Page 6

6 Film Industry Exam

PULP FICTION

CONTAINING LURID SUBJECT MATTER

Pulp Fiction (Quentin Tarantino, 1994) because its masses of pop culture references make it a postmodern landmark. The scene with Vincent and Mia in the trendy diner “Jack Rabbit Slim’s” is full of references to 1950s stars and movies, for example Marilyn Monroe is a waitress and they dine in a 50’s Chrysler car booth. There is intertextuality throughout this film, like small time gangsters (Vincent and Jules) who are working for a ‘big time’ gangster and they are just some of his pawns in his drug/ money game. The issue of Blaxploitation was raised during the feature because Tarantino was heavily inspired by the genre when developing the characters of Jules Winnfield and Marsellus Wallace (head gangster). The dialogue of these characters in many scenes is exploited as a source of humour and enjoyment for the audience:

“If Butch goes to Indo-China, I want a nigger waiting in a bowl o’ rice, ready to pop a cap in his ass.” Throughout this film there were mixtures of modernist and postmodernist techniques, which gave the film an old school feel because of the Hollywood theme of good versus evil. This was shown through odd angles which would show the backs of Jules’ and Vincent’s heads, unusually long takes were used when Vincent (Travolta) and Jules’ (Jackson) were getting guns from the boot of their car; the long duration of this shot makes the viewer feel voyeuristic because you are watching them for longer than necessary to

understand what is going on. Mia (Thurman) mimes a shape which actually appears on-screen after she infers Vincent to be boring and ‘square’; like the phrase ‘be there or be square’. There is also time bending as there is an

Year: 1994 Director & Writer: Quentin Tarantino Distributor: Miramax Films Budget: $8.5 million Box Office: $213,928,762

Postmodern Case Study Book  

PoMo is weird for the sake of weird.

Postmodern Case Study Book  

PoMo is weird for the sake of weird.

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