Page 1

Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba by Julia Gaines edited by Brian Tate

LEVEL 2 ...THE HEART OF THE CHORALE

Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba–Level 2 by Julia Gaines Copyright Š 2019 Tapspace Publications, LLC (ASCAP). Portland, OR. All rights reserved. International copyright secured. Printed in USA. tapspace.com

Notice of Liability: Any duplication, adaptation, or arrangement of this composition requires the written consent of the copyright owner. No part of this composition may be photocopied or reproduced in any way without permission. Unauthorized uses are an infringement of the U.S. Copyright Act and are punishable by law.

TSPB-43


INTRODUCTION This book is the second in a series designed to take the beginning marimbist through sequenced, pedagogical steps for learning four-mallet technique and literature. With the help of the Internet, too many young players just jump right into advanced literature because it looks or sounds fun. This can lead to injury, frustration, and bad musicianship. If you have not worked through Level 1 of this series, it is highly recommended that you do so before starting Level 2. They are designed to work in a sequence, and the techniques learned in Level 1 are assumed in Level 2. Dr. Gaines spent several years researching hundreds of four-mallet marimba pieces to uncover what techniques and musical attributes were common at the prescribed “beginning, intermediate, and advanced” levels. Her “Performance Level System” separates those broad labels into ten different categories of literature. Each method book is designed to help prepare the student for literature performance at that level. A partial list of literature at each level is listed at the end of each respective method book.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Many students helped with the research necessary to write these books. In fact, the research did not start out with a book series in mind as the final result. I was simply searching for more truly intermediate fourmallet marimba pieces. I’m very appreciative of those students that helped me through this process: Darin Olson, Amy Hinkson, Wes Stephens, Jeff Hewitt, Ryan Borden, Emily Marx Fuller, and Abby Rehard. My sister, Janene Sun, has been a great help as well when it comes to the stretches in the front of the book. Her expertise with the narrative and pictures is invaluable. Special thanks goes to Brian Tate, a University of Missouri alum and good friend, who has spent many hours with me compiling and editing both books so far. —Julia Gaines


Prelude

CONTENTS

Warm-up: Upper Body Stretching  Four-Mallet Grips  The Piston Stroke  Beating Spots  Mallet/Sticking Notation  Arm Position Two-Mallet Rolls  Musical Considerations  Practice Examples 

7 9 10 10 11 11 13 14 15

Part 1 Lesson 1  Lesson 3  Solo 1 - The Professional  Lesson 4  Lesson 5  Lesson 6  Solo 2 - Watcher of the Skies  Lesson 7  Lesson 8  Solo 3 - Song for Jessica  Lesson 9  Lesson 10  Solo 4 - Breezy 

19 25 27 31 33 35 37 41 43 45 49 51 53

Part 2 Lesson 11  Lesson 12  Lesson 13  Solo 5 - Escape  Lesson 14  Lesson 15  Solo 6 - Prelude in A major  Lesson 16  Lesson 17  Lesson 18  Solo 7- Largo  Lesson 19  Lesson 20  Solo 8 - Spinning Song 

57 59 61 63 67 69 71 73 75 77 79 83 85 87

Appendix Appendix 1 - Level 2 Characteristics  Appendix 2 - Examples of Published Level 2 Literature  Appendix 3 - Glossary 

93 94 95


JULIA GAINES Dr. Julia Gaines is the author of Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba – Level 1 which has become popular worldwide. As one of the only book series of its kind, Level 2 continues the direction of Level 1 by introducing the student to another stroke and new level-appropriate exercises and literature. Her first solo CD, Tiger Dance, includes recordings of pieces from both Level 1 and Level 2 in addition to more advanced works commissioned and written specifically for her. As a performer, Dr. Gaines has been a soloist throughout the United States and in several countries including Brazil, China, England, and Russia. She has performed in the percussion sections of the Missouri Symphony Orchestra, the Oklahoma City Philharmonic, the Fox Valley Symphony, and the Green Bay Symphony Orchestra. She also has a history in drum corps culminating as a member of the 1989 Santa Clara Vanguard front ensemble. Dr. Gaines has been a member of the Percussive Arts Society (PAS) for over thirty years. She has been the Vice President and President of the Missouri Chapter of PAS and hosted the MOPAS Day Of Percussion in 2003 and 2012. She served on the International Board of Directors of PAS before accepting a position as Secretary on the Executive Committee. She was also an Associate Editor for Percussive Notes, the scholarly journal of PAS, with the primary responsibility of Review Editor and served in that role until the summer of 2014. After a brief hiatus from editing, she recently accepted the position of Associate Editor for the Keyboard Percussion section of Percussive Notes.

BRIAN TATE

Brian Tate is currently on the faculty of the Swinney Conservatory of Music at Central Methodist University teaching applied percussion lessons and percussion ensemble. In addition, he is an adjunct member of the faculty at Moberly Area Community College and the School of Music at the University of Missouri – Columbia teaching courses in music theory and history. Outside of his classroom duties, he maintains a private percussion studio in Columbia. In the past, he has served as a percussion instructor for several prominent public school band programs in Missouri. He holds both a B.S. Ed. in Instrumental Music Education and a M.M. in Percussion Performance from the University of Missouri. As a percussionist, Mr. Tate has performed on recitals and at conferences throughout North America, including the 12th Festival Internacional de Percusión in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and the 2007 National Conference on Percussion Pedagogy in Greensboro, North Carolina. Currently he serves as timpanist for the Missouri Symphony Orchestra and is a regular percussionist for the Odyssey Chamber Series. He has also been a member of the St. Louis Wind Symphony, the Mighty Mississippi Concert Band, the St. Louis Chamber Winds, and the Sky Ryders Drum and Bugle Corps front ensemble.


...THE HEART OF THE CHORALE Prelude


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

WARM-UP: UPPER BODY STRETCHING Objective: Stretch short, tight muscles and strengthen long, weak muscles.

CHEST (horizontal extension)

1. Put your palms together in front of you with your arms down at a 45-degree angle. Keep your shoulders down and your back comfortable with a nice, normal arch. 2. Take a deep breath, then squeeze your shoulder blades together and open your arms staying at the 45 degree angle while exhaling. 3. Hold for two seconds and return to the starting position. Repeat 10 times. 4. You should feel the stretch through your chest and upper arms.

UPPER ARM (sideward elevation) 1. Hold your arms out to the side, parallel with your shoulders, with your palms facing forward. 2. Squeeze your shoulder blades together and try to raise your arms about 12 inches above your head. Keep your shoulders down. 3. Hold for two seconds, and return to starting position. Repeat 10 times. 4. You should feel the stretch in your chest and shoulders.

6


level 2...the heart of the chorale - prelude

FOREARM (elbow flexor stretch) 1. Hold your arms down at your side with your palms facing forward. 2. Push your palms back slightly past your hips at a 45 degree angle. 3. Hold for two seconds, and return to starting position. Repeat 10 times. 4. You should feel this stretch in your elbows and lower arms.

WRIST (ulnar flexion) 1. With your elbows bent at your side and palms facing up, rotate your wrists in mirror motion so your palms are facing the floor. Then rotate in the direction of the thumbs so the palms face up again. 2. Hold for two seconds, and return to starting position. Repeat 10 times. 3. You should feel this stretch on the outside of your forearm.

FINGERS (flexor stretch) 1. With your elbows bent at your side and palms facing up, open and extend your fingers to the floor without moving your wrist. 2. Keep your fingers straight and only go as far as the fingers will allow. 3. Hold for two seconds, and return to starting position. Repeat 10 times. 4. You should feel this stretch throughout your hand.

7


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

FOUR-MALLET GRIPS There are three basic types of four-mallet grips that are commonly used today, each with variations by many different players. The independent grip was used by Clair Omar Musser and later adapted by Leigh Howard Stevens. The traditional cross grip is usually attributed to Keiko Abe but is best described by Nancy Zeltsman in her book. The Burton cross grip was developed by jazz vibraphonist Gary Burton and is particularly popular among jazz players. The best way to select a grip that works for you is trial and error. Work with a teacher who understands the details of a grip to make sure you have all the necessary information on which to base a decision. It may be helpful to know more than one grip in case a musical situation arises that lends itself better to one grip over another. For example, on vibraphone, I rarely play with the independent grip and favor the Burton grip. However, on marimba, I tend to favor the independent grip as it was adapted by Leigh Howard Stevens.

INDEPENDENT GRIP • • • •

Mallets do not touch each other Wrist perpendicular to instrument Popular in United States Notable names: Clair Omar Musser, Leigh Howard Stevens • Good reference text: Method of Movement for Marimba by Leigh Howard Stevens

CROSS GRIP – Burton • Mallets touch each other, outside mallet touches palm • Wrist parallel to instrument • Popular among jazz vibraphone players • Notable names: Gary Burton, Ney Rosauro • Good reference text: Four Mallet Studies by Gary Burton

CROSS GRIP – Traditional • Mallets touch each other, inside mallet touches palm • Wrist parallel to instrument • Popular in Asia, Europe • Notable names: Keiko Abe, Nancy Zeltsman • Good reference text: Four-Mallet Marimba Playing by Nancy Zeltsman 8


level 2...the heart of the chorale - prelude

THE PISTON STROKE The basic stroke I use on marimba is the common percussion stroke known as the “piston stroke.” In short, you always stop the stroke where you start it. Think “down, up” instead of “up, down.” The hands should be low to the keyboard—no more than 2" off the lower manual—and the mallet heads should be higher than the wrists. A full stroke should be at least 9” off the keyboard. When the mallets actually strike the bar at the bottom of the stroke, the wrists should be parallel to the bars, not pointing at them (Figure 1). If this position is achieved, the mallet will be striking the bar at its premium spot. If the mallets are pointing at the keys at the bottom of the stroke (Figure 2), the mallet is striking the bar too close to the tip and will not get the intended tone production for which it was designed.

Figure 1 - CORRECT

Figure 2 - INCORRECT

BEATING SPOTS The beating spot on a marimba bar slightly changes with each octave. Every instrument is unique so it is up to the performer to experiment with every note to know where the best sound is achieved on each bar. For the lower two octaves of a 5.0-octave marimba, the beating spot on a bar that usually achieves the fullest sound is slightly off-center toward the upper manual. The center of the bar usually has more low sound to the spectrum, and as the beating spot moves toward the node of the bar, the highs take over the spectrum. On a 3.0-octave marimba, the lowest octave may have a beating spot that is slightly off-center. Try this experiment on your instrument. Strike the C above middle C two or three times. Now strike the lowest C on the instrument directly in the center of the bar and listen for the high C as an overtone. It should be very faint when the beating spot is in the center. Gradually strike the lowest C off-center towards the upper manual and listen for the strongest presence of the upper C note. The premium beating spot for this bar will be at the point where the upper C is the strongest. This beating spot contains the largest quantity of low and high overtones creating a full bar sound. As the range of the instrument gets higher, there will come a point where the overtones are too high to hear. For many instruments, this begins around middle C. At that point, the beating spot will be in the center of the bar. Many instruments are manufactured and tuned uniquely. If the above experiment does not yield results, make inquiries to discover where you should be striking the bars of your instrument. This should not be overlooked. 9


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

MALLET/STICKING NOTATION

1

2

3

4

Throughout this text, the mallets will be numbered from left to right: 1, 2, 3, 4. Sticking indications will appear when necessary.

LH

RH

ARM POSITION (FOR INDEPENDET GRIP ONLY) Arm position is directly related to correct beating spots. When using the adapted independent grip, commonly referred to as the “Stevens” grip, the wrists maintain a perpendicular relationship to the instrument (unlike either cross grip, where the wrists maintain a parallel relationship to the instrument). In order to play the bars in the proper beating spot mentioned above, the arms need to assist the wrist when executing certain intervals. As a reminder, at wider intervals (fourth through octave) the arm should bisect the interval. However, when the interval begins to decrease, the arm will need to push away from the body slightly to help the outside mallet maintain the proper beating spot. If this assistance does not take place, the outside mallet will eventually strike the bar almost an inch below where the inside mallet strikes its bar creating two very different tones. If this assistance is provided without the help of the arm, wrist injury is likely to occur. Keep in mind the elbow should almost always be in a straight line behind the wrist.

WIDE INTERVALS Fourths

4 &4

Fifths

Sixths

4 &4

4 &4 Play the following:

& w w

10

& w w

& w w Play the following:

& w w & w w

& w w ∑

& w w Play the following:

& w w


Sevenths

Octaves

4 &4 4 &4 Play the following:

& w w

& w w

Play the following:

& w w

Note how the arm bisects the intervals in each of these examples.

& w w w & w NARROW INTERVALS

w & w

4 & &4ww

4 & 4ww &

& w w

& w w

& w w

& w w

w & w

Thirds

Play the following:

w & w

Note how the arm is aligned with the outer mallet.

& ww

Seconds

Play the following:

& ww Note how the arm is angled slightly past the outer mallet.

© 2018 Tapspace Publications, LLC (ASCAP). Portla

11


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

TWO-MALLET ROLLS A good understanding of smooth, musical two-mallet rolling will definitely help your four-mallet chorales. Before you start working on four-mallet chorale technique, make sure your two-mallet rolling foundation is solid by reviewing these guidelines and musical considerations.

Sticking Guidelines for Smooth Rolling with Two Mallets When rolling on a keyboard percussion instrument, sticking is often not considered, though good roll sticking practice will make for much smoother rolls. These three roll sticking guidelines provide a place to start but will not work in all situations. Context is everything. Guideline 1 – Keep mallets in same position When rolling on one note on the lower manual, your mallets will need to strike the bar just above and below the center of the resonator (see Figure 1). You do not need to share the exact same beating spot with both mallets. One mallet will be higher than the other on the bar. As much as possible, try to keep this position when playing a rolled passage. There is more motion involved when you frequently change mallet positions, and this directly affects your ability to perform a smooth-sounding roll.

Figure 1 When rolling on the upper manual, you have two possible beating spots: 1. Same as lower manual – both mallets in the middle of the bar 2. Edge/middle – Since this is a raised manual, you can easily access the edge of the bar (unlike on the lower manual). Put one mallet on the very edge of the bar and one mallet closer to the center (see Figure 2). Avoid the node (where the string runs through the bar) unless the music calls for that specific sound.

Figure 2 Guideline 2 – Lead R when moving up the keyboard, lead L when moving down When rolling up and down the instrument, think about leading with your right hand when you move up in range and your left hand when you move down. This may not be as æhelpful withœ stepwiseæmotion as it is 3 ææ with larger leaps between notes. & 4 ææ œæ æœ ææ æœ œæ

œ

R

ææ œææ œ ææ œ

œ æ ææ æœ œæ æ

3 æœ œ œææ 4 & æ ææ

ææ œææ æœ œ æ

3 &4

R

12

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

L

R

L

R

ææ ˙™

L

˙™ ææ R

3 æœ &4 æ L

æ

R

R

œ œææ ææ L

L

æ

R

æ œæ

L

L

L

æ œæ æœ æ R

R

˙™

L

˙™ ææ R


Guideline 3 – Rolling between manuals When rolling between manuals, lead with the hand that needs to travel the least distance. Play the scale exercise below starting with your right hand over your left hand on the bar. You can follow Guideline 2 in the same manner for the first four notes. Between measure 2 and 3, you would then lead from the G to the F# with the right hand since it is physically closer to the F#. Then in measure 3, you would lead from the F# to the A with your left hand since it is physically closer to the A. By traveling the least distance, less motion is created, making it easier to perform a smooth-sounding roll.

## 4 æ æ & 4 ˙æ ˙æ R

# 4 & # 4 ææ˙ R

ææ ˙ææ ˙

R

L

˙ ææ

˙ ææ

L

R

R

ææ ˙ L

ææ ˙ææ ˙

ææ ˙ ˙ æ æ

æ ˙æ æ˙ æ

˙ æ˙ ææ æ

˙ ˙ ææ ææ

ææ ˙

æ ˙æ

R

L

L

R

L

R

˙ ææ

æ ˙æ

ææ ˙

ææ ˙

æ ˙æ

L

R

R

L

æ ˙æ

R

L

L

R

R

æ ˙æ

L

R

R

L

æ ˙æ

R

w ææ

L

æ wæ

L

MUSICAL CONSIDERATIONS Phrase Markings Phrase markings suggest musical “sentences” and help inform audible breaks, whether out of need (wind instruments) or assisting with lyrics (vocalists). Phrase markings can also help inform whether or not to add dynamics if none are included. Breath marks are critical for both wind players and vocalists but are rarely acknowledged by keyboard percussionists. However, it is often musically satisfying to have a break between phrases and therefore should be considered by all musicians. Breath marks and phrase marks often align. No matter which notation you may see in your music, they both should at least be considered and analyzed for their possible contribution to the piece of music.

Tempo vs. Rubato Lyrical melodies, rolling passages, and four-mallet chorales often do not require a strict beat like a march. Your performance should be at the indicated “tempo,” but the overall “time” can have some flexibility, especially at the end of phrases. This flexibility is called rubato. Feel free to take more time at the end of a phrase to make it more musical.

Dynamics: Written and Unwritten A common musical tool for unwritten dynamics is to follow the contour of the melody. For example, crescendo when moving up in pitch and decrescendo when moving down. There are very few incorrect options, if performed well, except to do nothing. 13


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

PRACTICE EXAMPLES Here are two examples for practice with roll sticking, phrase markings, tempo rubato, and dynamics. My recommendations are: 1. Amazing Grace can be played entirely on the lower manual. Try keeping your hand position the same throughout (Sticking Guideline 1). You can also observe Guideline 2 by leading with the right hand when moving up the instrument and the left hand when descending. 2. For Danny Boy, play just the melody first (only the notes with stems up). After you feel comfortable with this, move on to the whole arrangement. The top voice is the melody and should always be slightly louder than the harmony. Try to think horizontally by always focusing on the melody instead of just vertically which places the most focus on the accompaniment. 3. With both songs, say the lyrics and notice the inflection in your voice. Try to imitate this with your dynamics. 4. With both songs, sing the melody and notice where you want to breathe. It often corresponds with punctuation, but not always. Try this for potential phrase breaks—at least in volume if not an actual audible break.

Amazing Grace q = 64

#3 & 4œ A

# & ˙

5

# ™ & œ

9

once

# & ˙

13

blind,

14

-

-

maz

œ

saved

œ œ

˙ œ

a

œ J

ing

˙ Grace,

˙

œ

˙

was

œ but

how

sweet

œ

like

˙

the

˙™

Ϫ

but

œ

sound,

˙

That

œ

me.

œ

lost

œ

˙

œ

wretch

œ

œ

I

j œ œ

now

am

˙

œ

˙™

now

I

see.

œ

˙

found,

˙

œ

was


Danny Boy ,

e = 80

4 & b 4 œj œ œ

œ™ œ

j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

Dan - ny

boy,

the pipes, the pipes are

Oh

Traditional arr. Julia Gaines

j œ œ™ œœ œ œ œ &b œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™ J œJ ‰ Œ call

ing

œ̇ œ œ œ œœ ‰œ Œœ œ J

and down the moun - tain

&b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™ J œJ ‰ Œ ing

'Tis

you, 'tis

you

œœ ™ œ œ œœj œœ œ œ œ b œ & when sum - mer's in

12

& b œ̇

œ

& b œœ boy,

'Tis

œ oh

I

the

mea

dow

Or when the

j œ - - - œ™ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ

snow

15

and

j œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

9

back

must go

œ œ

I'll

be

œ <n>œœ

Dan - ny

boy,

here

in

œ

œœ

œ

I

love

you

sun - shine or

in

˙ ˙ so.

j œ œJ

and

all

the

ro - ses

,

j œ œ™ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ

6

fall

The sum - mer's gone,

side

to

j œ œ™ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ

3

glen,

From glen

œ̇

must

œ

bide.

œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ But come ye

j œ œ™ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ val

-

ley's hushed and white with

œœ œ œ œ œ bœœ ‰œ Œœ œ J

sha

dow

Oh Dan - ny

15


...THE HEART OF THE CHORALE

Part 1

17


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 1 OBJECTIVE: STEPS FOR PLAYING DOUBLE VERTICAL ROLLS • Double vertical rolls (“traditional” rolls) are played by alternating double-stops between the hands. • Accuracy will improve if you first practice following steps 1–5 below.

Normal Roll Passage Presentation q = 60

3 ææ æ & 4 q = 60 œ œœ æ 3 œq = 60 & 4 œœææ œœæ 3 ææ™ ææ ? & 443 œœ˙˙™ ææ˙ ™ œœ ? 43 ˙™ ? 43 æ˙˙™™ ææ

{{ {

æ œœæ æ œœææ œœæ

æ œœæ æ œœææ™ ˙˙æ™ œ ææ˙œ ™ ˙™ ææ˙ ™™ ˙ ææ

æ œœæ æ œœææ œœæ

ææ œœ æ œœææ œœæ

æ œœæ æ œœææ ˙˙™ æ™ œ ææ˙œ ™ ˙™ ææ˙ ™ ˙™ ææ

ææ œœ æ œœææ œœæ

æ œœæ æ œœææ œœæ

æ œœæ æ œœææ œœæ

ææ œœ æ œœææ™ ˙˙æ™ œ ææ˙œ ™ ˙™ ææ˙ ™™ ˙ ææ

Block Chords – Continuous Rhythm Step 1q = 50

& & ? & ? ?

{{ {

™™ q = 50 œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™ q = 50 œ œ œ œ ™™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™ œœm. 1œœ, beat 1 œœ œœ ™™ œœm. 1œœ, beat 1 m. 1 , beat 1

™™ ™™ ™™™ ™™ ™™

™™ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™™ œ œ œ ™™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™ œœbeat 2 œœ œœ ™™ œœbeat 2

œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ

beat 2

™™ ™™ ™™™ ™™ ™™

™™ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™™ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™™™ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ ™™ œœbeat 3 œœ œœ ™™ œœbeat 3 beat 3

œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ

æ œœ œœæ œœ œœ ææ ææ ææ æ œœ œœ œœ œœ ææ™ æ ææœ ææœ ˙˙™ œ æœ œ ææœ ææ˙œ ™ ææœ ææ ˙™ æ˙˙™™ ææ ™™ ™™ ™™™ ™™ ™™

™™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™™ œ œ œ œ ™™™ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™ œm. 2, beat 1 œ œ œ œ œ ™™ œm. 2, beat 1 œ œœ œœ m. 2, beat 1

œœ œœ ææ æ œœ ™ œœ ææœ˙˙ ™ ææœ œ æææ˙œ ™™ ææ ˙ ææ˙ ™™ ˙ ææ ™™ ™™ ™™™ ™™ ™™

œœ ææ œœ ææœ œ ææ

œœ œœ æœ ææœ œ œ ææœ˙˙™™ æ朜 œ æææ˙˙™™ ææ ææ˙ ™ ˙™ æ

™™ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™™ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™™™ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ ™™ œœbeat 2 œœ œœ ™™ œœbeat 2 beat 2

œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ

™™ ™™ ™™™ ™™ ™™

œœ ææ œœ ææœ œ ææ

˙˙™™ ææ ˙˙™™ ææ˙˙ ™™™ ˙™ æææ˙˙ ™™ ææ˙ ™™ ˙ ææ

™™ œœ œœ œœ ™™ œœ œœ œœ ™™™ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ ™™ œœbeat 3 œœ œœ ™™ œœbeat 3

œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ

™™ ™™ ™™™ ™™ ™™

Continue forbeat 3 every measure

q = 50

Step 2

& & ? & ? ?

{{ {

Block Chords – Broken Rhythm

™™ œœq = 50 œœ q = 50 œœ ™™ œœ œœ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œœ œm. 1 ™ œ™ , beat 1œ œœ™™ œ m. 1 , beat 1œ

œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œ™ œœœ™™™ œœ™™ beat 2 œœ™™ beat 2

m. 1 , beat 1

beat 2

œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ

œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œœœœ™™™™ œœ™™ beat 3 œœ™™ beat 3 beat 3

œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ

œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œœ œ™ œ œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œœ m. 2, beat 1 œœ ™™ œœ m. 2, beat 1

œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œ™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ beat 2 œœ ™™ beat 2

m. 2, beat 1

beat 2

œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ

œœ ™™ œœ ™™ ™ œœœ ™™ œœ ™™ beat 3 œœ ™™ beat 3

œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ

beat 3

Continue for every measure 18


{{ {{

∑ &4 ? 44 level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 1 ∑ ? 44 3 Split Chords – Continuous Rhythm ∑ Step ?4 ∑ It is important to practice starting a roll with each hand. There are musical reasons for leading with a

specific hand, and you must be prepared for any context. q = 60 Right Hand Lead ™ ™™ ™™ œ œ ™™ & ™ œœq = 60 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™™ q = 60 œ ™™ ™™ ™™ œœ

& & ? ? ?

m.1, beat 1

œœ œœ œœ œœ œ

m.1, beat 1 m.1, beat 1

beat 2 beat 2

™™ œœ œ ™™ œ ™™ ™™

™™ œœ œ œœ œ œœ ™ œœ œœ ™™ ™ œ œ ™™

Left Handq = 60 Lead

& & & ? ? ?

{{

™™ q = 60 œœ ™™ q = 60 ™™ œœ œ ™™ œœ œ œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œ œ

beat 2

œœ œœ œœ œœ œ

œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™ œœ ™™ ™ œ ™™

beat 3

œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™ œœ ™™ ™ œ ™™

beat 3 beat 3

™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œ œ œœ œœ ™ œœ œœ ™™ œ œ ™™™

m.2, beat 1

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ

m.2, beat 1 m.2, beat 1

beat 2 beat 2

œœ œœ

beat 2

™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™ œœ ™™ œ ™™™

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ beat 3

™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™ œœ ™™ œ ™™™

beat 3 beat 3

Continue for every measure

œœ œœ œœ

™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™

m.1, beat 1

™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œ

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ

œœ œœ œœ

™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™

beat 2

m.1, beat 1 m.1, beat 1

™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œ

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ

œœ œœ œœ

™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™

beat 3

beat 2 beat 2

™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œ

œœ œœ œœ œ œœœ œ

œœ œœ œœ

™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™

m.2, beat 1

beat 3 beat 3

™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œ

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ

œœ œœ œœ

™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™

beat 2

m.2, beat 1 m.2, beat 1

beat 2 beat 2

™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œ

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ

œœ œœ œœ

™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™

beat 3

beat 3

Continue forbeat 3 every measure

∑ ∑ & ∑ coming from and the first two strokes of the This is & important! The last two strokes of the chord you are chord you If you can play these four notes accurately, ? are going to are THE HEART OF THE CHORALE. ∑ you will? be on the right track to successfully playing a chorale. ∑ ? ∑

Step 4 &Split Chords – Broken Rhythm

{{

“Heart of the Chorale”

Right Hand Lead

& & & ? ? ?

{{

q = 60 q = 60 œq = 60≈

* Heart of the chorale

≈ œ ≈ ≈ œœ œœ ≈ ≈ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œœœ œœœ œ œ

Left Hand Lead q = 60

&

{

? œœ

œœ ≈ ≈ œœ œœ ≈≈ ≈≈ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ

œœ ≈ ≈ œœ œœ ≈≈ ≈≈ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ

œœ ≈ ≈ œœ œœ ≈≈ ≈≈ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œœœ œœœ œ œ

œœ ≈ ≈ œœ œœ ≈ ≈ œœ œœ ≈≈ ≈≈ œœ œœœ ≈≈ ≈≈ œœœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œ Continue œ forœevery measure œ3

* Heart of the chorale

œœ ≈ ≈

œœ

œœ

œœ

œœ ≈ ≈

œœ

œœ

œœ ≈ ≈ œœ

œœ œœ

œœ

œœ ≈ ≈

œœ

œœ

œœ

œœ ≈ ≈

œœ

œœ

œœ ≈ ≈ œœ

œœ œœ

Continue for every measure

19


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

3 3

Real Time – Continuous Roll

Step 5

Even though you have been playing rhythms up until now, the purpose of a roll is to create implied sustain q = 60 not rhythm. When preparing your final interpretation, you need to be moving away from a or duration, q = 60 metered≈approach. of strokes for duration. ≈≈ œ Usually ≈≈ there ≈≈ isœ not œœan≈≈exact ≈≈ number ≈≈ ≈≈ assigned ≈≈ any ≈≈ single ≈≈ œ œœ of≈≈ the & œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ However, you must perform the four strokes involved in each “heart” successfully. Both hands œœ & œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ double-stop you are leaving and both hands of the double-stop you are moving to will always constitute fourœstrokes – no œœ of the chorale. œœ œœ You’ll findœœthat the œœ tempo ofœœ the œœ matter œœ the duration œœ œœof the chordœœor tempo ? œ ?“heart” is dependent on the roll speed—or how fast youœalternate hands œ œduring the roll. œ œ œ

{

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

1.1 Moving Thirds (Right Hand) Take these exercises through steps 1–5 and check off the steps in the progress chart.

33 4 & &4

q = 60 q = 60

æ œœææ œ ˙˙™™™ ? ? 4433 æ˙˙™ ææ

{

æ œœææ œ

æ æ œœœæ

æ œœææ œ ™ ˙˙˙ ™™ æææ

æ æ œœœæ

æ æ æ œœææ œææ œœææ œ œœ œ ˙˙™™™ ˙˙™ æææ

æ æ œœœæ

æ œœææ œ ™ ˙˙˙ ™™ æææ

æ æ œœœæ

œ æ朜 æ

æ æ œ œœœæ 朜 ææ ˙˙™™™ ˙˙™ æ ææ

œ œ œ æææ

œœ œœ œ æææœ æææ ™ ˙˙˙ ™™ æææ

œœ ææœ æ

œ œœ œ œ æœ æææ ææ ˙˙™™™ ˙˙™ æææ

œœ œ æ ææ

˙˙™™ ææ˙˙™™ æ˙ ™ ˙™ ææ˙ ™ æ

1.2 Moving Thirds (Left Hand) q = 60 q = 60

™™ 33 ˙˙™ ˙ & & 44 æææ˙™ œœ œ œœ œ æ æ 3 ? æ ? 443 æ ææ

{

20

œœ œ æææ

˙˙ ™™ ææ˙ ™ æ œ œœ œ œ æææ æææœ

˙˙™ ˙˙™™™ ææ æ œœ œœ œœ ææœ ææœ ææœ æ æ æ

œœ ææœ æ

˙˙ ™™ ææ˙ ™ æœ œ œ ææœ æ朜 æ æ

æ ˙˙ææ™™ ˙™ œœ œœ œœ ææœ ææœ ææœ æ æ æ

œœ ææœ æ

æ ˙˙ææ™™ ˙™ œœ œ ææœ æ朜 æ æ

œœ ææœ æ

æ æ ˙˙˙æ™™™ œœ œœ ææœ ææœ æ æ

œœ ææœ æ

æ ˙˙ææ™™ ˙™

˙˙ ™™ ˙™ ææ˙™ æ


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 1

OBJECTIVE: DOUBLE VERTICALS (DV), STATIC WIDE INTERVALS • Beating spot – arm should bisect the interval no matter the grip you use • Piston stroke – down, up (not up, down) • Play hands separate (LH one octave lower)

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2 & 4 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ4 œ œ

1.3 Sixths

2 & 42 &4

œ œ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ &

& œœ œœ œœ & œœœ

œ œ œ

2 & 42 &4

œ œœ œ

œ œœ œ

œ œœ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ

œ œœ œ

œ œœ œ

œ œœ œ

œ œœ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œœ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ& œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœ œœœœ œœœ œœ œœœœ

œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœœ œœœœ œœ

œ œ œ

1.4 Sevenths

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ &œ œ œ œ œ œ

4

œ œœ œ

œ œœ œ

œ œœ œ

œ œ œ

œœœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œœœœ œœ 2 & 4 œœ œœ œœ œœ

œ œ œœ œ

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ

œœ œœ œ

œœ œœ œ

œ œ œœ œ

œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ

œœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ

œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ

œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ

1.5 Octaves

œ œ 2 & 4 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ

etc.

etc.

œ find charts to track your progress. The progress charts for chorale 2 œ œ œ Studies œ œ œ(level œ 1),œœ you’ll &As42 inœœœSequential œ œ œ œ œ œœ in the first book. Chorale tempos are relatively similar. It is more œ œ than œ those œœ aœœ bit œœdifferent 4 œœlook &practice œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ important that you complete each step instead of trying to increase your tempo. As a general rule, play steps 1–2 at 40–50 bpm and steps 3–5 at 60–70 bpm.

PROGRESS CHART

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

q = 40–50

Step 4

Step 5

q = 60–70

1.1 Moving Thirds (Right Hand) 1.2 Moving Thirds (Left Hand) q = 40

q = 45

q = 50

q = 55

q = 60

q = 65

q = 70

1.3 Sixths (Right Hand) 1.3 Sixths (Left Hand) 1.4 Sevenths (Right Hand) 1.4 Sevenths (Left Hand) 1.5 Octaves (Right Hand) 1.5 Octaves (Left Hand) 21


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 2 OBJECTIVE: SINGLE ALTERNATING (SA), STATIC INTERVALS, IN-OUT ROTATION • Single alternating strokes have a minimum and maximum tempo. If played too slowly, they become single independent strokes; if played too fast, they become double lateral strokes. The feel of a single alternating stroke is in the rotation of the wrist. It should be fluent with no stops, jerks, or uneven strokes. • Be careful not to play a flam between mallets 3/2 and 4/1.

3 & 4Hands 2.1 œ œTogether œ œ (In-Out) œ œ œ 3 4 3 4 3 4 3œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & ? 443 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2 1 2 1 2 1 œ œ œ œ ? 43 œ œ œ 3

{ { { {

& œ œ & ? œ œ ?

2

4

1

3

2

œ œ œœ œœ œ œ

4

1

3

4

2

1

œ œ œœ œœ œ œ

œ œœ œ

œ œ œ œ

œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ

œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ

œ

œ œ œ œ

œœ œ œ œœ œ

œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œœ œœ œ œ

œ œ œœ œœ œ œ

œ œœ œ

œ œ œœ œœ œ œ

œ œ œ œ

œ œ œœ œœ œ œ

œ

œ œ œ œ

œœ œ

œ œ œœ œœ œ œ Œ

Œ

Œ Œ

Œ Œ

Œ

Œ

œ œœ œ

2.2 Permutation 1

3 &4 œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 2 4 œ 1 3 2 4 œ 1 œ œ œ œ 3 &4 œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Œ & œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 2 4 1 3 2 4 1

2.3 Permutation 2

3 &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2 3 œ 1 4 2 3 œ 1 4 œ 3 &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2 3 1 4 2 3 1 4

22

etc.

Continue just like you did with Permutation 1.


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 1

OBJECTIVE: SINGLE INDEPENDENT (SI), ALTERNATING HANDS, STEPWISE MOTION • Keep your mallets at the interval of a fifth. • There should be an obvious rotation in your hands. There should not be any vertical motion in your stroke.

2

2.4 SI Alternating Hands

{

{ {

4 &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3

&

? œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

2 4 2 4 2 4 2 4

œ

{

?

1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3

1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3

œ œ

œ

œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ?

&

2 4 2 4 etc.

2 4 2 4 2 4 2 4

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

PROGRESS CHART

œ

œ

continue up instrument until

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

4 2 4 2 4 2 4 2

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1

continue down instrument until

3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1

4 2 4 2 etc.

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

q = 90

q = 95

q = 100

q = 105

q = 110

q = 115

q = 120

q = 60

q = 70

q = 80

q = 90

q = 100

q = 110

q = 120

2.1 Hands Together (In-Out) 2.2 Permutation 1 (3241) 2.3 Permutation 2 (2314)

2.4 SI Alternating Hands

23


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 3 æ æ æ æ æ

{

? 43 ˙˙™™ ææ

˙˙™™ ææ

˙˙ ™™ ææ

˙˙ ™™ ææ

™™ œ œ œæ œ æ™™ ™™ œæœ œæ œ æ™™ ™™ œæœ œœæ œ ™™ ™™ œæ & æ æ ææœ œæ œœæœ œœæœ œœæ œœæœ œœœæœ œœæ œœ ˙ ™ œæ œ æ 3 æ æ æ æ æ æ œ œ œ æ æ æ 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ æ 4 œ & œ œ œ OBJECTIVE: œœ œ œROLLS, œœ œ VERTICAL œ 朜 朜œ œæœ 朜œ 朜 œæœ 朜 ææœ æœæ˙™ œ æœ & 4 œœ DOUBLE œ æœ æœMOTION œ æœ STEPWISE œ OBLIQUE æ æ ætime. æ œæ œ æœ œ æ œæ œ æœ œ æ œæ œ œ œæ æ˙ œ æ • Make sure the double-stops in each hand æ hit at the same ? ™ œ œ œ œ ™™˙ ™™ œ˙ ™œ œ œ ™™˙ ™™ œ˙ ™œ œ œ ™™˙ ™™ œ˙ ™ • Take all four roll passages through all five chorale ˙ steps. ™ ˙ ™ ˙˙™™ ™ ˙ ™ ˙™ ˙™ 3 ? ˙™ ˙˙ ™ ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ ? 43 ˙˙™™ ˙™ æ ˙™ æ 4 æ æ æ m.2, etc. ææ ææ æ m.1, beat 3 ææ æ æ m.1, beat 1 æ æ m.1, beat 2 ææ Hand) ææ æ Fifths (Right 3.1 Moving æ æ æ 3 ææ œææ œææ œææ œææ œæ œææ œæ œ œæ œ œœ œ œœ3 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ˙˙™™ & 4 œœ œæ œæ æœ œæ œæ ææœ œæ æœææ œ æœææ æ œæœ&æ4™ œæ ™ œæœ ™œæœ™ ™œæ œæ œ™œæ™ ™ œææœ œæ œ ™˙ ™™ œ æ æ æ æ æ™ œ œ æœ &43 ™™ œæ œœœœæœœ œœœœ ™™ ™™ œœæ œœœœœœ œœœœ™™ ™™ œœ œœœœæœœ œœæœœ™™ ™™ œœæœœ 朜æ æœæ &æœœæ ™ 朜 ™œœæœœæ˙œœ™ 晜œ™ ™œœ œœæœœ ˙œœ™œ™œ ™ 朜œæ朜 ˙œœ™ æ™˙™™ œœ & œ ˙˙™™ æ ˙˙ ™™ æ æ ˙˙™™ æ æ æ ˙ ™ æ æ æ ˙™ æ æ æ˙ ™ æ™˙ ™ ˙˙ ™™ ? 43 ˙˙™™ ™™ ™œ œ œææœ œ˙™ ™ œœœ œæœœœ ™˙ ™ œœœ ææ ? ?˙43™ œœœ™™œ œæœœ ˙˙œœ™ ™ æ ˙ æ ™ ˙ ™ ˙™ æ œ æ ˙ æ œ™œ œ œ œ œ œ œ æ œ œ œ œ ™™ ™™ ˙œ™ ˙™™™ œ œ œ œ ™™ ™™ œ œ œœ œ œ™ ?æ3 ™™ ˙˙™ ? ææ™™ ™™ œœœ œ œ ææ™™ ™™ œ œœœœ æ æ æ 4 æœ œ œ œ æ™™ ™™æ˙œ™œ œ œ ™™ ™™æ˙™ æ m.1, beat 1 beat 2 æ æ beat 3 m.2, etc. æ æ m.1, beat 1 m.1, beat 2 m.1, beat 3 m.2, etc.

{

{{

{{

{

m.1, beat 1

m.1, beat 2

m.1, beat 3

m.2, etc.

™™ œ œ1 œ œ ™™ ™™ œ œ œ œ ™™ ™™ œ œ œ œ ™™ ™™ œ &Step œ3™™œ œ œ ™™œ ™™œœœœœœ œ ™™œ ™™œœœœœœ œ ™™œ ™™ œ & & 4 œœœœœ™™ œœ œœœ œœ ™™œ œ œœ œ œœ ™™ œ œœ œ œœœ ™™ œœœ ? ™™ œœ œœ œœœ œœ ™™ œ™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œ œ œ œ ™™ œ™™ ™œœ œœ œœ œœ œ™™ ™ ™™ œœ œœ œœ œœœ ™™ ™™ œœœ ? 3™™ œœœ™œ™ œ œœœ m.1, beat 2 ?m.1, beat 1 m.1, beat 3 œ™ œ œ™ œ œm.2, etc.œ 4

{{

m.1, beat 1 m.1, beat 1

m.1, beat 2 beat 2

m.1, beat 1

beat 2

& 43™™ œœœ ™ œœ œ ™™ œ™™ ™œœ œœœ & œ™ œ œ™ œ ™™ ™ œœ œœœœ ? 43™™ œœ™™œœ œœœœ ™™ œœ™

{

m.1, beat 3 m.2, etc. beat 3 m.2, etc.

3 ™ œœ ™™ right-œœand left-hand œ ™ œ œ™ œ 4 œ3 &Step œ Remember to do both œ3™ ™ œ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ œ ™ œ œ ™ œ ™ œlead!œ & 4 ™™ œœ ™ œœ ™™ œ™™ ™œ œ œ™™ ™ ™™ œ œ œ œ™™ ™ ™™ œ œ & œ œ ? 43 œœ™™ œ œœœ œœ™™ œœœ œœœ™™ œœœ œœœ ™™ œœ œ ? 43 œœ™™œ œœ œœ™™ œ œœ œ œœ™™ œœ œ œœ ™™ œœ ? m.1, beat 1 ™™ œ œbeat 2 ™™ ™™ œ beat 3 œ ™™ ™™ œm.2, etc. œ ™™ ™™ œ

{{

Step 2

beat 3

m.2, etc.

m.1, beat 1 m.1, beat 1

Step 4

beat 2 beat 2

™™œ ™™™ œ œ™ œ

œœœœ

œœœ œ

œœ™™ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ œœ œ™™ ™™ ™™ œœ œ

beat 3beat 3

m.2, etc. m.2, etc.

™™œœ™™™™

Remember to do both right- and left-hand lead!

™™ œ œ ™™ ™™ œ œ ™™ ™™ œ œœ œ≈ ≈œœœ œœ œ≈ ≈ œœ œœ œ ? ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ? œœ œ œ

& &

{

™™ œ œ ™™ œœœ ≈œ≈ œœ

m.1, beat 1 m.1, beat 1

beat 2 beat 2

beat 3 beat 3

m.2, etc. m.2, etc.

& ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ ™™ œ Play ™™in™™real ™™ œmeter ™ ™™ œ 2 Step œœ œœtime™™ (no roll speed) & 5 œ œœ or™ defined œ œ œœ ?& & œœ ≈ ≈ œœ œœ ≈ ≈ œœ œœ ≈ ≈ œœ œœ ™™ œœ œœ≈ ≈™™ œ™™ œœœ ≈œœ≈™™ œ™™ œœœœ ≈ œœ≈ œœ™™ ™™ œœœ œ œ œ THIS ONE SHOULD BE ON THE PREVIOUS PAGE, BUT WOULDN'T FIT ? ™™œ œœ œœœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ 3.2 Moving m.1, beat 1 Fifthsbeat 2 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ? œœ œœ(Left œœ Hand)œœbeat 3œœ œœm.2, etc.œœ ? ˙˙™m.1, beat 1 ™ œœ ™ ææ ææ ˙˙™beat 3 ™ ˙˙ ™™ m.2, etc. ™beat 2 ˙ ™ 3 æm.1, beat 1 ˙˙beat 2 m.1, beat 1 ˙ ™ beat 2 beat 3 m.2, etc. ˙ ™ ™ ˙ m.2, etc. ™ &4 æ ˙™ ææbeat 3 æ ˙™ ææ ææ˙™ ææ˙ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ≈ œœ œ œ≈ ≈œœ œœœ ≈œ≈ œœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ æ ? 43œ ææ ≈œææ≈ œ ææœ ææ≈œ≈æœ œææ ≈æ≈ œæ œæ æ æœ æ æœ œ æœ œ œ œ œ œ ˙˙™™ & œœ œœ œ æœ œ æ œæ œæ æ æ æ æ ææ æ ææ æ ææ æ æ æ æ æ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? 24 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ ? œ beat 2 m.1, beat 1 m.2, etc. œ œ beat 3 œ œ m.1, beat 1

{{ { {{

beat 2

beat 3

m.2, etc.

{

œœ ææ


æ æ æ æ æ æ ææ ˙˙™™ ™™ ææ of the chorale ˙ ææ - Part 1 ˙˙™™ ˙˙ ™™ level ˙˙™™ ™™ 2...the heart 3 ˙ ˙ ™™ ˙ ™ ˙ &4 æ ˙ ææ ˙ ™ ææ ˙ ææ ææ æ 3.3 Moving (Right Hand) œœ œ Sixths œ œæ œœæ œæ œœæ œœæ œœæ œœæ œœ œœæ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ ˙ ™™ æ ? 433 æææ ææœæ ææœææ ææœæ ææœææ æœææ ææœææ æœææ æœ æœææ æœ æœœ æœ æœœ œ 朜 œ œ œ œ œ ˙˙™ ˙™ 3 œœæ œæ œ œæ œ æœ œ æœ ææœ æœ ææœ ææœ æœ ææœ ææœ ææœ ææœ ææœ ææœ ææœ ææœ æææ˙™ 4 & & 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ æœ œ æœ æ æœ æ ææ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ œ æ æ æ æ æ æ˙ ™ æ æ æ˙ ™ æ ˙ ™™ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ˙ ˙˙™™ ˙™™ ˙˙™ ˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙™™ ˙™™ ™™ ˙˙™ 3 ? ˙ ææ˙ ™ ˙ ™ æ ˙ æ ˙ ™ æ ? 443 æ˙™ ˙ æ æ ™ ˙™ æ æ æ˙ ææ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ œ ˙™ æ æ æ æ æ æ œ œ æ æ œ œ œ æ œ œ œ æ æ æ æ æ æ œ œ œ ˙™ æ æ 3 & 4 œæ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ æœ œœ æœ æœ æœ æœ æœ æœ æœ æœ æœ æœ ææœ ææ œ Sixths (Left Hand) 3.4 Moving æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ ææ ˙˙ ™™ æ ™ ˙ ™ æ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ æ ˙ ™ ˙˙™ ˙™ææ ææ ˙æ™ ˙˙æ™™ ˙ææ™ ˙™ ˙˙ææ™™ ? 433 ˙™ ˙˙ ™™ ™ ˙ æ ˙ æ æ œ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ æ æ™™™ æ æ œ œ ˙ æ˙ ™ ™ ™™™ ˙™ 3 æ˙œ ™ œ œœ æœ˙ ™ œœ œ ææœ˙œ ™ œ œ ææ˙ ™™ æ ˙ 4 & ˙ ˙ æ æ ˙™ & 4 ææœ œ œ æœ œ œ œ œ œ ææ ˙ ˙™ ˙™ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ œ œ ææ ææ ææ ææ ææ ææ ææ ææ ææœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ æ æ æ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ ˙˙ ™™ 3 ? œ æ ? 443 ææ æææœ ææœ æææœ ææœ ææœ ææœ ææœ æœœ ææœ æœœ æœ æ˙™ ˙™ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ ææ ææ æ ™ æ ææ ææ ææ ˙˙ ™™ ˙ ™ ™ 3 ˙˙œ ™ œ œ œ˙˙ ™™ œ ˙ ˙ ™™ ™ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ˙ œ œ œ æ ™ ˙™ &4 œ œ ˙ ˙ œ ˙ ™ ææ œ æœ œ œ æœ œ œ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æDV, OCTAVE OBJECTIVE: æ æ INTERVAL æ æ EXPANSION, œ œ MOTION œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ æ ææ œœSTEPWISE œ ˙™ œ œ œwithœœtheœthumb œ œ ?• 443Independent œ œ grip users, make sure that you æ arriveæ at the octave on top of the stick. œ œ œ œœ œœLOOK ææœ ææœ æ朜 æœ œ ææ œ 朜 æœ æ œ æœ æœœ œæ˙™ œœ œœ must œœ œgood asœ well æœ æœgood. œœ octave œ œ œ & • 4The as SOUND œ stroke œ œœflamœœbetween œ œœ the œ mallets. œ œœ œœ 朜 œœ œœ 朜 朜 æ œœ 朜 朜 œœæ &• 4Don’t œ œ œ œ œ œ œ let the double vertical œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{ { { { {

3.5 Wide Interval Octave Expansion

4 œ œÓ œ œ œ 3œ Œœ &4 & œ œÓ œ œ œ 443œ Œœ &

{ {

Practice with each hand

? ?

∑∑

3 443 ∑∑

œŒ œ œ433 œ œ Œœ œ 433 œœ œœ ∑œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ∑ œœ œ œ œ∑ ∑ ∑ œŒ œ œ4 œ œ Œœ œ 4 œ œ œ∑

3 PROGRESS CHART Œ 4Œ & Ó

∑∑ 433 4

3 4

3.1 Moving Fifths (Right Hand)

?

3 4 ∑

3.2 Moving Fifths (Left Hand)

3.3 Moving Sixths (Right Hand) 3.4 Moving Sixths (Left Hand)

∑ 43

ŒŒ Step 1

Œ Œ

q = 50

3 443

∑∑

3 4

Step 3

3 4

Step 2

q = 55

q = 60

Step 4

q = 65

∑∑

∑∑

∑Step 5

q = 70

q = 75

etc.

q = 80

3.5 Wide Interval Octave Expansion (RH) 3.5 Wide Interval Octave Expansion (LH)

25


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

SOLO 1 The Professional

Rob Green

q = 120

4 &b 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{

? b 44

f

œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ 4 4 j j ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œj Œ œ œ

5

4

‰ j‰ j‰ jŒ œ œ œ œ œ œ mf ?b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ &b œ

{

œ

œ

œ œ

p

4 4 j j jŒ ‰ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ &b œ œ œ œ œ ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ?b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

9

4

3

{

4 2

3 1

&b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ?b œ œ œ

13

{

œœ œ ‰ œj ‰ œ œ f ? b ™™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

17

& b ™™ œœ

{

œœ

œœ

j œœ ‰ œœ

j œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ‰ œœ Œ œœœ œœœœœœœœ œ

œœ > >œ œ

œœ > >œ œ

œœ > >œ œ

f

œ‰ œ‰ œŒ œ œ œ J J J

™™

œœœœœœœ ™ ™

mf 26

œœ > >œ œ

© 2019 Tapspace Publications, LLC, Portland, OR. (ASCAP) International copyright secured. All rights reserved.


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 1

21

& b œœ

œœ œœ ‰ œj ‰ œ mp ?b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{

œœ

œœ

j‰ œœ œ œ

jŒ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ Œ J J J

œ œ œ œ œ œ

p

&b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

25

{

?b

Ϫ

p

œ J Œ

œ

Ϫ

œ J Œ

œ œ œ™

œ Œ J

mf

œ

œ

Œ

Ó

&b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

29

{

?b

Ϫ

œ J Œ

œ

Ϫ

œ J Œ

œ œ œ™

œ Œ J

œ

œ

Œ

Ó

f

&b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

33

{

?b

p

Ϫ

œ J Œ

œ

Ϫ

œ J Œ

œ œ œ™

œ Œ J

mf

œ

œ

Œ

Ó

∑ &b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ó f mp œ œ™ œ œ™ œ œ œ™ œœœ œ Œ Ó ?b J Œ œœ œŒ œ œ Œ JŒ J 3

37

3

2

{

1

1

1

4

3

2

3

2

27


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

PERFORMANCE NOTES Technical Considerations This piece gives you an introduction to single alternating strokes. The composer keeps the interval of a fifth consistent throughout. The two stroke types used in this piece require two different motions which need to be independent of one another. One hand will be “rocking” with single alternating strokes, and the other hand will want to add some of that motion into the up/down double vertical stroke. Challenge #1 – Keep hand motions separate The first instance of this is in measure 6. Your left hand needs to keep the single alternating movement going while the right hand plays off-beat eighth notes. Remember to keep the strokes coming up off the instrument in the right hand. Because they are off-beats, the tendency will be to make them short, choppy strokes that have very fast upstrokes creating a louder, harsher contact sound. Practice each hand separately and make sure that when you add the hands together they look the same as they did separately! Measures 25–41 will present the same idea. Don’t let the left-hand strokes become short and choppy just because the right hand is playing eighth notes. Play the left hand alone and see what it looks like. Then make sure it looks the same when you add in the right hand. Keep the right hand very soft. Challenge #2 – Consistent single independent strokes Measures 13–16 contain a series of single independent strokes that can have several different sticking options. The first recommendation is to play beats 1 and 2 with mallets 4 and 2 and then beats 3 and 4 with mallets 3 and 1. The transition between the measures will be the hardest part of this sticking, as those intervals are very small. Another option is to play the entire passage with mallets 3 and 2. This will probably be the easier option for many beginning players. Eventually, as your hands get stronger, you’ll want to be able to play single independent passages with any mallet. Musical Considerations 1. The concept of balance in marimba performance is all based on context. Sometimes both hands will need to play the same volume because they are playing a more vertical passage, and sometimes one hand will need to be louder than the other. In every musical passage, you need to make sure you know what the balance should be. 2. In measure 5, the melody starts in the right hand and should be more prominent than the left hand accompaniment. This is marked pretty clearly in the music, but sometimes this won’t be the case. 3. In measure 13, both hands are involved in a similar passage so they should be equal in volume. 4. In measure 25, the left hand takes over the melody, and now this hand should be a little louder.

28


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 4 OBJECTIVE: DOUBLE VERTICAL (DV), OCTAVES IN STEPWISE MOTION • Play hands separately and also transpose to other keys.

4.1 Double Vertical Octaves – C major

œ 4 & 4 œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œœœœœœœ œœœœœœœ œœœœœœœ œœœœœœ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ Œ Ó œ

4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ &OBJECTIVE: œ œ œ SINGLE œ œ œINDEPENDENT œ œœ œœ œœ(SI), œœOCTAVES œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœœ œœœ œŒ œÓœ œ œ œœœœ œœINœœSTEPWISE œœ œœ œœ œMOTION œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ &• œPlayœ asœ single œ independents, œ œ œ œ œfirstœwith œ œmallets œ œwith œ 1œand œ 3,œ then œ œmalletsœ 2œand œ 4.œ œ œ œ œ • Make sure the mallets you aren’t using stay over the playing area. • Transpose to other keys. & b œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

4.2 Single Independent Octaves – F major

4 & b 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœœ œ œœ œœœœœœœ œœœœœœœ œœœœœœ & b œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

30

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ Œ œ

Ó


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 1

2 2 2

OBJECTIVE: SINGLE ALTERNATING (SA), STATIC INTERVAL, OUT-IN ROTATION • Remember, this stroke type should have a smooth, even feel, rotating at the wrist. • Be careful not to play a flam between mallets 3/2 and 4/1.

4.3 Hands 4 4 4 3Together 3 (Out-In) 3

343 & & 43 &4 ? 343 ? ? 443

{{ {{

& & & ? ? ?

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ4 œ œœ œ1 4

3 3

œœ œ œœ œ 2 2 2

1 1

œœ œœ œ œ

œœ4 œ œœ œ1 4

1 1

œœ œ œœ œ

3 3

œœ œ œœ œ 2 2 2

œœ œœ œ œ

œœ4 œ œœ œ1

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œœ œ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

4

3 3

2 2 2

1 1

œœ œœ œ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œœ œ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œœ œ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œœ œ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œœ œ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œœ œ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œœ œ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œœ œ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œœ œ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œœ œ œ

œœ œœ œ œ

ŒŒ Œ

ŒŒ Œ

œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œœ œ œ

ŒŒ Œ

ŒŒ Œ

4.4 Permutation 3 1 4 2 3 1 4 2 3 343 1 œœ4 2 œ3 1 œœ4 2 œ3 œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ & & 43 œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & 4 œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 1 4 2 3 1 4 2 3

etc.

Continue just like you did with Permutation 1 in Lesson 2.

etc.

Continue just like you did with Permutation 1 in Lesson 2.

4.5 Permutation 4

343 & & 43 &4

4 1 3 2 4 1 3 2 4 1 3 2 4 1 3 2 4 1 3 2 4 1 3 2

œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

PROGRESS CHART

œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ q = 60

q = 65

q = 70

q = 75

q = 80

q = 85

q = 90

q = 90

q = 95

q = 100

q = 105

q = 110

q = 115

q = 120

4.1 DV Octaves – C (RH) 4.1 DV Octaves – C (LH) 4.2 SI Octaves – F (mallets 1 and 3) 4.2 SI Octaves – F (mallets 2 and 4)

4.3 Hands Together (Out-In) 4.4 Permutation 3 (1423) 4.5 Permutation 4 (4132) 31


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 5 OBJECTIVE: DOUBLE VERTICALS, STEPWISE INTERVAL EXPANSION AND CONTRACTION • • • •

Keep your thumb flat and relaxed on the mallet, allowing it to move along the mallet shaft. The mallet should roll across the index finger while the thumb slowly moves up the stick (independent grip only). Make sure your arm comes away from your body on narrow intervals and returns to your side on wider intervals. Be sure to practice with both hands.

5.1 Interval Expansion and Contraction 3 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ & 4 œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ & œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

Continue up keyboard 3as desired 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœ œœ œœœœœœ œ & 4 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œœœœœœœ 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

œ so œ keep œ œ the œœœœœstroke œœ œœtypes œ œœ vertical œœ œ should œœœ œœœindependent. œœœ œœ œœ œœœTheœœœdouble œ œœ œ œstroke, œœœ œ œœgoœœupœandœ œ œ isœa œcombination &• œThis œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œsingle œ œœ œalternating œ œ œ4œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ rotate. ? 44down, œœ œœand œœ the œ œ œœ stroke œ œ should œ œ3 3 3 4 3 3 3 COMBINATION OBJECTIVE: DV/SI, STROKES, STEPWISE MOTION 3

3

3

3

3

• Play slowly to make sure the stroke types are played correctly. 2 1

1

2 1

2

2 1

1

2 1

2

2 1

etc.

5.2 DV/SI Combination Strokes

œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ ? 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2 1

1

2 1

2

2 1

1

2 1

2

2 1

PROGRESS CHART

etc.

œœ œœ œ œ 4etc. 4

Continue up keyboard as desired

q = 40

q = 45

q = 50

q = 55

q = 60

q = 65

q = 70

q = 50

q = 60

q = 70

q = 80

q = 90

q = 100

q = 110

5.1 Interval Expansion (RH) 5.1 Interval Expansion (LH) 5.2 DV/SI Combination Strokes (RH) 5.2 DV/SI Combination Strokes (LH) 32


3

3

2 level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 1

æ ææ Combination ææStrokes ææ ææ – Triplets ææ ææ ææ 2 œœæ5.3 ˙˙DV/SI æ æ æ æ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ 3 3 3 œ 3 œ3 3˙˙4 ææ æ朜æ 3 œœæ ææ œœæ3 ææ ˙˙æ œæ 3 3˙ ææ 2 ææ œ æ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ 4 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 4 œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ˙ ˙˙ & 4 œœ ˙˙œœ œœ œœ œœ ˙œœ œœ œœ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œœ4etc. œœ ˙ œ œ ˙3 3 ˙˙3 3 ˙˙ ˙˙ ? 44 ææ ˙˙ 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 4 4 43æ4 4 3 4 etc. 4 4æ æ ˙ æ æ ˙ æ 3 3 3 3 3 3 æ3 3 3 3 3 3 ˙ ˙ æ æ ˙ œ œ œœ œasœœ desired œœ˙˙3 œœ 4 æ æ 4 œ œ3 œ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ 3 œ œ œ3 œ ? ˙ ˙˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ æ œ œ æ 4 æ 3 3 Continue up keyboard æ 4 œ & 4 œ œ œ œ3 œ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ34œæ œ œ œ œæœ œ œ œ œ œææ æ æ æ 4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 etc. œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ3œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ3œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ3œ œœ œœ3œ œœ 44 4 œ3 œ3 œ3FOUR-MALLET 3 3 3 &OBJECTIVE: 3 3 3ROLLS, 3 œ STATIC INTERVALS, SPLIT PARALLEL MOTION œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 4 4 4 4 4 œ 4 etc. 4 4 4 4 3 a moderate • When changing tempo 3 3 3 3 3 3notes 3 3while 3 3 rolling, it is important to move slowly 3 for accuracy. 3 Keep the roll at 3 æ æ æ æ Complete 4and ææall five ææsteps. æ ææ æ æ is appropriate. æ rubato œœæ remember ææ ææ ææ ˙˙æ that some 4 œ œ & ˙ æ œ œ œ œ ˙ ˙ ™ ™ ™ ™ ™ ™ ™ ™ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ ™æ ™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™ ™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™ ™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™ ˙ œ œœ ˙˙ œ & ™ œœ 5.4 ææ ææ ææ ˙˙æ ˙æHands 4Chasing ææ ™™˙ææœ œ œ ææœ ™™ ™™ œ œ æœ œ ™™ ™™æœ œ œæ œ ™™ æ™™ ˙˙ – Rolls ™ ˙ œ ˙ ˙ 4 œ œ œ & ˙ ˙ ˙ 4 ? æ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ 4œœ ææ œœ œœææ œœ œœææ œæ œœ œœ œœææ œœ˙朜 œœæœœ œæ & æ˙œœæœ œ œ˙˙œ ˙˙ œ œœœæœ œ ˙˙œœæœ œ œœæ œ ˙˙æ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™ æ æ™ ™ ˙æ æ ™ æ ææ ææ ææ ææ æææ œæ æ˙ææ ? ™™ & 4 ˙œœ™™ ™™ ˙˙ ™ ™ œ œ ™ ™ œ œ œœœœ œœ œœ˙˙œœ œœ œœœœœœ œœ 朜 œœ œœ œœæ œœ æ˙ œœ œœ œœ œœ ˙˙ ˙ ˙˙ ™ ™ ˙ ˙˙ ™ œœ ˙ 4 ˙ ? 4 ææ˙ beat 2 æ beat 3 æ beat 4 æ ? ™™æ m.1, beat 1 ™™ æ˙˙™™ ™™ ˙˙™™ ™™ ˙˙˙™™ ™™ æ ˙ æ ˙ ˙ æ æ ˙ ˙ æ æ˙˙ ˙ æ˙ ˙ æ˙˙ beat 3 ? 44 ææ æ˙˙ beat 4 ææ æ ææ ææm.1, beat 1 ææ˙ beat 2 ææ ææ ™™ œ œœ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œ œ œ œ ™™ & œœœœ Stepœ4 Step 2 & 41 œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œœ 4 ™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™ ™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™ & & 4 œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œœ ? ™™™ œ œœœœ™™ œ œœ™™™ ™™™ œœœ™™œ œœœœ œœ™ œ œ œ œ ™ ™ ™ ™ ™ ™ œ œ ™ œ œœ4 œœ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™™ ™™™ œœ œœœ œœœ™œœ ™™™ œ™™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™™ & ?™™m.1, beat 1 œœ4 œœ œœ œœ beat 2 œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œœ œœ™™ œœ œœ™™ œœ œœbeat 3 œœ œœ œœ beat 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? ™™ œ œm.1, beat 1 ? 44 œœ œœ ™™ ™™ beat 2 œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™beat 3™™ œœ œœ œœbeat 4 œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™ œ œ ? ™™m.1, beat 1 ™™ ™™ beat 2 ™™ ™™ beat 3 ™™ ™™ beat 4 ™™ m.1, beat 1 beat 2 beat 3 beat 4

4 &4

{

{ {{ {{ {{

{

{

Step 3 Remember to do both right- and left-hand lead! 4 ™ m.1, beat 1

beat 2

beat 3

beat 4

Step 4 Remember to do both right- and left-hand lead!

œœ ™ œœ œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œœ 4 & & ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ & œœ ≈≈œœ œœ ≈≈œœ œœ ≈≈œœ œœ ≈≈œœ œœ ≈ 4 œœ ™™™ œœ œœ ™™™ œœ œœ™ ™ œ œœ ™™ œœ & &œ ™™ œœœ œœœ ™™ ™™ œœœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œ ™œœ œ œœ ?œœ 444 œ œœ œœœ œ ™ œœœ œœœœ ™™ œœ œœ œ™ ? ™™ & 4™™ ™™œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™œœ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ ? œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ m.1, beat 1 beat 2 ™ ™ œbeat 3 ™ œ beat 4 ™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ? 44 œœ ™ œœ œœ ™ œœ œ™ œ œ™ œ ? ™™ beat 2™™ ™™ beat 3 ™™ ™™ beat 4 ™™ ™™m.2, etc. ™™ m.1, beat 1 ™ œ œ ™ beat 3œ œœ™™ beat 4 œœ œœ™™ œœ m.1, beat 1 beat 2 œ ? 44 m.1, beat 1 beat 2 beat 3 beat 4 m.1, beat 1 beat 2 beat 3 beat 4

{ { { { { {{ Step 5

{{

m.1, beat 1

beat 2

beat 3

beat 4

Play in real time (no meter or defined roll speed)

& ™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ ™™ œ œœ œ œœ ™™ ™™ œœ œœCHART œ & œ PROGRESS ? ™™ ™™™ ™™™ œ œ ™™™ ™ 5.3 Combo& Strokes œœ œ œœ œ ™ ™ œœ œ- œœTriplets ™ ™(RH) œ œ œ œ œ beat 2 5.3 Combo? Strokes - Triplets (LH) ™™m.1, beat 1 ™ ™ œœ œœ ™ ™ œœ œœ ™™ ? ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ m.1, beat 1 beat 2 5.4 Chasing Hands

m.1, beat 1

beat 2

™™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œ œ ™™ œ œ œœ ™ ™ œœ œœ ™™ ™™ œ qœœ =œ 45 ™™™™ œœ œœq = 40 ™™™ ™™™ œ œ ™™™™ ™ œœ œœ ™ ™ œœ œœ ™ œœ œœ beat 4 œœ œœ ™™ beat 3 ™ ™ œœ Step œœ ™ 1 ™ œœStepœœ2 ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ beat 3 beat 4 beat 3

beat 4

q = 50

q = 55

q = 60

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

q = 65

q = 70

33


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 6 OBJECTIVE: SINGLE INDEPENDENT, SCALE PASSAGES • Keep the mallets at an interval of a fifth throughout the exercise. • Do not let the outside mallets “wander” as you play fast passages with the inside mallets. • The final octave double-stop serves as a placeholder for the outside mallets.

2 3 6.1 Ebb 3 major

& b b 4 2 3 2 3 2 œ3 œ2 œ3 b 3 œ & b b 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ1 œœœœœ œ 1 bb œ b œ & œœœ œ œ œ b œ &b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2

3

2

3

2

3

etc.

œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœœœ œ etc.

œ b œœœœœ œ œ œ4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ &b b b œ œ & b b 3 œ2 œ3 œ2 œ3 œ2 œ3 œ2 œetc.œ œ œ œ œ œ 4

3

2

3

2

3

2

3

2

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ

œ œœœœ œ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œœœœ œ œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ

b œ œœœœ &b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ b œ œ œ & b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ etc.

œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ œœ œ

œ œœœœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ

6.2 A major

### 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 etc. & # # 4 2 3 œ2 œ3 œ2 œ3 œ2 œ3 etc.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 œ œ œ & # 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ1 œ œ œ œœœœ œœ œ œœœœ

etc.

Practice in as many keys as you1 feel comfortable playing.

PROGRESS CHART 6.1 Eb major 6.2 A major

34

q = 60

q = 65

q = 70

q = 75

q = 80

q = 85

q = 90


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 1

OBJECTIVE: SINGLE ALTERNATING, STATIC INTERVAL, LOW-HIGH ROTATION

3 &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 4 3 4 3 4 3 œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? & 4Hands œ œ œ 6.3 (Low-High) œ œ œ œ Together œ œ 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 4 3 4 3 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 ?&434œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ & œ 2 œ2 œ œ2 œ2 œ œ2 œ2 œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? 43 œ œ œ œ 2 œœ 2 œ 2 œœ 2 œ 2 œœ2 œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ ? & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ ?& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? œ 3

{ { {{ { {

4

3

4

3

4

• Make sure the single alternating strokes feel smooth and even. • Watch out for flams between mallets 1/3 and 2/4.

3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œœ 4 & œ 6.4 Permutation œ 5œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 1 4 2 3 1 4 2 3 &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3œ 1 4 2 3œ 1 4 2 œ 3 &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3

1

4

2

3

1

4

œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ Œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œœ Œ œ œ

œœ œ Œ œ Œ œ œ Œ

ŒŒ

œ œ

œ œ

Œ

Œ

Œ

2

etc.

Continue as you did with Permutation 1 in Lesson 2.

etc.

Continue as you did with Permutation 1 in Lesson 2.

6.5 Permutation 6 (“Yellow”)

3 &4

1

3

2

4

1

3

2

4

œ œ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œ1 3 2 4 œ1 3 2 4 œ 3 &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 1 3 2 4œ 1 3 2 4œ 3 &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ q = 90 œ q = 95 œ œ œ CHART PROGRESS

q = 100

q = 105

q = 110

q = 115

q = 120

6.3 Hands Together (Low-High) 6.4 Permutation 5 (3142)

6.5 Permutation 6 (“Yellow” or 1324)

35


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

SOLO 2 Watcher of the Skies

Tracy Thomas

q = 104 4 3

4 3

3 & b 4 œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ

{

3

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™™ œ œ œ œ œ œ

3

etc.

? b 43

pp

f (1st time) p (2nd time)

- ™™ œœ œœ Œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ -œ -œ œ œ Œ

Œ

Œ

& b œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ

5

{

? b -œœ -œœ Œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ -œ -œ œ œ Œ

Œ

2

2

2

2

2

Œ

2

-œ -œ œ œ Œ

Œ

-œ -œ œ œ Œ

Œ

(L.H. only)

& b œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ

10

{

?b

œ œ œ œ œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ -œ -œ œ œ Œ

Œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

-œ -œ œ œ Œ

-œ -œ œ œ Œ

Œ

2 3 & b œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ 4 œœ œ œœ œ 4 œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ

14

{

? b -œœ -œœ Œ

36

œ œ 2

2

2 4

œ œ œ 2

2

2

p

3 -œœ œœ- Œ 4

-œ œ

Œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ- œœŒ

© 2019 Tapspace Publications, LLC, Portland, OR. (ASCAP) International copyright secured. All rights reserved.

-œ œ


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 1

& b œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ

1.

18

{

? b -œœ -œœ Œ

&b Œ

{

> > ? b œœ œœ mf

2 3

3

2

3

œ

3

&b Œ

{

>œ >œ ?b œ œ œœ b & œœ

31

{

?b

f

œœ œœ

2

œ-

3

œ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

2

œ

2

3

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

2 3

œ

2

>œ >œ œ œ

œœ œœ

3

œ

3

œ- Œ

3

3

3

œ- œ-

œ

œœ œœ

3

2

œ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

>œ >œ œ œ

3

>œ >œ œ œ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

2 3

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ ∑

3

3

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

3

œ-

3

œ- œ-

œ

œœ œœ

3

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ ∑

3

3

2 3

œ œ œ œ œ -œ >œ >œ œ œ œ

œ

2

3

œ œ œ œ œ œ

2

3

œ

3

œ

œœœ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

2

3

œ

œœ œœ

2

œ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

3

2 3

œ

œœ œœ

3

œ- -œ œ- œ Œ -

3

œ- Œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ

™™

-œ -œ œ- -œ Œ

œœ œœ œœ œœ b & œœ œœ œœ œœ ?b

3

œ- œ-

œœ œœ

35

{

3

>œ >œ œ œ

2 1

27

™™

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ- œ œ œ Œ - - œ

∑ pp

Œ

3

23

2.

3

2

œ

>œ4

œ

œ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œœœ œ

œœœ œ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œœœ œ

œœœ œ

œœœ œ

œœœ œ ∑

37


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

œ œ œ &b œ œ œ

39

{

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

Œ

œ œ œ œ œ ?b 2

2

2

2

mp

œœ œœ Œ

2

Œ

& b œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

?b

œœ œœ Œ

43

{

œ œ œ œ œ œ

2

2

2

2

2

2

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œœ œœ Œ

œœ œœ Œ

Œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ Œ

Œ

Œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ Œ

Œ

(L.H. only)

& b œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

?b

œœ œœ Œ

œœ œœ Œ

œœ œœ Œ

47

{

œ œ œ œ œ

Œ

Œ

2 3 & b œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ 4 œœ œ œœ œ 4 œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ

51

{

œ œ

? b œœ œœ Œ

2

2

& b œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ

55

{

? b œœ œœ Œ

38

Œ

Œ

œ œ œ 2 4 2

2

p

3œ œ 4œ œ Œ

2

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2

2

2

2

2

œœ

Œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ Œ

œœ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

pp


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 1

PERFORMANCE NOTES Technical Considerations One of the challenges in this piece is found in the first measure. This is a combination stroke because you have two different stroke types that follow each other in the same hand. The first is a double vertical followed by a single independent. One is vertical; the other is lateral. This technique is one of the main parts of this piece so you’ll want to make sure your right hand can master this combination of strokes. If necessary, go back and review exercises 5.2 and 5.3. Musical Considerations The most important musical elements to consider in this work are balance, notation, and harmony. Balance Whenever the left hand has the melody, the balance between the hands is always challenging. For most beginners, it is easier to get a solid sound in the right hand. Therefore, the right hand is almost always louder. What I love about this piece is the left hand has the melody – a lot! This is a great opportunity to practice creating more volume in the left hand – or keeping that right hand volume under control. Make sure you pay attention to balance when working on this first section. Notation The middle section has some interesting notation. There are accents indicated in the left hand but only tenuto marks in the right hand. Tenuto marks indicate a slightly higher volume than non-tenuto notes, or “regular” notes. But with two different notations, there should be two different volumes. I would suggest that accents be played a little louder than tenuto marks. Harmony Measures 31–38 have a minimalist type of chord progression that needs to be played musically. Once again, one of my favorite sayings comes into play: All notes are NOT created equal. With this passage, all the eighth notes have a different responsibility. The downbeats should get a little more volume, and the repeated chords a little less. Chord changes within the bar might have a little more volume but not so much that it sounds like a printed accent. Sometimes the harmony changes only in the inner notes, and you should bring that out. Try playing it on the piano and see what sounds good there; then replicate that on the marimba.

39


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 7 OBJECTIVE: MIXED STROKES (SINGLE ALTERNATING/SINGLE INDEPENDENT) • Both hands involve a rotation in the stroke, but they are different types of rotation that must remain independent. • As you move to the upper manual, watch the beating spot. When both mallets are on the upper manual, feel free to move to the center of the bar. When splitting the manual with one hand, move the body to assist the arm position.

7.1 Mixed Strokes (Single Alternating/Single Independent)

## 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 & 4œœœœœœœ

{

œœœœœœœ

œ œœœœœœ

œœœœœœœ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ ? ## 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 1

2

1

2

# œ &# œ œ œ œ œ œ

{

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? ## œ œ œ œ 3 4 3 4 3 4 3 4 ## œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? ##

{

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

## œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœ œœœ œ œ œ œœœœœœœ œœœœœœœ œœœœ œœœ ? ## œ œ œ œ

{

PROGRESS CHART

&

7.1 Mixed Strokes SA/SI 40

q = 60

q = 65

q = 70

q = 75

q = 80

q = 85

q = 90


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 1

OBJECTIVE: FOUR-MALLET ROLLS, OUTSIDE MALLET STEPWISE MOTION Remember the steps: 1. Block Chords – continuous 16ths 2. Block Chords – dotted eighth rhythm 3. Split Chords – continuous (start with both hands) 4. Split Chords – just the essential four notes (“heart”) 5. Play as written, moving away from specific rhythm.

7.2 Outside Mallet Movement Roll and connect all notes

4 & 4 œw œ œ œ w w ẇ ? 44 w w

{

œw œ œ œ w w ẇ œ œ w w

w œw œ œ œ w ẇ œ œ w w

œ w œw œ w œ œ œ œ œ œ w œ w &4 w w w w & 4 œw œ œ œ w œw œ œ œ œw œ œ œ w w w w ẇ œ œ w w ẇ ẇ œ w œ œ w w ? w œ w w ẇ ẇ ? 44 w œ œ w œ œ w

{{

œw œ œ œ œ œ w w

œ œ w w w w ẇ ẇ œ œ

w w œw œ œ œ œ œ w w w w

Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 w w œ w œ œ œ w œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w w œ w w 7.2 Outside Mallet Movement & w w w ẇ œ œœ œœ œ w œwœ œ œ œ ẇ œ œ œ œw œ œ œ œẇ œ œ œ œ œ ẇ œ œ œ œ w œ w ?? ## 44 œœ œ œwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ OBJECTIVE: DV, OCTAVE INTERVAL EXPANSION, STEPWISE MOTION

PROGRESS CHART

{

• • • •

w w

w w

This is a repeat of Exercise 3.5, just in a new key. Pay attention to body position as you navigate the accidentals. Independent grip users: Make sure that you arrive at the octave with the thumb on top of the stick. The octave must LOOK good as well as SOUND good. Don’t let the double vertical stroke flam between the mallets.

7.3 Wide Interval Octave Expansion

œ œ œ ? ## 44 œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

PROGRESS CHART

q = 60

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ q = 65

q = 70

q = 75

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ q = 80

etc.

q = 85

q = 90

7.3 Wide Interval Octave Expansion (RH) 7.3 Wide Interval Octave Expansion (LH) 41


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 8 OBJECTIVE: FOUR-MALLET ROLLS, INSIDE MALLET STEPWISE MOTION • Once again, Steps 1–5 are not written out here but it is important you always practice them first. • Try to slightly bring out the volume of the inside notes that change without putting a flam in the stroke. This can be done with just a little bit more pressure in the grip.

8.1 Inside Mallet Movement

4 &4 w œ œ ˙

Roll and connect all notes

{

? 44 ˙™ w

& œw œ ˙

{

? ˙™ w

œ

œw œ ˙

œ

˙w™

& œw œ ˙ œ ˙w™ ?

w œ œ ˙

{

œ

˙™ w

œw œ ˙

˙w™

w œ œ ˙ ˙w™

œw œ ˙

œ

˙w™

w œ œ ˙

œ

˙™ w

{

˙w™

œw œ ˙

œ

˙™ w

Split chords – continuous (lead with both hands)

Step 4

Split chords – just the essential four notes (“heart”)

Step 5

Play as written – moving away from specific rhythm

#

∑ ∑ PROGRESS CHART &# ∑

8.1 Inside Mallet Movement

? ##

œ

˙w™

˙™ w

œw œ ˙

œ

w œ œ ˙

œ

˙™ w

w œ œ ˙

˙™ w

œ

œ

œ

w œ œ ˙ w w

Block chords – dotted eighth rhythm

Step 2

?Step ## 3 ∑

42

œ

w œ œ ˙

œ

Remember the Chorale steps ## ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ &Step 1 Block chords – continuous 16ths

œw œ ˙

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 1

2 OBJECTIVE: SINGLE ALTERNATING, STATIC INTERVAL, HIGH-LOW ROTATION • Again, make sure the single alternating strokes feel smooth and even. • Watch out for flams between mallets 1/3 and 2/4. 4 3 4 3

3œ œ œ œ œ œ 4 & œ 8.2 Hands Together 4 3 4 3 (High-Low) 3 & 43 œ4 œ3 œ4 œ3 œ œ œ ? & 443 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? 43 œœ2 œ1 œœ2 œ1 œœ œ œ ? 43 œ œ œ 2 1 2 1 & œ 2 œ1 œ2 œ1 œ œ œ & œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ ? & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ?

{{ { {{ {

œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ

œ

Œ ŒŒ

œ œ œ œ

Œ Œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

2 2

Œ

Œ ŒŒ Œ Œ

8.3 3Permutation œ œ7

&4 3 & 43 &4

2 4 1 3 2 4 1 3

œ œ œ œ2 4 œ1 œ3 œ2 4 œ1 œ3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2 4 1 3 2 4 1 3 œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œ œœœ œœœ œœ œ œœœ œœ

etc.

Continue as did with Permutation 1 in Lesson 2.

etc.

Continue as did with Permutation 1 in Lesson 2.

8.4 Permutation 8 (“wolleY”)

3 &4 3 & 43 &4

4 2 3 1 4 2 3 1

œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œœœ œ œ 4 œ 2 3 1 4 œ 2 3 1 œ œ œ œ œ4 2 œ3 1 œ4 2 œ3 1 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœœ œœœœ œœ œœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

PROGRESS CHART

q = 90

q = 95

q = 100

q = 105

q = 110

q = 115

q = 120

8.2 Hands Together (High-Low) 8.3 Permutation 7 (2413) 8.4 Permutation 8 (“wolleY” or 4231)

43


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

SOLO 3 Song for Jessica Playful q = 110

## 3 & 4

{

œœ Œ Œ

f

? ## 43 œœ Œ Œ

œœ Œ Œ œœ Œ Œ

œœ Œ Œ

œœ ™™ œ ™ œ™ œœ ™™ œ ™ œ™

œœ ™™ œJ œ

œ Œ Œ œ

œœ Œ Œ

Jamieson Carr

œœ œ ‰ œj œ œ œœ œœ ™™ œœ ™™

œœ œ œ œ œœ Œ

Œ

## &

8

œ- œ- œ œ œœœ- œ- œœœ œ œ œ œ œ-œ - mp œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ ? ## œ Œ Œ

{

## & œ-

13

{

? ##

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œ-

œœ œœ

œ

œœ

œ œ œ œ >œ

œœ

œ >

œœ

œ >

œœ

œ >

œœ

> œ œ ## œœ œœ >œœ œœ œ >œœ œœ >œœ œœ œ >œœ œœ œ >œœ œœ >œœ œœ >œœ œœ œœ œ œ & œ œ œ œ > œœ œœ > œœ œœ > œœ œœ > œœ œœ f

17

{

? ##

mf

© 2019 Tapspace Publications, LLC, Portland, OR. (ASCAP) International copyright secured. All rights reserved. 44


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 1

# œ œ & # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™ Œ ™ œ ™ Œ ™ œ™ >œ>œ>œ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ ? ## ∑ ∑ Œ ™ œ ™ Œ ™ œ™ Œ ™

23

Ϊ

{

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

Ϫ Ϊ

œœ ™™ œœœ ™™™ ™ œ Œ™

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ >œ œ œ œ ## œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ

31

{

? ##

## & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ-

36

{

mf

? ## # & # œ-

œœ œœ

œ-

œœ œœ

41

{

? ##

œœ œœ

# & # œœ ™™ œ ™ œ™ ™ ? ## œœ ™ œœ ™™

47

{

œ-

œœ œœ

œ-

œœ Œ Œ œ Œ Œ œ

œœ œœ

œ-

œœ œœ

œœ ™™ œJ œ œœ Œ Œ

œ

œœ

œ-

œœ œœ

œ-

œœ œœ

œ-

œœ

œ-

œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ

œœ œ œ œ œœ Œ

Œ

rit.

œœ œœ ‰ œj œ œœ œœ ™™ œœ ™™

œœ

œœ

œ- -œ

œœ Œ Œ œœ Œ Œ

œœ

-œ -œ

œœ

œœ Œ Œ œœ Œ Œ œœœ ™™™

œœ œ œ œ œ œ™ p œ Œ Œ ∑ œ

45


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

PERFORMANCE NOTES Song for Jessica does not have any new technical elements. Instead, there are some great musical ideas to discuss.

Musical Considerations The three primary musical ideas that need to be addressed in this piece are tenuto markings, the hemiola, and musical themes.

Tenuto Markings This piece has a really nice melody that needs to be brought out. You’ll notice that the composer uses tenuto marks to help identify the notes that constitute the melody. This notation begins in measure 9 and lets you know to play those notes a little louder and/or play the accompanying notes a little softer. Here is another situation where I can use one of my favorite sayings: All notes are NOT created equal.

Hemiola A hemiola occurs when a written-out rhythm in a composition actually creates the feel of a different meter signature. The composer plays with this idea throughout the entire 3 piece. He starts with a 3/46 meter but 4 œ to œdealœwith.œ In œ3/4 œthey8are usually &notes will often write in a 6/8 feel. In either meter, there are six eighth beamed in three groups of two, and in 6/8 they are usually beamed in two groups of three.

3 6 &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ 8

6 &8 œ œ œ œ œ œ

The first appearance of the 6/8 feel is in measure 3. With the use of the dotted notes, there are only two 6 bar, “big beats” in this œ œwhereas œ œin the œ first œ measure you clearly see three quarter notes/rests.

&8

Sometimes the composer uses the tenuto marking to indicate the 6/8 feel even though the eighth note groupings don’t show it. Notice how in measures 9 and 10, the six eighth notes are beamed according to the indicated 3/4 meter, but the composer has included tenuto markings on the first and fourth eighth notes. Those tenuto markings will override the beaming, and you should hear 6/8 instead of 3/4. This happens throughout the rest of the piece and is an important musical concept to understand.

Musical Themes Music can often be divided up into sections just like we divide up a story. There are paragraphs (sections), sentences (themes), and ideas (motives). In this piece there are three basic sections, and two of those sections are heard twice, once at the beginning and once at the end. These sections often provide an opportunity to make different musical decisions. Perhaps the return of the first theme, heard at the very end, could be played softer than in the beginning – like a reminder. This is just one possible idea that could be drawn from the connection between these two identical passages.

46


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 9 OBJECTIVE: FOUR-MALLET ROLLS, INTERVAL EXPANSION, JUMPING MOTION • I recommend adding one more step to this exercise by first practicing the entire exercise as quarter note, double vertical strokes. Then complete the rest of the chorale steps. • Remember to move your feet so that you are comfortable playing between the manuals.

9.1 Interval Expansion with Major Chords

œœ œœ œœ œœ

œœ œœ œœ œœ #œœ œœ œœ œœ w w

w w

w #w

w #w

w w

Roll and connect all notes.

œ 4 & 4 œœ œœ œœ œœ #œœ œœ œœ œœ #œœ œœ œœ œ w w ? 44 w w w w

{

œœ œœ œœ œœ

#œœ œœ œœ œœ # &

{

?

w w

#w w

w & w

{

? œœ

œœ

œœ

œ œ

w w

œœ œœ œœ œœ ## œœ œ œœ œœ # œœ œ œœ œœ œ œ

w #w #œœ

œœ

w w

œœ

œ œ

w #w #œœ

œœ

œœ

œ œ

w w

w w

˙˙

œœ œœ œœ œœ

˙˙

w w

By now, you should have memorized all five steps. If you need a reminder, refer to Lesson 1.

&

{

PROGRESS CHART ?

∑ 9.1 Interval Expansion &

?

9.2 Left Hand Stamina

{

48

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

q = 40

q = 45

q = 50

q = 55

q = 60

∑ ∑

∑ q = 65

q = 70

4 4 4 4


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

OBJECTIVE: DOUBLE VERTICALS, STEPWISE MOTION, INTERVAL EXPANSION, OCTAVES, STAMINA • This is a chops-building exercise for octaves in the right hand and interval expansions in the left hand. • Make sure the right hand plays fluid eighth notes instead of short, quick strokes that might mimic the left hand.

9.2 Wide Intervals: Left Hand Stamina

œ œ œ 4 & 4 œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ ? 44 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

{

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

{

œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœ ? œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

{

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ

œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ

œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

œ œ œ & œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ ? œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

{

œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœ ? œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{

œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ

œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ

œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ

œ Œ Ó œ œœ Œ Ó 49


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 10 OBJECTIVE: DOUBLE VERTICAL, OCTAVES IN JUMPING MOTION • Keep the octave interval consistent. It is easy to shrink this large interval if your hands are not strong enough. 3 3 10.1 Double Octave j œ – Right œ Hand3 œ Vertical

3

œ 4 œ œ & 4 œ œ3 œœ œ œœ3 œ œœ 3 œj œ 4 œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ œ & œœ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ œJ œ œ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ 3 & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J 3

3

œœœœœœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ3 œ œœ3 œœJ œ œ3œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J œ3 œ œ œ 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ 3œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3

3

10.2 Double Vertical Octave – Left Hand

œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ ? 44 œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œJ œ œ ? 44 œ 3œ œ œ 3œ œ3 œ œ J œ œ œ 3 3 œ 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ ? œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœJ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 3 œ ? œ 3œ J 3

3

3

œ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œJ œ œ3œ œ œ œœ œ œœ3 œ œ œ 3J 3 33 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 œ œJ œ œ œœ3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J œ œ

œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœJ œ œ œ œ3œ œ œ3 œ œœ œ 3œ J 3 3œ œ œ œ 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œ 3œ œ 3 3

3

œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œJ 3œ œ3œ œ3 J 3 3 œ3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œJ œ œ œ œ 3 œ œ œ 3œ œ J 3

3

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œœœœœ œ œœ œœœœœœœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œJ œ œ3œ œ œ 3œ œ œ3 œ œ œ J 3 33 3 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ3 œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœJ œ œœœœœ 3œ œ3œ 3 J 3 3 œ 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 œ œ 3 œ œ œ œ 3

œ œ œ œ

3

OBJECTIVE: SINGLE INDEPENDENTS, OCTAVES IN JUMPING MOTION

4 ? 44 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 4 4 ? 44 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 4 10.3?Single 4 Independent 4 Octaves∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 4 4 Go 10.1 with mallets 2 and 4 (SI stroke type); Then play Exercise 10.2 4 to Exercise 4 and play ?back ∑ ∑ ? 4 ∑ 1 and 3. 4 ∑ with mallets ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ? ∑ ∑ ∑ q = 40 q = 45∑ q = 50 q = 55 ∑ q = 60 q = 65 ∑ PROGRESS CHART ? ∑ (RH) ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 10.1 DV Octave ? DV Octave 10.2 ∑ (LH) ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

• Play as single independent strokes with no flams. You may be able to play these strokes faster than the double verticals above.

{{ {{

10.3 SI Octave (mallets 2 and 4) 10.3 SI Octave (mallets 1 and 3)

50

4 4 & q = 704 4 4 4 4 &4


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

OBJECTIVE: SINGLE INDEPENDENTS, CHROMATIC SCALES

2

• Start off slowly but work up to a fast tempo. • Use a complete piston stroke on all quarter notes!

10.4 Chromatic Triplets

4 &4 4 &4

2

œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ #œ œ # œ œ # œ œ # œ œ # œ œ œ œ # œ œ # œ œ#œ <n> œ œ #œ #œ œ 3

3

2

3

2

3

3

3

3

2

3

2

3

2

3

3

2

3

1

3

1

3

3

3

3

etc.

2

œ œ œ œ continue pattern up œ œ #œ œ # œ œ # œ œ # œ œ # œ œ # œ œ # œ œ œ 3 œ 3# œ œ#œ3 <n> œ chromatically until œ # œ œ#œ œ # œ œ #œœ œ œ œ # œ œ # œ œ 3 œ # œ 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3œ <n> 2 œ 3 #œ 2 3œ 1 3 1 3 2 œetc. <n>œ œ ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ #œ & œ #œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ #œ <n>œ 3 3 3 3 3 continue pattern up œ 3 chromatically until œ#œ œ œ 3 3 œ # œ œ # œ œ œ œ # œ œ #œ <n>œ œ 2 4 2 3 etc. & œ2 #œ3œbœ2 œ3 #œ2 œ3#œ2 œ3 #œ2 œ3 <n>2œ 3#œ 2 <n>œ4œ ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ œ œ b œ œ b œ œbœ3 œ œbœ3 <n> œ œ œ b œ œbœ œ œbœ 3œbœ 3 3 œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ & 3

3

3

3

œ œ b œ œ b œ œbœ œ

3

3

3

œ œ œ b œ œ b œ œbœ œ œbœ œbœ œ œbœ œbœ œ œ <n> œ œ œ œ & bœ continue pattern up 3 b œ œ b œ chromatically until 3 3 3 3 œ b œ 3 3 œ œ bœ 3 3 3 3 œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ b œ ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ & œ œ 3 3 3 3 3 3 b œ œ b œ œ bœ œ œ bœ b œ continue pattern up chromatically until 3 3 œ bœ œ œ bœ ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ œ œ b œ œ b œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ &OBJECTIVE: ROLLS, EXPANDING VOICE 3 3 3 3 3

2

3

3

2

3

3

2

3

2

3

3

3

2

3

2

3

2

4

2

4

2

3

3

3

3

etc.

3 3. In the second measure, both hands will • The first measure starts off as a two-mallet roll with mallets 2 and eventually switch from playing single independent strokes to double vertical strokes, one hand at a time. • Make sure the rotation motion changes to a vertical motion between measures 1 and 2 so a flam does not occur when all four notes are played.

4 & b 4 ˙ ˙˙ w 10.5 Roll Expansionw˙ ˙ ˙

˙

˙˙

w w˙ ˙˙

˙

w w˙ ˙˙

˙˙

˙

˙˙

w w˙ ˙˙

4 w w˙˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙˙˙˙ w w & bb 4˙ ˙ ˙ ˙˙ w w w˙˙˙ ˙˙ w w w ˙ ˙ w ˙ ˙ w ˙ ˙ ˙ w ˙ ˙ ˙ w ˙ ˙ w ˙ ˙ ˙ w ˙ ˙ ˙ & ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ Roll all notes

&b ˙

˙˙

w w˙ ˙˙

˙

PROGRESS CHART

&

˙˙

w w˙ ˙˙

&

˙˙

w w˙ ˙˙

˙

˙˙

q = 90

q = 100

q = 110

q = 120

q = 130

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

10.4 Chromatic Triplets

10.5 Roll Expansion

˙

w w˙ ˙˙

q = 140

q = 150

51


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

SOLO 4 Breezy 4 &4

{

Roll all notes

ẇ mp

{

œ

œ

? w w

˙ & ˙

9

{

œ œ

? w w

& ˙˙

{

? ẇ

52

˙ œ

f

13

œ̇

˙˙ dim.

˙

œ œ

œw

˙

œ

˙™ ˙

œ

˙˙ ™™

œ

œ

ẇ ˙

5

˙™

œw

œ

œ

? 44 w w

&

Julia Gaines

w w

w w

œ œ

œ œ

œ

œ œ

˙˙

cresc.

˙˙

œ

œ œ

œ œ

œ œ

œ

w w

œœ œœ

˙

œ œ

˙ ˙

œ œ

œ œ

ww

œ œ

œ̇ ™

˙

œœ

œœ œœ

œœ ˙˙

œœ

œœ œ

œœ

œ œ

w w

mp

w w

© 2019 Tapspace Publications, LLC, Portland, OR. (ASCAP) International copyright secured. All rights reserved.

© 2018 Tapspace Publications, LLC (ASCAP). Portland, OR. International copyright secured. All rights reserved.

œ


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

PERFORMANCE NOTES This is a short chorale but allows you the opportunity to practice both vertical and horizontal thinking. The technical aspects of playing these chords will force you to think vertically about the transitions between each chord. The musical aspects of playing this accompanied melody will force you to think horizontally about playing this linear melodic line. Technical Considerations 1. Work through each of the five chorale steps listed in Lesson 1 to ensure smooth transitions between these chords. Measures 7, 11, and 15 will need the most practice, as those measures have the most chords. 2. Think vertically and listen for accurate transitions without any wandering mallets on wrong notes. Musical Considerations 1. Play the melody (top voice â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all stems up) several times to practice different ways to phrase the piece with the dynamics. This is a great time to experiment with different musical ideas. 2. Once you are happy with phrasing and dynamics youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve decided to use, go back and add in the other two mallets. Try to make sure the melody and phrasing sound like it did when you played the melody by itself.

53


...THE HEART OF THE CHORALE

Part 2

55


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 11 OBJECTIVE: DOUBLE VERTICAL, STEPWISE INTERVAL EXPANSIONS AND CONTRACTIONS • • • •

Keep your thumb flat and relaxed on the mallet, allowing it to move along the mallet shaft. The mallet should roll across the index finger while the thumb slowly moves up the stick (independent grip only). Make sure your arm comes away from your body on narrow intervals and returns to your side on wider intervals. Be sure to practice with both hands.

11.1 Interval Expansion and Contraction – A major 3 3 ### 3 & 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ ### 3 œœ œ3 œ œ œ3 œ œ & 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ### œ 3œ œ œ 3œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # ## œ œ3 œ œ œ3 œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ

3

œ œ3 œ œ

œ œ œ œ3

œ œ œ œ œœ œœ3 œœ œœ œœ œœ

3

œ œ3 œ œ œœ

œ œ œ œ 3 œ œ3 œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œ œ œ œ

3 3 11.2 Interval Expansion and Contraction – Eb major 3

b 3 œ & b b 4 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ3 œœ œ 3 bb 3 œ b & 4 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ 3 3 b œ œ œ & b b œ œ3 œ œœ œœ3 œœ œœ b œ & b b œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

œ œ3 œ œ

œ œ œ œ

3

œœ œœ3 œœ œœ

œ œ œ œ œ 3œ œ œ œœ 3 œœ œœ œœ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 œ

œœ œœ

3

œœ 3 œœ œ œ œ œ

œœ 3œ œ

œ 3œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

3

3

3

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ œ3 3 3 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ 3 3 3 œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ 3 3 œ3 œ œ œ3 œ œ œ œ Continue œ œ œœupœœkeyboard œœ œœasœœdesired œœ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ3œ œœ

œ œ3 œ œ

œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ 3 œ

œ3 œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ

3

œ œ œ 3 œ

œœ œœ œ œ œ œ

3

3

œœ 3œ œ œœ œœ

3

3

œœ œœ

œœ 3œ œ

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ 3œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ3œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ3œ œœ

3

3

3

Continue up keyboard as desired

PROGRESS CHART

3 11.1& Interval 4 Expansion:∑ A major (RH) 11.1 Interval 3 Expansion:∑ A major (LH) &4 11.2 Interval Expansion: Eb major (RH) & Interval Expansion:∑ Eb major (LH) 11.2 56

&

q = 40

∑ ∑

q = 45

∑ ∑

q = 50

∑ ∑

q = 55

q = 60

∑ ∑

q = 65

∑ ∑

q = 70


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

OBJECTIVE: DOUBLE VERTICAL, SKIPPING INTERVAL EXPANSIONS TO OCTAVE • • • •

When expanding or contracting intervals, do not change your grip. The inner mallet should not cross the center of your body. Keep the arm to the right or left of your body. Play with each hand separately.

5

œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœœ œœ œœ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ

11.3 & 4 Fifth œ œ to œ Octave œ œ œ œ– Cœmajor œ œ

œœœœœœœœœ 5 & 4 œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ & œœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œ & œœœœœœœœœ

œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœœ œœ œœ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ

œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœœ œœ œœ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ

œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ

œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœœ œœ œœ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ

11.4 Fifth to Octave – Bb major

b &b b &b b &b

œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ b & b œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ

œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ

Practice in as many keys as you feel comfortable playing.

b

b CHART ∑ 45 PROGRESS & ∑

{ { {

bb ∑ 45 b ∑ 45 b 11.4 Fifth to Octave (Bb major RH) 11.4 ? Fifth to∑ Octavebb(Bb major ∑ LH)45 b ∑ ∑ &b bb ∑ ∑ & ? bb ∑ ∑ ?b ∑ ∑ 11.3 Fifth to Octave (C major - RH)

& ?

∑ ∑

11.3 Fifth to Octave (C major - LH)

∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

4 4 4 44 4 4 4

q = 40

∑ ∑ ∑

4 4 4 44 4 4 4

q = 45

∑q = 50 ∑q = 55 q∑ = 60

q = 65

∑ ∑

∑ ∑

∑ ∑

∑ ∑

∑ ∑

∑ ∑

∑ ∑

∑ ∑

∑ ∑

∑ ∑

q = 70

& & 57


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 12 OBJECTIVE: MIXED STROKES (SA/SI) INDEPENDENCE • Keep the muscle motions involved with these two strokes independent of each other. • Do not lose grip control when expanding and contracting the intervals. • If you would like to see all the notes for the exercise, refer to Sequential Studies - Book 1, Lesson 13. This includes all the ascending notes for this exercise.

12.1 Changing Intervals/Mixing Strokes

œœ œœ œœ œœ 3 Œ Œ œ œ œ b œ œ & 4 œœ œœ œœ bbœœ œœ œœ <n>œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ continue pattern until œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œœœ 33 œ œ œ œ œ œ bœbœ œ œ œ œ <n>œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ bbœœbœ œœ œ ? œ œ ŒŒ ŒŒ & 44 œœ œœ œœ bbœœ œœ œœ <n>œ œ œ b œ œ œœœ œ continue pattern until œ œ œ ? 43 œ œ œ œ œ œ bœbœ œ œ œ œ <n>œ œ œ œ œ œ bœbœ œ œ Œ Œ œœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ & œœœœœœ œ Œ Œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ continue pattern until œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ bœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ ? œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ & œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ ŒŒ ŒŒ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ continue pattern until œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ Œ ?

{ { { {

OBJECTIVE: DOUBLE VERTICAL CHORDS, INCORPORATION OF UPPER MANUAL

• Maintain the correct angle of the arm. Often both arms will not be in the same position. • Use your feet to adjust to the correct angle. • This exercise is good preparation for the next eight permutations.

2 & 4 œœ œœ œœ œœ ##œœ œœ œœ œœ 12.2 Chromatic b œœ œœ œœBlockœœ Fourths # œœ œœ œœ œœ 2 & 4 bœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ ##œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ & b œœ œœ œœ œœ ##œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & bbbœœbœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ & bœbœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ bœ & bbbœœœ

58

2 &4

œœœ œ

œœœ œ

#œœœœœœœ œ

œœœ œœœ

œœœœœ œ

œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œ œ œ œ ∑

œœœœœ œ

œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ bbbœœœ œœœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ

œœœœœœ œœ

œ bœœœœœœœ

œœœœœ œ

œ œœœœœœœ

œœœœœ œ

œœœ œ

œœœ bbbbœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ bbbbœœœ œœœ œœœ

œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œ œ œ œ

œœœ œœœ

œœœ œœœ

œœœœ œœœœ

œœœœ œœœœ

œœœ œœœ bbbœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œœœ bœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ

2 4

œœœœ œœœœ

œœœ œ

4 4


œ œ œœ œ œ 4 œ bœ œlevel 2...the œ œ œ b œ heart of the chorale Part 2 œ &4 œ & bœœ œ œ 3 2 œ 4 1 œ bœ œ INCORPORATION œ 2 3 1 4 œ b œ OBJECTIVE: SINGLE ALTERNATING PERMUTATIONS, OF UPPER œ & bœMANUAL œ & œ & œ • Use your feet to keep the body at the correct angle when moving between the manuals. 3 2 3chromatically 1 4 up the keyboard 2 reach 4 1 • Move until you the top octave. 4 1 3 2 • This is written in fourths but you can play this exercise with as many intervals as you feel comfortable.

œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ 4 œ bœ œ œ œ &œ bœœ œ &4 œ œ œ œ &œ œ 3 œ1 bœ4 œ bœ œ 3 2 3 2 œ 2 4 œ 1 bœ 4 1 œ 12.3 Permuation 1 & & œ œ & œ 4 1œ bœ4 œ2 3 œ œ œ 4 1œ bœ3 œ 2 œ œ œ 3 œ 1œ œ4 2œ œ œ #œ <n>œ #œ &4 œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ 4 & 4 œ 3bœ 2 4 œ 1 œ œ & œbœ œœbœ œ œ œ œ &œ œœ œ bœœ œ œœ œ&#œ <n>œ œ œ#œ bœ œ3 œ1 bœ4 3œ 2 2 4 4 1 1 2 3 œ œ b œ 4 1 3 2 œ b œ & & œ & œ œ 12.4 Permuation 22 œ 12.5 3Permuation 32 12.6 1Permuation 44 12.7 Permuation 5 3 2 1 4 4 1œ 3 b œ & œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ b œ b œ & & & 2 3 œ1 4 & œ œ œ œ œ3 œ 3 1 4 2 & bœ4 1 œ3 œ2 & œ1 œ4 bœ2 & œ2 œ3 1 bœ4 1 3 2 4 2 4 1 3 3 1œ 4 2 œ b œ & œ œ bœ8 œ 12.8 Permuation 12.9 œPermuation 7 12.10œ Permuation œ bœ 6œ 3 œ b œ œ & & b œ œ œ & & œ1 4 2 œ œ œ œ 1 3 2 4 & œ1 œ4 bœ2 3 & 3 bœ1 œ4 œ2 & bœ4 1 œ3 œ2 1 4 2 3 1 2 4 1 3 œ 3 2 œ 4bœ & œ œ œ bœ œ œ b œ œ œ œ bœ b œ œ & & œ œ & œ 4 1 3 2 & q = 60 q = 70 q = 80 q = 90 q = 100 q = 110 q = 120 œ PROGRESS CHART œ œ 1 3 2 4 2 4 1 3 12.1 Intervals & bœChanging 4 1 & 3 bœ1 œ4 œ2 œ3 œ2 2 4 1œ 3 4 2 3q = 40 1 q = 45 q = 50 q = 55 q = 60 q = 65 q = 70 œ b œ & œ œBlock Fourths œ 12.2 Chromatic œ bœ œ œ œ b œ œ b œ & œ & œ b œ & œ œ & 3 œ1 4 2 œ bœ œ q = 90 q = 95 2q = 100 q = 105 q = 110 q = 115 q = 120 4 1 3 4 2 3 1 1 3 2 4 3 1 4 2 & œ 12.3 Permutation 1 (3241) 4 2 3 2 (2314) 1 œ 12.4 Permutation œ b œ & œ œ bœ œ 12.5 Permutation 3 (1423) œ œ œ b œ œ & b œ œ & 4 œ & Permutation 12.6 œ 1 3 42 (4132) 12.7 Permutation 1 3 2 5 (3142) 4

2

4

1

3

œ œ b œ & œ œ œ 12.10 Permutation 8œ (4231 or “wolleY”) bœ œ b œ & œ & 2 4 œ1 3

4

2

3

1

12.8 Permutation 6 (1324 or “Yellow”) 12.9 Permutation 7 (2413)

2

4

1

3

4

2

3

1

59


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 13 OBJECTIVE: DOUBLE VERTICAL INDEPENDENCE, JUMPING INTERVALS • Maintain the right hand at the same interval while expanding intervals in the left hand. • Do not lose grip control as you expand and contract the intervals. • You can also play this exercise using major chords as written out in 9.1.

4 & 4 œœ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 13.1 Large Interval Independence – Left Hand œœ œœ œœ ? 44 œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ & 4 œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ ? 44œ œœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœ œœœ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ ? œœœ œœ œœœ œœ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ ? œœ œ œœ œ œ

{ { { {

13.2 Large Interval Independence – Right Hand

4 œœ &4

{ { { {

? 44 &4

œ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ

œœ

œ œœ

œ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ ? 44œ œœ œœœ œœœ œœœ &

œ œ ? œ & œ ? œ

60

œ œ œ

œ œ

œ œœ

œ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ

œœ

œ œœ

œ œ

œ œ œ

œœœœ œœœ œ

œ œœ

œ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ

œœ

œ œœ œœœœ œ œœ œ œ

œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ

œ œ

œ œ œ

œœœ œ œ œ œ

œ œ

œ œ

œœ

œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ

œœ

œ œ

œ œœ œ

œ œœ œ

œœ œ œ

œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ

œœœ œ œ œ œ

œ œ

œ œ

œœ

œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ

œœ

œ œ

œ œœ œ

œ œ œ

œœ œ œ

œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ

œœ œ œ œ œ

œ œ

œ œ

œœ œ œ

œæ ˙œæ ˙

˙˙æ ææ˙˙æ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ Œ œ œ œœ œ œ

˙˙ ææ

œœ œ œœ œ ˙˙œ ææ ˙ ˙ ææ˙ æ ˙ ˙ æ

Œ Œ

œœ

œ œ

Œ

œœ

œ œ œ

œ œ

œ œœ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ Œ œ œ œ

Œ Œ

œ œ

Œ


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

OBJECTIVE: CHORALE, JUMPING VOICE LEADING • Take this chorale through all five steps. • The inner voices jump. Bring out the inner voices. • There are moments where the inner voices share a note. Use both mallets on that note.

13.3 Chorale – Jumping Voice Leading

4 Roll all notes. &4 w œ œ œ œ wœ œ ˙ w ? 44 w w w

{

{

w & w

w w

{

w w

? œw œ œ œ œw œ ˙

4 &4

{

œw œ œ œ œw œ ˙

w w

w w

13.2 Large Interval Independence (RH)

w w

w w

œw œ œ œ œw œ ˙

q = 65

Step 2

w w

q = 70

w w

œw œ œ œ œ̇ œ Ó̇

∑ Step 1

œw œ œ œ œw œ ˙

w w

∑ q = 60

13.1 Large Interval Independence (LH)

w œ œ œ œ w w

œw œ œ œ œw œ ˙

w w

PROGRESS CHART

? 44

w w

w œ œ œ œ wœ œ ˙ w w w w

& wœ œ ˙ w ? w

w œ œ œ œ wœ œ ˙ w w w w

w œ œ œ œ wœ œ ˙ w w w w

∑ q = 75

q = 80

∑ q = 85

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

q = 90

13.3 Chorale – Jumping Voice Leading

&

2 4

?

2 4

{

61


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

SOLO 5 Escape

Larry Lawless

q = 120

4 & 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{

f

? 44 œœ Œ

œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œœ J J J

œœ œ œ Œ

œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œœ J J J

œœ œ Œ œ

œœ ‰ œœ J

6

Œ œ ‰ œj ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ & ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ Ó œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ > > mp > > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œœ ? ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ ‰ œœ Ó Ó œ œ œ œ œœ J J J J J

{

11

j œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œœ

& œ Œ œ

{

œœ œœ Œ

j œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œœ

œœ œœ

Œ

œœ Œ

œœ œ ? œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ J J J J

16

& œœ Œ

{

‰ œj œ œœ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œœ œ œœ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œœ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ f

œœ œ œ œ ? Ó

62

œœ œ ‰ œJ Œ

‰ œœ ‰ œœ Œ J J

œœ Œ

œœ œ ‰ œJ Œ

‰ œœ ‰ œœJ Œ J

© 2019 Tapspace Publications, LLC, Portland, OR. (ASCAP) International copyright secured. All rights reserved.

© 2018 Tapspace Publications, LLC (ASCAP). Portland, OR. International copyright secured. All rights reserved.

œœ Œ


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

2

21

∑ & œœ œ œœ ‰ œ ‰ œœ ‰ œ ‰ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ > mf > ? œœ ‰ œœ Œ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ Œ œœ Œ œœ ‰ œœ Œ ‰ œœ ‰ œJ ‰ œ œ œ œœ Œ œœ ‰ œœ J J J J J J J

{

26

‰ œ‰ œœ œ œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œ œ œ & ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœœ œ œœœ œ œ œœœœ

{

? ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œœ J J

œœ œ œ Œ

œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œœ J J J

31

& œœ œ œ œœ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > > > > œœ œ ? œœ ‰ œœJ Ó Œ œœ

{

36

& œœ

{

‰ œj Œ œ

œœ

? œœ œ œ œœ ‰ œ œœ J

œœ Œ

œœ Œ

œœ Œ

œœ Œ

œœ œ Œ œ

œœ

œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œœ J J J

œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ

œœ œœ Œ

œœ

Œ

œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ ‰ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ J

œœ œœ œœ >œœ Ó

> œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ Ó

œ f

œ ‰ jœ œ œ ∑

œ œ œ œœ Ó > >œœ œœ™™ J Ó

63


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

PERFORMANCE NOTES Technical Considerations The combination stroke that occurred in “Watcher of the Skies” appears in this solo, but now it is found in both hands. The composer was very creative in moving the melody around where it forces you to practice this stroke in every mallet. Measures 1 through 7 have the combination stroke in mallet 4, measures 9 through 16 have the stroke in mallet 2, measures 25 through 34 have the stroke in mallet 3, and measures 35 through 38 have it in mallet 1. Review the exercises from Lesson 5 in both hands to prepare for this solo. Musical Considerations This is a “groove” piece. In other words, you want to play this with the feeling of rhythm accompaniment underneath. It’s in 4/4 but it is not “march-like” with every beat in the measure receiving equal treatment. It has some neat syncopation that gives it a punchy feel and can easily be thought of in a bigger two feel – like it was in 2/2. There are very few accents written, but it is appropriate to add some smaller accents on some of the syncopated rhythms. Be careful as you do this, though, as two things could happen: 1. Make sure that you don’t lose any important linear lines. For example: In measures 15 and 16, the left hand melody needs to be clear. You wouldn’t want to punch the chords so much that you lose the important ascending line. 2. Don’t rush! It’s really easy to play syncopated notes faster and faster. I would encourage you to grab a friend and have them play shaker with you so you can really gauge your tempo. This is a fun piece and represents a significant portion of a type of musical style seen in four-mallet marimba literature. Have fun with this one!

64


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 14 OBJECTIVE: OCTAVE INDEPENDENCE, MIXED STROKES • • • •

Keep the right-hand octaves at a solid interval while changing manuals. The arm should bisect the octave. The single alternating strokes in the left hand should maintain the same interval while changing manuals. Keep the eighth notes in the right hand in the second measure of the pattern fluid, not short and choppy.

14.1 Octave Independence

4 & 4 œœ

œ bœ œ bœ œ ‰ œ ‰ bœ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ b œ œ œ bœ œ b œ œ

#œ #œ

& œœ

œ bœ œ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ

bœ bœ

œ & œ

œ œ

œ œ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ

#œ & #œ

œ œ

œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ #œ ‰ œ œ œ œ

œ œ

{

œ <n>œ œ <n>œ œ ‰ #œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ <n>œ œ <n> œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ

? 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{

œ bœ œ bœ œ ‰ bœ ‰ bœ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ bœ œ

? œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{

œ bœ œ bœ œ ‰ œ ‰ bœ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ

? œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{

œ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ bœ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? #œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

66


4 4 ∑ 4 & OBJECTIVE: DOUBLE VERTICAL, ARM INDEPENDENCE 4 ? ∑ 4 • You will need to use your peripheral vision on this exercise. • Adjust your arm position slightly as they move away from each other to accommodate the correct beating spots4 ? ∑ 4 on the bars. &

{{

14.2 Mirror Motion Between Manuals

4 & 4 œœœœ œœœœ œœœ 4 œ œœ œœœ & 4 œœœ œœ œ œœ œœ ˙˙ œ & œœ œœ ˙˙ œœ œœ ˙˙ & œœ œœ ˙˙ œœ œœ œœ œ & œœ œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œ & œœ œœ œœ œœœ

œœ œœœœ œœ

œœ œ œœœ œ œœœœ œ œœœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

œœ œœ œœ œ œœœ œœ œœ œœ ˙˙ ˙˙˙˙ ˙˙

˙˙˙ ˙ ˙˙˙ œœ ˙ œ œœœ œœ

level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

œœœ œœœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœœ œœœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœœ ˙˙œ œœ œœ œœ ˙˙ œœ œœ ˙˙ œœ œœ ˙˙ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

œœ œœœœ œœ œœ œœœœ œœ

OBJECTIVE: CHORALE, MALLET INDEPENDENCE

œœ œ œœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœ ˙˙ ˙˙˙˙ ˙˙

œœ œœ œœ œ œœœ œ œœœ œœ

œœœ ˙˙˙ œ ˙ œœœ ˙˙˙ œ ˙ œœ œœœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœœ œœ œœ œœœ œ œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œ

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœœ œœ

œœ œœ œœ œœ ˙˙ ˙˙˙˙ ˙˙ w w w w w w w w

œœ œœœœ œœ

• All voices move independently of each other. • Play this exercise in the lowest register possible on your instrument. • Bring out the moving lines.

14.34 Chorale – Voice Leading Practice

&4 4 &4 ? 44 ? 44

{{ {{

œw œ ˙ œw œ ˙ ẇ™ œ ẇ™ œ

& œw œ & œw œ ? ẇ™ ? ẇ™

˙

˙

œw œ ˙ œw œ ˙ ẇ™ œ ẇ™ œ

ẇ™ œ ẇ™ œw œ ˙ œ œw œ ˙

œ

œ

ẇ™ ẇ™ œw œ œw œ

PROGRESS CHART

œ

˙ œ

˙

œw œ œw œ ẇ™ ẇ™

ẇ™ œ ẇ™ œw œ ˙ œ œw œ ˙ ˙

˙

œ

œ

œw œ ˙ œw œ ˙ ẇ™ œ ẇ™ œ

˙w™ ˙w™ œw œ œw œ

œ

˙

œ

˙

q = 60

q = 70

q = 80

q = 90

q = 100

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

ẇ™ œ ẇ™ œw œ ˙ œ œw œ ˙ w w w ww w w w q = 110

q = 120

14.1 Octave Independence 14.2 Mirror Motion

14.3 Chorale–Voice Leading Practice 67


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 15

2 & 4 œœ

œ œ

? 42 œœ

œœ

{

bœ b & œ

œ œ

œ œ

œœ œ œ

œœ œ œ

bœ œ

œ œ

œ #œ

œ œ

bbbœœœ œ

œœ œ œ

œœ œ #œ

œœ œ œ

15.1 Chromatic Open Voicing

? 42 2 &4

bœœ 2 ? b & 4 œœ bœ ? bbœœ &b œ bœ ? bœ

œœ œœ

œ bœ œ œb œ œ

œœ œ œ

œœ œ œ

œœ œ œ

œœ

œœ

œœ

œœ b œœ

bbb œœœ œ

bb œœ

œœœœ

œœ œ œ œœ

2 & 4 œœ

bbœœ

œœ

œœ

œœ

bb

bœ œ

œ œ

œ #œ

œ œ

bb œœ œ œ

œœ œ œ

œœ

œœ

œœ œ œ

œœ œ œ

bœ œ œœ ? bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ #œ

œœ œ œ

bbbœœœ œ

œœ œ œ

œ œ

bœ œ

œ œ

œœ#œœ

œœ œ #œ œœ

{

œœ œ œ

œbœ b œœ œ œb œ œ 2œ 4 & œœ bœœœ œ b œœ œ? 2 œ 4œ œœ b œœ

{

œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œœœ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ bœœ œœ #œœ œ œœœ # œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ #œbœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œœ œœ œœ # œœ œœ

THESE TWO VARIATIONS SHOULD BE ON THE PRE

œ 2œ &4 œ ? 42 œœ ? 42 œ œ

œ #œ

œœ œ #œ

{{

œ

œ œ œœœ œ œ

? 42 œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ 2 & 4 œœ œœ bœœ œœ #œœ THESE TWO VARIATIONS SHOULD BE ON THE PREVIOUS PAGE bœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ 4 2 & 4 œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ Œ

? 2 œ 3œ Variation

2 ? & 442 œœ

68

œ œ

œ œ

2 Variation & 4 2œ

Variation 1

{ { { {

œ #œ

• The upper manual beating spot should be on the edge of the bar. Once you are comfortable with 15.1, move on to the four variations. Make sure each stroke type is correct. • Open voice is a term from music theory. A chord is “open” when there is more than an octave between the soprano and tenor voice in four-voice harmony. For marimba, that means that more than an ocvtave exists between mallets 2 and 4 in four-voice chords. “Closed” spacing is less than an octave between the soprano and tenor voice.

2 & 4 œœ

{ { { {

œ œ

œ œ

OBJECTIVE: MIXED STROKES (SA/DV), OPEN CHORD VOICING

œœ

bœ bbœœœ

œœ œœ

œ #œ

? 42 œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ 2 œ & 4 œœ œœ bœœ œœ #œ

Œ

b

bœ œ

bœ œ bœ œœ b bœ bœ bœ

œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ

œ #œ Œ œ #œœ œ Œ œ œ

Variation 4

2 & 4 œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ #œ Œ

{

? 42 œœ

œœ

bbœœ

œœ

œœ

Œ


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

OBJECTIVE: SINGLE ALTERNATING STROKES, MIRROR MOTION • Use your peripheral vision to play this exercise accurately. • It may be helpful to play hands separate first. • This exercise builds off of skills developed in 14.2, so be sure you are comfortable with that exercise first.

15.2 Mirror Motion Single Alternating Strokes

œ œ œ œ œ œ 4 & 4 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ 3

2

4

3

4

1

2

1

3

4

2

1

œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

4

3

4

3

1

2

1

2

4

3

1

2

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ &

PROGRESS CHART

∑ q = 60

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑

q = 70

q = 80

∑ q = 90

q = 100

Ó ∑

q = 110

q = 120

15.1 Chromatic Open Spacing

Variation 1

Variation 2

Variation 3

Variation 4

15.2 Mirror Motion SA Strokes

69


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

SOLO 6 Prelude in A major from Preludes, op. 28, no. 7

Frédéric Chopin arr. Brian Tate

Andante (q = 60)

### 3 & 4

œ

{

p

? ### 43 Œ

### & #œœ ™™

5

{

? ### œ

### œ ™ & œ™

9

{

? ### œ

{

? ### œ

œœ

œ

œ œœ œœ

œ œ œ œœ

### œ ™ & #œ ™

13

œ™ œ œ œ dolce

œœ œœ œ œ

œ œ

œ œ œœ

æ ˙æ ˙

œœ

˙˙ æ

œ œ

ææ ˙ ˙

œœ

œ nœ œ œ

˙˙ ææ

˙ ææ˙ ˙ ˙ ææ

œœ

ææ ˙ ˙

˙˙ ææ

#œ ™ œ œœ

œ œ

œœ

œœ

œ

Œ

œ œœ

œœ

œœ ™™

Œ

œ

œœ

#œ ™

Œ

œ

œ œ Œ

æ ˙æ ˙

œ œ

œœ

˙ ˙ æ ˙˙ ææ

œ

œœ

˙˙ æ

œ œ œ

œ œ

œœ

œœ

˙ ˙ ææ

#œœ

#˙˙ ææ

Œ

œœ

Ϫ Ϫ

œ œ œ

œ œ

Œ

œ

œ

œ

Œ

˙ ˙ ææ ˙˙ ææ

© 2019 Tapspace Publications, LLC, Portland, OR. (ASCAP) International copyright secured. All rights reserved. 70


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

PERFORMANCE NOTES Technical Considerations 1. None of the rolls in this piece have any transitions so you should have plenty of time to prepare the roll. No need to do any of the chorale steps with this piece. 2. Any single bass clef note can be taken down an octave if your marimba has the range. Use your peripheral vision to reach those lower notes. 3. Play the right hand by itself to understand the arm movement. There are several different sticking options. Sixths are a very popular interval used in marimba literature, and they can be a challenge to play accurately. Do not try to accommodate all the intervals by just moving the wrist. Allow the elbow and arm to help get to the interval. Musical Considerations Chopin provides only one dynamic marking in the music. Feel free to experiment with phrasing concepts within this one dynamic rather than adding four different dynamics. Listen to recordings of skilled pianists to hear different phrasing examples.

71


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 16 OBJECTIVE: SINGLE ALTERNATING STROKES, CHANGING INTERVALS • Keep the single alternating stroke smooth while moving in stepwise motion. • Don’t hold the stick too tightly or it will eventually push out of your hand. • Practice hands separately. For the right hand, alternate between mallets 3 and 4. For the left hand, alternate between mallets 1 and 2.

16.1 Changing Intervals – Stepwise

œ œ œ œ 4 &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœ & œ œ œ œ & œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ & œœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ OBJECTIVE: DOUBLE VERTICAL STROKES, CLOSED CHORD VOICING • The feet should move the body for every chord to ensure appropriate beating spots. • In measure 11, step into the instrument instead of leaning over, and in measure 12, step away from the instrument with your wrists almost touching.

2 & 4 œœœœ

œœ œœ

bœœ b b & 2 bœœœ 4 œœ & 7 œ

œœ œœœ œœœ

bœœ b b & bœœ

œœ œœ

1

bbbœœœœ

2

16.2 Chromatic Closed Voicing

1

7

72

8

œ #œœœ

3

œœ œœ bœ bbœœœ

œœ bbœœœ œœœ œœ œ b œ œœ œœœ #œœœ 9

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

2

8

œœ œœ

3

bbœœ b œœ 9

œœ œœ

bbbœœœœ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

4

œ #œœœœ œœœ

œœ b œœœ œœbœ bœ œ bbœœœ œœœ 11

4

œ #œœœ

œœ œœ

10

10

b œœ bœœ 11

œ #œœœ

œœ œœ

5

œœ œ œœ œ ##œœœ #œœœ12 5

œœ œœ

œ ##œœœ 12

6

œœ œœ œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œœ œœœœ œœ

œœ œœœ œœœ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

13 6

œœ œœ 13


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

OBJECTIVE: CHORALE, STEPWISE MOTION, PARALLEL VOICE LEADING • The outer mallets will move together with one note being held through each bar. The inner voice (beginning with a dotted half note) should be played with both inner mallets. The contour does change about halfway through the exercise, so watch the notes carefully.

16.3 Parallel Voice Leading Chorale

3 & 4 œ̇ ™ ? 43 œ

{

œ

œ

œœ

Œ œ

Œ œ

œ̇ ™

œ

œ

œœ

Œ œ

Œ œ

œ

œ

œ

Œ

Œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

Œ

Œ

bœ̇ ™

œ

œ

bœ̇ ™

Œ

Œ

bœ̇ ™

œ

œ

œ

Œ

Œ

œ

& œœ

Œ œ

Œ œ

? œ

Œ

Œ

{

œ̇ ™

œ

œ

œ

œ

bœœ

Œ œ

Œ œ

œ

Œ

Œ

& œ̇ ™ bœ

œ

œœ

Œ œ

Œ œ

œ̇ ™ œ

œ

œœ

Œ œ

œ̇ ™ œ

œ

? œ bœ

Œ œ

˙™ ˙™

œ

œ

Œ

Œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

Œ

Œ

œ

œ

œ

˙™

{

PROGRESS CHART

q = 70

q = 80

q = 90

q = 100

q = 110

q = 120

q = 130

16.1 Changing Intervals – Stepwise (RH) 16.1 Changing Intervals – Stepwise (LH)

&

4 4

16.2 Chromatic Closed Voicing 30

31

4 4

32

∑ 33

∑ 34

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

35

& 36

Step 4

∑ 37

Step 5

17.3 Parallel Voice Leading Chorale

& 38

∑ 39

∑ & 40

41

∑ 42

∑ 43

∑ 44

∑ 45

∑ 46

73


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 17 OBJECTIVE: DOUBLE VERTICAL STROKES, JUMPING MOTION, CHANGING INTERVALS • Start by playing each measure four times before moving on. Eventually reduce that to just two repetitions. • Make sure that the move between beats 2 and 3 is quick so that you are already over the chord on beat 3 before you play it.

17.1 Chromatic Open and Closed Voicing

4 & 4 ™™

{

œœ

œœ

? 44 ™™ œœ

œœ

& ™™ bœ bœ

œœ

? ™™ bœœ

œœ

{

& ™™bbœœ

œœ

™™bbœœ

œœ

{

?

œ œ

™™ ™™ bb œœ

œœ

œœ

œœ

™™ ™™ bœœ

œœ

bœ œ

œ œ

bœœ

œœ

™™ ™™ œœ

œœ

™™ ™™#œœ

œœ

bœ bœ

œ œ

b œœ

œœ

™™ ™™ œ œ

œœ

™™ ™™ œœ

œœ

& ™™ œœ

œ œ # œœ œ œ

™™ ™™bœœ

bœ œœ œ

? ™™# œœ

œœ

œ ™™ ™™b œ

œœ

{ 74

œ œ

œœ œœ

œœ

œ œ œœ

bœ œ

œ œ

bœœ

œœ

™™ ™™ œœ

œœ

™™ ™™#œœ

œœ

œ #œ

œ œ

™™ ™™ œ œ

œœ

œœ

œœ

™™ ™™ œœ

œœ

œ œ

œ œ

™™ ™™ bœ bœ

œœ

œœ

œœ

œ ™™ ™™ b œ

œœ

œ # ™™ ™™#œœ œœ œ # œœ œœ # œœ ™™ ™™

œ œ

™™ ™™ œœ

œœ

œœ

™™ ™™

œ #œ

œ œ

™™

œœ

œœ

™™

œ œ

œ œ

™™

œœ

œœ

™™

bœ œ

œ œ

™™

b œœ

œœ

™™

œ œœ œ

œ œ

™™

œœ

™™

œœ œœ


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

b 43 ∑ ∑ & OBJECTIVE: MIXING THREE STROKE TYPES

{

• This exercise includes single alternating, single independent, and double vertical strokes. It also prepares you for the final solo. With all three strokes present, continue to practice the separation of movement between vertical and rotation movements.

? b 43

17.2 Mixing Stroke Types 3

3 3 etc. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ

œ œ œ œ

œ

2

1

3 3 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ &b œ œ 4

3

{

?b œ 1

3

3

3

2

4

1

4

1

2

{

&b

{

œ

œ

3 &b 4

?b

{

œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ

? b 43

œ

œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ

œ

œ œ œ œ

∑ q = 60

œ

2

œ

œ

PROGRESS CHART 17.1 Chromatic Open/Closed Voicing

œ

œ œ œ œ

œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ &b ?b œ

œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

q = 50

∑ q = 70

q = 55

∑ q = 80

œœ

q = 60

q = 90

q = 65

œ

œ œ œ œ

Œ

Œ

Œ

Œ

∑ q = 100

q = 70

∑ q = 110

q = 75

b 43 q = 120

3 b4

q = 80

17.2 Mixing Stroke Types

75


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 18 OBJECTIVE: MIXED STROKES (SA/SI), CHANGING INTERVALS • This combination of single independent strokes and also single alternating strokes provides an independence challenge. It is important, as in all independence exercises, that each hand performs its stroke properly and independently of the other.

18.1 Mixed Strokes with Changing Intervals

4 &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

? 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

2

3

4

3

4

{

1

1

1

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

1

& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ?

{

? œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 1

&

{

?

76

1

1

1

œ œ

& ™™

continue down keyboard until

2

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

2

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

continue up keyboard until

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2

œ œ

2

œ œ

œ4 œ3 œ4 œ3 œ œ œ œ &

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

2

2

2

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

™™ ™™

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

™™ ™™

™™ 44


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

OBJECTIVE: SINGLE ALTERNATING, CHANGING INTERVALS • This exercise was used for the mixed strokes exercise in Lesson 12. • For more practice, play this exercise in all eight permutations from Lesson 12.

18.2 Single Alternating with Changing Intervals

{ { {

{

{

4 & 4 œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ <n>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? 44 œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ <n>œ 3

1

2

4

1

3

2

4

1

3

2

4

& bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ <n>œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ <n>œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ

& #œ #œ œ œ œ <n>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ œ œ œ <n> œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ # œ œ œ ? #œ # œ œ œ <n>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ <n>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ <n> œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ <n>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? &

&

? œ

œ

œ

œ

œ œ

œ

œ

œ

PROGRESS CHART

œ

œ

œ

œ œ

œ

q = 60

œ

œ œ

œ

q = 70

œ

œ œ

q = 80

œ

œ

œ

q = 90

œ

∑ Œ q = 100

Ó q = 110

q = 120

18.1 Mixed Strokes (SA/SI) 18.2 SA with Changing Intervals 77


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

SOLO 7 Largo from Symphony No. 9 in E minor “From the New World,” mvt. II

## 4 æ & 4 nn˙˙æ

{

mp

? ## 44 n˙˙ ææ

æ #˙˙æ

æ nn˙˙æ

æ #˙˙æ

æ n˙˙æ

##˙˙ ææ

n˙˙ æ

<n>˙˙ ææ

b˙ ææ

## ææ & <#>w w

4

{

f

# &#

{

œ™ œ œ

œœ

œœ ™™ ææ

œœ J

˙˙ ææ

œœ

p

œ™ œ œ

pp

## & œœ™ œ œ ™ œ ˙ ˙

10

? ## œœ

78

æ ˙˙æ

roll all notes

? ## w w

{

j œœ

pp

? ## w w ææ

7

æ œœæ™™

<n>œœ

˙˙

^

Largo (e = 70–80)

Antonín Dvorák arr. Brian Tate

æ ˙œæ ææ ˙˙ ææ

œœ œœ

œ ™ œ œ™ œ ˙

œ™ œ œ

w w

˙˙

œ ææ

æ ˙˙æ™™ ˙˙ ™™ ææ

œœ ™™ œ œ #˙˙

œ™ œ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ ˙

œ™ œ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ ˙

© 2019 Tapspace Publications, LLC, Portland, OR. (ASCAP) International copyright secured. All rights reserved.


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

# & # œ™ œ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ ˙

œ™ œ œ

? ## œ™ œ œ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ ˙

w w

13

{

# & # œ ™ œ œ™ œ ˙

œ™ œ œ œœ

œ ™ œœ œœ œ™

? ## w w

œœ

œ œ

œœ

# œ™ œ œ ˙ & # œ™ œ œJ ˙ œj ˙ œ™ ? ## ˙ ˙

œ™ ˙™

œj œ

16

{

19

{

{

? ##

˙™ w

œj œ

˙ ˙

Œ

œ œ œ œœ œ œ

˙˙

no roll

3

3

# & # ˙˙

22

œ™ œ ™ œ œ œœ ˙˙ J œj ˙ œ™ ˙ ˙

œœ

œ Œ œ

œ™ œ œ

bb˙˙

<n>˙˙

#˙˙

<n>˙˙

œ̇

nb ˙˙

p

˙˙

sf

˙

˙˙

roll all notes to end

p

˙˙

˙˙

œ

˙˙ ˙˙

˙ ˙

w w

˙˙

w w

ff

79


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

distantly

## œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ & w

œw œ œ œ ˙

œ™ œ œ œ œ œ w

œ œ œ œ ˙ w

œ™ œ œ œ œ œ ? ##

œ œ œ œ ˙

œ™ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ ˙

27

{

pp

## œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ &

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 42 œ œ œ œ 44

œ œ œ œ œ œ ? ## œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2œ œ œ œ 4 4 4

31

{

## 4 ˙ ™ & 4œ

34

{

? ## 44 œw

## &

37

{

#˙ nœ bœ

œœ ™™ œœ œœ

œœ ™™ œ œ

p

b˙ ™

˙w™

œ

(small swells)

˙˙

? ## ˙˙

80

œ

bb˙˙ nb˙˙

<n> ˙˙ ˙˙

# ˙˙ ˙˙

<n> ˙˙ ˙

œ̇ œ ˙˙

œœ ™™ œœ œœ ˙˙ ™™

œœ œ

œœ Œ

œœ Œ

œœ Œ

œœ Œ

p

œœ ™™ œ œ œ

˙˙

j œœ ‰ Œ

˙˙

œœ ‰ Œ J

pp


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

PERFORMANCE NOTES Technical Considerations 1. Go through the steps: Block Chords, Broken Block Chords, Split Continuous Chords (each hand leading), and then Split Broken Chords (each hand leading). This last step is the most important, so be sure to get through the entire progression. 2. In measure 7, be wary of the different wrist motions. Here, the left hand is using a vertical stroke, and the right hand rotates. Make sure these hands are operating independently, or it will affect your accuracy. 3. Measures 11–14 are just two mallet rolls – however, they need to be the same speed as your handto-hand rolls. Be careful that the striking speed doesn’t increase too dramatically simply because it’s easier. 4. In measures 27–30, you may optionally put a whole note A that is shared by both inner mallets right in the middle of the range. You’ll hear this in the original, but it is harder to do on marimba. It is optional. 5. Measure 17 is the hardest measure of the piece. The leap from beat 4 of measure 17 to beat 1 of measure 18 is the largest in the entire piece. If necessary, leave out the D in the left hand on beat 4 of measure 17. You can pick up both notes on beat 1 of measure 18 to help with that transition. Eventually work on playing all the notes. Musical Considerations 1. Listen to a good orchestral recording. 2. The tempo is very slow. Put your metronome on eighth notes to help you keep it slow. 3. Repeated notes: Lightly re-articulate repeated notes that are in the melody; if you do nothing, it will sound like a different duration. 4. Repeated phrases: Sometimes you can play one phrase softer than the other for contrast (i.e., bars 11–12 and 13–14 are the same, or 18 and 19; bars 27–32 have several phrases that repeat). 5. Be very conscious of how phrases end; for example, in measure 21, pretend like you are running out of air or bow at the end of this roll. Don’t end it like a drummer with a stinger! The triplets should be soft and light and not necessarily strictly in time. Use a relaxed grip while playing the triplets so that you get a full, warm tone. 6. Some rubato is appropriate. For example, measure 34 can slow down. 7. If you have a five-octave instrument, you may transpose beat 3 of measure 40 down an octave until the end.

81


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 19 OBJECTIVE: MIXED STROKES (SA/SI), CHANGING INTERVALS • Here is another independence exercise with multiple stroke types. It is the inverse of 18.1. Maintain each stroke’s independence.

19.1 Mixed Stroke with Changing Intervals

4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 &4

{

? 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 1

2

1

2

{

œ œ œ ? œ œ œ œ

{

œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? 1

& œ œ œ œ ?

{ 82

2

3

3

3

3

3

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ4 œ4 etc. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ

œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4 œ4

2

3

etc.

& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

&

3

3

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

continue up keyboard until...

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3

3

3

3

etc.

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

1

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ continue down keyboard until...

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

OBJECTIVE: OPEN/CLOSED VOICING ROLLS, JUMPING INVERSIONS • Play each bar several times before moving on. The “heart” is a big jump so practice those critical four notes between each inversion several times. Take this exercise through each of the five chorale steps. • If necessary, review Exercise 17.1 in Lesson 17 to get a feel for the jumps.

19.2 Open/Closed Jumping Inversions

& ™™ ˙ææ ˙ ? ™™ ˙˙ ææ

{

æ & ™™ ˙˙æ

{

? ™™ ˙˙ ææ

æ & ™™ ˙˙æ

{

? ™™#æ˙˙ æ

æ ˙æ ˙ ˙˙ ææ

æ b˙æ ˙

™™ ™™ æ bb ˙˙

b˙˙ ææ

™™ ™™ b˙˙ ææ ˙ ææ˙ ˙˙ ææ ˙ #˙ ææ ˙˙ ææ

™™ ™™

™™ b˙ææ b˙ ™™bbæ˙˙ æ

æ ™™ ™™b˙˙æ ˙ ™™ ™™bææ˙

PROGRESS CHART

æ ˙æ #˙

™™ ™™ æ ˙˙ ™™

˙˙ ææ

™™#˙˙ ææ

b˙ b˙ ææ b ˙˙ ææ b˙ ˙ ææ ˙˙ ææ

™™ ™™

™™ ˙ææ ˙ ™™ æ˙˙ æ

æ ™™ ™™#˙˙æ #˙ ™™ ™™ ææ˙

™™ ™™ ææ bb˙˙ ™™ ™™ b˙˙ ææ

b˙ ææ˙ b˙˙ ææ

™™ ™™ ææ ˙˙ ™™

˙ ˙ ææ ˙˙ ææ

™™ ™™ b˙ææ b˙

˙ #˙ ææ # ˙˙ ææ

æ ™™ ™™ ˙˙æ

™™#˙˙ ææ

˙ ™™ ™™ bæ˙ æ

˙˙ ™™ ™™ ææ

q = 60

q = 70

q = 80

q = 90

q = 100

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

˙ #æ˙ æ ˙˙ ææ b˙ ˙ ææ b ˙˙ ææ ˙ ˙ ææ ˙˙ ææ

q = 110

™™ ™™

™™ ™™

™™ ™™

q = 120

19.1 Mixed Strokes (SA/SI)

19.2 Jumping Inversions

83


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

LESSON 20 OBJECTIVE: SINGLE ALTERNATING STROKES, PARALLEL MOTION • This is an extension of 14.2 and 15.2. Single alternating strokes can be played many different ways, and this variation works on parallel motion. • This is more of an independence exercise than a stroke exercise.

20.1 Parallel Motion Single Alternating Strokes

œ 4 & 4 œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ 3

4

3

4

3

4

etc.

1

2

1

2

1

2

etc.

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

4

3

4

3

4

3

etc.

2

1

2

1

2

1

etc.

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

84

œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

Ó


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

OBJECTIVE: SINGLE ALTERNATING STROKES, ALBERTI BASS • Alberti bass is a common keyboard accompaniment style outlining the harmony in the accompaniment. For marimba, that means single alternating strokes that constantly change intervals.

20.2 Alberti Bass – Right Hand (C major)

4 &4 & 44 &4 ? 44 ? ? 444

{{

œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœœœ œœœœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ1 œ1 œ1 œ1 œœ2 œœ2 œœ2 œœ2 œ1 œ1 œ1 œ1 2 2 2 2

™™ ™™ ™™ ™™ ™ ™™™

œ œ œ œ œ3 œœ4 œœ3 œœ4 œ3 œœ4 œœetc.œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ1 œ1 œ1 œ1 2 2 2 2 1

1

1

1

2

2

2

2

œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ1 œ1 œ1 œ1 2 2 2 2 1

1

1

1

2

2

2

2

™™ ™ ™™™ ™™ ™™ ™™

1

1

1

1

2

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

2

2

2

2

œ œ œ œ œ3 œœ4 œœ3 œœ4 œ3 œœ4 œœetc.œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ11 œ11 œ11 œ11 œ22 œ22 œ22 œ22 3 3

4 4

1

3 3

4 3 4 3

1

1

4 etc. 4 etc.

1

2

2

2

2

20.3 Alberti Bass – Right Hand (G major)

#4 &# 4 & # 44 & 4 ? # 44 ?# ? # 444

{{

3 4 3 4 3 4 etc. 3 4 3 4 3 4 etc.

œ œ œ œBassœ – Left œ Hand 20.4 Alberti

4 & bb 4 & 44 &b 4 ? b 44 ? ? bb 444

{{

œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ11 œ22 œ11 œ22 œ11 œ22 œetc. etc.

1

1

1

1

2

2

2

2

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ

Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ

Ó Ó Ó Ó Ó Ó

œ œ œ œ œ œ1

Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ

Ó Ó Ó Ó Ó Ó

1

1

1

™™ ™ ™™™ ™™ ™™ ™™

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

1 2 1 2 1 2 etc.

PROGRESS CHART

œ œ œ œ œ1 œ1

Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ

Ó Ó Ó Ó Ó Ó

q = 60

q = 70

q = 80

q = 90

q = 100

q = 110

q = 120

q = 40

q = 45

q = 50

q = 55

q = 60

q = 65

q = 70

20.1 Parallel Motion SA Strokes

20.2 Alberti Bass - Right Hand (C) 20.3 Alberti Bass - Right Hand (G) 20.4 Alberti Bass - Left Hand 85


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

SOLO 8 Spinning Song q = 90–100

2 &b 4

{

3 3 3 3 3 3 > œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ 4

? b 42 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 1

2

1

{

?b œ

œ

& b œœ œœ œœ<n>œœ

{

?b œ œ œ œ

œœ nœœ œœ > > f

œ œ œ œ

>œ œ œ œ 3 œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ & œ a tempo

p

œ

1

2

?b œ

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

13

86

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ

2

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ &b œ œ

{

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ 3

p

7

19

œ

Albert Ellmenreich arr. Brian Tate

œ

j ‰ œœj ‰ bœœj ‰#<n>œœj ‰ œœ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

j ‰ œœj ‰ bœœj ‰#<n>œœj ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ<n>œœ

p

œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ

œ œ œ œ

poco rit.

œœ œ

Œ

œ2 nœ2 bœ2

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ

© 2019 Tapspace Publications, LLC, Portland, OR. (ASCAP) International copyright secured. All rights reserved. © 2018 Tapspace Publications, LLC (ASCAP). Portland, OR. International copyright secured. All rights reserved.


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ &b œ œ

25

{

œ

?b œ

bœœ œœ œœ œœ bœœ œœ œœ œœ p >œ ™ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ Œ 2

1

1

2

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ >œ™ œœ œ Œ 2

2

2

2

31

& b bœœ œœ œœ œœ bœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ bœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ bœœ œœ œœ bœœ p >œ™ >œ ™ > œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ ?b Œ Œ Œ

{

2

1

1

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

1

1

2

37

& b bœœ œœ œœ œœ

{

>œ ™ ?b

1

1

4 >Ϫ &b

Œ

2

œ3 nœ3 #œ4

#œ œ œ

2

2

f

1

>3 ™ & b nœ

>3 ™ nœ

Œ

œ

œ

2

2

3

3

3

p

œ

Œ

2

2

1

3

Œ

4 >Ϫ

œ3 nœ3 #œ4

#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ

œ œ œ ? b œ #œ œ œ

3

Œ

#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

2 1

49

4

4

#œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ # œœ <b>œ2 n ?b œ

{

>œ ™

2

43

{

œœ œœ œœ œœ #œœ œœ œœ œœ

œœ œ

2

œ œ <n>œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ # œœ œ œ œ œ œ 3

3

3

<b>œ 3

œ 3

2 œ2 <n> œ

œ

3

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 1

œ

œ œ

2

subito p 87


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

œ œœ œ &b œ œ

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ

55

{

?b œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ b & œ œ œ

61

{

?b œ œ œ œ

œ

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ

œœ nœœ œœ > >

œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ

j ‰ j œ œ ‰ b œœ œ œ œœ<n>œœ œœ <n> œ & # œ

{

œ œ œ œ

a tempo

Œ

3

p 2 2 2 œ n œ b œ ?b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ &b œ œ œ

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

?b œ œ œ œ

œ

{

œ œ

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ

œ

4

‰ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ

?b œ œ

œ œ

œ œ

dim.

4

œ œ

œ

p

œ œ œ œ

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œœ œœ œ

3 œ œ œ œ &b ‰ 4

88

œ

œ œ

œ

œ œ

2

1

73

{

œ

œ

‰ œœj ‰ bœœj

f

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

poco rit.

67

78

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

j ‰ œœj ‰ bœœj ‰#<n>œœj ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ<n>œœ œ œ œ œ

>œ œ œ œ œœ œ

rit.

Œ

œ3 œ2 œ3

œ

œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

∑ 3 œ2 œ œ2 œ3

∑ œ2 ‰ Œ J

pp


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Part 2

PERFORMANCE NOTES This piece is a challenge. Not only do you need to keep a solid single alternating stroke in the left hand for much of the arrangement, but you also need to move around a lot in the right hand. This famous piano piece works very well on piano but presents more challenges on the marimba. If you listen to a pianist perform this work, don’t be surprised if it is quite a bit faster than is reasonable on the marimba. Technical Considerations 1. I highly recommend playing the right hand by itself several times for accuracy. It is by far the harder hand to play. 2. Measures 11–14 present some arm movement challenges but be sure to move in plenty of time. 3. Once again we have a great opportunity to work on the left hand melody in measures 27–42, and this is the section where I would recommend some independent left hand work. Remember, when this section occurs, keep the volume of the right hand down – even though there are challenging chords to play. The important musical information is in the left hand. This transfers over to the right hand starting in measure 43, and the same will apply: Keep the left hand accompaniment down in volume. Musical Considerations Themes This piece has very solid musical “sentences,” and we hear them several times. You may choose to play the repeated ideas at a different volume when they present themselves again – or not. That is a musical decision you can make after you can play it well and have heard several examples. Form This piece has a very clear form. The first section (measures 1–26) is called the “A” section, and we hear this same music again at the end. The “A” section returns in measures 52 to 77 with a short little ending or “codetta” in measures 78–82. The middle section is called the “B” section and occurs in measures 27–51. This section has a completely different melody from the “A” section and features the left hand. We call this ABA form ternary form. The form isn’t necessarily critical information for the technical playing of the piece but does illustrate the organization of music much like the organization of a story.

89


TIGER DANCE Julia Gaines, marimba Includes recordings of pieces from Sequential Studies Level 1 and Level 2

Listen on:


...THE HEART OF THE CHORALE

Appendix level 2 characteristics examples of published level 2 literature glossary


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimbaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Julia Gaines

APPENDIX 1 LEVEL 2 CHARACTERISTICS Musical Considerations Average Duration

1:40

Tonality

0â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3 sharps/flats in key signature

Rhythm

half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth, dotted half & quarter, triplets, quarter triplets

Meter

simple duple or simple triple (2/4, 3/4, 4/4)

Form

AB, ABA, ABA coda, theme and variations, song form (chorales), based sections

Style

transcriptions-Renaissance, Romantic; original tonal contemporary; transcriptions-includes more linear lines with accompaniment Basic six dynamics; standard Italian and English words; clear sticking indications; standard beat beaming

Notation (clefs, musical terms, legibility, phrase markings, stickings)

Accompaniment Wingspan

none up to 3 octaves

Technical Considerations STROKE TEMPOS: Double Vertical Single Independent Single Alternating

RH octave at slow tempo Rolls between mallets 2 and 3, linear lines Introductory tempos at 4ths/5ths

Double Lateral

None

Triple Strokes

None

Combination Strokes

None

(linear stickings for monophonic lines)

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS: Independence

Rolls 92

Alternating Hands/Non-lateral Strokes Unison Non-lateral strokes Overlapping non-lateral strokes (melody-dominated homophony hands with SI/DV) More linear lines introducing oblique motion Introduce chorale steps for double vertical roll


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Appendicies

APPENDIX 2 EXAMPLES OF PUBLISHED LEVEL 2 LITERATURE Marie-Francoise Bonin

Jumping (published in Marimb’un)

Anthony Cirone

Etude No.1 (published in 4-Mallet Marimba Solos)

Anthony Cirone

Etude No.4 (published in 4-Mallet Marimba Solos)

Anthony Cirone

Etude No. 9 (published in 4-Mallet Marimba Solos)

Julie Davila

Sueños (published in Impressions on Wood)

Mark Ford

Fry (published in Marimba Technique Through Music)

Mark Ford

Manhattan (published in Marimba Technique Through Music)

Murray Houllif and James Moore

Loch Lamond (published in Progressive Solos for 3-4 Mallets)

Murray Houllif and James Moore

German Dance (published in Progressive Solos for 3-4 Mallets)

Jeffrey T. Parthum, Sr.

Four Spans on London’s Bridge

Mitchell Peters

Zen Wanderer

Bart Quartier

Crocodile Tears (published in Image: 20 Children’s Songs for Marimba)

93


Sequential Studies for Four-Mallet Marimba—Julia Gaines

APPENDIX 3 GLOSSARY beating spot – the place where the mallet strikes the bar chromatic turnaround – the part of a chromatic scale where, when played with alternating sticking, the hands change from one manual to the other (e.g., Eb, E§, F§, F#) closed spacing – when the distance between the tenor and soprano notes (usually mallets 2 and 4) in a four-note chord is less than one octave duration – a length of time double vertical roll/traditional roll – both hands alternate double vertical strokes in fast succession to create the illusion of duration interval expansion – changing from a smaller interval to a larger interval in one hand; requires grip adjustments jumping motion – moving from one set of notes to another with at least an interval of a third in between them legato – smooth playing without articulation; connected mirrored motion – the motion produced when the left and right arms move away from each other or toward each other on the instrument mixed strokes – playing different stroke types in each hand at the same time (i.e., one hand is playing double vertical strokes, and the other hand is playing single independent strokes) oblique motion – the motion produced when one hand remains in place, but the other moves in a different direction open spacing – when the distance between the tenor and soprano notes (usually mallets 2 and 4) in a four-note chord is more than one octave overlapping motion – when the hands play the same rhythm displaced by one or two notes; one hand starts a rhythm, and the other plays the same thing one or two beats later parallel motion – the motion produced when the left and right arms move in the same direction on the instrument

94


level 2...the heart of the chorale - Appendicies

piston stroke – the motion produced by moving the wrist down and up quickly; requires that the wrist start in the “up” position placeholder – a note or set of notes specifically placed within an exercise to double-check the position of the mallets throughout a phrase. When playing single independent strokes, the unused mallet often needs to retain an interval, and a “placeholder” note is inserted to force this mallet to hold its position. preparatory upstroke – the act of preparing the volume or position of the next note. If the next note is soft, the upstroke will be low. If the next note is lower in the range of the instrument, the upstroke will move quickly down the instrument. static motion – no significant motion produced by the arms due to repeated strokes and notes played stepwise motion – moving up or down the instrument by only one adjacent note at a time (e.g., B to C or Db to Eb). ternary form (A B A form) – type of musical form that includes three parts with the beginning part repeated at the end torque/rotation – a movement created by moving the wrist in a circular fashion, similar to turning a doorknob upper manual – the “black” keys of a piano on the marimba; all the accidentals wingspan – the greatest intervallic distance between the hands when played at or relatively close to the same time of any given phrase; a piece may have multiple wingspans to consider

Stroke Types The titles of these strokes were coined by Leigh Howard Stevens in his method book, Method of Movement for Marimba, where more in-depth descriptions can be found. double vertical stroke (DV) – two mallets in one hand both striking the bar vertically with the wrist producing two pitches at the same time single alternating stroke (SA) – two mallets in one hand striking each of two bars individually as a result of the wrist rotating horizontally single independent stroke (SI) – two mallets in one hand with only one mallet (outside or inside) striking the bar in a rotated, vertical motion producing one pitch

95


tapspace.com

Profile for Tapspace

Sequential Studies (Book 2)  

Sequential Studies (Book 2)  

Profile for tapspace