Page 1

Design Portfolio

Research Portfolio

Tanya Chandra

Curriculum vitae


Work

Education 2013 Technische Universiteit Delft, - 2015 Netherlands Masters of Science in Urbanism 2015 Graduation: Delhi-on-Demand, Urban Mobility – 9/10 Studio: Design as Politics Mobility Utopia for Delhi - LINK VerticalCities Asia, Mumbai – Second Winner Studio: Complex Projects & Urbanism Urban development strategy for 100,000 people/km2 LINK Socio-spatial Intervention Hofbogen – Exhibited Studio: Urbanism -MSc 1

2005 Manipal University, Manipal, India - 2010 Bachelors in Architecture Rank -2, CGPA: 8.66/10 2010 Graduation: How to make cost-effective habitable? Awarded & Published - LINK

Additional tools Expert

Good

BAsic

2016/01 - Veldacademie : Research Trainee Present Ruth Höppner, Rotterdam - LINK 2016 Social Resilience: Under the ‘100 Resilient cities’ program by Rockefeller Foundation, studying Rotterdam and New York as case studies in collaboration with AIR foundation, TU Delft, Stevens Institute of Technology and Leiden University. Research comissioned by Municipality of Rotterdam. Social Harbour: Designing a model to measure social impact, in collaboration with Jeanne van Heesvijk (www.jeanneworks.net), Department of Social & Policy Sciences of the University of Bath and IABR Rotterdam Biennale.

2015/03 - Play the City : Present Free Lancer: Design & Research Ekim Tan, Amsterdam - LINK 2016 Game planning for Waternet: City Innovation game in Buiksloterham, Amsterdam Noord for locating a new Bio-refinery. 2015 Game design for Shenzhen Biennale in collaboration with INTI (Internation New Town Institute) for the area Da Lang in Shenzhen, which has high migrant worker population and new fashion valley development proposal. Game training sessions hosted at Pakhuis de Zwijger for Overhoek, Amsterdam and Oosterwold, Almere.

Autocad Archicad Revit Adobe Suite 3DS Max SketchUp MColor Autodesk Impressions Depthmap GIS Carpentry

Tanya Chandra_CV_2016

2010/11 - Sangath, Vastu Shilpa Consultants : 2013/06 Senior Architect B.V. Doshi, Rajeev Kathpalia and Sönke Hoof, Ahmedabad, India - LINK Project Head 2012 - 2013 Mahindra Affordable Housing, Boisar, Mumbai 2010 - 2013 Premashraya, Kolkata (housing for cancer patients) Competition Team International 2013 Nalanda University, India (winning entry) - LINK National 2012 Indian Institute of Technology, Gandhinagar (winning entry for housing) 2011 National Agri-Food Biotechnology Institute (NABI), Chandigarh


Tanya Chandra Curriculum vitae

Publication / Exhibition 2016 Social Harbour Workshop, Speaker International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam

Awards 2014 Vertical Cities Asia : Mumbai Edition

Second Prize (International, Student, Team)

TU Delft, Singapore

Model to Measure Social Impact

2015 Unmaking the Netherlands, Speaker ‘Play’ series: Expodium Utrecht Introducing Play the City - LINK

2015 Atlantis, Urbanism Magazine, Published TU Delft October Article titles ‘Products of Line’ - Ways of presenting your Master thesis

2014 Confronting Informality, Symposium TU Delft Poster exhibition for selected master theses.

2014 Atlantis, Urbanism Magazine, Published TU Delft November Article on Vertical Cities Asia – International student competition; co-author Zivile Simkute April Published the poem ‘Utopic – Dystopia’ as a prologue April Drawing titled ‘Discussion as a factor of Urbanism’

2012 ‘Cost Effective Made Habitable’, Published a monograph Lambert Academic Publishing, Stuttgart

Jury: Rahul Mehrotra, Nathalie de Vries, Teddy Cruz, Wowo Ding and Fun Siew Leng - LINK

2012 International Prize for Sustainable Architecture : Thesis Honourable Mention

Ferrara, Italy Jury: Thomas Herzog, Peter Rich, Li Xiaodong, Nicola Marzot and Gianluca Minguzzi. - LINK

2010 Pidilite Architectural Awards ‘Optimum Space Utilization’

India Annual architectural awards hosted by Pidilite Industries Limited. I was nominated by my Institute. The award selection is done as per design performance in college design for the 5 years of Bachelors.

2010 NIASA Thesis Awards Nominated

India Bachelor Thesis on ‘Labour Housing Development’ nominated by department head, Ar. Nishant Manpure, for the National Thesis Competition held by Council of Architecture.

LINK

2011 Close The Gap, Exhibited D3, New York An international competition hosted by the USA based D3 and Transportation Alternatives called ‘Close The Gap’, inviting proposals for pedestrian and cyclist connections on the east riverside of Manhattan. It was exhibited in CUNY Baruch College, New York and at University of Houston.

2006 49th Annual NASA

Momentum for Manipal Institute of Technology

Manipal, India Co-designed and executed the proposal of a momentum for the event hosted by our college, in the form of a wall with Shalmali Wagle. The selection was done by a team of professors and students.

2006 49th NASA’s Annual Magazine, Published National Association of Student of Architecture, Manipal Edition Article dealt with hosting and working for an Annual NASA

Tanya Chandra_CV_2016


Participation Wokshop

‘Stadmakerscongress’, Rotterdam, 2014 ‘Get Well City’ Cesis, Latvia by Riga Technical University, 2014 - LINK

Design

Extracurricular Activities Set Lustrum Theatre (Stylos, TU Delft) - Production Designer worked on: Delftse Lente(Feb. 2014) Dramanon (Manipal University Drama Club) Productions worked on: Black Adder (Oct. 2007), Love, Sex and IRS (Oct. 2007), Fools (May 2008), The Darn Plot (Oct. 2009)

International competition on modular housing for Australia by Urban Collective, 2012 Housing for the Urban poor in Bangalore, India, a CO Design Competition organized by Architecture for Humanity, 2011

Documen- 500 years old mud house in Halsnadu, taTion Karnataka, India, 2009 Sringeri Temple, Karnataka, India, 2009

Modular Classroom design Competition by Architecture For Humanity, 2009

Writing

Essay submission for Saint Gobain Scholarship competition, on ‘Urban Spaces: Vital Role In The City’, 2012 Poems juxtaposed with photographs for ‘Socio‘ in the 40th issue of the Threshold Magazine of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2011

Mookambika Temple, Kollur, Karnataka, India, 2006 Car Street Of The Temple Square, Udupi, Karnataka, 2005

Event 49th Annual National Association of Students Head of Architecture Convention, Manipal, 2006 Designing Committee (Event Layout Plan, Signage, Certificates and Dept. T-Shirts)

Travel For learning and leisure: Extensively within India and Europe; Research Excursion to New York City

Language Fluently: English and Hindi Beginner: Dutch (A1/A2 - Volksuniversiteit Den Haag)

Interest Poetry writing, Travelling, Swimming, Dancing

Tanya Chandra_CV_2016

Planning and scripting design competitions held during the event Campus planning for zoning of events

Lead Paper Presentation for Zonal National Association of student of Architecture, 2006 Teams for wall murals for events within the Faculty of architecture, Manipal 2006-10 Intra-department cultural fest for Faculty of Architecture, 2006

Illustra- Board of school magazine at Convent of Jesus tor & Mary 2003-05


Activity map

Email tanya.chandra@gmail.com

Nationality Indian

Mobile 0091- 9574834345 0031- 626247894

Work Permit India (Registered Architect) USA (B1/B2 Visa - 2016 - 26) Netherlands (Orientation year, June 2015 2016)

Address T2/1103 Parsvnath Estater, Sector Omega, Pocket P2, Greater Noida, India - 201308 Date of birth 04-02-1986

Design Portfolio

Web http://issuu.com/tanyachandra http://tanyachandra.wix.com/city-on-demand

Research Portfolio Tanya Chandra_CV_2016


Research Portfolio 2016

Tanya Chandra


Lucknow

New Delhi

1994 Kanpur

1986

2001

Manipal

2005

Ahmedabad

Delft

Greater NOIDA

2003

Bangalore

2008

2010

2013

Design Portfolio 2016

Tanya Chandra


Tanya Chandra Curriculum vitae


Content

10 - 21

urban design

strategy

architecture

research

urban planning

+

technology

FACE 2 FACE: Urban mobility, Delhi, India Graduation project, TU Delft | 9/10 | 08-2014 to 06-2015

22 - 31

AAMCHI MUMBAI: FUNDAMENTALS, Mumbai, India MSc 2 Semester, TUDelft | International Competition - 2nd Winner | 02 to 06, 2014

32 - 35

EAT THE STREET, Rotterdam, Netherlands MSc 1 Semester, TUDelft | Socio-Spatial Studio - Exhibited | 11-2013 to 02-2014

36 - 41

MAHINDRA LIFESPACES, Boisar-Mumbai, India Sangath, Ahmedabad | Professional Project - Affordable housing | 05-2012 to 06-2013 Head Project Architect

42 - 45

Close the Gap, New York, United States of America D3-International Competition | Exhibited | 10-2011 research portfolio Professional Overview


FACE 2 FACE: Urban mobility, Delhi-India Design as Politics Studio : New Utopias on the ruins of a welfare state Graduation project, TU Delft | MSc Urbanism - 9/10 | August 2014 to June 2015

Mentors Marta Relats : Design as Politics Dominic Stead : Urban and Regional Planning Akkieles van Nes : Spatial Planning and Strategy

+ sCALE

200m

60km

Task A utopia of mobility

Personal Contribution Besides the spatial intervention required by the studio, I developed City-on-Demand technology to govern the strategy, design and policy.

10


Delhi - on - Demand Urban equity initiated through mobility City-on-Demand is a technology, it gathers the demand of commuter (public transport or walking) and urban residents (public spaces) and interprets the spatial requirement and changes the city’s infrastructure accordingly. Thus creating a real-time dynamic system of demand and supply. Making a city smarter by having a demand based supply chain management of its resources. It stems from my research on Delhi, where resource (supply) and demand are mismatched and there is an explosion of image based planning resulting in a gentrified and inaccessible city; plagued by pollution, congestion, high car ownership growth, safety and lack of urban commons for its growing density.

11


12


Banksy does Delhi Problem Definition - introduction

As an emerging market, Indian cities are faced with rapid urban changes for ‘progress’. We are exchanging human scale with technology that reduce one in a bubbled life of gated communities and private motorized transport. Delhi as the capital faces this image planning since 1980s. The repercussions of image planning in Delhi has led to the growing car culture and with the focus of governmental developmental on high technological public transport (Metro rail), both of which are unaffordable by the 55% of lower income group helpless. This problem is accentuated further when the urban poor is driven to periphery of the city, where affordable transport is lacking and non-motorized transport is limited by its range. Leading to poor quality of life for the urban poor due to limited job accessibility, strenuous commuting hours, poor provision for pedestrian and cyclist, unavailable public transport, lack of accessibility to social amenities and poor job security due to lack of job choices. Due to socio-spatial segregation, there is creation of socioeconomic burden on the urban poor which is reflected clearly through their options of transit mode. Though the make the majority in number but or the most public space, the roads, they make a minority in priority.

until 1977

1977 - 1986

1986 - 2000

2000 - 2010

13


Cost | Mode Share per income group | development emphasis

Transit mode share

Infrastructure share and development emphasis

70% of the urban poor (~10 million inhabitants of Delhi) find going to work as the most dangerous thing they do daily - Hazard centre, Delhi, 1999 14


80% of transport budget (~3 billion Euros) of 2002-07 was used for road widening and from the rest 20%, 60% was used for metro which though being 10-15 times more subsidized than a bus tickets has transit mode share of less than 5% and is running daily in a loss. - Tiwari, Urban age conference, 2007

Scale

Mode Priority

Project: Mode priority

The mode choice and priority is done as per function accessibility range and physical distance that can be covered by per mode and its economical viability in running the resource. 15


1. Functions TYPE AND ITS CATCHMENT AREA

2. mode accessibility range

3. connectivity OF THE CURRENT NETWORK

16


Delhi - on - demand Strategy - Route Divide Space syntax is an amazing tool to understand the connectivity of a given network and also indicated thus where most activities is popped up. Similarly density also has a similar function. And given the scenario and working with India’s densest district, sometime gave obscured function to route connectivity. Thus I approached my strategy through the order of the following rules: a) Route selection hierarchy for different scales (speed, walking and still) according to the connectivity they give b) the functions in the neighbourhood made the second layer of twisting around with the routes.

Still Route

walking Route

District Speed Route

c) typology of the route 1. For speed in is necessary that they use wider roads, are best connected and approachable by all also higher the width it should always border a neighbourhood but never cut across 2. For walking routes, these were selected every 500m on their connectivity to speed scale and would always cut across the neighbourhood to engage with a large audience. 3. For still routes, they usually disconnected with speed routes and always bordered the walking route instead. They were selected with their lack of functions which have a larger catchment area and disrupt the a softer social life of the neighbourhood.

City Speed Route

District Speed Route

17


Delhi - on - demand: matrix A) Speed Routes: for increasing the accessibility to public transport 1. Railway line covering intra city distance of 60km 2. City Speed route | Bus | 30km 3. District Speed Route - Primary | Bus | 5km 4. District Speed Route - Secondary | Bus | 2km B) Walking Routes: for increasing the walk-ability within neighbourhoods 1. Footpath | Walking | 1 - 5km 2. Dynamic Walkway | Walking | 500m

City Speed Route

Function ring

Share in road section

Priority of mode when system is Active District Speed Route

C) Still routes: for increasing public space with neighbourhoods 1. Urban space (streets) closed for motorised traffic | social, cultural, economical | 200m

priority bus lanes within neighbourhood and district levels

30KM

District Speed Route

priority bus lanes within neighbourhood

Speed Scale

500M

Still Route

walking Route

District Speed Route

2KM

walking Route

District Speed Route

200M

better approach to shopping streets, schools, religious & community centres and residential streets

5KM

Walking Scale

City Speed Route

Still Route

18

urban seating, public playgrounds, services, informal economy plaza Function ring Still Scale

Share in road section

Priority of mode when system is Active


Delhi - on - demand: Design elements

technical

Symbolic

Social

cultural & informal economy

Service

City Gate Meter for the technology

>

NORTH NORTH WEST

DENSITY OF THE DISTRICT

CENTRAL

WEST

EAST

SOUTH WEST

SOUTH

LOCATION OF SURGE POINT ON THE NETWORK

District Gate: Community

DENSITY OF THE DISTRICT

BORDER FOR A DISTRICT OR NCT OF DELHI

NORTH EAST

Night Bus

NEW DELHI

Surge Point WHEN THE VECTOR OF DEMAND IS ACROSS THE CITY AND CONSEQUETLY INCREASES FROM START TO END Buses have increased their allowable capacity going towards surge points, only to reduce it at surge point

Footpath Increases

START POINT

Higher frequency to reduce pressure per bus

SURGE POINT

Increases

Increases in demand

increases in bus requency and reduces pressure or demand reduces

SURGE POINT

Traffic Bollards

WHEN THE VECTOR OF DEMAND IS ONLY TILL SURGE POINT AND CONSEQUETLY REDUCES AS IT MOVES ACROSS THE CITY Buses return back as the demand further in the vectorial line reduces or Stop and wait for the peak to go up if the demand is not increasing in the earlier routes

stop & wait

Decreases

START POINT

Per bus’s capacity increases due to reduce in demand and hence the frequency also reduces of each bus route

SURGE POINT

Decreases

base

return as per peak

District Gate: Bus only

SURGE POINT

Demand Lighting Plaza with dynamic activities

Demand Stops and stations Neighbourhood Gate: Guard

Dynamic Walkway

Seating on the streets converted to still routes Platform on streets converted to still route Neighbourhood Gate: Tree Public playground on street converted to still route

Toilet Box on routes converted to still route

19


http://tanyachandra.wix.com/city-on-demand

20


UTOPIA : walk delhi | chalo dilli - 22 millions people

As per the system one can achieve in Delhi :

1. Bus stop or train station maximum at 1km from any house 2. Takes 1% (densest district) to 13% (least dense district) of the density to make it a walk-able neighbourhood. 3. From 2sqm/ person it increases to 16sqm / person of open public space.

21


AAMCHI MUMBAI: FUNDAMENTALS, Mumbai-India MSc 2 Semester, TUDelft | International Competition - 2nd Winner | 02 to 06, 2014 Tutors:

Group Members:

Mitesh Dixit Ulf Hackauf

Povilas Daugis Di Fang Betül Gürcan Karolis Macernis Zivile Simkute Akshey Krishna Venkatesh

Mentors: Kees Kaan Henco Bekkering Stefan de Koning

In 1970s, the first regional plan was introduced to create Navi-Mumbai, a twin city to the greater Mumbai. In the course of time Mumbai’s population grew and quick fixes in infrastructure by the municipality continued to fail. This visionary movement can be revived to complete the tale of two cities and re-evaluate and revive the density, program and vibrant street life of Mumbai. The competition site is strategically located with the connection to Navi-Mumbai in the vision for metropolitan area of Mumbai. Taking this move as a counter-intuitive to mega-infrastructure project only we use it to become a focal point in reviving the existing conditions of liveability factor and infrastructural network. Thus, this facilitated in questioning per person living area which is 4.5 m2 in Mumbai and what street & its network meant in daily life in Mumbai.

sCALE

20m

1km

Task An Urban solution for a density of 100,000 people per sqkm for Mumbai, India Personal Contribution

The combination of thoughts from Jane Jacob’s diversity of ingredients or mixture of uses and Charles Correa’s infrastructure is a city’s DNA, were the drivers of our proposal. Keeping the key element of network, the proposal was devised in a manner that allows mixed used landuse catering to all economical sections of society. By the network we achieved a compact live, play and work environment thereby reducing the carbon footprint per person. Hence through fundamentals of urbanism one tries to make the city for the people.

City scale research, urban rules, space syntax, design poster & booklets.

22

Street

Program


2.9 km

2.8 km

Anchoring Waterfront

Inter-city Ring

23


context - mumbai

Municipality of Mumbai constantly tries to solve congestion problem which act like a quick fix.

Mega- infrastructure projects

Flyovers aiming to move traffic through the city faster, attract more drivers making them land into the same jams of unclear and patchy road network.

More than 55% people of Mumbai walk instead of using motorized transport. Skywalks were introduced to save people from accident prone streets which in reality often resulted in dark and unsafe environment and attracted squatters.

24


collage by akshey

only typology offered - towers

Developers make nice renderings for selling premium apartments, claiming it can improve life qualities and free you from mess in the city while in reality projects are completely detached from the context.

Strict building code set unreasonable setback for towers which leads to large area of fenced private gardens. In this hyper dense city, towers are as holy grail for the bright future of the city.

25


street in india Local production

Small industry

Residential Commercial Production

Residential Commercial Production

Market

Vendors

Tertiary street

Main street

Hawkers

Tertiary street

collage by zivile

People are constantly in a rush, therefore everything you need has to be on your way. The ground is full of entrepreneurs, some run a shop others are hawkers and vendors run their business directly along the street. Ground above in the building is for living, where windows of the rooms become “eyes of the street”. Business men put their signboard out, inhabitants upstairs hang clothes outside or cover the window with bright curtains. This favour of colours and textures adds to the unique façade. People from shady houses & huts and people from luxury towers all walk and do shopping in the same street. All these elements together shape the vibrant street.

bringing son to school

Grocery shopping off to work

collage by zivile, akshey, povilas 26


Proposed Urban rules on street types

Program Distribution Rule 5: Thus program is given as per route type and its layout, thus aiding the network and functions on terms of accessibility.

FAR Distribution Rule 4: FAR calculation is done as per route capacity and connectivity on which the project lies.

Public Transport Network Rule 3: Public transport is rerouted to support the proposed area.

Street Network Rule 2: The street type and thus the program type depends on the connectivity of existing streets

Areas of Intervention Rule 1: The areas where the urban rules of fundamentals will be applied would be locations having slums, run-down or abandoned industrial area, large offsets of towers and toxic or abandoned waterfront leading to urban regenerations of inner city.

by author 27


FUNDAMENTALS - I Street Network and program

proposed existing

+ 10% Residential

Primary street

1X1 km2

calculation by zivile; drawing by povilas, karolis, di 28

+ 5% Green / Open Space + 10% Commerce - 15% Industry / Production + 02% Social Public facilities - 01% Healthcare facilities

Secondary street

1X1 km2

Tertiary street

1X1 km2


Fundamentals - II guidelines for future developments

building typology

program distribution

high-rise middle-rise low-rise

Primary street

Secondary street

Tertiary street

parcelation

permeability drawing by akshey 29


FUNDAMENTALS - Iii & iv anchoring WATERFRONT & INTER-CITY RING

Loop on shopping area

pr

Loop on waterfront

Loop on production

30


TRAIN STATION HUB

cULTURAL hUB

roduction village

fERRY tERMINAL

31 illustrations by povilas, karolis, di, zivile


EAT THE STREET, Rotterdam-Netherlands MSc 1 Semester, TUDelft | Socio-Spatial Studio - Exhibited | 11-2013 to 02-2014 Tutors:

To start with the very end, my project’s crux is “Multiplicity”. Culture and its context has shifted its meaning since the last century. In today’s world almost everyone is a dual citizen if not by birth then by experience. As I am, an Indian Architect and a Dutch Urbanist.

Luisa Calabrese

sCALE

3m

2km

Task Socio-spatial solution for Hofbogen area in Agniesebuurt and Bergpolder Personal Contribution Neighbourhood research on economic flows, using the demographic to propose for the areas urban regeneration of the area without the gentrification effect of it

32

The project strives to bridge the many facets of culture in Agniesebuurt and Bergpolder neighbourhoods of Rotterdam. It addresses the social and economic divide within the site with Hofbogen defining its borders. “Eat The Street” is an initiative made towards bridging this gap and giving the neighbourhoods a strong economic and cultural holding in Rotterdam. Rather than competing as a second centre it creates a unique identity derived from the neighbourhood’s context, thus acting like a focal point for the city. “Culture-related activities are powerful tools for urban redevelopment and revitalization.” Dialogue on urban cultures: globalization and culture in an urbanizing world – World Urban Forum by UNHabitat “Food should be, and has been in the past, an important medium for binding communities and generations together and for connecting them with strangers.” – Intercultural cities, Rotterdam’s Profile – Council of Europe


Rotterdam

Neighbourhood

Project

33


Existing

Proposed

PARK

EAT THE STREET Food Street Service below Entrance through hofbogen Extended Public Space Toilet below Inner courtyards Extended green network

Field work analysis Visual analysis

Social and demographic

Environment and safety

Economics and flows

Spatial analysis and history

34

LATIN CART


Office Shop Restaurant Storage Open arches EAT THE STREET LARGE UMBRELLA

CANOPY

Entrance Toilet Service Restaurant/Cart

MASTER PLAN

35


MAHINDRA LIFESPACES, Boisar:Mumbai-India Sangath, Ahmedabad | Professional Project - Affordable housing | 05-2012 to 06-2013 Head Project Architect Principal Architect Sรถnke Hoof MENTORS Dr. B.V. Doshi Rajeev Kathapalia

500m

Task Affordability with spatial quality Personal Contribution Team Lead

36

Mahindra Affordable housing is first of its kind project undertaken by Mahindra Lifespaces to be developed in the upcoming satellite port & industrial town near Mumbai called Boisar. The group initiated the project to not only address the growing demand for housing by the lower income group but also to provide good living space with a sense of community as opposed to the current housing solutions. The project started in May, 2012 with the vision of designing a community with incremental and sustainable units. The sizes of the units were set to the minimal with a prospect of growith. It was integral that quality of space making is not lost within costeffective methods.

sCALE

1m

TEAM Ar. Mariana Paisana Intern: Mimosa Cerratti Intern: Kriti Verappan

Clustering of units had to be designed in a way that helps to visually and physically make the house connect to the community area, influencing us to make courtyard architecture which has traditionally was also a response to the climatic conditions in the area. As a tead lead, I initiated different experiments to combine cost-effective methods with space making concepts such that integrating the two creates a community that is affordable.


architect

client

policy Rubik’s cube of affordable housing’s design, policy and developer

37


to Mumbai

in Boisar

38


Mahindra Costing Structure

1 euro = ~ 70 rupees 1 sqft = 0.09 sqm

Saleable at Rs. 2000/sqft Construction cost at Rs. 850/sqft

in India official documents are metric whereas market based documents follow the feet system

Infrastructure reduction vs accessibility

Rs. 100/sqft MEP

Rs. 600/sqft civil

Rs. 450-475/sqft structural

UNIT

Unit stacking and growth

Rs. 150/sqft infrastructure

Rs. 700/sqft building

Rs. 150-125/sqft finishes

Rs. 50/sqft electrical

Rs. 50/sqft plumbing

Configuration

Composition

Carpet area(sqft)

1RK

30%

200-290

1BHK

50%

300-435

2BHK

20%

390-550

15 acre of plot for ~1200 families with estimated average of 12.7sqm per person

Unit types : Service dependent core design

Unit types : Structural rhythm precast

39


June, 2012

circulation 8%

JUNE, 2012

August, 2012

JULY, 2012

Section through the court

built-up area court area 40

1 circle= 4 people

The court of 64.1sqm would contain 86 persons

The court of 706.2sqm would contain 409 persons


circulation 19%

October, 2012

SEPTEMBER, 2012

circulation 11%

OCTOBER, 2012

The court of 269.5sqm would contain 324 persons

The court of 1326.2sqm would contain 608 persons

41


Close the Gap, New York-United States of America D3-International Competition | Exhibited | 10-2011 An individual endeavour in form of a competition for Urban regeneration of the east side of New York. The proposal aimed to make the motorized corridor of 33 blocks in Midtown with abandon fringes at the waterfront into a pedestrian and cyclist friendly connection with a quotient of leisure getaway. sCALE

1m

5Km

Task Pedestrian and cyclist link on the east side of Manhattan

Personal Contribution Using the urban environment to create a strategy and design for opening the east side of Manhattan for active modes in the city.

The intervention seeks to provide relief and closeness to nature when compared to the hustlebustle and hectic life of everyday New Yorker. The stretch is sub-divided into three categories cyclist, pedestrian and leisure zones, with each zone the suggested activity has a higher priority than the other two. The three activities go along side by side with one more prevalent; this is decided by the site features in each zone with natural lighting acting as a catalyst in the decision making.

New York a city of movement, of bustling directions, on a trampoline balance, its catatonic reactions, to concrete bombardment! Now, a new pulse, a wave of air, a distinct version, a private affair, an uncanny breath, its titillating effects, brought ashore, to calmer boards, for whom aboard. - by author

42


pedestrian & cyclist connection on the east river side, Manhattan 43


Existing

Darkness and speed

lighting issue unused waterfront traffic insertion

44


Proposed

Cyc li st

Zone

pedestrian

Zone

Leisu re

Zone

Light and perception of one’s own environment

45


design Portfolio 2016

Tanya Chandra


Kanpur

1994

Lucknow

1986

Greater NOIDA

2003

New Delhi

2001

Bangalore

2008

Manipal

2005

Ahmedabad

2010

Delft

2013

Research Portfolio 2016

Tanya Chandra


Tanya Chandra Curriculum vitae


Content urban design

strategy

architecture

research

urban planning

+

technology

Design portfolio 50 - 53

Social Impact, Impact Assessment Researcher | Veldacademie | 01-2016 to present

54 - 57

Social Resilience (100 Resilient Cities Initiative, Research Excursion Researcher | New York City as case study for Rotterdam | 03 to 06, 2016

58 - 63

City Gaming, Participatory Research Researcher and Designer | Play the City | 03-2015 to 01-2016

64 - 75

Urban mobility, Formulating a Research Question Graduation project, TU Delft | 9/10 | 08-2014 to 06-2015

76 - 79

Affordable Housing, Research by Design Bachelor Thesis project | Awarded and Published | 01 to 06-2010 Professional Overview


Social Harbour: Impact Assessment Veldacademie | Freehouse | International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam Research - Social Impact | 01-2016 to present Researcher | Speaker Mentors

Collaborating Partners

Otto Trienekens : Veldacademie Ruth Höppner : Veldacademie

Jeanne van Heeswijk Freehouse, Radicalizing the local Annet van Otterloo Afrikaanderwijk Coöperative, Rotterdam Ana Dinerstein University of Bath, UK Graham Taylor University of West of England, Bristol, UK

scale

individual

region

Task Exploring through the installation in the Biennale, what ‘Social Harbour’ could entail and contribute to the neighbourhood. Personal Contribution Developed a methodology to combine a qualitative and quantitative assessments to make a model to measure social impact of policies and initiatives taken by government and /or communities.

Social Harbour IABR 2016; Image courtesy Ana Dinerstein, 2016

Aim of Social Harbour Workshop at IABR Local and international experts together with the Afrikaanderwijk Cooperative, the Veldacademie and the Department of Social and Policy Sciences of the University of Bath, will assess the need for a Social Harbour: a space for experiments related to new forms of work, based on the use of locally available qualities.

MODEL aspiration

Finance

Identity

physical factors

push n pull

impact Population Need

Spatial

2014 2010

Connectivity

2006

Architecture Representation Demographic Urban Commons

Integrate

initiative aspirational value

Entrepreneur Environment

physical environment factors changed or effected

social capital the push and pull by the people effected by or effects the initiative in the area. effects on / by: - individual, community, neighbourhood, district, city, region

50

compounded pressure political period, ideological time frame


Aspiration Labour in Transition and Urban Transformation Finance

1. Labour, Identity and Urban Politics

Identity 2. Labour, Representation and Democracy Representation 3. Labour, Community and the Urban Commons

Urban Commons Integrate

4. Labour, Capitalist crisis and Urban Space

Adapted from “Notes from the Workshop: Labour in Transition and Urban Transformation”, by Ana C. Dinerstein & Graham Taylor

Best Practices

crowd and public participation

Finance

Identity

Crowd funding

Anonymous, activist

Representation

Bitcoin

M-pesa IGNIA Home Credit

Integrate

You can Kingston

Rio invisível

Rés do Chão

Citymart

What a Space!

Megafonen

Manuela Carmena Mayoral Election

Time Bank firm / person

Yaratıcı Fikirler Enstitüsü

Urban Commons

Afrikaanderwijk Coöperatie

Megafonen

Think Public

Pitch your project Afrikaanderwijk Coöperatie

government

DMFP

Right to Challenge

Right to Challenge

Jan-Dhan Yojana

Bhagidari Scheme

1999 Anytime, Anything, Anywhere

Basic Income

Global Movement

Neighbourhood Improvement District

1999 Anytime, Anything, Anywhere DMFP

Share an Idea

Internal Conflict / riots

Crisis 2008

Financial Inclusion

51


Physical Factors Spatial Connectivity Architecture Demographic Entrepreneur Environment

Matrix model in terms of Theme Category

Quantitative factors derived through theoretical research (list in progress) Matrix model in terms of Data Category

Push and Pull Historical timeline for social capital defination 1890 The term social capital was in intermittent use from about 1890 1960 Jane Jacobs used the term early in the 1960s. Although she did not explicitly define the term social capital, her usage referred to the value of networks 1970s Social Impact assessment made in U.S. for civil projects (Dams, infrastructure, etc. ) on the lines of environmental impact assessment (EIA) 1960-70s The terms social entrepreneur and entrepreneurship were used first in the literature on social change 1972 Sociologist Pierre Bourdieu used the term ‘Social Capital’ in his Outline of a Theory of Practice 1976 Rise of the term social entrepreneurs with noble prize winner for microcredit (Grameen Bank) by Muhammad Yunus in Bangladesh (studied in U.S.)

52

1980-90s Social Entrepreneurs term was popularised by Bill Drayton and Charles Leadbeater and many more. 1981 Social Impact Theory proposed by Bibb Lantané as seeing its behaviour on a collective. 1986 Sociologist convinced that industrialisation and urbanization were transforming social relationship in an irreversible way. They observed a breakdown of traditional bonds and the progressive development of anomie and alienation in society (Wilmott)

Social Entrepreneurs

Large state projects

Social Impact

Social Capital

1988 Social Capital in the Creation of Human Capital by James S. Coleman. 1990s the concept of social capital gained popularity, serving as the focus of a World Bank research programme and the subject of several mainstream books

Inference: Push and pull factors develop patterns because of this cyclic factors which depend of physical, social, cultural, economical and political changes in the area


Working Examples for the Model Impact on networked entity IABR 2016 Spatial

Connectivity

Architecture

Demographic

Entrepreneur

Environment

Larussa

Lady

Larussa

Hasan

Larussa

Larussa

Lady

Cleaner

Cleaner

Larussa

Maria

Cleaner

Maria

Larussa

Maria

Maria

Cleaner

Maria

Cleaner

Maria

Lady

Cleaner

Lady

Hasan

Hasan

Hasan

Hasan

Lady

Hasan

Lady

Criteria

home vs workplace area used

time spent at work vs work commuting time

no. of years spent (house/ shop/centre) vs or x age of the building

dependants vs previous dependants

no. of work interaction per day x types of interaction

no of visits to doctor 2008 2016 vs (time difference of time spent at home awake to time spent at work

Theme

Personal development

Work-life balance

Real Estate value

Family

Reachability

Health

Network examples compared along different physical factors but put adjacent to see the bigger picture of impact on each link in a network

Impact on individual entity

Maria

Social Capital Coleman

strength

obligation & expectation

immediacy

information exchange

numbers

norms and sanctions

Criteria

Finance

Organise+ Represented Identity

Urban Commons

Integrate

2008 2016

LantanĂŠ

Flows

0%

Development

Social Impact Theory

Flow

income

social help

community

Development

income vs dependants with lower education

social help received vs give (time spent)

community meeting attended x time spent / types of organisation

Individual entity to see the increase or decrease of compounded pressure felt on a single entity in an array of categories to measure the social impact.

100 % change trade sponsors / support trade with no. sponsors or of traders x support x work types area

NOTE Starting from the aspirational themes it is also important to see the impact in an overall model to understand more facets of the impact made

53


Social resilience: Research Excursion Veldacademie | Municipality of Rotterdam | Rockefeller Foundation Research - Social Resilience under “100 Resilient Ciities” Initiative | 03-2016 to present Researcher | Organiser Project Heads - Veldacademie

Collaborating Partners

Otto Trienekens Ruth Höppner

Patrick van der Klooster Director, AIR Foundation, Rotterdam Machiel van Dorst President Chair, Urbanism & Landscape: TU Delft Alexandros Washburn Founding Director, Center for Coastal Resilience and Urban Xcellence (CRUX) Stevens Institute of Technology, New York City

+ scale

individual

city

Task

Team members

Municipality of Rotterdam for their Social Program, commissioned Veldacademie to investigate best practices and programs concerning the theme of social resilience in NYC, under ‘100 Resilient Cities’ initiative founded by Rockefeller Foundation. The research is to improve policy making in Rotterdam by the knowledge exchange.

Researchers: Otto Trienekens (Architect), Ruth Höppner (Architect, Sociologist), Sander Smoes (Architect), Karin Post-Snoep (Architect), Jomme Rooijakkers (GIS Specialist), Pieter Graaff (Architect), Andrea Fitskie (Architect)

Personal Contribution Along with research on the subject in NYC, I acted as a lead point of contact for the group and coordinated the research excursion. We were able to use the time and human-capital available to contact 60 different leads and have developed a report with key findings and relation maps, which will be shared in the ‘Stadmakerscongres’ (City makers congress) later this year.

Interns: Nienke Dalinghaus (Sociologist), Elisabeth von Hausen (Architect), Yuqing Liu (GIS Specialist) Graduating Students: Hedwig van der Linden (Architect), Dorris Derksen (Architect), Dylhan Groenendijk (Sociologist), Floor van Dijk (Urbanist), Lisa ten Brug (Urbanist)

Stakeholders and topics

Rotterdam’s Social Program

100 Resilient Cities

Rockefeller Foundation

54

1. 21st Century Skills empowering city’s work force

Social Resilience NYC - R’Dam

2. Health healthy city through design & policy 3. We - Society inclusive cities 4. Strong Shoulders attractive cities to live


Research Excursion to NYC Methodology in NYC Lecture and Discussion: Hosting a day of lecture at Pioneer Works where researchers from NYC and Netherlands shared their findings, thoughts and methodology to research different topics under Social Resilience; Image courtesy Patrick van der Klooster, 2016

Tours: We participated in guided tours at Highline and Jane Jacobs’s Walk hosted by MAS(The municipal Art Society of New York) by Jia Jia of Art Assets on Red Hook Neighbourhood; Image courtesy Ruth Höppner, 2016

Excursion Booklet Interviews,Seminar & Visits: We visited both public and private institutions, initiatives and community members in NYC; Image courtesy Ruth Höppner, 2016

Cultural Studies: Cultural indicators where identified in various projects, interventions, spirits and places under the heading of symbols, rituals and heroes; Image courtesy Dylhan Groenendijk, 2016

Field Work: Parks and recreavtional spaces became the part of field studies to not only observe but interact with New Yorkers and get a perspective from a resident’s point of view; Image courtesy Nienke Dalinghaus, 2016

55


21st Century Skills As a team member of 21st Century skills, post our excursion we defined social resilience under the topic of skills as: Social Resilience in the 21st century is using hard skills to train oneself in ‘soft’ skills to build a social network hence acquiring social capital as a result. We found the many digital skills or hard skills offered at different levels of public/ private institutions, initiatives and individually, revolved around subtly addressing ‘soft’ skills - Leadership, Collaboration and Communication in their methodology. This helped various individuals to acquire and maintain social networks that was otherwise missing as a tool for resilience.

Team: 21st Century Skills

Image courtesy Dylhan Groenendijk, 2016

A) Relation Map - Skills and Scope: 21st Century Skills Interviewees; The triangle of relation types differ with scope of effect that interviewee can or makes in the community. Showing the strength of connections between them.

Young Adult, Brooklyn Bridge Park;

Image courtesy Hedwig van der Linden, 2016

Principal, Brooklyn New School;

Image courtesy Sander Smoes, 2016

Nick Higgins, Director Outreach Program, Brooklyn Central Public Library; Image courtesy Sander Smoes, 2016

56

Ryan Davis, Social Worker, Red Hook Initiative;

Image courtesy Nienke Dalinghaus, 2016

Holly Howard, Entrepreneur, Ask Holly How;

Image courtesy Sander Smoes, 2016


B) Relation Map - Skill and City Life: 21st Century Skills Interviewees; Flows of the diagram shows the emphasis the interviewee puts on a particular skill and where its used as a tool of resilience in the city.

C) Relation Map Skills and Social Interest: 21st Century Skills Interviewees; The the sphere combines the skills, scope and city life to give a resultant map to showcase interviewee’s background, interest, type of institute and its programs give what kind of skill development. This map helps in placing new or develop policies on a particular skills in the quadrant (institute) that is aligned to similar interest and change. 57


City Gaming: Participatory research Play the City Research - land use policies, stakeholders & interest, environmental innovation, demographic shift | 03-2015 to 01-2016 Researcher | Designer Project Head Ekim Tan Founder and Director of PtC scale

community

city

Project

Image courtesy Di Fang, 2015

Image courtesy Ekim Tan, 2015

Image courtesy Ekim Tan, 2016

Play Oosterwold (Almere) & Play Noord (Amsterdam) Game Training, Pakhuis de Zwijger

Play Da Lang Shenzhen Biennale Game Sessions, Shenzhen

Play Waternet City Innovation Game Game Session, Amsterdam

Task Designed for municipality of Amsterdam and Almere was also used for game training. It helped with drawing legal plan for land-use policy & understanding different stakeholder interests.

Designed to understand the ongoing demographic shift in the district of Da Lang, with conversion from manufacturing to a proposed fashion valley, having 98% of migrant workers.

Designed as an urban challenge for testing potential locations for a biorefinery in Buiksloterham, based on 4 parameters: investment, timeline, environmental and social impact and spatial configuration.

International New Town Institute (Almere); Creative Industries Funds NL (Rotterdam); Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism\ Architecture (Shenzhen)

Waternet (Amsterdam); One Architecture (Amsterdam); Studio Noord (Amsterdam);

Ekim Tan (Founder & Director); Danli Sheng (Game Master & Translator); Mariana Fabris (Intern)

Ekim Tan (Founder & Director); Ida van Eck (Manager)

Contextual research, game design, graphic designing for the entire game and reporting

Contextual research, graphic designing and planning of game session

Collaborating Partners Pakhuis de Zwijger (Amsterdam); Game attended by universities, project manager, financial & legal advisor, spatial planner, circulair advisor, municipal employees. Team Members Ekim Tan (Founder & Director); Jacob Buitenkant (Game Master); Nicolas Klaus (Communication Manager); Di Fang (Intern); Janine Loubser (Volunteer) Personal Contribution Contextual research, game design (phases), graphic designing of game tools and hosting of the game. 58


Play The City @ Unmaking the Netherlands

Introducing Play the City @ Unmaking the Netherlands At ‘Play Series’ of Expodium, Utrecht Unmaking the Netherlands - LINK Video of the talk: LINK

Play Da Lang : Shenzhen Biennale Contextual Research

Locating Da Lang

Statutory plan for Da Lang Site 基地

a ut al e

f all

World China

Guangdong

n

ts m y e e

China Guangdong

From Da LangShenzhen

hua e d

Da any and y

Guangdong Guangdong Shenzhen

Entrepreneur

Migrant Worker

Da Lang

1. China introduced this Hukou household-registration system in the 1950s; it divides and demarcates the population into urban and rural residents. People who are registered on the countryside, but live and work in the city, have not the same benefits in health care, pensions and other social welfare as city residents. 2. Shenzhen currently consists of six districts. Nanshan, Futian, Luoho and Yantian are part of the original SEZ. Bao’an and Longgang were later added to give room to Shenzhen’s growth. In these districts, widespread developments had already taken place since the late 1980s due to DaShenzhen Lang Public Spce pressure inside the SEZ and lower land prices, speculation and loose development control outside the SEZ boundary. It led to random, chaotic

Built environment

development in both Bao’an and Longgang with extensive urban sprawl. Nevertheless, both districts are still rather rural and ‘economically underdeveloped’.

59


Demographic Research Social Trends

Demographic difference between key Chinese cities

Timeline of players and activities in Da Lang

60

Needs of migrant workers in Da Lang


Characteristics of migrant workers in Da lang

Landuse in Da lang

61


PLay Da Lang What’s happening now? As proposed, Play Da Lang has become a long-term platform that will use gaming to mediate the desired but missing conversations between the communities of the ‘floating population’, Da Lang government, NGOs, entrepreneurs, volunteers and more, to improve livelihoods and the general socio-economic functioning of Da Lang Neighborhood.

Play Rules for Play Da Lang 1. Layer Rule Players build area in a bottom up way. Also literally! Plinth and public spaces are followed by upper floor layers until tops in various game phases. 2. Priority Rule As the major users of public spaces, migrant workers carry priority for playing ground spaces and plinths. 3. Density Rule Play Da lang is based on the actual density assumptions of the official Statutory Plan. Build-able footprint: 120,000.0 Overall Construction: 300,000.0 4. Land Use Rule Mixture of living, working, leisure both built and unbuilt, and infrastructure program is left to individual players independent from the official Statutory Plan.

Game session at Shenzhen Biennale

5. Local Context Rule The game table carries information based on the exisiting local site from topology to landscape to infrastructure. Players interacting with conditions such as water levels, exisiting vegetation and buildings earn priority in case of conflict with other players’ decisions.

Play Da Lang - Players

Migrant worker participating in Play Da Lang at Shenzhen Biennale 62


Play Da Lang - Game Table

Play da Lang - Game Pieces

Danli and Ekim - Game Master of Play Da Lang at Shenzhen Biennale 63


Urban mobility: Formulating a research question Design as Politics Studio : New Utopias on the ruins of a welfare state Graduation project, TU Delft | MSc Urbanism - 9/10 | August 2014 to June 2015

Mentors Marta Relats : Design as Politics Dominic Stead : Urban and Regional Planning Akkieles van Nes : Spatial Planning and Strategy

+ sCALE

200m

60km

Task Developing a research question for master thesis.

Personal Contribution Combining both qualitative and quantitative methods to develop the research question and spatial resultant (design).

Theoretical construction What a city should have and how should it be distributed?

Parameters to evaluate different urban models and see their effectiveness

Live Economics

Environment

Live

+ Play patrick geddes lewis mumford ebenezer howard jane jacobs doxiadis chicago school

64

Work

Economics Environment Quality of Life jane jacob john friedmann communitas - goodman achieving sustainable urban form spiro kostof althasser manual castells

= Play

Work

Quality of Life Balance and unbalance; source author


PUSH Economics

PULL

PULL

middle income

economically weak

rising real-estate price

migration as urban poor

urban sprawl

slum creation

Environment

urban pollution

Quality of Life

urban congestion

demand of suburban homes

mall culture in suburbs

lack of services

low amenities accessibility

ingenious illegal and legal ways to service

recreation in unhealthy environment

Finding the balance

Push and Pull of the system to Balance

The urban model like garden cities and centre place theory and urban theories of Jane Jacobs are based on the underlying connections between live, work and play. Playing around the distances between these functions and redefining each theory with new parameters to understand the relationship between them for a healthier life.

As perfection of urban life is difficult to achieve, the urban life tends to balance itself in its own absurd accord. When pushed in any criteria of economics, quality of life and environment the urban fabric reacts to get in balance but what would a continuous state of push and pull will result into?

Whereas, urban critics judge and research these theories on the parameters of economics, environment and quality of life. Each parameter has different importance depending of the outlook of the researcher. But, magic of urban environment happens when you combine these six parameters together and if they all are in perfect balance, one gets a balanced urban life. But, perfection is difficult to achieve in a competitive economy. Thus, one should consider the six parameters while design any urban design element especially the urban connections which bring them together. Mobility is the tool of urban design and key to its balance.

Middle income and economically weaker section of society cope with different push by the parameters in a different way as a way to survive. As can be seen in the adjacent table of diagrams and pictures.

Balance and urban model link between theory and utopia

It is important to understand this balance and push and pull when applying a urban model because they define the context of each city and neighbourhood making the design applied to be customized with context of the culture and lifestyle of each place.

65


Policy Analysis vs Data

1985

1991

1992

1997

1999

2000

2005

delhi recognised by government of India as a potential global metropolis

economic liberalisation of India

decentralised strategic governance & promoted participatory democracy

white paper on pollution in delhi with an action plan towards transport planning

repeal of urban land ceiling & regulation act

Bhagidari Scheme: ‘legal’citizen government partnership programme

JNNURM (JawaharLal Nehru New urban renewal mission) rehabilitation scheme and city development

12

28,000 32 settlemets

22,500

25 settle

bid and budgeting 2003 15,000

8

2002 Delhi Metro

bid 1976 9,000 5 settlemets

1971

1981 In 1976 bid for 1982 asia games

1991

2001 In 2003 bid for 2010 commonwealth games

Delhi’s policy, population, transport network and global events timeline

Delhi

Urban transport is a theatre for urban class differences, especially in Delhi. The majority of the people living in the Delhi Metropolitan Area has to walk1 to their jobs and the lacking road safety situation makes commute the deadliest plight2 for the urban poor. There is an extensive car-based system, yet only a minority of the city can afford a car3 for themselves. A metro system is in development, but by location and costs is affordable to only till the middle income group4 . This leaves buses, trains and walking as an affordable transport option for the lower

66

1. 35% of the transit mode share is walking, Tiwari, 2003; Economic survey 2007-08. 2. 70% of the urban poor (~10 million inhabitants of Delhi) find going to work as the most dangerous thing they do daily - Hazard centre, Delhi, 1999

income group. The bus system having been lowered in priority of development next to metro system, insufficient for metropolitan scale traveling currently in terms of capacity and ease of connectivity. Potentially the train system has this capacity, but it mostly serves industrial and peripheral areas. Delhi on one hand has an extensive road network which covers 20% of the city’s land. Correspondingly, 80% of transport budget (~3 billion Euros) of 2002-2007 was used for road widening. The metro took 12% of the transport 3. Urban age conference organised by London School of Economics (cities), 2015 4. Choguill, C. L. (1994). Crisis, Chaos, Crunch? Planning for Urban Growth in the Developing World. Urban Studies, 31(6), 935–945. doi:10.1080/00420989420080761

20 Delhi


until 1977

1977 - 1986

1986 - 2000

2000 - 2010

2007

Chief Minister’s vision 2021 for Delhi as global metropolis & World class city

32,000

road length in km city’s population at 17 million

emets migration population in the city at 50%

no. of slum settlements demolished

008 BRTS

6

2011

road length in km/ 1000 vehicles

Delhi’s growth and slum demolition and resettlement

budget, making it 10-15 times more subsidized than a bus tickets, while the metro has a transit mode share of less than 5% and is running a daily loss5. The repercussions of image planning in Delhi has led to the growing car culture and with the focus of governmental developmental on high technological public transport (Metro rail), both of which are unaffordable by the lower income group which make 55% of the city’s population6. In the end, those who are already excluded from the city pay the heaviest price for the mismatch & Tiwari, G. (2011). Key Mobility Challenges in Indian Cities (International Transport Forum Discussion Papers No. 2011/18). 5. Tiwari, Urban age conference organised by London School of Economics (cities),

between the need for and supply of organised urban transport. In recent times, the ‘smart city’ notion is being raised as the technical answer to this societal gridlock. And both smart cities and big data build on the promise of unlocking existing but invisible demand through technical innovation. So might a combination of (voluntary) urban data collection and the urban implementation of digital networks offer a transport answer to Metropolitan Delhi?

2007 6. DDA. (2007a). Master Plan for Delhi 2021. Delhi Development Authority. & National Census 2007

67


Demographic and the city

City’s data comparison; source LSE Urban age conference

world view

delhi development authority

slum demolition : DDA

global city network: saskia sassen

road

metro

production of neoliberal space

pac-man planning

slum before 2004

redevelopment 2010 commonwealth games

governance Delhi state vs Netherlands 68

brts


80

Low-income population

Mode

70

60

50

80

cycle

38.87

2.75

bus

31.43

36.20

car

0

28.35

scooter/motorcycle

2.48

29.29

three-wheeled scooter taxis

0.96

1.74

taxi

0

0.4

rail

1.79

0

other vehicles walking

40

41.5

70

2.34

0

22.12

1.62

Estimated shares of transport modes in Delhi, source Tiwari, 2003

1994 30

High-income population

2008

60

21.5

50

20 13.941.5

40

1994

7.9

10

6.8 30

1957 20

Transit mode share when walking is taken into account

4.1 3.6 0.7

0 1969

1981

1994

2001

2008

21.5

2008

Delhi’s transit mode share, source adapted from Tiwari, 2003; Economic survey 2007-08

13.9 10

Transport is the key

7.9 6.8 4.1 3.6

Urban transport is a key to Delhi’s spatial 0.7 0 1969 1981 2001for 2008 expansion1957 and economic viability 1994 as aimed in the Master Plan for Delhi 2021: “Vision-2021 is to make Delhi a global metropolis and a worldclass city” 7. Mega infrastructure projects are taken to ease vehicular traffic by constructing 28 flyovers (2007-10), bridge over Yamuna, metro (first line opened in December 2002), high capacity bus system with dedicated corridors (later revoked due to protest by car owners) and modernization of Delhi airport in 2006. This “overdue modernization” was considered “an essential step towards improving connectivity within India and with the rest of the world”8 and also observed in other aspiring global cities9. Whereas, it does not account for the

The mega projects of transportation play like the two sides of a coin, they are promoted as transport need for the city by planners and another side are criticized by transport expert for being capital intensive project yet badly responding towards ridership, reduction of pollution and lack of financial sustainability 11. They are rather used as a hidden agenda to portray as a symbol of progress 12. Transport planning in Delhi thus shown to be “a vehicle for societal transformation” but instead panned to be “the triumph of image over substance” 13.

7. DDA. (2007a). Master Plan for Delhi 2021. Delhi Development Authority. 8. Uppal, V., & Ghosh, D. (2009). The impact of the Commonwealth Games 2010 on urban development of Delhi. Theoretical and Empirical Researchers in Urban Management, 4(10), 7–26. 9. Gugler, J. (Ed.). (2004). World cities beyond the West: globalization, development, and inequality. Cambridge ; New York: Cambridge University Press. 10. Fernandes, L. (2004). The politics of forgetting: class politics, state power and the restructuring of urban space in India. Urban Studies, 41(12), 2415–2430. doi:1

0.1080/00420980412331297609 11. Mohan, D. (2008). Mythologies, metro rail systems and future urban transport. Economic and Political Weekly, 43(4), 41–53. 12. Siemiatycki, M. (2006). Message in a Metro: Building Urban Rail Infrastructure and Image in Delhi, India. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 30(2), 277–292. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2427.2006.00664.x 13. Harvey, D. (1989). The condition of postmodernity: an enquiry into the origins of cultural change. Oxford [England] ; Cambridge, Mass., USA: Blackwell.

marginalized social groups which make 55% of Delhi’s population for whom bus is economical limit10.

69


Lower income

Character Analysis: People and quality of life

Slum and resettlement colonies

Middle income

Old city

Higher income

green fields

old city post independence villages green fields lutyen & villas slum & resettlement colonies

post - independence

0

0

villas Mode Option

Building Typology

5

5

10

10

residential - different building typology open spaces commercial centres industry education airport army

Delhi Land-use 2011; source author adapted from DDA,2007

People and perception: quality of life

I conducted a questionnaire in the summer of 2014 of people’s perception of their daily commute in school (St. Columbus), offices (Schenck RoTec, Noida; Dhampure sugar Mill, Delhi) and Localities of greater NOIDA. With total questionnaires filled 156.

Quality of Life

Aim of the Questionnaire: To understand people’s perspective regarding Indian cities and its many dualities especially on the aspects of mobility and different strata’s of society.

Environment

Economics

you Delhi’s Outlook What should be Delhi’s Outlook

70

As a conclusion I am putting two drawings, one shows what people think their quality of life should be and where it is going and second the dual perception of the same road indicating the absence of realization to the urban environment and urban decay felt during the commute.


People and perception: Daily life

Delhi’s Indraprashta Marg (Road) Central District;

71


5

People and quality of life

SHAMI

Cleaner Rs. 10,000/m

Different income groups & their commute to work

SHAMI

I studied special cases of people depending on their economic background, how they commute too and from work, time spent, quality of their lives in their perception, living conditions and percent spent on traveling cost from their monthly income.

Cleaner Rs. 10,000/m

PURAN

Security Gua Rs. 11,000/m

PURAN

Security Guar Rs. 11,000/m

SURAJ

Construction Worker Rs. 5 - 7,000/m

SURAJ

Construction Worker Rs. 5 - 7,000/m

5

7

18

20

23:00

4

10KM

SURAJ 7

5

10 KM

0

5

10 KM

16

18

22:00

30KM

Construction Worker

5000

65 18 20

23:00

family

time spent

working family

traveling

10KM

72

SURAJ

7

0

Construction Worker

5000

65

RADHE 7

Cleaner

4

8000

105

16

18

22:00

Cleaner

4

traveling

30KM

RADHE

family

8000

105

time spent

working family

R


RADHAE Cleaner Rs. 8,000/m

RADHAE Cleaner Rs. 8,000/m

RAWAT Security Guard Rs. 10,000/m

RAWAT Security Guard Rs. 10,000/m

SHIKHAR IT Enginner Rs. 110,000/m

SHIKHAR IT Enginner Rs. 110,000/m

DHIRAJ Driver Rs. 10,000/m

SANGITA

DHIRAJ

School Teacher Rs. 50,000/m

Driver Rs. 10,000/m

SANGITA School Teacher Rs. 50,000/m

ard m

rd m

SAVITRI House Cleaner Rs. 4 - 5,000/m

SAVITRI House Cleaner Rs. 4 - 5,000/m

4

8

18

20

23:00

2

3

7

30KM

RAWAT8

4

RAWAT

Guard

18

20

22:00

18

20

family 22:00

45KM

10000

130

18

20

23:00

family

DHIRAJ 3

2

Driver 10000 7 9

traveling

30KM

Guard

9

10000

130

time spent

working family

130

traveling

45KM

DHIRAJ

Driver

10000

73

130

time spent

working family


Character Development for Design Testing

1

1 3 2 Live Work

4 3

2 Character from real life situations

1

4 0

2

5

3

10KM

4

Rawat, 45 Security Guard

Shikhar, 28 IT Engineer

sangita, 55 school teacher

Dhiraj, 42 Farmer / Driver

Lives in post partition refugee colonies; dense neighbourhood with boundary connections to the city

Lives in low-rise development with good connections

Lives in satellite city within NCR in high dense & high rise neighbourhood with poor public transport connections

Lives in infringe villages of NCR with poor connections to the city

Response to Design Simulation in their life: City-on-Demand (Website) “yes, if it actually happens”

74

“If it is convenient then its better than being stuck in traffic for 2 hours”

“if i don’t have to walk more than 1km to get a bus”

“will it reach my village, would my village start developing and ours farms will be converted to urban land”


Research Questions Main research question

How to reduce socio-spatial segregation created by ‘image building’ planning and growing car culture in the National capital region of Delhi by improving the mobility of people(public transport and walk-ability) within the city?

Sub research question

1.How to establish a dual system of walkable neighbourhoods and public transport city network (especially in socio-spatially segregated neighbourhoods)? 2. How through urban design and policy can one reverse the car culture? 3. How can one convert the current over-built transport network for cars into a sustainable networks of walking & cycling (neighbourhood scale) and mass-transport systems (city scale)? 4. How to implement the challenge of a balanced urban transformation in an emerging economy?

Abstract of the data flow for primary study of design execution Income Groups as per annual household income; source world bank

Lower Income <= 1,045

Middle Income 1,046 12,735

Higher Income > 12,735

Who do you relate to in your society ?

User Interface 1

Where do you work?

User Interface 2

How you can commute?

Secondary output

Why the transport planning should adapt to demand?

MAIN output

75


Affordable Housing: research by Design Bachelor Thesis, Manipal University | B.ARCH | January to June 2010

Mentors Lekha Hegde : Manipal University Madhuraj P.C. : Manipal University

0

5

scale Rewari district in the rural fringe of Delhi 1mm

500m

Task Bachelor thesis project for Architecture developed on a topic of my own choice and design. Personal Contribution

Density planning

Working on the topic of affordable housing through the looking glass of climatology and experimenting with different tropical building technologies

- As per studies, housing & infrastructure optimise at a density between 680-1360 people/ hectare (Doshi) - Density helps with change in average family size to increase from 3 to 4.4(avg. family size), while maintaining number of plots

Residential only G = 71.7% then, open spaces & roads = 26.9% Residential only G+1 = 35.8% Open spaces & roads = 60.7% Residential only G & G+1= 22.3% Open spaces & roads = 59.4%

Climatology Voids along the wind direction helps in overall siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s cross ventilation, with mass distribution in a manner to circulate wind better within the site.

Wind Circulation and sunlight penetration

Shaded secondary street

Standalone unit

Plan

Section Duplex units cluster

A series of courtyards only would diverge the wind from the site, hence causing hindrance in overall cross-ventilation in the site. 76

Plans of Building in Cluster

10KM


Zoning Commercial School & Medical Residential

Public to Private

Climatology

Built-up: Residential Commercial complex School Medical Facility Community Hall F.A.R = 0.42 Ground Coverage Residential Commercial complex School Medical Facility Community Hall Road Open Spaces

(in sqm) 13731.4 306.1 725.0 275.5 124.0

(in %) 22.3 4.9 13.4 59.4

Decentralized Service System G to G+1 Storey

Layout

Hierarchy of Spaces

Services infrastructural requirements

Septic tank usage for sewage disposal

1. Water Supply - 135l/day/person - 4.4 ppl/DU - 546 DU - 324324 l/day - twice as much should be stored (as per regulations) - 648.7 Kl water required

- 15 houses (a cluster) using 1 septic tank - 4.4 people per household with 135 litre requirement / person / day - 8910 litre/day of water requirement per cluster - daily sewage 7128 lt/ day - cost of septic tank is Rs.10/lt - cost for a cluster Rs.71,280 - cost per household Rs.4,752

2. Sewage Requirements - 80% of the water needs - 518.9 sewage disposal of the entire community Hierarchy of Open Spaces

Hierarchy of Roads

Site Services

3. Electricity Required - 1315KV for the entire community

4. Rain water - all surfaces used to direct or store rain water General Piping Layout: for 15 houses cluster (only G+1)

Pipe Legend Water Storage water storage line water main supply secondary cluster supply individual lines Sewage Treatment septic tanks main lines individual house lines

- to reduce piping and yet have the facility for easy repair - sunken slab and sand filling and finished with pavers for semi-dry area

77


Unit Construction

Typical Section through different Units Layout: Floor and roof Plan

roof Panel detailing Design

Methods of Construction / design

Rat-trap Bond: Wall construction

Brick Arch Foundation

Entrance to the Site looking towards the commecial center 78

Full height openings

* Estimation is inclusive of land & infrastructure and addition of 15% for wastage during construction and inflaton in material cost over the period of construction.

Residential Area:


Dwelling units: types and probable incremental growth

Unit combination

Coutyard ventilation

Modular unit

Cross ventilation

Social Connection

Service linkage

Standalone Layout

Dwelling units: types and probable incremental growth

Frontyard & Backyard - Option 1

Frontyard & Backyard - Option 2

Frontyard only

position of the staircase for G+1 expansion

addition of the room on the same floor

addition of the room on the same floor

position of the staircase for G+1 expansion

position of the staircase for G+1 expansion

Frontyard & Backyard - Option 1

position of the staircase for G+1 expansion

Separate Toilet

position of the staircase for G+1 expansion

Frontyard & Backyard - Option 2

position of the staircase for G+1 expansion

Ground Floor Plan

First Floor Plan Why Duplex? - 5 units surrounding 2 courtyards - chawl effect: compact yet ample open spaces - possibility of later addition on the same floor - built-up is same as standalone - in the master plans, helps to some extent in wind flow manipulation

later addition of a room on the ground floor

Backyard only

addition of the room on the same floor

position of the staircase for G+1 expansion

Internal Courtyard & Separate Toilet

position of the staircase for G+1 expansion

later addition of a room on the first floor

Estimate Cost of Unit* (in INR) Standalone 1 Room Standalone 2 Room 5 Dwellings in Cluster 1 Room (G) 2 Room (G) 2 Room (FF)

195,000 260,000 190,000 260,000 230,000

1 INR = 0.013 EUR = 0.015 USD (July, 2016)

: Large open spaces

Cluster Section

Duplex: Courtyard

Cluster Layout

Standalone: secondary street

79


Professional Overview Modular Housing, Australia Urban Collective

Spatial Vision, Alkmaar Socio-spatial, Rotterdam TU Delft

= You

research

Social Impact measuring model: Veldacademie

strategy

urban planning

urban design

2017 architecture

+

2015 Overhoe, NL Oosterwold, NL Shenzhen Biennale Waternet, NL Play the City

Vertical Cities Asia National University of Singapore

2013 Mahindra Housing, IN Premashraya, IN Sangath

technology City-on-Demand Master thesis TU Delft

Get Well City Riga University

Nalanda University International Competition Sangath

cv Design Portfolio Research Portfolio 80

Deltse Lente : Lustrum Theatre Stylos, TU Delft

C D


Exhibition Hall Mixed-use development Manipal University Sport City Complex ARCOP, NOIDA

Modular Classroom Architecture for Humanity Ashram Design School Design Manipal University

Close the Gap, NYC D3

2010

Sustainable Hotel, IN Mixed used Development, IN Manipal University

Documentation : Temple & 500 years old mud house Manipal University

2005

Wall Momentum Paper Presentation Event - Campus Planning Manipal University

Housing Project Training Good Earth, Bangalore Labour Housing Bachelors thesis Manipal University

Documentation : Kollur Temple Manipal University

81

Profile for Tanya Chandra

Design and Research Portfolio 2016  

Tanya Chandra Interactive pdf

Design and Research Portfolio 2016  

Tanya Chandra Interactive pdf

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