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ReCOGnition

Newsletter of the High Country Council of Governments Vol. 35 / Issue 1 / June 2015

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A Fond Farewell to Kenny Poteat The Executive Board members of High Country Council of Governments honored Kenny Poteat for his 20 years of service to the COG and the High Country. Board members spoke warmly of his mentorship and leadership abilities, and lauded Kenny as not just a respected colleague but as a dear friend. Read more inside about his legacy.

Also in this issue . . .

Meet Cindy Lamb Get to know the new LCA Coordinator for AAA

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Endorsed by:

Adopted by: Avery County Date: October 6, 2014

High Country RPO Date: December 17, 2014

£ ¤ 321

Town of Banner Elk Date: October 13, 2014

Recommended by: Transportation Planning Branch Date: December 15, 2014

Town of Beech Mountain Date: October 14, 2014 Town of Crossnore Date: December 9, 2014

Beech Mountain

Notes:

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Elk River

Beech Mountain 184

Elk Park

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Cranberry Creek

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Grandfather Village

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Sugar Mountain

Newland

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£ ¤ 221

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NCDOT Date: January 8, 2015

Yellow Mountain

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Village of Sugar Mountain Date: October 28, 2014

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Town of Seven Devils Date: November 12, 2014

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Town of Newland Date: October 7, 2014

Avery CTP Plan A long-range multi-modal transportation plan Adoption Sheet

Sheet 2

Highway Map

Sheet 3

Public Transportation and Rail Map

Sheet 4

Bicycle Map

Blue Ridg e Parkway

19E

Legend

Roads

Rivers and Streams

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Sheet 1

26

There are no existing public transportation (fixed route) or rail features within the county, and the CTP does not include any recommended improvements for these modes.

Town of Elk Park Date: October 6, 2014

ArcGIS Online App A cost-efficient and webbased solution

HCCF Fundraising Events in Mitchell & Yancey raise money for caregivers

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Wilkes Detention Center New facility in Wilkes County opened in October 2014

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Schools Airport County Boundary

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Adoption Sheet

Avery County Comprehensive Transportation Plan

GE Aviation Expansion Finding and training the right workers for 105 new jobs


2014–2015 Executive Board Chairman: Gary D. Blevins Vice-Chair: Brenda Lyerly Secretary: Johnny Riddle Treasurer: Valerie Jaynes Minority Representative Paul L. Robinson, Jr. Alleghany County Tom Smith, Chair Chris Jones, Councilman, Sparta Ashe County Dale Baldwin, Mayor, West Jefferson Mark Johnston, Alderman, Jefferson Brien Richardson, Commissioner Brenda Reeves, Alderwoman, Lansing Avery County Valerie Jaynes, Mayor, Newland Gunther JÜchl, Mayor Pro Tem, Sugar Mountain Brenda Lyerly, Mayor, Banner Elk Rick Miller, Councilman, Beech Mountain Maxine Laws, Commissioner Tudor Vance, Mayor, Crossnore Joel Whitley, Alderman, Elk Park Mitchell County Rocky Buchanan, Mayor, Spruce Pine Bill Slagle, Commissioner Charles Vines, Mayor, Bakersville Watauga County Andy Ball, Mayor, Boone Larry Fontaine, Mayor, Seven Devils J.B. Lawrence, Mayor, Blowing Rock Jimmy Hodges, Chair

High Country COG Staff 828-265-5434 828-265-5439 Administration

Finance

Mickey Duvall Executive Director mduvall@regiond.org / x.125

Beth Norris Finance Officer bnorris@regiond.org / x.109

Kathy Combs Receptionist kcombs@regiond.org / x.100

Planning & Development

Tanna Greathouse Clerk to the Board tgreathouse@regiond.org / x.101 Fred Sides Information Systems Specialist fsides@regiond.org / x.110

Area Agency on Aging

Phillip Trew Director ptrew@regiond.org / x.121

Michelle Ball Community Development Planner mball@regiond.org / x.115 Jessica Brannock GIS Planner jbrannock@regiond.org / x.134

Julie Wiggins Director jwiggins@regiond.org / x.126

Kelly Coffey Senior Planner kcoffey@regiond.org / x.114

Nicole Hiegl Aging Services Coordinator nhiegl@regiond.org / x.113

David Graham Transportation Planner dgraham@regiond.org / x.135

Cindy Lamb Local Contact Agency Program Coordinator clamb@regiond.org / x.118

Workforce Development

Brenda Reece Family Caregiver Support Specialist breece@regiond.org / x.128 Diane Tilson Aging Program Assistant dtilson@regiond.org / x.141 Laura Jane Ward Regional Ombudsman ljward@regiond.org / x.126

Adrian Tait Director adrian.tait@highcountrywdb.com x.130 Misty Bishop-Price Systems Manager misty.bishopprice@highcountrywdb.com x.119 Rebecca Bloomquist Special Projects Coordinator rebecca.bloomquist@highcountrywdb.com x.136 Don Sherrill Operations Director don.sherrill@highcountrywdb.com x.120

Wilkes County Gary D. Blevins, Chair Victor Varela, Mayor, Ronda Jimmy Hayes, Mayor Pro Tem,Wilkesboro Robert L. Johnson, Mayor, North Wilkesboro Yancey County Theresa Coletta, Mayor, Burnsville Johnny Riddle, Chair

(P) (F)

www.regiond.org


ReCOGnition Newsletter | 3

A Fond Farewell to Kenny Poteat Honoring 20 Years of Service

On December 15, 2014, Kenny Poteat attended his last Executive Board meeting. It was truly the end of an era characterized by 20 years of service and dedication to Avery County, High Country Council of Governments, and the entire region. When colleagues speak of Kenny they do so fondly with words and phrases like “fair and equitable,” “exemplary leaderships,” and “mentor.” Kenny’s lasting legacy for many Executive Board members will be his mentorship. Chuck Vines, Mayor of Bakersville and 24-year board member, said “it was my honor to have served beside Kenny for many years. He’s the one I looked up to the most. He gave me so Chairman Blevins presents Kenny Poteat with a clock honoring his much. The best mentor I have ever had, I learned so 20 years of dedicated service to the High Country region much from him. Above everything else our friendship means the most. I will never forget him for taking a young mayor and bringing me along all these years. It’s an honor to call Kenny my friend!” Robert L. Johnson, Mayor of North Wilkesboro, said Kenny has “been a great public servant [in Avery County], a great board member here, and a heckuva mentor to me.” At the December board meeting Blowing Rock Mayor J.B. Lawrence, and 22-year board member, told Kenny “it has been a real pleasure . . . everything you did, you did with class, integrity, and honesty and you certainly taught me a lot.” Chairman Blevins read a letter from Sparta Mayor John Miller to Mr. Poteat regarding their many years of service together on the board. “There will always be many times as I reflect back, how truly blessed it was for me to serve with an outstanding member such as you. . . . All who have had the pleasure of serving with you will look back and say ‘Kenny Poteat was one of the very best people I have ever known.’” In summarizing his 20 years of service, Kenny said “it’s like family, it truly is. I’ve been on many boards in 20 years but nothing compares to Region D.” The staff of High Country Council of Governments can honestly say nothing compares to Kenny Poteat. Kenny Poteat annoints Dr. Duvall as an Appalachian State University Mountaineer as his parting action on the Executive Board We are thankful for his service and dedication to the High Country, and for his incomparable leadership on the Executive Board. You leave behind a legacy that encourages all of us to reach for the loftiest of goals for the betterment of all our communities.


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Ribbon-Cutting for Wilkes County Detention Center by Jule Hubbard, Wilkes Journal-Patriot Staff

The efforts of many for building a new Wilkes County Jail were recognized during a dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the 58,000 square foot facility on October 22, 2014. “It’s been a long journey to get here and I want to thank you all for being here to help dedicate this detention center for the safety of the citizens of Wilkes County,” said Gary D. Blevins, chairman of the county commissioners. Blevins was speaking to a crowd of about 100 people, mostly government employees, in an area of the jail with dormitory housing for inmates. “Vannoy Construction Co. really came through for us and built an excellent facility that was very cost effective,” said Blevins. “I want to personally say thanks to them. They are a real team player and contribute a lot to the economy of Wilkes.” He said Jefferson-based Vannoy, construction manager at risk for the jail project, used a lot of local contractors. Blevins said the company employs many Wilkes residents and has a strong presence with a hangar and aircraft at the Wilkes County Airport.

Wilkes County Sheriff Chris Shew

Blevins acknowledged the efforts of Vannoy’s Kris Little and Wesley Hicks, construction manager and building supervisor respectively, for the jail project. He said he was grateful to Hicks for giving 110 percent to the project. He recognized Jack Hemphill of Charlotte-based Hemphill-Randel Associates, architect for the new detention center. The commissioners first met with Hemphill concerning the project in January 2011. Hemphill Randel also designed plans for the Ashe County Jail, which opened in November 2011. Wilkes officials decided to build a jail similar to the one in Ashe, but larger, after visiting the facility. Blevins said Keith Walsh, Wilkes building inspections director, was a key player in keeping the project on time and ensuring quality. “The (Wilkes) County Board of Commissioners really stepped up and fought through the adversity of the economic downturn. . . . With spending cuts and, unfortunately, a tax increase, we were able to come through and build what we consider is an affordable jail.” Blevins mentioned county commissioners David Gambill, Eddie Settle, Keith Elmore, and Gary L. Blevins, as well as County Manager John Yates, County Finance Director Jerry Shepherd, and Judy Snyder, Clerk to the Board. He thanked people who work in the nearby Wilkes County Courthouse for their patience during construction, the Town of Wilkesboro for its help with infrastructure and subcontractors. “This was truly a county project,” said Blevins, referring to the fact that the new jail was built entirely with county government funds. The county borrowed $12.6 million, the entire cost of the project, with an interest rate of nearly 2 percent. Wilkes Sheriff Chris Shew was referring to both the recent opening of a new sheriff’s department administrative building and the new jail when he spoke and said, “I have to hit myself in the morning and make sure I’m not dreaming because so many good things are happening.” Shew said the jail was built in 1970 for 48 inmates “and if we had 25 we thought we were about full. We renovated it many times to end up with (capacity for) 68 inmates and we acquired the detention center on Boston Avenue” to house women inmates. He said the sheriff’s department eventually was operating in seven different buildings at the same time. “When I took office (as sheriff ) in 2010, we had over 100 inmates and they were sleeping on the jail floor. The state said we couldn’t do that so we started transporting them to Ashe County” to be housed in a county


ReCOGnition Newsletter | 5

jail there that had just been completed. Wilkes County government paid other counties, but mostly Ashe County, $2.56 million since September 2010 to house inmates from Wilkes due to lack of space in the Wilkes jail. The new Wilkes detention center will open with a staff of 32, including 15 from the men’s detention center, 11 from the women’s detention center, one from the day reporting center on Main Street, Wilkesboro and five new jailers. These three current facilities will be closed, but commissioners haven’t yet decided what to do with them. Shew said adjustments will likely be made where people are stationed as needs become apparent. Wilkes County Detention Center He said it might also be realized that more than five additional jailers are needed as the inmate population increases. Shew said he expects to open with about 150 inmates. Capt. Jason Whitley, detention center director, said one of the greatest advantages of the new jail is that it allows enough beds to properly segregate certain categories of inmates, including sex offenders, youthful offenders, people scheduled to testify in court, and others. Immediately around the control towers are common areas in the blocks where inmates, unless in isolation or padded cells, can exercise or sit, including to eat or watch TV. There will be one jailer in each control tower per shift overseeing inmates by viewing monitors for about 137 video (interior and exterior) cameras and using audio equipment and their naked eyes through windows. The jail wasn’t built with a kitchen, which was estimated to cost about $1 million. Meals instead will be delivered. The jail has sally port areas for transporting inmates to and from the facility. At one sally port is a shower room for decontaminating inmates, including those arrested at meth labs. There also is a completely enclosed walkway to the courthouse for escorting inmates to and from court.

Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony


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Beech Mountain Hires Four New Employees

Kate Gavenus

Shawn Freeman

Steven Smith

Rebecca Ward

Kate Gavenus, Director of Tourism and Economic Development

Gavenus moved into this position from her employment as the Director of Beech Mountain Chamber of Commerce. She brings more than 30 years of experience in small business ownership, nonprofit management, government administration and community service. She holds a Bachelor’s degree from Appalachian State University, a Master’s degree from Western Carolina University and a Certificate in nonprofit management from Duke University.

Shawn Freeman, Police Chief

Freeman earned his degree from Mountain State University. Freeman served in the United States Air Force, which included participating in Operation Desert Shield/Storm as well as Operation Watch; worked within the North Carolina Department of Corrections, for the Morganton Department of Public Safety as a Public Safety Officer, and worked for Bald Head Island Police Department where he held the position of lieutenant. While there Bald Head Island combined the Fire/E.M.S. and the Police Department to become a fully integrated Public Safety Department with Shawn being promoted to Deputy Chief of Public Safety.

Steven Smith, Finance Officer

Smith earned his B.S.B.A. from Appalachian State University in 1991. Smith’s work experience include private, having worked for Crisp Hughes and Associates, CPA, and public, having served as the Finance Officer for the Town of Seven Devils, NC and Finance Officer for the Town of Banner Elk. Smith also holds a Certification in Utility Management National Rural Water Association.

Rebecca Ward, Tax Collections Administrator

Ward brings 14 years of customer service and collections experience. She holds a certificate for fundamentals of Tax Collection from the University of North Carolina School of Government.


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A Cool 5 Race Eastern America’s highest town announces five options for runners during this year’s “A Cool 5” race weekend. This year the event will consist of 5 different races held over a two day period emphasizing outdoor activity and showcasing the beauty of Beech Mountain. Families are encouraged to participate in the two running events Friday afternoon, June 19, 2015. The first is the Kids’ Cool Popsicle Relay, which takes place at 4:00 pm on the athletic fields at the Buckeye Recreation Center. The free Popsicle relay offers competition in different age groups. Also Friday afternoon is the “Buck-A-Thon” fundraiser in which participants pledge a dollar for each lap they complete on the Buckeye Rec Center walking track. The bulk of racing takes place Saturday morning, June 20, 2015 with a 5-mile run; 1.5-mile fun run/walk; and a pet-friendly 1.5-mile walk & wag. All three begin at Town Hall at 8:30 am. Adult registration for the 5-mile run is $25; and $30 race day. Youth registration (12 and under) is $10 for all races. Kids are FREE for Friday events. Entry fees for the Fun Run/Walk and the Walk & Wag are $20 before day of race and $25 day of race. Contact: sroyall@townofbeechmountain.com

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Awards && Post Race Celebration Races for all ages/ and fitness levels

Taste of Beech - June 19, 2015 Register At:::

www.acool5race.com


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Regional Highlights

Celebrating Our Successes and Achievements

Music and Memory Fundraiser Appalachian State University’s Music Therapy Program recently selected the Area Agency on Aging’s Music and Memory Program initiative as the recipient of their annual fundraiser. The Music and Memory Program is a nationwide program that trains individuals to provide personalized music therapy to those suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Research suggests that the program increases social activity and decreases anxiety and agitation, and potentially reduces the need for psychotropic and anti-psychotic medication (musicandmemory.org). Furthermore, when individuals with dementia are calmer and happier, their caregivers experience decreased stress. The conclusion is then drawn that the overall care environment and the quality of life for both participants and their caregivers improve by implementing this program.

L-R: Shelley McCluskey, Vice President, Appalachian Music Therapy Student Association; Jasmine Tilden, President, Appalachian Music Therapy Student Association Laura Jane Ward, Regional Ombudsman, High Country Area Agency on Aging

The AAA’s Long-Term Care Ombudsman, Laura Jane Ward, has been working to create awareness of Music and Memory and encourages our region’s long-term care facilities to implement the program. For more information on the program and how to support its mission, contact Laura Jane Ward (828-265-5434 x126, ljward@regiond.org).

New Local Contact Agency (LCA) Coordinator The High Country Area Agency on Aging welcomes its newest member Cindy Lamb. Cindy will be working as the Local Contact Agency (LCA) Coordinator. Her role will be to inform nursing home residents of their options for returning to the community. Primarily, this will be by referral but she will be educating nursing home staff and resident council groups on the information and resources available for community living. Cindy received her Graduate Certificate in Gerentology from Appalachian State University in May. She has also interned and worked with Brenda Reece, AAA Family Caregiver Specialist and Director of the High Country Caregiver Foundation. For more information, or to welcome Cindy, call or email (828265-5434 x118, clamb@regiond.org).

Cindy Lamb, LCA Coordinator


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Wilkes County Regional Library Hosts Community Health Series Luncheon One of the many healthy aging initiatives of the High Country include the Wilkes County branch of the Appalachian Regional Library’s annual Community Health Luncheon Series. The three-part series focuses on various aspects of managing personal health and well being, bringng in a diverse portfolio of topics and speakers. On Friday, April 24, 2015 the luncheon series focused on Chronic Disease Self-Management, highlighting the evidenced-based program Living Healthy. As the regional coordinator for the Living Healthy program, Nicole Hiegl of the High Country Area Agency on Aging lead the luncheon presentation providing an overview and sample of the six-week program series. Living Healthy is a community-based chronic disease self-management program developed by Stanford University which empowers individuals to manage their own chronic conditions. The program is considered one of the most effective and highly researched prevention programs by the National Council on Aging. As an additional provider of the Living Healthy program, the Wilkes County Health Department sponsored the luncheon and will be hosting a six-week Living Healthy class at no charge beginning in June. For additional information and to find a Living Healthy class in your community, please contact Nicole Hiegl, Aging Services Coordinator at (828) 265-5434 x113 or nhiegl@regiond.org.

Wilkes County Regional Library Hosts Community Health Series Luncheon On April 14, 2015 Laura Jane Ward, Regional Ombudsman, traveled to Chapel Hill, NC for the 2nd Annual Disability Advocacy Conference. The conference was hosted by Disability Rights North Carolina, a 501(c)(3) that provides legally-based advocacy for individuals with disabilities on the beautiful campus of UNC. Keynote speakers for the conference were Andrew Imparato and Sharon Lewis. Andrew Imparato has been a life-long advocate for individuals with disabilities and is the current Executive Director of the Association of University Centers on Disabilities. He has previously served as a senior counsel and disability policy director to Senator Tom Harkin of the US Senate. Mr. Imparato’s message highlighted important ways for advocates to leverage federal focuses such as the Olmstead decision to leverage change at the local level for improved opportunities for community-based care and long-term supports for individuals with disabilities. Sharon Lewis is the Senior Advisor for the US DHHS Secretary on Disability Policy and is the Deputy Administrator of the Administration for Community Living. She has both personal and professional experiences in advocacy for individuals with intellectual disabilities. She spoke on current key legislation impacting those with disabilities and emphasized the importance of choice and person-centered care in community integration initiatives. She stated “if we do not include everyone in our communities then we all miss out.” In addition to keynote speakers, the conference held a choice of four breakout sessions of topics ranging from 2012’s Department of Justice Settlement with NC on inappropriate placements to Guardianship Alternatives to Legal Standards of Restraint Use in Facilities. Laura Jane said “It was a great opportunity to see so many advocates from across the age spectrum come together to learn best practice for practical and legislative advocacy for those with disabilities.” For more information about the conference or disability advocacy, please contact Laura Jane Ward at (828) 265-5434 x126 or ljward@regiond.org.


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HCCOG Begins Hosting Workshops

Features

Cost-Effective

Seminar

Speakers

Classes

Workshops Regional Cooperation Timely

So far, the COG has hosted or plans to host several workshops with varied topics such as Insurance Captives, impacts of the Affordable Care Act, Grant Communication and Information, and Capital Planning/Fiscal Control Policy Workshops.

Announcements Training

H i ghlights

As we work through the goals, objectives, and strategies of our Strategic Plan for FY2016, we recognized the need to bring educational opportunities to our member governments and partners in the region. With budget cuts, travel plans closer to your home office can have a positive impact.

We are currently considering options for upgrading our audio/visual equipment in the board room so that we may better host UNC School of Government Webinars, as well as offer remote-attendance to our members for workshops presented in our building. Please contact Tanna Greathouse (tgreathouse@regiond.org / (828) 2655434 x101) if you have a suggestion for a particular topic to be presented.

Are You in the Know? Almost every week the High Country Council of Governments publishes a Weekly Information Bulletin online. The bulletin highlights kudos, conferences and events, member services, state and regional grants, meetings and announcements, webinars and classes, legislative developments, and much more! Members are encouraged to submit their own announcements to keep colleagues informed of anything they feel is important enough to share. To subscribe to the email list, please contact Tanna Greathouse (tgreathouse@regiond.org).

www.regiond.org/HCCOG-WEEKLY-BULLETIN.html


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Ashe County Grant Award Benefits Ambulance Maker Ashe County recently received a $500,000 grant from the North Carolina Department of Commerce’s Building Reuse Program for renovations at American Emergency Vehicles (AEV). AEV, an ambulance manufacturer, is expanding production and creating 50 new jobs. The company purchased the former Gates factory, and will be moving all its operations into the 210,000 square foot building. It was constructed in 1978 as a manufacturing facility for Gates Corporation, a maker of automotive belts. The company ceased operations in the building in 2014. The grant will fund construction necessary to install equipment and reconfigure the interior to accommodate AEV’s assembly process. AEV is the country’s number one domestic ambulance maker, and Ashe County’s second-largest employer. The company began operations in Ashe County in 1990 with 50 employees, growing to 340 workers currently. Last year the business built over 1,100 ambulances.

NCWorks Commission Releases Strategic Plan for 2014-2016 The NCWorks Commission has released its 2014-2016 Strategic Plan, which provided the framework for all workforce agencies to create a more aligned and coordinated system focusing on four goals: • System Alignment & Transformation: create an integrated, seamless, and customer-centered workforce system • Create a workforce system that is responsive to the needs of the economy • Prepare workers to succeed in the North Carolina economy and to continuously improve their skills • Use data to drive strategies and ensure accountability Four committees will be formed by the NCWorks Commission based on the four elements of the Action Plan (within the Strategic Plan itself ): • • • •

System Alignment and Transformation Strengthen Customer Services Career Pathways Accountability

Workforce Development Boards statewide are being asked to adopt the state’s Strategic Plan and have it mesh with their regional plans. The Chair of the HCWDB is currently gathering interested board members to work on the new strategic plan for the High Country Region.

NCWorks Commission 2014-2016 Strategic Plan


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All High Country Career Centers Attain NCWorks Certification All seven Career Centers in the High Country Workforce Development Board’s area have now received NCWorks Career Center certification. Newly-certified centers­ —Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Mitchell, and Yancey—achieved a Level 2 designation. They join the centers in Watauga and Wilkes, certified last fall, that have a Level 1 designation. In order for a center to be certified, the team at each center must go through an application process and meet certain standards based on hours of operation, maintain certain staffing levels, provide access to services, and set goals for the center’s improvement. After approval at the local level and state level a site visit is conducted by representatives from the NC Division of Workforce Solutions. Join us in congratulating all the NCWorks Career Centers in the High Country region!

NCWorks Certified Work Ready Communities The North Carolina Chamber Foundation, in partnership with the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, North Carolina Community College system, and the NCWorks boards and centers, has launched an initiative allowing counties to apply for the NCWorks Certified Work Ready Communities designation. The certified communities’ initiative leverages North Carolina’s strong history with the National Career Readiness Certificate (CRC) and asks communities to engage with employers in their recognition and/or usage of the CRC. There are also requirements for graduation rates. Several High Country Counties are in serious discussions about applying for certification, and to date, applications for Ashe, Watauga, and Wilkes Counties have been submitted. We are encouraging our region as a whole to achieve an NCWorks Certified Work Ready Community designation. Contact the HCWDB staff or visit the Work Ready Communities website to find out more! www.workreadycommunities.org/NC


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New High Country Workforce Videos The final four of the six videos in the High Country Workforce Development Board’s year-long video series have been completed and uploaded to the HCWDB website and YouTube channel. The videos focused on the High Country Workforce Development Board, the Incumbent Worker Grant, Business Services provided by NCWorks Career Center staff, and Young Adult Services provided at NCWorks Career Centers. You can view them now by clicking on the links provided.

Video Links:

About the HCWDB highcountrywdb.com/about-us Business Services at the NCWorks Career Center highcountrywdb.com/employers/videos/ Young Adult Services at the NCWorks Career Center highcountrywdb.com/youth/videos/ Incumbent Worker Grant highcountrywdb.com/employers/training-existing-workers/


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Mitchell and Yancey Fundraising Efforts a Success High Country Caregiver Foundation Hosts Two Events High Country Caregiver Foundation (HCCF) recently hosted its inaugural Mitchell/Yancey Trivia Challenge and Festival of Tables fundraisers to benefit caregivers in Mitchell and Yancey counties. The events were very well attended and raised over $5,000.

Trivia

On March 12, 2015 eleven teams came together to match wits to determine who would reign as the 2015 Mitchell/Yancey Trivia Challenge winners. The 1st place team, “A Leap of Faith,” put together by Ms. Gina Phillips, narrowly edged out the fine folks representing the Bakersville Clinic in 2nd place, and 3rd place was claimed by the “Toe River Dames & Don.” Trivia participants

Winning teams are now eligible to compete at the Regional Trivia Challenge Championships on June 20, 2015 at the Boone Golf Course. First, second, and third place teams from each district (Ashe/Alleghany, Avery/Watauga, Mitchell/Yancey and Wilkes) will compete to see who becomes the first HCCF Regional Champion.

www.hccgf.org

like our page!

Without the financial aid and in kind contributions of our sponsors, partners, and supporters we simply could not provide the amount of respite care and other supportive services to family and kinship caregivers of the High Country. Please patronize our sponsors and thank them for their continued contributions. Brian Center Brookside Nursing & Rehabilitation Carolina Home Care Specialist High Country Area Agency on Aging High Country Council of Governments High Country Home Care Hospice & Palliative Care of the Blue Ridge Hospice of Yancey

Life Care of Banner Elk Medi Home Health & Hospice Meridian (Cranberry & Mitchell House) Mitchell Senior Center Pruitt Health Home Health Roan Highlands Nursing Center Western Sizzlin’


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Festival of Tables

On April 9, 2015, community members again came together to support HCCF’s Festival of Tables. Dr. Mickey Duvall, HCCOG Executive Director, and the staff of High Country AAA were also in attendance. Thirteen tables were sponsored and beautifully decorated by area businesses and organizations. It was extremely challenging for judges Norma and Charles Duncan (Mitchell County Senior Tar Heel Legislature Delegates) to determine whose tables would win the prizes. After much deliberation, Hospice of Yancey took home 1st prize, with Cranberry House finishing 2nd, and Hospice & Palliative Care of the Blue Ridge finishing in 3rd. A big thank you goes out to Trivia Challenge host Bruce Ikard; Festival of Tables co-hosts Brent Price and Scott Hospice of Yancey, 1st Place Table Alexander, Ms. Gina Phillips and Dr. Rocky Branch, Ms. Frances Johnson, and the fabulous folks at Spruce Pine First Baptist Church. Event organizers consider both events very successful with a combined total of more than 200 people in attendance. The fundraisers included a meal, door prizes, raffles, silent auctions, and a wonderful bake sale. Some of the area’s finest cooks donated scrumptious homemade cakes, pies, cookies, fudge, jam, jellies, and salsas to generate additional revenues for the fundraisers. High Country Caregiver Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Their mission is to improve the quality of life for family, kinship caregivers, and those they are caring for in the 7-county service area. It’s a one of a kind foundation which allows for most of its administrative expenses to be paid with government funds which then allows for 95% of money raised to be used to pay for direct services. Funds raised at county events are allocated for respite vouchers in those counties. Recently the program was expanded to Mitchell and Yancey Counties—since then HCCF has awarded 23 Respite Vouchers totalling $500 each to Mitchell and Yancey family caregivers. For more information visit our website at www.hccgf.org and like us on our Facebook page. If you would like to know how you can become involved please contact Brenda Reece at breece@regiond.org.


16 | ReCOGnition Newsletter

Advocating for Older and Disabled Adults Advocacy is the process of stakeholders making their voices heard on issues that affect their lives and the lives of others at the local, state, and national level (ncaoa.org). As outlined in the Older Americans Act, Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) are required to advocate for the development or enhancement of comprehensive and coordinated community-based systems of service in each community (OAA, Title III, Section 1321.61). Recently, the High Country Area Agency on Aging has been taking steps to increase advocacy efforts locally, statewide, and nationally. In March, Mary Bethel, AARP, provided a workshop to the AAA staff and its contracted service providers on effective advocacy. During the presentation she described the legislative process and then provided tips on how to effectively and appropriately communicate the needs of our communities’ older and disabled adults. The AAA also supports the region’s Senior Tar Heel Legislature. The High Country has a very active group of Senior Tar Heel advocates who meet quarterly in Boone and in Raleigh. The group establishes legislative priorities and then meets and communicates with state legislators on the issues that face North Carolina’s growing older adult population. In February, the High Country Senior Tar Heels joined the other regions’ Senior Tar Heel advocates in Raleigh to meet with their legislators and communicate their legislative priorities, including the restoration of Home and Community Care Block Grant (HCCBG) funds that support home and community-based services. In April, Julie Wiggins and Nicole Hiegl attended a Policy Briefing in Washington, DC presented by the National Association for Area Agencies on Aging. Following the briefing, representatives from three AAAs met with our legislators including the staff of Senators Burr and Tillis. We communicated the need for home and communitybased services in our communities and informed them that 8,000 individuals throughout North Carolina are waiting to receive these services. Finally, we explained the cost-effectiveness of investing in these programs as they can prevent or delay more costly long-term care placement for many individuals. For more information on the services provided through the Area Agencies on Aging or for more information on how to advocate for the needs of our older and disabled adults, please contact us! (828) 265-5434, press 2 for the Area Agency on Aging Department.

NC Area Agency on Aging staff with Senator Thom Tillis

Find us on Facebook!


ReCOGnition Newsletter | 17

Falls Prevention

Healthy Aging in the High Country According to the National Council on Aging, one in three people over 65 will fall each year, with 20 to 30% of those falls resulting in a serious injury ­‑ most typically a hip fracture or head injury. Of those hospitalized due to a fall-related hip injury, 40% never return home and 25% will die within one year. Fall-related injuries impose an enormous burden on individuals, society, and the nation’s healthcare system. Falls have a potential to affect us all, but through the important work of aging and injury prevention networks, falls can be prevented. As an effort to address this important public health issue, falls prevention initiatives are happening on the national, state, and regional levels ­­‑ typically through coalitions. On April 15, 2015 Area Agency on Aging staff Julie Wiggins and Nicole Hiegl attended the 2015 NC Falls Prevention Summit in Chapel Hill, NC. The Summit is sponsored by the North Carolina Falls Prevention Coalition and is held annually to bring regional coalitions together to discuss statewide data and initiatives, including the recently awarded Administration on Community Living Falls Prevention Grant. The state of North Carolina is following the leadership of the National Council on Aging Falls Free® Initiative with the implementation of the ACL Falls Prevention Grant by focusing on the goals of expanding the number of older adults and adults ith disabilities participating in evidence-based programs and increasing the sustainability of evidence-based programs. These goals will be met through the creation of an online falls prevention resource hub, expansion of specific evidence-based falls prevention programs in community settings, and focused fall prevention screenings with a referral to community-based resource components. In partnership with the North Carolina Falls Prevention Coalition, the High Country Falls Prevention Coalition will be focusing on the following strategies to address falls in our local communities: • Expand the evidence-based falls prevention programs A Matter of Balance, and Arthritis Foundation Tai Chi through community lay leader trainings. These classes focus on increasing confidence, cognitive awarness, balance, and strength • Expand falls prevention awareness and environmental modifications through community health fairs, home-based risk assessments, and partnerships with EMS and local fire departments • Expand falls risk screenings through partnerships with community agencies and providers • Include High Country falls prevention classes and community resources on the North Carolina Falls Prevention resource hub

To receive more information on falls, prevention efforts, or evidence-based health promotion classes contact Nicole Hiegl, Aging Services Coordinator, (828) 265-5434 x113 For more information on the North Carolina Falls Prevention Coalition Initiatives and Partnerships visit: https://sites.google.com/site/ncfallsprevention/home


18 | ReCOGnition Newsletter

NC Housing Finance Agency Programs Urgent Repair and Single Family Rehabilitation Programs Awarded

In April High Country Council of Governments (HCCOG) was awarded one Urgent Repair Program (URP) and three Single Family Rehabilitation (SFR) Programs from the North Carolina Housing Finance Agency (NCHFA). The URP award of $180,000 will assist low-income homeowners in Mitchell, Wilkes, and Yancey Counties by addressing housing conditions which post imminent threats to their life and safety. The program may also assist with handicapped accessibility modifications necessary to prevent displacement of elderly and disabled homeowners. Average repairs tend to run about $5,000 per home, with a program limit of $7,200. The SFR funds will assist low-income, elderly, and disabled homeowners in Wilkes, Ashe, and Mitchell Counties. The primary goal of the program provides funding for rehabilitation of moderately deteriorated homes to ultimately increase the home’s energy efficiency. The assistance is in the form of a no-interest, no payment secured loan which is forgiven at a rate of $3,000 per year. Loans may range from $5,000 to $45,000. NCHFA has awarded HCCOG $170,000 for each county. Currently HCCOG has a 2014 URP that covers Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, and Watauga Counties and three 2014 SFR Programs (for Alleghany, Avery, and Yancey Counties). HCCOG plans to submit a SFR application next year for Watauga County.

Roof Replacement (URP) - Before

Roof Replacement (URP) - After

Roof Replacement (URP) - Before

Roof Replacement (URP) - After


ReCOGnition Newsletter | 19

Town of North Wilkesboro ArcGIS Online App The Town of North Wilkesboro needed a cost-efficient and web-based solution for delivering their geospatial local government data to the public. The Town contracted with High Country COG GIS to develop an app using ESRI’s ArcGIS Online. ArcGIS Online is an innovative method to develop, customize, and share web-based maps and apps that are compatible with multiple devices including smartphones, tablets, and desktop computers. Now citizens, visitors, local government staff, elected officials, realtors and the business community can all access and interact with pertinent GIS data simultaneously in one application. North Wilkesboro’s App includes the following data layers: • Zoning • Flood Hazard Zones (100- and 500-year floodplain and floodways) • Contour Topographic Intervals • Town, ETJ, and Historic Downtown District Boundaries • Public Parks • Yadkin River Greenway and Trailheads • Roads • Stormwater System, Water System, and Sewer System • Wilkes County Parcels

To access North Wilkesboro’s app:

www.north-wilkesboro.com and click on the GIS Mapping Apps link under Popular Interest

Key Functionality includes: • Query Parcels by PIN or Parcel ID • Click to view attributes about any feature via pop-up boxes • Hyperlink to Town Zoning Ordinance PDFs and the Wilkes County Real Estate Tax website • Print your own map view • Toggle layers on/off to view different layers simultaneously • Choose a basemap background from imagery, street map, and topographic map • Get latitude and longitude coordinates • Zoom in/out to closely view infrastructure features on aerial orthoimagery


20 | ReCOGnition Newsletter

Avery County Comprehensive Transportation Plan In November of 2012 the North Carolina Department of Transportation, Avery County, the Avery County Comprehensive Transportation Plan Steering Committee, and the High Country Rural Planning Organization (RPO) initiated a study to cooperatively develop the Avery County Comprehensive Transportation Plan (CTP) which includes Banner Elk, Beech Mountain, Crossnore, Elk Park, Newland, Seven Devils, and Sugar Mountain. Modes of transportation evaluated as part of the plan include: highway, public transportation and rail, bicycle, and pedestrian.

2014 Avery County Comprehensive Transportation Plan

The CTP is a long-range multi-modal transportation plan that covers transportation needs through the year 2040. The Avery County CTP process involved analysis of the existing transportation system, anticipated growth areas and employment centers, as well as analysis of local land use plans in an effort to correlate with local plans and to identify transportation deficiencies. The Avery County CTP makes recommendations for long term transportation projects and can also be used to help justify transportation projects for the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The Avery County CTP documents recommendations for transportation improvements. The major recommendations for improvements for Avery County are as follows:

HIGHWAY

Cover photograph by Ed Evans

Avery Comprehensive Transportation Plan Cover

US 19E/NC 194, TIP No. R-2520: Widen to a multi-lane boulevard with bicycle accommodations from Mitchell County to US 221 (Linville Falls Highway). US 221, TIP No. R-2595/R-2596 & AVER0003-H: Widen to a multi-lane boulevard with bicycle accommodations from Burke County to NC 105 in Linville. US 321, TIP No. R-5016: Widen to a multi-lane expressway with bicycle accommodations from Watauga County to Tennessee. NC 105, TIP No. R-2566: Widen to a multi-lane facility with bicycle accommodations from US 221 to Watauga County. NC 184 (Tynecastle Highway), TIP Project R-2811: Widen to a four lane boulevard with bicycle and pedestrian accommodations from NC 105 to Banner Creek Road (SR 1341).


ReCOGnition Newsletter | 21

NC 184, AVER0001-H: Construct a two-lane major thoroughfare with 12-foot lanes and bicycle accommodations on new location from NC 184 (Tynecastle Highway), near Banner Creek Road (SR 1341), to the intersection of NC 194 (Banner Elk Highway) and Elkview Place. NC 194 Alternate, AVER0002-H: Construct a two-lane major thoroughfare with 12-foot lanes and bicycle accommodations, partially on new location in western Newland, from NC 194 at Old Cranberry Street to NC 194 at Old Public Road.

BICYCLE/PEDESTRIAN

New State Bike Routes: The NCDOT 2013 WalkBikeNC Plan recommends the new NC Bike Route 11 (the “Mountain Route”) and new Tennessee Connector Route in Avery County. The plan also recommends the rerouting of NC Bike Route 2. The recommendations from the plan are route designations that have already been implemented, though signage is not yet on the routes . The Avery County CTP was adopted by Avery County on October 6, 2014. The CTP was also adopted by all Avery County municipalities between October and December of 2014. The High Country RPO endorsed the Avery CTP on December 17, 2014 and the North Carolina Board of Transportation approved the CTP on January 8, 2015.

Endorsed by:

Adopted by: Avery County Date: October 6, 2014

High Country RPO Date: December 17, 2014

£ ¤ 321

Town of Banner Elk Date: October 13, 2014

Recommended by: Transportation Planning Branch Date: December 15, 2014

Town of Beech Mountain Date: October 14, 2014 Town of Crossnore Date: December 9, 2014

Beech Mountain

Notes:

There are no existing public transportation (fixed route) or rail features within the county, and the CTP does not include any recommended improvements for these modes.

Town of Elk Park Date: October 6, 2014

sse e Te nn e

Beech Mountain

" $ 184

194

Elk River (Mill Pond)

Elk Park

r oa g in C re ek

No rth

R

To eR

ive

r

19E

ve r

184

Ri

" $ 194

19E

ga au

Sugar Mountain

Ri

r ve

at W

105

n

Grandfather Mountain

Grandfather Village

£ ¤ 221

Newland

£ ¤

n

nn £ ¤

Seven Devils

" $ 221

" $ 181

River

£ ¤

Cranberry Creek

n

" $

n To e

Roan Mountain

n

Linvil le

n

194

Banner Elk

No rth

NCDOT Date: January 8, 2015

o

" $

ty un

£ ¤

Village of Sugar Mountain Date: October 28, 2014

Co

" $

19E

a ug

Town of Seven Devils Date: November 12, 2014

Yellow Mountain

Elk River

ata W

Town of Newland Date: October 7, 2014

£ ¤ 221

M

W ils on


22 | ReCOGnition Newsletter

Source Water Protection Awards Town of Wilkesboro One of Eight Recipients

The Town of Wilkesboro was one of eight recipients of the NC Source Water Collaborative’s Source Water Protection Awards. The Awards Program recognizes projects that demonstrate innovative and collaborative solutions to protect North Carolina’s drinking water and the watersheds that support it. The NC Source Water Collaborative is a partnership to protect drinking water. Founded in December 2011, the NC Source Water Collaborative includes participants from nonprofit organizations, university programs, state, local, and federal agencies, professional associations, and regional councils of government. The Collaborative’s intent is to develop and support strategies designed to preserve the lakes, streams, rivers, and aquifers used for drinking water and the land that protects and recharges these sources of water.

Cub Creek

The Town of Wilkesboro’s Cub Creek Stream Restoration and Stormwater Mitigation project was selected for an award in the Surface Water Implementation category. The project was completed in phases between 2007 and 2012.

Cub Creek Wetland

Cub Creek was a problem for Cub Creek Park due to flooding caused by stormwater, and unsightly streambank erosion. In an effort to halt the erosion and improve park aesthetics, the Town of Wilkesboro obtained funding to restore a 3,000 linear-foot stream section. Additional phases have since been implemented for a total of 7,500 linear feet of stream restoration and sedimentation abatement to date. More phases—totaling approximately 3,800 linear feet—are planned. Various stream restoration methods have been used including channel realignment, repairing vegetation plantings, floodplain establishment, and in-stream structures. By preventing erosion and/or trapping sediment, each method reduces the stream’s sediment load; thereby improving source water quality.

In addition to repairing the damaged streambanks, addressing the cause of the flooding and erosion has been a vital aspect of this project. Two wetlands were constructed to receive stormwater flow from the Cub Creek watershed. Because the wetlands release the stormwater into the creek slowly, the streamflow volume does not reach levels that would cause bank erosion. Materials detrimental to source water quality—such as metals, nutrients, and fecal coliform bacteria—are filtered out by the wetlands before the stormwater reaches the creek. For example, studies show that stormwater wetlands can remove 40-55% of nitrogen and phosphorous.


ReCOGnition Newsletter | 23

NCWorks Youth Services Snapshots From Across the Region

• Collaborative Effort of NCWorks Career Center Youth Services, Mountain Heritage High School, Mayland Community College, Altec Industries, and New Buck Corporation. Approximately 160 sophomore students participated and the day included tours of Altec Industries and New Buck Corporation; workshop on soft skills, local labor market, and appropriate use of social media; and a tour of Mayland Community College Yancey Campus including the new Anspach Advanced Manufacturing School. • NCWorks Registration Workshop with 60 Avery High juniors and one upcoming junior for Mitchell High. • Second Annual Grade 8 Project in Avery County – all Avery County 8th graders participated in interactive sessions to get them thinking about importance of long-term education and career decisions. Local businesses participated with school and workforce development staff. • Youth customer workshop on interviewing skills – participants will contact interviewer (local businesses are helping out) who will score them on how they do in the interview. The score will be reviewed with their case manager. Participants will earn an interview outfit for taking part in the workshop. • Youth participants from Alleghany, Ashe, and Wilkes counties participated in a leadership-building day at Camp Harrison in Boomer, NC. Everyone participated in low ropes, high ropes, team building, and zip lining activities. • Upcoming workshop by the ASU Center for Entrepreneurship (for youth participants and the general public) at the Alleghany County Library about the basics of starting your own business. • Representatives from all seven counties (local school systems, Board and Youth Council members, and service providers) participated in a Career Pathways event hosted by the HCWDB in Boone that was a morning filled with best practices and networking. • Youth participants in Watauga are planning a community service Spring Cleanup in June. The youth program has adopted a portion of Winkler’s Creek in Boone, and every year they get together to pick trash and junk out of the waterway and its banks.

Youth participants from Alleghany, Ashe, and Wilkes Counties at Camp Harrison in Boomer, NC

Mountain Heritage High School sophomores on manufacturing tour in March


24 | ReCOGnition Newsletter

NC Lead Prosperity Zone Data Book The North Carolina Labor & Economic Analysis Division (LEAD) recently published data books profiling the economies of each North Carolina Prosperity Zone. Data and analysis can be found on population growth; labor force and employment changes; unemployment; industry and wage data; and education. The statewide analysis compares the eight (8) zones; however, there are also individual data books on each zone. The data books cover years 2008-2013 (the latest full year for which data is available for all indicators in the data books) and will be updated periodically as new data becomes available. The High Country WDB, Western Piedmont WDB, and part of the Region C WDB make up the Northwest Zone: • Counties: Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Burke, Caldwell, Catawba, McDowell, Mitchell, Watauga, Wilkes, and Yancey • Metropolitan Statistical Areas (core urban area of 50,000 or more population): Hickory-Morganton • Micropolitan Statistical Areas (core urban area of at least 10,000 but less than 50,000 population): Boone, Marion, North Wilkesboro Some highlights from the statewide summary relating to the Northwest Region: • Population growth in the Northwest Region was the slowest of the state (6.2%). • The Northwest Region was the only region with a decreasing labor force (-9.0%) since 2001. • The Northwest Region was one of only two zones (with the Western Zone) that did not see average wage increases between 2008 and 2013. • The Northwest Region was one of only two zones (with Piedmont-Triad) that were far below their pre-recession levels of employment by the end of 2013. • The Northwest Region has the highest concentration of Manufacturing: 27% of private sector employment vs. 14% in the state as a whole. • High school graduation rates and community college enrollments are up statewide.


Email: Ryan Nance Email: ryan.nance@edpnc.com

Mobile: 910-733-9611

Mobile: Regional Industry Manager:

Email: andy.dulin@edpnc.com

Vacant

Regional Industry Manager:

Southeast

Email: tim.ivey@edpnc.com

Mobile: 252-799-6720

Tim Ivey

Regional Industry Manager:

Northeast

Sandhills (South Central)

Andy T. Dulin

Email: bill.payne@edpnc.com

Email: harry.swendsen@edpnc.com

Mobile: 919-703-5369

Harry Swendsen

Regional Industry Manager:

North Central

Mobile: 704-591-5229

Southwest Regional Industry Manager:

Mobile: 828-707-4709

Email: tracy.dellinger@edpnc.com

Mobile: 336-214-7283

Tracy Dellinger

Bill Payne

Regional Industry Manager:

Western

Email: bill.slagle@edpnc.com

Mobile: 828-592-1029

Bill Slagle

Regional Industry Manager:

Northwest

Regional Industry Manager:

Piedmont-Triad

(as of May 5, 2015)

North Carolina Prosperity Zones

ReCOGnition Newsletter | 25


26 | ReCOGnition Newsletter

GE Aviation, West Jefferson Rotating Parts Facility NCWorks Uses a Team Approach to Recruiting, Screening, and Training When the GE Aviation facility in West Jefferson, North Carolina announced an expansion of more than $150 million it wasn’t the thousands of tons of concrete needed to build the building or the multi-million dollar equipment or even the deadlines to their network of global partners that kept them up at night. They were concerned about finding and training the right workers for the 105 new jobs. NCWorks brought together a team from the NCWorks Career Center, Wilkes Community College, the High Country Workforce Development Board, the Ashe County Chamber of Commerce, and Ashe County Economic Development to help. “Every member of the team offered services to help recruit talent, develop trainings, and outreach to the GE Aviation Employee community,” said Adrian Tait, Director of the High Country Workforce Development Board. “By combining the strengths of this team we were able to deliver a complete package of services to connect GE Aviation with the talent they needed.” “NCWorks has done a lot of great things for us. They came on site with us, sat in strategy meetings, and helped us decide how we were going to go after the workforce and how to be most effective,” describes Kory Wilcox, GE Aviation Human Resource Lead. To meet GE Aviation’s need, a multi-step application screening process was used beginning with a dedicated microsite on NCWorks.gov, an online application and skills assessment, pre-employment training, and in-depth new hire training. Then the High Country Workforce Development Board implemented a multi-faceted marketing strategy that included a direct mailing to workers dislocated from other area manufacturers, newspaper and web advertising, local television and radio spots, and social media outreach. In addition, area NCWorks Career Centers provided personal outreach to job seekers, one-on-one assistance with applications and resumes, and hosted online skill assessments. “The Career Center is very important to GE,” said Wilcox. “They cut down on our administrative burden by streamlining the screening and application process.” The Human Resource Development program at Wilkes Community College held preparation workshops for candidates with tips on interviewing and insight into today’s manufacturing careers. The NCWorks Customized Training program developed a comprehensive pre and post hire training series and leveraging funding from Golden Leaf a training center was set up providing the right environment to prepare new employees. “We knew that manufacturers like GE Aviation needed a facility for hands-on CNC training,” said Ginger Shaffer, Director of Workforce Development at Wilkes Community College. “This is a great example of how we can respond to the needs of employers.” Within a few months after the initial convening of GE Aviation and NCWorks, Wilkes Community College hosted a successful hiring event where almost 300 candidates were able to complete applications, speak with GE employees, and learn more about NCWorks. GE Aviation has been pleased with the results. “I highly recommend the NCWorks system to other employers,” stated Wilcox.


ReCOGnition Newsletter | 27

NEED TO ADVANCE YOUR CAREER?

Find training to increase your skills

Sparta (336) 372-9675 Jefferson (336) 982-5627 Newland (828) 737-5419 Spruce Pine (828) 766-1175 Boone (828) 265-5385 Wilkesboro (336) 838-5164 Burnsville (828) 682-6618


Meeting Schedule

High Country Council of Governments Executive Board Meeting :: 7:00 pm 3rd Monday of the Month. No meetings Jan. or Sept.

Mickey Duvall, mduvall@regiond.org, x.126 Tanna Greathouse, tgreathouse@regiond.org, x.101

Area Agency on Aging Regional Advisory Council on Aging Meets on a Quarterly Basis

Julie Wiggins, jwiggins@regiond.org, x.122

AAA Provider Meeting Meets on a Quarterly Basis

Julie Wiggins, jwiggins@regiond.org, x.122

AAA Quarterly Training :: 1:00 – 4:00 pm Training Dates Advertised

Julie Wiggins, jwiggins@regiond.org, x.122 Laura Jane Ward, ljward@regiond.org, x. 126 Brenda Reece, breece@regiond.org, x. 128

Workforce Development Workforce Development Board :: 3:00 pm 2nd Thursday, Quarterly (Sept., Dec., Mar., Jun.)

Adrian Tait, adrian.tait@highcountrywdb.com, x.130

Planning and Development RPO Rural Transportation Advisory Committee :: 2:00 pm 3rd Wednesday, Quarterly (Feb., May, Aug., Dec.)

Phil Trew, ptrew@regiond.org, x.121 David Graham, dgraham@regiond.org, x.135

RPO Rural Transportation Coordinating Committee :: 10:00 am 3rd Wednesday, Quarterly (Feb., May, Aug., Nov.)

Phil Trew, ptrew@regiond.org, x.121 David Graham, dgraham@regiond.org, x.135

Region D Development Corporation Meets Annually (usually in August) and as needed

Phil Trew, ptrew@regiond.org, x. 121

Recognition June 2015  

High Country Council of Governments Newsletter

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