all aspects of our current operating model,” Carson said. “This affords us an opportunity to reorganize as well as resolve the claims with the sur vivors.”

IN BRIEF

F

ive-time NBA champion and former New York Knicks head coach Derek Fisher will be taking his basketball experience to the WNBA. The WNBA’s Los Angeles Sparks announced Thursday that Fisher had been hired to be the team’s 12th head coach. Fisher replaced Brian Agler, who resigned last month after four seasons as head coach of the Sparks. Fisher previously played in Los Angeles as a point guard for the Los Angeles Lakers alongside Kobe Bryant from 1996 to 2004 and then again from 2007 to 2012. Fisher was the only player other than Bryant to be a part of all five of the Lakers’ championship teams. As a head coach, Fisher went 4096 over a season and a half with the Knicks. In his debut season as head coach in 2014, Fisher led the Knicks

to a 17-65 record, the worst record in the history of the organization. “I’m excited to be the new head coach of the LA Sparks,” Fisher said, according to ESPN. “There is no finer organization in the WNBA and I can’t wait to work with our ownership group, front office, talented players and staff to cement a culture of sustained excellence, which is what LA basketball fans demand — and deserve.” Two-time WNBA MVP Candace Parker will now play under Fisher in her 11th season in the league as a part of the Sparks. “(Fisher) is a great basketball mind who brings a ton of high-level experience to our team,” Parker said, according to ESPN. “I look forward to working with someone with championship pedigree and who has a track record of strong leadership.”


UNDERDOG Sophomore guard Geo Baker had 15 points in the No. 14-seeded Knights’ upset win over No. 6-seeded Indiana in the second round of the Big Ten Tournament last season. Rutgers rallied back from 16 points down for the team’s biggest victory under head coach Steve Pikiell. THE DAILY TARGUM / MARCH 2018


Page 14

December 6, 2018 MEN’S BASKETBALL MOST MEANINGFUL WINS IN PAST 3 SEASONS

Top 5 Rutgers basketball wins of Steve Pikiell era ROBERT SANCHEZ SPORTS EDITOR

Over six days, the Rutgers men’s basketball team played against Miami on the road, came back home to play then-No. 9 Michigan State on short rest and traveled back on the road to face No. 12 Wisconsin. Now, the Scarlet Knights have a little break to catch their breath before their next opponent, Fordham. With no basketball to report on and a slew of close games for Rutgers recently, The Daily Targum’s sports desk has been thinking about the top-5 wins for the Knights under head coach Steve Pikiell. So, without further ado, here are the five most notable wins in the Pikiell era:

NO. 5 — FEB. 4, 2017 @ PENN STATE, 70-68

A year after winning just one conference game, Rutgers reached two milestones in this game against the Nittany Lions —

nabbing their second conference win of the season and their first ever Big Ten win on the road. Then-sophomore guard Corey Sanders was lights-out from beyond the arc, going 4-5 from behind the arc and led all scorers with 25 points. Then-junior forward Deshawn Freeman wasn’t far behind, as he went 6-8 from the field for 15 points. He also added eight boards as the Knights out-rebounded Penn State 39-27. Rutgers survived a late push by their cross-state rivals and won the game, 70-68.

NO. 4 — NOV. 28, 2018 @ MIAMI, 57-54

Happening just last weekend, the Knights pulled this one by the skin of their teeth and escaped Coral Gables with the thrilling one-possession win. The victory marked the first true road win for Rutgers under Pikiell since the game mentioned above. Sophomore guard Geo Baker came up big in this one, leading the team with 16 points and adding

seven rebounds and six assists in a career-high 39 minutes. He also blocked a shot from beyond the 3-point line with less than a minute remaining to seal the win for both the Knights and the Big Ten in the Big Ten/ACC Challenge. The 54 points scored by the Hurricanes were the fewest point total since they scored 50 against then-No. 1 Virginia last season.

NO. 3 — DEC. 16, 2017 VS. NO. 15 SETON HALL, 71-65

It was a tale of two halves in this in-state rivalry game. Down 42-32 at halftime, and as much as 13 at one point, Rutgers regrouped, coming out of the locker rooms and shocking the Pirates. The Knights shut them down, storming back from 39 points in the second half to win 71-65. Both Sanders and Baker came to play and combined for 39 total points to completely energize the sold-out crowd that came out to watch. The stunning win was Rutgers’ first against a nationally-ranked team since a 67-62 win against No. 4 Wisconsin back in Jan. 11, 2015 and prompted many of the 8,318 spectators who came to storm the court. The win also brought the Garden State Hardwood Classic trophy back to the Banks.

NO. 2 — JAN. 21, 2017 VS. NEBRASKA, 65-64

Rutgers defeated then-No. 15 Seton Hall 71-65 in front of a soldout crowd at the Rutgers Athletic Center (RAC) last season to win the Garden State Classic trophy. THE DAILY TARGUM / NOVEMBER 2017

Down 64-59 with a minute and a half remaining, the Knights needed a miracle to come out with this win — and it got one. Rutgers scored the final 6 points of the game, with the final 2 coming as time expired as Sanders missed his initial shot, grabbed the rebound and scored on a last-second putback for the Knights’ first conference win of the season. Sanders scored a season-high 25 points, but none were more important than his final 2. “We wanted to get the ball in Corey’s hands and make something happen,” Pikiell said. “I

Former guard Corey Sanders had a game-high 28 points to power the Knights past Indiana in last season’s Big Ten Tournament at Madison Square Garden. THE DAILY TARGUM / NOVEMBER 2018 thought we had a couple different options on that play and when he got to the rim, they iced the ball screens, so they did a good job, but he attacked like he was supposed to and got the ball up on the rim. We wanted to have a chance and knew we would get a rebound attempt.”

NO. 1 — MARCH 1, 2018 VS. INDIANA, 76-69

A day after reaching the second round of the Big Ten Tournament by defeating Minnesota as the No. 14 seed, Rutgers’ cinderella story was supposed to be over as they took on conference powerhouse Indiana. But the Knights refused to have their season end, and inside a raucous Madison Square Garden just 30 miles outside of Piscataway,

Rutgers stunned the No. 6 seeded Hoosiers to move on to the quarterfinals — the highest seed to reach the round of 8 in the history of the tournament. Once again, Sanders put the team on his back, scoring 28 points and putting the exclamation point with a dunk late in the game that cut Indiana’s season short. Along with his performance in the quarterfinal loss against Purdue, Sanders earned himself a selection to the All-Big Ten Tournament Team — the first for a Knights player and Sanders’ final contribution for Rutgers as he entered the NBA Draft after the season. For updates on the Rutgers men’s basketball team, follow @TargumSports on Twitter.

Former guard Corey Sanders’ last-second putback gave Rutgers a win over Nebraska with 1 second left in head coach Steve Pikiell’s first season at the helm. The 65-64 home win against the Cornhuskers was Pikiell’s first conference win on the Banks. THE DAILY TARGUM / NOVEMBER 2017


Page 15

December 6, 2018

SWIMMERS All athletes must be 18 and under to participate at Junior Nationals to go out there and do her best. If it doesn’t go well, we’ll know how In her first collegiate season, to do better in the Big Ten.” One important to factor to Woods has increased her times dramatically. At last week’s Rut- watch out for this week is that gers Invitational, she had a sea- the two participating Knights are son-best time of 2:23.38 in the coming off an intense four-day Invitational. It’ll be interesting to 200-yard breaststroke. At this week’s meet, she’s see if they can overcome possible the No. 17 seed in the 100-yard fatigue from last week’s meet. Rutgers’ record-breaking perbreaststroke event and is ranked higher in the 200-yard breast- formances at its Tri-Meet could even catapult it into the NCAA or stroke as the No. 9 seed. “We didn’t rest her for the in- Big Ten competitions coming up vite,” said head coach Jon Mac- in the spring. Even with these procoll. “Her focus is to do what the jections, Maccoll said there are still some other peothat ple are do“I want to see her go out there things need to be ing in the worked on invite, to and compete with the best before and see where under 18 in the world.” after this she’s at.” next meet Dymek to improve has done JON MACCOLL for the fuvery well Head Coach ture, particthis season ularly with with relay and butterfly races. At last week’s Dymek’s stroke count increase Rutgers Invitational, she scored a and Woods’s fatigue. “This high-caliber meet is a career-best time of 1:59.80 in the 200-yard butterfly race. This time great opportunity to get two of our ranks her as 16th in the Big Ten promising young swimmers some for this race. Dymek is the No. valuable experience,” Maccoll said. 18 seed in the 100-yard butterfly “(Dymek) will be working on rest event and is the No. 44 seed in the strategies with her taper to optimize her plan for the Big Ten Champion200-yard butterfly event. “We want to see where she’s at ships. Nora will be making up some with a two-day longer rest period. ground after missing the beginning I want to see her go out there and of the season with an injury.” compete with the best under 18 For updates on the Rutgers in the world,” Maccoll said. “I’m hoping we’ll get slightly better re- swimming and diving team, follow sults out of (Dymek). I want her @TargumSports on Twitter. CONTINUED FROM BACK

Freshmen Nora Woods and Kasja Dymek will represent the Knights this weekend in the pool for the Winter Junior Nationals. THE DAILY TARGUM / NOVEMBER 2017

WEEKEND Rutgers’ duo combines for 10-0 record at Cliff Keen Invitational CONTINUED FROM BACK

No. 3 junior 133-pounder Nick Suriano has compiled a 11-0 record on the season. He defeated three ranked opponets at the Invitational last week. CURSTINE GUEVARRA / NOVEMBER 2018

So far on the season, Ashnault is 11-0 with six pins and two technical falls. He has earned the Scarlet Knights 35 points in dual meets. “I’m always trying to score bonus points, I’ve been trying to pin everyone this year, that’s the goal of the sport,” Ashnault said, according to FloWrestling. “It’s just fun for the crowd and more fun for me to score a lot of points.” Not only was Ashnault out to show everyone he hasn’t lost a step, it was also junior Nick Suriano’s showing-out party to the nation at the 133-pound weight class. Ever since moving up a weight from last year, Suriano has yet to be tested. Until last weekend, where he faced a stacked weight class in the Cliff Keen Tournament. His bracket featured 7 of the top 10 wrestlers in the nation. “It’s awesome to have them both go deep into tournaments,” Goodale said. “I’m not sure if they will admit it, but they’re kind of feeding off of each other. When one guy does something special, the other guy wants to do something special. It’s a good thing to have right now.” The most anticipated matchup at the 133-pound weight class was supposed to be Suriano and No. 3 ranked wrestler in the country, Steven Micic of Michigan, who

was last season’s runner-up at the weight. Micic weighed in, but was scratched from the tournament for an unknown reason. “In one particular case, the man was here. I saw him here. He saw me. It’s no callout, it’s just the reality of it,” Suriano said, according to FloWrestling, obviously speaking about Micic. “You’re here. We flew to Vegas, it’s fight country. People get millions of dollars to fight out here, lets lace them up.” As a team, Rutgers finished ninth in the team standings, and overall had a fairly disappointing tournament other than Suriano and Ashnault. Rutgers has a few weeks off before a home dual against instate rival Rider on Saturday, Dec. 16, at 1 p.m. “Those guys wrestled really well,” Goodale said, according to ScarletKnights.com “Their preparation was awesome. They were locked in with laser-beam focus the whole weekend with what they wanted to accomplish here. They wrestled extremely well and they deserved to win. Now it’s about getting back home and getting some rest as we look at what we did right and what we can work on.” For updates on the Rutgers wrestling team, follow @TargumSports on Twitter.


TWITTER: @TargumSports WEBSITE: DailyTargum.com/section/sports

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY—NEW BRUNSWICK

SPORTS

QUOTE OF THE DAY

“It’s just fun for the crowd and more fun for me to score a lot of points.” — Graduate student 149-pounder Anthony Ashnault

THURSDAY DECEMBER 6, 2018

ONLINE AT DAILYTARGUM.COM

WRESTLING KNIGHTS RANK 9TH OUT OF 42 FIELDED TEAMS AT CLIFF KEEN INVITATIONAL

Ashnault, Suriano claim titles over weekend MATTHEW HOWE CORRESPONDENT

Vegas is fight countr y. The best fighters in the world often frequent Las Vegas for one reason. To prove why they’re the best in the world. This weekend, Nick Suriano and Anthony Ashnault proved why they themselves are some of, if not the best wrestlers in the country in the Cliff Keen Invitational. For Ashnault, the No. 2 ranked wrestler in the 149-pound weight class, this was his showing out party. After sitting out all of last season due to injury, the graduate student came out to Vegas to prove he hasn’t lost a step. And he showed the country he’s gained one. Ashnault went 5-0 in the tournament, including a pin in the round of 32, an 18-2 tech fall in the quarterfinals, a major decision in the semifinals over the eighth ranked wrestler in the countr y, and an easy 14-10 win in the finals that wasn’t as close as the score indicated. The championship bout was Ashnault versus No. 3 wrestler of the 149-pound categor y, Ohio State’s Micah Jordan. After opening up a 10-1 lead, Jordan was able to fight his way back in the match, but would ultimately fall short. No. 2 graduate student 149-pounder Anthony Ashnault has a team-high 35 points in dual meets and forced five falls in his first six matches of the season. CURSTINE GUEVARRA / NOVEMBER 2018

SEE WEEKEND ON PAGE 15

SWIMMING AND DIVING USA WINTER JUNIOR NATIONALS, TODAY, ALL DAY

2 swimmers selected for Winter Junior Nationals ALEC SPECTOR CONTRIBUTING WRITER

From Dec. 5 to Dec. 8, several members of the Rutgers swimming and diving team will be facing off against swimmers from other schools in the Speedo Winter Junior Championships in Greensboro, N.C. This event is a part of the USA Swimming series. Freshmen Nora Woods and Kasja Dymek will represent the Scarlet Knights at the Greensboro Aquatics Center. These two swimmers will be competing on Friday and Saturday at different events. Native U.S. swimmers aged 18 and under who have met certain required times during the period of Nov. 1, 2017 to Nov. 27, 2018 are eligible to compete in this tournament. Woods has had an exciting start to her first collegiate season. Earlier this year she was the New Jersey state champion in the 100yard breaststroke event. This season, Woods’s season-best time in the 100-yard breaststroke was 1:06.38. In her final year at Collingswood High School, she swam in this same meet, placing 30th in the preliminaries with a time of 1:03.29. Head coach Jon Maccoll mentioned how the Junior Nationals is a great opportunity for freshmen Kasja Dymek and Nora Woods to gain more experience in tournaments. THE DAILY TARGUM / NOVEMBER 2017 NBA SCORES

Detroit Milwaukee

92 115

Golden State 129 105 Cleveland

Washington Atlanta

131 117

Dallas New Orleans

106 132

Denver Orlando

124 118

JUSTIN PRICE, head coach of the rowing team, hired Sarah Jordan as an assistant to his coaching staff. She was a part of Virginia’s 2012 National Championship team. Jordan was a First-Team CRCA AllSouth Region selection.

SWIMMERS ON PAGE 15

KNIGHTS SCHEDULE

EXTRA POINT

Oklaoma City 114 112 Brooklyn

SEE

SWIMMING AND DIVING

SWIMMING AND DIVING

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Winter Junior Nationals

Winter Junior Nationals

at Harvard

at Fordham

Today, All Day, East Greensboro, N.C.

Tomorrow, All Day, East Greensboro, N.C.

Saturday, 2 p.m., Boston, Mass.

Saturday, 2:30 p.m., Bronx, N.Y.

The Daily Targum  

The print edition of The Daily Targum 12.06.18

The Daily Targum  

The print edition of The Daily Targum 12.06.18

Advertisement