Page 1

TANNER HYLAND architecture portfolio | 2016 tanner.hyland@ku.edu university of kansas


TANNER HYLAND tanner.hyland@ku.edu issuu.com/tannerhyland 636.484.2903

EDUCATION Aug. 2013 - May 2018

University of Kansas

Master of Architecture

Pursuing a Minor in Business 3.8 GPA, Honor Roll 6 Semesters

Fall 2016

University of New South Wales, Australia

Study Abroad, Faculty of the Built Environment

Completed Arch. Studies Final Year Studio with Distinction

EXPERIENCE May 2016 - Present

Ross & Baruzzini

Architectural Intern Contributed to a number of government projects in various phases ranging from Schematic Design to Construction Administration. Produced technical drawings and finish schedules for the Fort Hood Bennett Health Clinic in addition to preparing a proposal for two alternate vestibule options. Spearheaded the creation of a Revit library for detail drawings to ease the assemblage of drawing sets for future projects. Summer 2015

C. Rallo Contracting, Inc.

Project Engineer Worked closely with the project manager and Dickinson Hussman Architects to oversee the completion of a major renovation to four elementary schools in the St. Charles School District. Participated in the bidding process on a number of projects in and around the St. Louis area. 2007 - 2016

Ballwin Athletic Association

Umpire Supervisor, Umpire Oversaw all of the ballpark’s umpires and fielded concerns from parents and coaches. Gained valuable experience managing different personality types and conducting myself in a professional manner despite tense situations.


INVOLVEMENT 2015-2016 Student Senator, SADP Represented the School of Architecture in the University of Kansas Student Senate. In addition to pursuing solutions for issues facing the university as a whole, significant progress was made towards strengthening the communication between staff and students within the architecture school.

Student Advisory Board, SADP Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity Campus Tree Advisory Board KU Bicycle Advisory Committee Intramural Basketball, Flag Football, Softball KU Big Event Volunteer Missouri Families for Effective Autism Treatment Volunteer

DISTINCTIONS AIA St. Louis Scholarship / 2015, 2016

KU Office of Study Abroad Merit Scholarship / 2016 Donald P. Ewart Memorial Traveling Scholarship / 2016 Tile Contractors’ Association of America Scholarship / 2015 NAWIC Founders’ Scholarship Foundation Scholarship / 2014 Charles H. Frees Scholarship / 2013

Spring 2016

Dirt Works Studio: Sensory Pavilion Best of Design Award for Student Work: Architects’ Newspaper ArchDaily’s “The Best Student Design-Build Projects Worldwide”

SKILLS Software Revit | SketchUp | AutoCAD | Rhinoceros 3D | Bluebeam Revu | Adobe Suite | MS Office | Laser Cutting | 3D Printing Professional Creative Thinking | Freehand Drawing | Model Making | Verbal Presentation | Visual Communication | Writing


6-15

DONALD JUDD MUSEUM Kansas City, MO Fall 2015

28-39

Lawrence, KS Spring 2016

SENSORY PAVILION

46-51

ARCHITECTURE ABROAD Sydney, NSW, Australia Fall 2016


16-27

ST. SPYRIDON COLLEGE

40-45

AMELIA EARHART MUSEUM

Sydney, NSW, Australia Fall 2016

Atchison, KS Fall 2014

52-53 DESIGN SKETCHES Various Projects 2013-2016


DONALD JUDD MUSEUM Kansas City, MO Fall 2015 | Nilou Vakil

In examining a potential site for a museum dedicated to the works of Donald Judd, it became apparent that the design must be responsive to the surrounding urban context. Situated in the heart of Kansas City’s Crossroads District, the location provides views to the downtown skyline as well as proximity to the Kauffman Center. The building’s exterior form seeks to engage these elements to establish a clear connection between the southern end of the city’s arts district and downtown Kansas City. In addition to the desire to unify the Crossroads District, it was imperative that the design represent Judd’s work in a meaningful way. The design seeks to incorporate Judd’s philosophy by applying his notion of empiricism to architecture. Judd’s works were often placed in settings that were subtle in nature, but had a very direct intent. This idea of quiet spaces with clear purposes represents the overall goal for the building’s interior galleries, and is further reinforced by the angling of the exterior form.

7


Separation of Museum Space

Acknowledge Surroundings

Gallery spaces are elevated to maximize views, designating the ground floor for public spaces including a cafe and library.

The building’s upper volume angles to the Northeast as a nod to the Kauffman Center and nearby Power & Light District, while the triangular cutout on the lower level allows the building to align itself with the historic Sullivan Higdon & Sink building.

8


Embed Within Site

Create a Gathering Place

In an effort to fully embrace its surrounding context, the museum offers a sculpture garden at the site’s southern end. The landscaping of the garden aligns itself with the bays of the adjacent 310 building to maximize visibility.

The project seeks to establish itself as a focal point within the Crossroads District, capitalizing on its central location to continue the growing popularity of the area.

Donald Judd Museum

9


6

6

UP

UP

5

4

4

3

3

2

2

1

1

UP

5

Parking Garage

A

East Elevation

10

B

C

D

Level 1

A

B

C

D


6

DN

5

Gallery Spaces The dramatic cantilevering of the building’s upper volume allows it to fulfill its goal of embodying Judd’s notion of empiricism, creating subtle gallery spaces with highly focused views.

4

3

2

DN

1

Level 2

A

2

South Elevation

B

C

D

Level Two 1/16" = 1'-0"

North Elevation

Donald Judd Museum

11


12


Diagramming Movement Yellow and orange hues were used in various iterations of sectional and elevational drawings to illustrate not only daylighting conditions, but movement patterns through the building as well.

Donald Judd Museum

13


14


Donald Judd Museum

15


ST. SPYRIDON COLLEGE Sydney, NSW, Australia Fall 2016 | Angelo Candalepas

In an area of Sydney where the construction of high rise school buildings is becoming increasingly popular, the brief proposed by St. Spyridon College calls for a hybrid of sorts between this new age style of school and a more traditional campus. In phase I of a proposed three phase plan, St. Spyridon will seek to condense its Kingsford and Maroubra campuses onto a site that is currently home to the junior school and centrally located Greek Orthodox Church. This design addresses phase I of the campus plan by accommodating the school’s full enrollment of 1,500 students while providing maximal greenspace and remaining considerate to the church that is to remain on the site. The design also seeks facilitate the school’s future growth by establishing a clear entrance and open sightlines to a potential athletic complex in phases II and III.

17


ce Bru St.

Doran St.

eners

Gard

18

Rd.


Staff Parking/Loading Area Doran St. Entrance Gardeners Rd. Street Frontage Downtown Kingsford

Phase I: Present (12,570m²)

Playing Fields/Underground Parking

Phase II: 5-10 years (19,559m²)

The master plan simplifies the program into two buildings; a junior school and a senior school. The strong form of the church informs circulation patterns throughout the site. Identifying Bruce St. as the primary drop off point for students allows for a dynamic pathway extending through the senior school to the infants courtyard at the site’s western end.

Phase III: 10-30 years (25,698m²) St. Spyridon College

19


1. Address Church While the church lacks architectural significance, it plays an important role within Sydney’s Greek community and needed to be acknowledged in the design.

3. Elevate Education Spaces Classrooms are symbolically elevated within cantilevered volumes clad in preweathered copper, a nod to the school’s religious context as well as the climate of Sydney. Building heights are varied to create hierarchy.

5. Establish a Clear Central Axis Building forms are manipulated to accentuate the linear progression from the Bruce St. entrance to the infants courtyard.

20


2. Create a Central Courtyard Building footprints are informed by the boundaries of the site and the form of the church, leaving a void to the North of the church.

4. Provide Enclosure The junior school forms an L-shape to create an enclosed playground area for grades K-2, maintaining a low profile to allow sunlight into the playground area.

6. Addition to Church Concrete volumes are added onto the church as an alternative to unsightly fire stairs, enhancing connectivity with the school buildings and providing additional space for Sunday school classrooms.

St. Spyridon College

21


Section Through Courtyard

22


St. Spyridon College

23


5

A

4 3

5 B

4 3

C

2

2

B

C

1

1 D

D

E

E

F

F

G

G

H

H I

I

J

Level 2 Senior School

South Elevation

24

A

J

Level 3


5 4

A

5 B

4

3

A B

3 C

2

C

2

1

1 D

D

E

E

F

F

G

G

H

H I

I

J

Level 4

J

Level 5

East Elevation

St. Spyridon College

25


J

parapet coping sloped to drain to roof side coping support shim roof drain EPDM roofing membrane tapered rigid insulation preweathered copper patina fascia

Roof 22m horizontal mullion w/ integrated thermal break insulated glass curtain panel vertical mullion sitecast concrete column

5th Floor 18m one way concrete slab w/ beams and girders sitecast concrete girder HVAC duct preweathered copper patina panel air cavity 100mm rigid board insulation vapour/moisture barrier 12.7mm exterior gyp. board sheating 150mm metal stud

12.7mm gypsum over plywood hardwood flooring

2nd Floor 4.25m

preweathered copper patina soffit

vapour/moisture barrier pressure equalized cavity w/ rigid board insulation double sleeved sitecast concrete

Ground Floor 0m

Detail Section Senior School

26

scrim coating over rigid insulation stone drainage bed vapour/moisture barrier sitecast concrete pile perforated drain pipe


Design Development The studio was divided into two segments: the first dealt with master planning for the entire campus while the second focused on a single building within the proposal. I chose to focus on the senior school, as it houses a number of critical programmatic elements including an auditorium, gymnasium, and administrative offices. The building was developed to the point of detailed floor plans and sections, explaining the building’s envelope and spatial layout.

St. Spyridon College

27


SENSORY PAVILION Lawrence, KS Spring 2016 | Dirt Works Studio

The primary objective of the Audio Reader Network is to serve the vision-impaired community, both through their radio network and the creation of the Sensory Garden, which is filled with a variety of plantings intended to delight the senses and provide a tranquil experience for its users. Over time the Sensory Garden has evolved into a popular place within the community, not only for listeners of the Audio Reader Network but for families of the local community as well. Therefore, when the existing gazebo at the rear of the garden fell into disrepair, the Dirt Works Studio was granted the unique opportunity to design an addition to the garden that would both enhance the existing sensory experience and entice new visitors. Our proposal sought to introduce a dynamic yet unimposing structure, with the aim of complementing the garden’s aesthetic while also providing ample shelter. The signature feature of the open air pavilion is a 9 ft. rammed earth column, which acts to facilitate circulation along the existing brick pathway as well as to support the nail-laminated timber roof. Spatially, the pavilion seeks to provide seating via timber benches anchored to three rammed earth walls without acting as a literal enclosure. The pavilion’s feathered roof design symbolizes the idea of “reaching out into the garden,” a sort of gesture to the existing setting.

29


Define a Space

efine a Space

Establish a Rhythm 03 Establish a Rhythm

Add Enclosure

d Enclosure

30

Reach into Garden 05 Reaching into Garden


Schematic Design The initial phase of the studio consisted of a series of charrettes in which a variety of potential design solutions were discussed amongst all members of the studio. As the semester progressed, students were divided into specialized groups focusing on specific roles within the project. My role within the studio consisted primarily of SketchUp modeling and the preparation of presentation graphics.

Sensory Pavilion

31


32


Demolition of Existing Gazebo Before we could move forward with the construction of the pavilion, we first had to remove the existing gazebo at the rear of the garden. Whereas the gazebo acted as a terminus to the brick path that winds through the sensory garden, our design was predicated upon the idea of establishing a greater sense of continuity.

Sensory Pavilion

33


Shou-Sugi-Ban Wood Burning

34

Rammed Earth Column


Foundation Pour

Compacted Earth Floor

Construction Phase The methods used to construct the pavilion are indicative of our desire to create a pavilion that was truly of the garden. From the use of the shou sugi ban wood burning technique to the interlocking joints of the roof and timber screen, the pavilion seeks to strike a subtle presence within an already pristine setting.

Sensory Pavilion

35


Rammed Earth Wall with Metal Rod Tiebacks

“Reaching into the Garden�

Charred Screen Members on Rammed Earth Wall

Sensory Pavilion

37


Bust on Rammed Earth Pedestal

View from Entrance to Garden

Architects’ Newspaper’s “Best of Design Award for Student Work” ArchDaily’s “The Best Student Design-Build Projects Worldwide”

Sensory Pavilion

39


AMELIA EARHART MUSEUM Atchison, KS Fall 2014 Completed in the fall semester of my second year in architecture school, this project was influential in forming a basis for my individual approach to design. Situated on a steeply sloped site overlooking the Missouri River and across from Amelia Earhart’s childhood home, the project was rich in context from the beginning and presented an opportunity to respond to a number of factors. This notion of contextual response is something that I seek to demonstrate in all of my projects, as I feel that acknowledging a project’s surroundings through its overall design is an important tool for unifying communities. Given the museum’s residential setting across from Earhart’s childhood home, which currently functions as a small museum itself, it was critical that the home’s views to the river not be inhibited. For this reason, the building seeks to maintain a subtle presence along the street while capitalizing on the dramatic slope of the site to provide maximal views from within.

41


Emulating Flight The building’s form stems from the goal of emulating the wings of an airplane in the roof design. Further reinforcing the theme of aviation is the hanger-like appearance that is conveyed by the large structural trusses and column-free interior spaces. The building’s interior is largely predicated on creating a variety of vantage points from which to view the river valley as well as the historic airplanes that are housed within.

North Elevation

42


West Elevation

Amelia Earhart Museum

43


View from Entrance Plaza

44


Viewing Deck Overlooking Valley

View from River Valley

Amelia Earhart Museum

45


46


ARCHITECTURE ABROAD University of New South Wales, Australia July - Nov. 2016

My decision to study in Australia was based primarily upon the desire to experience something completely different; something that I couldn’t find anywhere else. Given Australia’s relatively young history and harsh climate, the country’s architecture is incredibly diverse, responding to a wide range of environmental factors and foreign influences. I spent my time in Sydney exploring the city and familiarizing myself with a new culture, an experience that ultimately caused me to rethink my own approach to design.

47


48


Architecture Abroad

49


Paris, France Dec. 2016 After living in a sharehouse with several European exchange students in Australia, I was eager to continue my travels. I had the chance to spend two weeks in Paris before returning home, a unique experience in the sense that I traveled from a relatively young city in Sydney to one of the oldest and most beautiful cities in the world.

50


Architecture Abroad

51


52


DESIGN SKETCHES Various Projects & Travels 2013-2016

The surrounding are a selection of sketches from previous projects and trips. Throughout my time in architecture school, I have found hand drawing to be a useful tool for both generating and communicating design ideas.

53


REFERENCES Nilou Vakil nilou.vakil@ku.edu Principal, In Situ Design Paola Sanguinetti paolas@ku.edu Associate Professor, University of Kansas SADP Brad Pierce, bpierce@rossbar.com Senior Project Manager, Ross & Baruzzini

54


55


tanner.hyland@ku.edu issuu.com/tannerhyland 636.484.2903

Tanner Hyland - Portfolio 2017  

A compilation of academic work

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you