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FROM THE E D I T O R TAPE is back. CPL5938: Remake/Remodel. TAPE is back - it’s been a while, and we’ve missed you terribly, but rest assured, we used our hiatus wisely. A new team, a new outlook, and a new attitude, TAPE returns stronger than ever, and ready to take on the world with issues centered around an editorial theme. Every issue of TAPE will extend a challenge to photographers to embrace a theme, and make it work for them in their own, inimitable way. This, our relaunch issue, is all about the magic of instant photography: Polaroids. But why Polaroid? “I think Polaroids are made with magic: by tiny little elves that live inside the camera. I don’t know where they get food, or how they breathe in there, but I thank them.” The opening quote of trailer of the upcoming Polaroid documentary, Time Zero: The Last Year of Polaroid Film (www.timezeromovie.com/), alludes to the mystery and wonder of the instant photograph. I remember vividly, seeing a Polaroid develop for the first time, my toddler eyes gazing in wonderment at a picture, coming seemingly out of nowhere, developing in front of my eyes. Somehow, a grey surface had the ability to generate amazement and awe. This fascination has stayed with me throughout my life not only as an artist and photographer, but as a human being. Polaroids, and instant photos in general, seem organic; they invoke unique emotions and feelings. Like a photo can take the viewer back to a special moment, a Polaroid makes this moment seem just so much more real. Fashion photography is often accused of being cold, lifeless, too retouched and fiddled around with. Digital photography makes it easy to get lost in the editing process, but frequently I find myself missing the warmth, the organic nature, and the flaws and imperfections, of analog photography. And among analog photography, the instant photo will always have a special place in my heart. Isn’t it nice to be able to take a step back, and live in the moment? I challenged the photographers who contributed to TAPE: Polaroid to leave their digital rigs behind for a while, step into the moment and embrace the immediateness of the instant photo. And they stepped up to the challenge. Be it expired vintage stock Polaroid film, old-style peel-apart films, or modern day Fuji Instax or The Impossible Project film stocks, each photographer not only shows us what this medium is capable of, but their own unique character and style shines through at all times. I am immensely proud of this relaunch issue, and I hope you will experience the same level of excitement and wonder that we experienced while putting TAPE: Polaroid together. It’s great to be back, see you all for TAPE: Hotel Rooms! Stuart McConaghy Editor-in-Chief

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TAPE Editor-in-chief/Publisher Stuart McConaghy Creative Director/Designer & Publisher Sherri McConaghy Fashion Editor Esmeralda Ferretti DaMara Altman-Hernandez Lifestyle Editor Jonathan Qualtere Beauty Editor Hillary Hunt-Maxwell

With contributions from: Nick Blumenthal

Angela Marklew

Rich Burroughs

Michelle Paulsen

Michael Cinquino

Marisa Pike

Daniel K. Johansson

Adrien Sicart

Emelie Svensson

TAPE is a LondonIsACountry publication Š2013 TAPE magazine, unless otherwise specified. The copyright to all photo editorials lie with the respective photographers. All rights reserved. No unauthorized reproduction.


Front cover: Stuart McConaghy Back cover: Michael Cinquino This page: Stuart McConaghy

ISSUE 0 7 POLAROI D Designer Profile: Karin Brettmeister

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Form Follows Function: Scandinavian Fashion

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The Cult That Shaped Me

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Designer Profile: Logan Neitzel

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The Case for Just Being Yourself

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Beauty: Tips & Trends

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Beauty: Must Haves

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New York Fashion Week

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Editorial: Sie

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Editorial: Saturdays = Youth

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Editorial: Katie

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Editorial: Indigo

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Editorial: A Day in the Life

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Editorial: The Painted Desert

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Editorial: The Desert Knows Your Name

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Editorial: Sweet Jane

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by Stuart McConaghy by Emelie Svensson

by Esmeralda Ferretti

by Stuart McConaghy

by Esmeralda Ferretti

by Hillary Hunt-Maxwell by Hillary Hunt-Maxwell by Stuart McConaghy by Stuart McConaghy by Angela Marklew by Rich Burroughs

by Michael Cinquino by Adrien Sicart by Marisa Pike

by Michelle Paulsen

by Daniel K. Johansson


FASHION

DESIGNERPROFILE by STUART McCONAGHY

KARIN BRETTMEISTER TAPE was very fortunate to work with German Couture designer Karin Brettmeister on several shoots for this issue. Karin’s unique designs and incredible eye for detail make her one of the designers we are eager to see progress in the world of fashion. So impressed were we that we drastically stripped back our editorial to feature just her clothes, no accessories, and only minimal makeup. “These aren’t even my favorite pieces, those are still back in Munich,” she laughs. TAPE

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Born into a family of tailors in a small town near Munich, Germany, Karin grew up making her own clothes for her dolls, learning the craft from an early age. Later, entering the internationally renowned Munich fashion school ESMOD, she graduated top of her year in 2012, as well as winning several international fashion design competitions. “I love the technical aspect of fashion design, the construction on paper and the complexity of the geometry as much as the artistic aspect; clothing as an expression of an idea, an inspiration, or political opinion.” The Karin Brettmeister look incorporates many traditional materials, such as furs and leathers. “I like working with leather and fur,” she says. ‘These traditional materials have been used for clothing forever, and for me they signify power, self-confidence and longevity.” Recently relocated to New York, Karin now works for Haute Couture house Marchesa, while still developing her own signature line. “Marchesa as a couture house is a very interesting experience for me, because there is a lot of creative work involved. The gowns have many details and require precise handwork. I don’t really see my personal design style directly related with theirs; mine is more edgy and rebellious compared to the very feminine and glamorous style of Marchesa. But I find the challenge to get into another designer’s mind interesting and important to expand your spectrum.” “My future plans for my own collection are too big for the little time I have besides work. If you work for a fashion house which is involved in fashion week, you not only work there, you live there. I hope I can find some time in between the seasons when it is a little bit calmer to create. I feel more free working on my own collection, more independent. I would like to experiment more with uncommon materials and complex surface manipulations. I have a very diverting year behind me with a lot of new experiences, good and bad. I went through very hard times and my attitude and priorities in life changed a lot. Fabricating my own collection is for me a way of therapy to express myself and my feelings, like artists use their paintings and sculptures as reflection of their soul. I want to get as close to art as possible for fashion.” Karin Brettmeister’s collection can be viewed at www.muuse.com; she is also mentioned in the book New Faces Of Fashion as one of the thirty-five most creative young German designers.

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PHOTOGRAPHY & STYLING: STUART McCONAGHY ART DIRECTION & STYLING: SHERRI McCONAGHY STYLING ASSISTANT: DaMARA ALTMAN-HERNANDEZ HAIR: YAJAIRA DANIEL MAKEUP: HEIDI PADILLA MODEL: EMILY CROSS ALL CLOTHING: KARIN BRETTMEISTER

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FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION:

SCANDINAVIAN FASHION

by EMELIE SVENSSON It’s hard to write about Scandinavian fashion without mentioning Swedish fast-fashion retailer H&M. It also seems hard to ignore H&M’s affordable luxury collaborations, commonly referred to here as ‘’democratic fashion.” The world’s first doctor in fashion knowledge, Swede Philip Warkander, disputed the concept of democratic fashion in a recent thesis presented at Stockholm University on May 4th. “It’s a misleading impression that this is something typically Swedish,” he recently said in an interview. “On the other hand it generates good PR for Swedish labels such as Acne or Our Legacy when selling abroad,” he adds. A quick Google search defines democratic fashion as affordable fashion. High fashion is only available to select individuals who can afford the increased prices, while democratic fashion is within reach. Swedish fashion is however heavily influenced by the vision of Folkhemmet (the People’s home), a political concept that played an important role in the history of the Swedish Social Democratic Party and the Swedish welfare state. Sometimes referred to as ‘’the Swedish Middle Way,” Folkhemmet is viewed as being midway between capitalism and socialism. “I think it makes luxury available for people, and I think that’s wonderful and very democratic” - Sarah Jessica Parker summing up the buzz at the Maison Martin Margiela x H&M Silent Manifesto March A/W 2012 collection collaboration.

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If democracy is a form of government in which all citizens (ideally) have an equal voice, then democratic fashion actually means the masses right to consume fashion. The concept of affordable, democratic Folkshemmet, Swedish fashion is uncommonly functional and androgynous when compared to other Scandinavian countries. And therefore very exotic abroad. In September 2008, three Danish girls founded one of the first fast growing Danish fashion blogs ‘Anywho.dk,’ which showcased a significantly different street wear look in Denmark; large coats with rounded shoulders, neon sneakers, big leather tote bags, and towering hair buns on bikes. Throughout the years, Anywho has been featured in Vogue, Elle, Marie Claire and Danish Cover magazine. They’re now Denmark’s most influential trendsetters, with a growing international following. Blogging could be one of the most democratic platforms we have today, where every consumer has an equal say, and an equal shot at the front row. Traditionally, fashion defines orientation in class, identity and gender. Fashion consolidates role expectations in the same way as it challenges the existing order. Denmark’s enfant terrible, Henrik Vibskov, is renowned for his rebellious and twisted universes, where vivid art installations are created that tie in with his collections and incorporate the models in innovative ways. Henrik Vibskov’s approach to clothing seems to explore fashion through cultural expression, far from the common commercial arena. Graduated from Central St.Martins in 2001 with over 20 produced mens collections so far, he is currently the only Scandinavian designer on the official show roster at Paris Mens Fashion Week. Unique landscapes filled with quirky characters doesn’t even begin to describe the imaginative images the TABERNACLE TWINS collections serve up. The vivid colors and random combinations presented at each show are always unpredictable, and always highly appreciated by the audience. The ELLE Style Awards 2013 Denmark premiered this May with its first festive gala honouring 45 nominated talents across 15 categories in gorgeous surroundings at The Royal Theatre House. This red carpet event took place on the eve of Copenhagen

HENRIK VIBSKOV A/W 2012

HENRIK VIBSKOV A/W 2012

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TABERNACLE TWINS S/S 2013

Fashion Week, one of four competing annual trade fairs showcasing Danish design, and attended by internationally recognized street style blogger Yvan Rodic (Face Hunter.), among others. A few years ago the harem pant rose in popularity when it was reintroduced in Scandinavian fashion, and it has remained a best-selling fixture in Danish fashion. To explain why the pajama pant is a rising star this year, we need look no further than the comfort aspect. Comfort seems to play an important role in the style vocabulary of Danish fashion designers, where Swedish design distinguishes itself as stricter, in comparison. Another style staple in Denmark is Hunter Boot Ltd, from Edinburgh, Scotland. Their footwear is designed to perform in any terrain; from city streets to muddy music festivals and rugged countryside. The company has manufactured vulcanized rubber footwear for over 150 years with their best-selling style, the Hunter Green Welly, regularly worn by the outdoorsy British Royal family as well as famous frequent festival goers like Kate Moss. Their form follow function approach navigated to Scandinavia during the 20th century, where construction is considered to be of higher value than decoration. Marc Jacobs may have set the trend when he launched his slightly hypnotic Spring/Summer 2013 line in stripes, however Danish fashion designer Mads Nørgaard has maintained the classic stripes as his signature in all his collections since 1986, with color and place of stripes differing from collection to collection. While Sweden is well known for a minimalistic sense seen also in home interior decorating and furniture design, Denmark’s style is more bold in both cut and material. This year, Danish stylist Dorothea Guntoft, ELLE’s 2013 “Stylist Of The Year”, published her book “Fashion Scandinavia, Contemporary Cool”. Her publisher, Thames & Hudson, explains the Scandinavian fashion design aesthetic: “Their appeal lies in the simplicity, minimalism, attention to detail and high quality of materials so iconic in Scandinavian design, as well as in their sustainable and ethical production methods.”

Emelie Svensson is the head designer of Swedish fashion label MLI, by Emelie Svensson

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THE CULT THAT SHAPED ME by ESMERALDA FERRETTI

“People are strange when you’re a stranger. Faces look ugly when you’re alone. Women seem wicked when you’re unwanted. Streets are uneven when you’re down.“ These lines couldn’t be more accurate; that’s how I felt my entire life. I was the unwanted kid, the odd one out, the little mouse that waits for the perfect moment when no one’s looking to run from under the fridge to under the stove trying not to get caught, finding relief only in dark corners, alone. I was 5 years old, blowing out the candles of what I remember as my last birthday in the cult, right before the escape and the craziness and confusion that lead after that in my path of trying to quietly merge into normality, the outside world, society or what they called “the system.” I think it was very early in the morning, maybe 5 am. And I say I think because most of my memories associated with the cult are sort of a blur, a giant mass of images. There’s a quote from the movie Martha, Marcy May, Marlene that describes it perfectly: “Do you ever have that feeling where you don’t know if something’s a dream or a memory?” My mom was rushing us into some family’s car, it was a light blue Mercedes Benz and why do I remember this so perfectly? Because of the name. You see, the cult was in Ecuador where names are strange and fancy like that. I thought “how

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funny, this car must be a girl!, I need to be gentle to it then.” Again, I was 5; I didn’t know that we were escaping from a highly persecuted religious cult, that this was life or death, that my life was about to change forever and that my selective memory would be so cute. After that a blank and then a bus. My dad of course, being like he is, had made friends with all the people in the back, pulled out his guitar and was playing songs about Jesus and being a clown. Later in life I would learn to be embarrassed by this, but for now, being the 5 year old who would go down the street saying “God bless you” to strangers, this was totally normal. We were in the middle of the desert, and I was puking my guts out. The driver was threatening to kick us out if I didn’t stop bathing the other passengers with my home made bus salsa, when suddenly the bus died. Great. Literally in the middle of nowhere. We were trying to secretly escape from a cult for Christ sakes, and this bus just died. All passengers exited the bus, and my parents, of course, held hands and began to pray: “Sweet lord Jesus Christ lord, we love you lord, we believe in your miracles dear Creator, please give this holy man the ability to start this bus again Jesus Christ lord, my love, dearest, bla, bla, bla.” And then it did, the bus started up, and my parents started yelling “Alleluia!” “Alleluia Jesus!” Now, I don’t think you can understand how embarrassing that was, but then again, that wasn’t even the worst embarrassing moment of my cult childhood, and if I started writing about them I would prob-

ably fill this entire magazine with a combination of painful memories wrapped with colorful funny rollercoasters of silliness and things that seem unreal, like going to the county fair on acid. And so, here’s where I wanted to get to, that moment in your life where you can sit at a coffee shop (next to some Williamsburgies) and just write about this crazy, unreal past, where you were shaped and taught to be afraid and not trust anyone, where things that are normal to everyone could mean the damnation of your soul and I believed it, I really did. My stories turned into party tricks that I used to make people laugh, like the one about the cult’s little choir. Yes, there was a little choir of kids that would sing at malls for the holidays, at banks, companies, the president, whatever, whoever and whenever that cult could find a way to promote its religious paraphernalia to make money. And me, I was there, in the tightest ponytail you can imagine, wearing a tropical printed skirt and a fluffy white blouse (this was our uniform) chanting along other 30 kids while strangers stare at us like we were cute little kittens playing with a ball of wool. Later in my life I found out the truth about the cult, and the funny cute memories weren’t funny or cute anymore, I had been raised in The Children of God, also known as Family International. Now, for those who are not up to date with their Cultipedia, this particular cult was the same one where Joaquin and River Phoenix spent their childhood, a cult constantly investigated for


child abduction, sexual abuse, and many other things that were starting to make me feel dizzy, I was feeling lightheaded and my vision started going black. “Do you ever have that feeling where you don’t know if something’s a dream or a memory”. So many questions rushing through my mind: Was it real? Is this true? Did my parents know about this? How could they do this! What if we were hurt? Were we? Am I dreaming? And so my journey to hide had begun. I was still the weird one, as if the cult had stamped me on the forehead with a giant red sign that said STUPID, everyone was having a good old big laugh at my expense, and no one had the decency to tell me “Hey dude, there’s something on your forehead” (I’m totally quoting Never Been Kissed here). I was called crazy by everyone, even my family! (Come on people, really? You were there too!) and so I learned to be ashamed of myself. Ashamed of that little girl who was still confused about what was real and what was a dream. Ashamed of my emotions and the way I shared them. Ashamed of every single word that came out of my mouth, and I couldn’t forgive myself for being so stupid every time I decided to stand up for the weird one in the group, danced with the unpopular kid at the parties and tried to do great in school because I was taught to do good in the name of God. I grew up an angry teenager because I couldn’t trust my instincts, because after a couple of years I understood that every single thing I was taught to think, do and feel

was wrong and that I’d never have what normal people have. I would never belong. I was so deeply ashamed of my past and the stupid “God bless you”s, that I never had seen cartoons, never played with Barbie dolls, but knew exactly how to survive Jesus’ Second Coming, how not to say certain things and how to use my little chubby blond girl’s charm to get things from people. No matter how much I tried to hide, the emotions and the true me always found a way to sabotage my act, that bitch would just come in the middle of my fake me being awesome and spoil the moment. I hid and hid and hid, and I was still that little mouse trying to run from one corner to the other. I just thought I wasn’t, I thought I had my act together and no one would notice, no one would be able to see the cult inside me. There’s so much we hide, we want to belong and just feel normal, we just want a break, a moment where no one is judging you with their eyes to the point that you feel they can almost see through you, playing back the image of that little kid being yelled at by their parents or bullied and ridiculed at school, or even punished by some “mentor” who is not even your parent in the name of God. We build a cocoon with a predisposed personality, where things have been carefully planned out, hair is not moving anywhere and the clothes we wear represent this character to perfection, we drink the drinks we are supposed to drink, we walk the walk and we talk the talk, sometimes we even use our

cute selective memory to chose specific moments of our past to shape our image to be just edgy enough to be appealing, but not too much that it would scare people away and make them call you “that weird dude at the party who shared way too much about his past.” It wasn’t until I turned 24 that I learned not to hide, to just let that bi-polar, attention whore go out and do her thing. I learned to say fuck it, close my eyes and jump off the horribly high bridge with nothing but a flimsy rope attached to my small ankles and be free. Really free. The kind of free that Townes Van Zandt talks about in his songs. The cool breeze hitting your face kind of free. Some people desire the past that for them seems exciting and adventurous, the kind of past that blues and country singers use to inspire their emotion-packed songs, the same past that haunted me for so many years, but in the end we are who we are. We lose that along the way because we are taught to be certain things, and those things are as varied as a giant box of colorful crayons and the infinite combinations of colors you can get from painting with them, but in reality we are a blank sheet of paper. We need to un-learn some colors and create our own patterns embracing our singular texture and coating. Let that weirdo shine through, because in reality, who the fuck cares? Take that Bob Dylan!

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FASHION

DESIGNERPROFILE by STUART McCONAGHY

LOGAN NEITZEL People can be forgiven for automatically thinking “Project Runway” upon hearing the name Logan Neitzel. But that’s about to change. Unlike other former participants in everyone’s favorite Heidi Klum extravaganza, Logan hasn’t resorted to marketing his name with the “of Project Runway” suffix, and he’s repeatedly turned down offers to appear on all-star seasons as well as other TV shows. This soft-spoken designer has no plans of becoming a professional reality tv star; he’s all about fashion. TAPE

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Photo: Stuart McConaghy

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“It’s easy to go full-on conceptual and weird, but for me that’s less appealing than making something that’s well crafted, has a voice, and is still a day-to-day wearable piece.”

Photo: Stuart McConaghy


With an aesthetic that is influenced by Goth, street fashions and sportswear, Logan’s past collections have demonstrated his ability to whip up a collection that is not only youthful and edgy, but also displays a vibrant elegance. And people are buying. From creating Macklemore’s much talked about stage look for this year’s Billboard Awards, to pieces for Trent Reznor’s Nine Inch Nails comeback, Logan Neitzel is in demand. “Coming from small-town Idaho, fashion was never a career path,” he recalls. “I had an artistic side that never had a proper outlet. I was into action sports, but also interested in fashion. I was always the weird kid wearing Hammer pants in third grade! (laughs) I always loved working with my hands and figuring out how things work, so eventually I started figuring out how things were put together, be it a piece of clothing, making my own mocassins when I was 13, building bikes, or fixing a car.” Logan studied fashion in Seattle “mainly because of proximity to the mountains. It was a good place to be based on the fact that a lot of sportswear and outerwear companies are based in that area, and I could still head into the mountains on the weekends. I was a total adrenaline junkie when I was younger,” he laughs. “But I ended up designing for London Fog, and for the snowboard outerwear line Black Dot.” After designing for Black Dot, Logan began working as an accessories designer, which enabled him to travel to China and Japan, among other locations. “I guess my style evolved out of this; the traveling deeply inspired me, and I learned a lot in the process. I gradually discovered that I had a vision as to what I was seeing in fashion, wanted to see in fashion, and it became something more conceptual, as opposed to simply making a garment. And the concept of perhaps making wearable art became much more interesting than making a simple jacket that gets worn a few times and eventually thrown away.” “I can’t say that I was born to be a fashion designer; I hate when people say that. I believe you eventually become a fashion designer in an ongoing process, shaped by everything you’ve done up until that point. Whether you’re making clothes, tinkering with car engines, whatever. What you do shapes you and takes you in a direction that you might not have foreseen.”

So who would he list as influences? “Well, Karl Lagerfeld is an inspiration, definitely. Not necessarily for his designs, but for his vision. This is someone who’s not concerned with the current season, because his vision is already three or four seasons further ahead than everyone else. And someone like Carol Christian Poell is amazing to me, the craft is at another level entirely, it’s not just a leather jacket, there’s another process behind it. I respect designers who stick to their vision, as opposed to morphing and jumping on trends. Rick Owens and Ann Demeulemeester are great examples; they stay true to their voice and don’t morph to what the public wants. They make what they want, and the public adapts, or doesn’t. They have a definite vision, and that vision is what guides them.” Faced with the inevitable question about his stint on Project Runway, he laughs again. “I’d rather not talk about it, “ he says, but adds: “It definitely got my name out to a lot of people who would never have heard of me, and it’s driven me to become a better designer than I was on the show, so in that sense I guess it was a good thing. People have approached me for other shows, but I turn them all down. I don’t intend to revisit any kind of reality tv show again. If you’re still clinging on to your time on a reality show more than a year after the show aired, you’re just desperate for attention.” An interesting partnership is Logan’s work with rapper Macklemore. His eye-catching creation worn at the Billboard Awards was much talked about earlier this year. “I’ve been working with Macklemore for two years now. Macklemore is an incredibly driven person, and he’s given me an outlet to try new ideas and things that I would never out in my regular collections, like the big blue suit. In a way we see a lot of ourselves in the other. There are a lot of similarities in that he’s worked for ten years in grimy clubs and small venues, working his way up, and it’s the same with me.” “My clothes aren’t going to be hanging at Macy’s any time soon, and that’s fine. That’s not where I want to be. I want to make great clothes that are like the prize piece in someone’s wardrobe. Someone puts their outfit together in the morning, and maybe they add that one piece from my collection that transforms their look. It’s easy to go full-on conceptual and weird, but for me that’s less appealing than making something that’s well crafted, has a voice, and is still a day-to-day wearable piece.”

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The Case for Just Being Yourself (or How I Learned Not to Fear the Faux Pas) by ESMERALDA FERRETTI

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hen I first sat down to write this I thought to myself “Yeah, I’m going to write something about fashion, luxury, something exuberant in its complexity but silky and easy to swallow.” I wanted something that would catch your attention with the first sentence, something morbid and sexy, like a big slap in the face followed by a bucket of ice water, maybe a nipple pinch while you’re still in shock. And after the pain and the awe was gone, you’d start feeling that tingly sensation crawling up your spine all the way up to your head. The problem was that the more I thought about it the less inspired I felt; “What is luxury?” echoed in my head like that darned Miley Cyrus song, and as I looked for luxury sitting on the stairs of some fancy store in Soho, or at people hanging outside of trendy Williamsburg spots hoping that street fashion bloggers take their picture, I realized that I haven’t felt inspired like that in a while. What a contradiction. We live in a time where colorful patterns have taken over like an explosion of baby food all over your new Céline sweater, where there’s a different understanding of what fashion is and should be, the rules have been bent and the sky is the limit! So what is wrong!?

I feel like Britney Spears in the song Lucky: how can I feel so uninspired if there’s a carnival of self-expression on every corner? This is New York City, damn it! There are lights and music and laughter and people everywhere… as well as cockroaches, mice and the stink of hot garbage, but it’s New York City! After this epiphany that could have come straight out of The

Sound Of Music, I tried to go back and remember the last time I felt butterflies in my stomach. Aaah! That wonderful, warm feeling of completeness when you’ve put together that perfectly crazy outfit. At first it looks insane, and more conservative minds might insist that nothing matched, but upon closer inspection there’s a symphony of refreshing combinations that only connect when it’s unexpected, creating a whole universe of magic and playfulness. It’s fun, it’s careless, it’s in your face, and it feels like Christmas. And then I remembered a moment when I was on the A train going back home after a shoot with my fabulous friend Jonathan, when this kid walks in wearing a striped black & white scarf, plaid pants, a cut off DIY tee and sunglasses that had eyes drawn on them. “Eyes on top of your eyes!” I thought to myself, “that’s funny, and stupid, and abso-


lute genius!” He told us he grew up upstate and just moved to New York to be himself. TO BE HIMSELF. But what set this kid apart from the playfulness of the million characters around me? Was it not his outfit, but his attitude? The aura of honesty that surrounded this crazy looking kid? Then the next question and the most important one popped into my head: Is this carnival a planned out theatre set, with simple characters that are worn out at the end of the first act? Is this the Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus, or the Bratz doll factory? I would be exaggerating to say that everyone is boring and uninspired and copying each other, but I can definitely say I see more store mannequins repeated, with slight variations of print and pattern, than I get the slap on the face these days. Are we afraid of yelling “GLITTER!” and wearing our underwear on the outside? Do we feel more comfortable with looks associated with something familiar, rather than the thrill of maybe taking risks by letting your inner bi-polar, attention whore come out, sing along to Icona Pop, yelling “I don’t care?” Let your inner flamboyant drag queen shine, fly your freak flag, stop judging it (and yourself) and

Are we afraid of yelling “GLITTER!” and wearing our underwear on the outside? give him/her/yourself the room to admit and accept that we can’t be the Picasso’s of fashion everyday, and that occasionally committing a faux pas and wearing things the wrong way will not land us in jail. Hell, it won’t even land us on the pages of the Sartorialist. Maybe that’s what luxury actually is: Being yourself and honest about how you really feel inside and letting that shine through with a carnival of technicolor explosions, maybe it’s seeking the thrill of self-expression and moving to New York City to be yourself. And maybe it’s just giving yourself a little pat on the back and saying “this is not my day, I’ll try again tomorrow.” Be the drag queen you dream of becoming, and don’t punish yourself when you fail to pull off a beanie in the middle of the summer. Instead, brush it off with a smile and have fun with it, because there is no better time for that than now.

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BEAUTY

TIPS&TRENDS by HILLARY HUNT-MAXWELL

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Photo: Stuart McConaghy


As we say goodbye to our sunkissed skin, beachy tousled hair, and the effortless makeup regime of summer, we say hello to the bolder colors of fall and the need to reinvent our look to stand up to them, without seeming brash. Think of your skin as the palette with which this look will be sketched. Summer skin products tend to be rich and luxuriant because most of us are exposed to sun, wind and the damaging effects of heat and humidity during our summer escapades. Take advantage of mild fall weather to pull back a little on the moisturizers. Use a less intense product and remember to exfoliate regularly now that the sand and saltwater isn’t doing that for you. As you switch over from summer to fall skin products, it’s a good idea to have a professional analyze your skin, because it is always changing – just like the weather. First and foremost, if you are going to be outdoors, it is crucial that no matter what the season, you need to remember to use sunblock. Sun damage doesn’t discriminate with the temperature outside! The next step is getting a moisturizing cream that can truly take care of your skin, transitioning from humid summer days to drier, cooler, fall days and nights. One of my favorites is Embryolisse Lait-Crème Concentré. Give it a try. I’m sure it will win you over.

For the more polished fall look that goes with heavier clothing and deeper hues, start with a little more coverage. Swap out tinted moisturizers for a more matte finish. Don’t confuse a matte finish with an overdone doll-like face. My trick for this is to add foundation to the forehead, bridge of the nose, and chin and then blend out with a makeup brush. This way your face is not covered in makeup, your natural skin still shines through, and you can go back with a concealer to cover blemishes as desired. Keep in mind that we’re competing with beautiful and rich colors of fall and that can make us appear washed out. It’s important to add the “warmth” back into our look. As for hair, say goodbye to the harsh ombre and bleached blonde look, and welcome the warmer colors like chocolate, cinnamon, and honey - either one shade, a softer ombre, or highlighted. This instantly brightens your face. Now for some fun trends! They say in fashion “What is old becomes new again,” and this season is no exception. In addition to some new things, this fall/winter is all past, present, and future fun. We’ve all noticed that crop tops, acid washed denim and flannel shirts are coming around again. It appears that the 90s have made a serious comeback. And it’s affecting the look of hair and makeup too!

Clueless Prep: This consists of polished skin, wellkempt and full eyebrows, nude and minimal makeup. Sleek, glossy hair and a neat ponytail are trademarks of this look. Nirvana Grunge: This is all about the hard and beautiful purposeful messy look. Deconstructed black liner, wet slicked-back hair or bed hair, and black nails. Great Gatsby Glam: Popularized recently by the remake of the movie, the Roaring 20s were all about high glam and fully-made up looks. This season gives us a chance to play with this, but with a bit of a modern twist. Bobbed hair, and bangs! Dark, smokey eyes, long lashes, dark blackberry lips, and a half moon manicure. Futuristic: CoverGirl is putting out a makeup collection based on The Hunger Games: Catching Fire that hits stores soon, and from the preview shots we can take it from there and play with what the future of makeup may be. This look includes metallic shadows, colorful eyes and lips and strategically-placed glitter. Graphic liner is applied in creative shapes, and nails with texture added are part of the look. Play it safe, or try something new and adventurous, either way, fall is a fun time to experiment!

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BEAUTY

MUSTHAVES by HILLARY HUNT-MAXWELL

EMBRYOLLISE Lait-Cremè Concentré

DIOR CC Primer Radiance Booster

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MAKE UP FOREVER

LAURA MERCER

HD Foundation

Kohl Liner Extreme in Black

ANASTASIA BEVERLY HILLS Brow Wiz


DIOR Diorshow Fusion Mono Mystic Metallics Eyeshadow in Cosmos (no. 281, top) and Aventure (no. 081, bottom)

NARS

ILLAMASQUA

Velvet Matte Lip Pencil in Cruella (left) and Train Bleu (right)

Nail Varnish in Boosh

GUERLAIN Voilette de Madame Collection Gloss d’Enfer Maxi Shine in Madame Fascine (no. 863)

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NEWYORK

FASHIONWEEK by STUART McCONAGHY

KATYA LEONOVICH Katya Leonovich has quickly become a regular at New York Fashion Week, and rightly so. The Studio at Lincoln Center played host to Leonovich’s ultra-dreamy Spring ‘14 collection, a collection bursting with color and detail. Beginning with printed silks based on Katya’s own paintings, the color scheme of blue, pink, coral and brown gave way to an immaculately tailored leather dress in light purple. Standout looks were embroidered dresses with plunging necklines and vertical ruffles, as well as an asymmetrically laced black dress. Katya Leonovich’s collections makes one wish we could just skip winter and just head straight into next spring already. Stuart McConaghy

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You’re always in for a treat with Falguni & Shane Peacock, and the Spring Summer ‘14 collection is no exception. Year after year, it seems that this designer duo is capable of taking emerging trends, plugging them into the fashion equivalent of a Marshall amp, and cranking the volume to 11. Styling the models in spaceage white wigs and dark makeup courtesy of Kryolan Professional served to simply underline the fact that Falguni & Shane Peacock are at least a couple of seasons ahead of the pack. Daring custom prints with incredible depth, nude overlay, and those incredible leg harnesses, everything about the Spring Summer 2014 collection just screams fabulous. To. Die. For.

Stuart McConaghy

FALGUNI & SHANE PEACOCK

Stuart McConaghy

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Stuart McConaghy

KATIE GALLAGHER “For you, I am a chrysanthemum, Supernova, urgent star. For you, I’ll be a dandelion, a thousand flowerettes in the sky, or just a drop in the ocean.” - Blume, by Einstürzende Neubauten

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Stuart McConaghy

Katie Gallagher has already proven she is not your run of the mill designer. Her idea of a spring summer collection may not contain any brightly colored t-shirts with youthful slogans, and inspiration is not something she gets from conventional sources. Her 2014 Spring Summer collection, aptly titled “Bloom”, takes its inspiration and name from the video and lyrics of German industrial pioneers Einstürzende Neubauten’s track Blume (from the 1992 album Tabula Rasa). You could be forgiven for thinking this song (and therefore Katie’s collection) is a brash, ear-splitting orgy of sonic torture, after all, this is a band who play instruments such as sheets of metal, pneumatic drills and shopping carts, but you’ll be delighted to discover that not only is Blume an ambient, calm and quiet song that envelops and surrounds the listener, Katie Gallagher’s collection is light and airy, while maintaining a certain dark energy that we have come to expect from her work. Funeral flowers play a prominent role, and pink carnations meet with romantic silhouettes in black, ivory and powder pinks. Cuttingedge, 3D-printed manicures meet up with hand-made textiles, perforated lambskin, silk chiffons and paper spandex. Katie Gallagher is hitting her stride as a designer, and if she’s not on your to-watch list, you’re simply not paying attention.

Stuart McConaghy

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SK INGR AF T Jonny Cota’s Skingraft label always attracts the daredevils, the edgy and the sometimes wonderfully weird, and his debut NYFW show features the crѐme de la crѐme of New York’s left-of-mainstream fashionistas and fashionistos. Attendees ranged from famed bloggers Mynxii White, the always fabulous Jean of the Idiosyncratic Fashionistas, and TAPEbuddies Wanderlust, along with the uncrowned king of New York nightlife Kayvon Zand. Of course the fashion is worth its own chapter, blending influences from Balinese tribes and Americana sportswear, the trademark black leathers are infused by white bone-like elements and prints, vertebrae patterns and the odd smidgen of yellow. Skingraft don’t just design clothes, they design exoskeletons for the true urban warrior.

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Stuart McConaghy

Stuart McConaghy


Stuart McConaghy

Stuart McConaghy

Stuart McConaghy

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ASHER LEV I NE

Nick Blumenthal

Rather fittingly, Asher Levine launched his 8th mens collection on Friday the 13th with a funeral. Masked men carried funeral pop group MXMS vocalist Ariel Levitan on to the runway in a coffin, and dark, minimal beats ushered in Levine’s updated take on modern downtown menswear. We saw bone Pasikley prints, molded leather and sculptural bone cages inspired by tribal sea creatures, and sprinkled with colors like teal, ivory and saffron yellow. Utilitarian, Bondage, Motorcycle and organic shapes united in perfect harmony.

Nick Blumenthal

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Nick Blumenthal

Nick Blumenthal

Nick Blumenthal

Nick Blumenthal

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FALGUNI & SHANE PEACOCK BEHIND THE SCENES PHOTOS: STUART McCONAGHY

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KATYA LEONOVICH BEHIND THE SCENES

PHOTOS: STUART McCONAGHY

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SKINGRAFT

BEHIND THE SCENES PHOTOS: STUART McCONAGHY

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PHOTOGRAPHY: STUART McCONAGHY STYLING: SHERRI McCONAGHY HAIR: YAJAIRA DANIEL MAKEUP: HEIDI PADILLA MODEL: EMILY CROSS JACKETS & LEATHER HARNESSES: KARIN BRETTMEISTER NECKLACE: LOYALTY & BLOOD

She She She She TAPE

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SWEATSHIRT: VINTAGE JEWELRY: STYLIST’S OWN

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saturdays = youth P H OTO GRAP H Y BY ANGELA M ARK LEW

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SWEATSHIRT: VINTAGE LEE SHORTS: VINTAGE

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LEATHER JACKET: VINTAGE T-SHIRT: VINTAGE SHORTS: RAG & BONE JEWELRY: STYLIST’S OWN

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BLOUSE: VINTAGE SHORTS: RAG & BONE SUNGLASSES: STYLIST’S OWN

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T-SHIRT: VINTAGE SHORTS: RAG & BONE BELT: RAG & BONE

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TANK: VINTAGE SHORTS: UNIF

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TOP: KELLY CALABRESE OVERALLS: TOPSHOP BELT: CACTUS TREE VINTAGE

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OPPOSITE PAGE

THIS PAGE

TANK: VINTAGE

LACE TOP: VINTAGE

SHORTS: UNIF

LEATHER JACKET: CHEAP MONDAY

JEWELRY: STYLIST’S OWN

JEWELRY: STYLIST’S OWN

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TOP IMAGE T-SHIRT: VINTAGE SHORTS: RAG & BONE BELT: RAG & BONE BOTTOM IMAGE TOP: KELLY CALABESE OVERALLS: TOPSHOP OPPOSITE PAGE BLOUSE: VINTAGE SHORTS: RAG & BONE

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Katie

Photography by Rich Burroughs Model: Katie Carr

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INDIGO PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL CINQUINO STYLIST: CHRISTINA CISNEROS MAKEUP: DALLAS WILLIAMS HAIR: ALYN MARTIN OF KEN BARBOZA ASSOCIATES MODEL: JOHANNA STICKLAND (ONE MANAGEMENT) ASSISTANT: KARA GRAVES

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LEATHER COAT: JONATHAN SIMKHAI PRINT BLOUSE: KATE SPADE SKIRT: KAELEN GLASSES: STYLIST’S OWN SOCKS: HUE HEELS: MICHAEL Michael Kors

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LEATHER COAT: JONATHAN SIMKHAI PRINT BLOUSE: KATE SPADE SKIRT: KAELEN GLASSES: STYLIST’S OWN SOCKS: HUE HEELS: MICHAEL Michael Kors


KNIT SWEATER: HELMUT LANG BUTTON UP: STYLIST’S OWN TROUSERS: THEORY TIE: VINTAGE CHRISTIAN DIOR NECKLACE: LULU FROST


KNIT SWEATER: HELMUT LANG BUTTON UP: STYLIST’S OWN TROUSERS: THEORY TIE: VINTAGE CHRISTIAN DIOR NECKLACE: LULU FROST


SHIRT DRESS: HARVEY FAIRCLOTH SOCKS: TOMMY HILFIGER JEWELRY: LULU FROST BELT: STYLIST’S OWN


JACKET: JONATHAN SIMKHAI SWEATER: 3.1 PHILIP LIM SKIRT: STYLIST’S OWN NECKLACE: LULU FROST GLASSES: STYLIST’S OWN SOCKS: HUE HEELS: MICHAEL Michael Kors

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a day in the life PHOTOS BY ADRIEN SICART M O D EL: TH IBAU LT S ERVIÈRE TAPE

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BLUE & WHITE TOP: FROM BRITTEN DARK WOOL JACKET: JULIUS LEATHER BAG: SONGZIO DARK TROUSERS: SONGZIO LONG SLEEVE BLACK SHIRT: ALIBELLUS+ LEATHER JACKET: BACKLASH PANAMA HAT: CableAmi BLUE HAT: CableAmi LINEN BAGS: CHANNEL KOBE SUNGLASSES: LOZZA GLASSES: LOZZA BLUE JACKET: U-NI-TY BLUE FOULARD: U-NI-TY BLUE JUMPER: U-NI-TY UNDERWEAR: LE SLIP FRANÇAIS BEACH SHORTS: LE SLIP FRANÇAIS BEACH TOWEL: LE SLIP FRANÇAIS

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THE PA I N T E D DESERT PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARISA PIKE

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STYLIST: J-CHAN’S DESIGNS MAKEUP & HAIR: JESSICA ROWELL DESIGNER: J-CHAN’S DESIGNS by JESSICA ROWELL MODEL: BETZABE ARZOLA WWW.TAPEZINE.COM


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PANTS: TOMMY HILFIGER BRALETTE: LEITH JEWELRY: JAKIMAC

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THE DESERT KNOWS MY NAME PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHELLE PAULSEN STYLIST: AMY PIGLIACAMPO MAKEUP: AUDREY RAMOS HAIR: STACEY BARNES MODEL: MARIA MARGARITA

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FUR COAT: 10 CORSO HAT: VINTAGE JEWELRY: JAKIMAC

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HAT: VINTAGE JEWELRY: JAKIMAC

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FUR COAT: 10 CORSO HAT: VINTAGE JEWELRY: JAKIMAC

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BLACK JEANS: TOMMY HILFIGER JEWELRY/HARNESS: JAKIMAC

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LACE DRESS: NICOLE MILLER ARTELIER JEWELRY: JAKIMAC

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PANTS: TOMMY HILFIGER BRALETTE: LEITH JEWELRY: JAKIMAC


TOP: LEATHER SKIRT: EVIL TWIN JEWELRY: JAKIMAC BOTTOM: BLACK DENIM JACKET: JOE’S JEANS LEATHER SKIRT: EVIL TWIN HAT: BRIXTON JEWELRY/HARNESS: JAKIMAC


PANTS: TOMMY HILFIGER BRALETTE: LEITH JEWELRY: JAKIMAC


TOP: JEWELRY: JAKIMAC HAT: LOVELY BIRD LEATHER VEST: VINTAGE SHORTS: VINTAGE CENTER: PANTS: TOMMY HILFIGER BRALETTE: LEITH JEWELRY: JAKIMAC BOTTOM: FUR COAT: 10 CORSO HAT: VINTAGE JEWELRY: JAKIMAC


BLACK DENIM JACKET: JOE’S JEANS LEATHER SKIRT: EVIL TWIN HAT: BRIXTON JEWELRY/HARNESS: JAKIMAC BOOTS: MODEL’S OWN


PANTS: TOMMY HILFIGER BRALETTE: LEITH JEWELRY: JAKIMAC


TOP: LACE DRESS: NICOLE MILLER ARTELIER JEWELRY: JAKIMAC

BOTTOM: LEATHER SKIRT: EVIL TWIN JEWELRY: JAKIMAC


SWEET JANE Photography by Daniel K. Johansson

STYLIST: STEFANIE RAVELLI MAKEUP: REBECCA OZOLINS MODEL: FRIDA TARRAS-WAHLBERG (SWEDEN MODELS) TAPE

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PANTS: 1440 BODY: VIRGINIE CASTAWAY SHOES: MONKI SUNGLASSES: MAX MARA NECKLACE: BJORG

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PANTS: NLY TREND/NELLY.COM TOP: MINIMARKET

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PANTS: STYLE BUTLER TOP: CHEAP MONDAY SHOES: ADIDAS

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PANTS: GENTLEMEN’S AFFAIR TANK TOP: ESTRADEUR/NELLY.COM HAT: MINIMARKET SCARF: LALA BERLINZ SHOES: CHEAP MONDAY

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PANTS: ADIDAS TOP: STELLA FOREST SHOES: MINIMARKET BACKPACK: MONKI

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Tape: Polaroid  

TAPE's Polaroid issue features editorials shot exclusively on instant film cameras. The magic of instant film, the raw nature of the photos,...

Tape: Polaroid  

TAPE's Polaroid issue features editorials shot exclusively on instant film cameras. The magic of instant film, the raw nature of the photos,...

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