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STORYTELLING

Toolkit

A How-To Guide for #StoriesAcrossBorders

tangledroutes.org


Tangled Routes is an international project to recognize and share the diverse stories of people whose lives have been shaped by migration in the 21st century. In these pages, you’ll find guidance for migrants, refugees and asylum-seekers to help craft and share stories. Visit us online at tangledroutes.org

Berenice’s Story

For the past 14 years, I have lived in five different countries so I am an immigrant by heart. I have a Bachelor’s from Columbia University and a double master’s degree from two European Universities. To many, I’m living a privileged lifestyle full of fun traveling and adventure, but what most people ignore is that this life has come with many sacrifices.

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co ntents 1 Background on Tangled Routes ...........................................4 2 Introduction.................................................................................4 a Purpose: What is this toolkit about? ........................................4 b Audience: Who is this toolkit for?..............................................5 c Lexicon: The power of words....................................................5 3 An Overview of Storytelling ...................................................7 a What is storytelling?....................................................................7 b Why should migrants and refugees share their stories?.......7 c What’s your story?.......................................................................7 d Storytelling formats....................................................................8 e Ethical storytelling ......................................................................9 4 Workshop Design .........................................................................9 a Pre-workshop checklist..............................................................9 b Workshop plan......................................................................... 10 c Workshop wrap-up.................................................................. 15 5 Appendix........................................................................................ 16 1 A storyteller’s bill of rights....................................................... 16 2 Informed consent form........................................................... 17 3 Meet the Tangled Routes team.............................................. 18

Joyce mimes a story of escaping through the jungle at Tangled Routes first #SoiréeStorytelling with Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS) in Paris

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1 | B ackgro und o n TAN G LED ROUTE S The thrust behind Tangled Routes is the stories that need to be told. From family separation across the US-Mexico border to deaths in the Mediterranean Sea, migration is a contentious topic in contemporary politics. Across countries and regions, the stories told about migrants in the mainstream media are, at best, incomplete and fragmentary, and, at worst, vitriolic and incendiary. The rhetoric surrounding migration often deepens divides, ignites hostilities, and entrenches conflict. However, the voices of migrants themselves are rarely frontlined. Tangled Routes is an international project to facilitate the sharing of stories by people who move across borders in the 21st century. In Istanbul, Paris, London, and Boston, the TR team hosts workshops to support migrants, asylum-seekers, and refugees during the process of developing and finessing their story. Via social media, TR offers a crowdsourcing platform to encourage migrants, asylum-seekers, and refugees from other regions to also share. In harnessing the power of storytelling from migrant communities worldwide, Tangled Routes aims to humanize today’s discussion on migration and bridge policy with the lived experiences of migrants, asylum-seekers and refugees present in our everyday lives. Tangled Routes proposes three prompts: I have, I am, and I will. A story can be as simple as completing the sentence: I have run three marathons. Or they can begin with a prompt sentence and create a longer story through prose, poetry, song, video, or whatever medium they like best. Migrants, asylum-seekers and refugees can submit their story in their preferred language. Tangled Routes publishes both the original and an English translation. You can submit and enjoy stories at: Website: www.tangledroutes.org Facebook: www.facebook.com/tangledroutes Instagram: @t_routes Twitter: @t_routes Contact email: info@tangledroutes.org If you organise a workshop, we encourage you to submit participants’ final stories so they can be featured on the Tangled Routes platform. We also welcome pictures from the workshop and feedback on your workshop’s activities, challenges, and successes. While your submissions and feedback are invited, please note that they are not required. The toolkit’s main aim is to empower the storyteller that lives inside us all, migrant or not.

2 | In tro ducti o n a — Purpose: What is this toolkit?

The Tangled Routes toolkit aims to guide community leaders that would like to host a storytelling workshop. This toolkit focuses on storytelling philosophy and activities and comprises: An introduction to storytelling techniques and formats

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An overview of storytelling workshop activities

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How-to guide for individual migrants who want to share a story but may not have the opportunity to host or participate in a workshop.

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Husnia shares her story prompt at Tangled Routes Workshop

b — Audience: Who is this toolkit for?

Organizers, Trainers, Teachers, Storytellers, Writers, Community-Builders, YOU! This toolkit is aimed at anyone interested in learning how to organize a workshop to help documented and undocumented migrants, refugees, or diasporic communities share their stories. So if you’re a teacher, a community leader, a student, an activist, a migrant leader or someone hoping to help migrants and refugees share their stories, keep reading! c — Lexicon: The power of words

What do we mean by “migrant”? What is the difference between a migrant and a refugee? migrant: 1. One that moves from one region to another by chance, instinct, or plan. 2. An itinerant worker who travels from one area to another in search of work (American Heritage Dictionary definition) = International migration is an act by individuals who decide to voluntarily leave their countries for various reasons. refugee: One who flees in search of refuge, as in times of war, political oppression, or religious persecution (American Heritage Dictionary definition) = The 1951 Geneva Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees describes a refugee as any person “owing to well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country”.

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News coverage tends to use migrant, asylum-seeker, and refugee interchangeably. However, terminology plays a critical role in shaping our perceptions, attitudes, and behaviours. According to Metin Corabatir, president of the Ankara-based Research Centre on Asylum and Migration, Calling those who flee from persecution, inhumane treatment, torture, violence and war as “migrants” may have irreparable consequences on government policies and the lives of thousands of actual refugees. 1 As such, the reason for leaving one’s country is considered as the main factor for distinguishing refugees from migrants. However, we must keep in mind that, in many cases, migrants lack realistic alternatives to escape extreme poverty or to build a more dignified life in the future. Whether they enter with proper documents or not, whether they are refugees or economic migrants, those who cross borders are people, and their stories matter.

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http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2015/08/refugees-terminology-matters-150831091756282.html

Tangled Roots versus Tangled Routes

We have chosen to name this project Tangled Routes to show that people are not only influenced by where they come from but also by the journeys they have undertaken. The roots/routes distinction stems from the academic fields of anthropology and sociology. Roots relate to emotional bonds with the physical environment but often also contain notions of local community, shared culture, and so forth. The relationship between place, people, and culture may also be thought of in terms of routes. Rather than focusing on the local anchorage of peoples and cultures, it focuses on their mobility, their movements, encounters, exchanges, and mixtures. In Clifford’s account, roots and routes are not necessarily opposed but rather “intertwined”. Tangled Routes draws its name from Nailah Baniti’s poem Tangled Roots.

TANGLED ROOTS

Hunting for treasures I stumbled on truth buried treasures my ancient roots calling all siblings connecting the roots borders are illusions distracting the truth Mexicans are Americans they’ve been cut from the truth native flowers chopped from their roots tangled weeds untangled truth different routes to the same root You and I the same truth distant relatives from the same root

6Copyright © Nailah Baniti | 2015


3 | An o verview o f S t o r yt e lli n g a — What is storytelling?

According to the National Storytelling Network of Canada2 , storytelling is the interactive art of using words and actions to reveal the elements and images of a story while encouraging the listener’s imagination. Storytelling is about putting ideas into the world. Your individual story could be invaluable to someone and to yourself. Each of us has a story to tell and each of us has a story that can move others to action. Storytelling is a powerful way to connect to other people and help them see what you see! Storytelling involves a two-way interaction between a storyteller and one or more listeners. It can take different forms: a story can be told through written or oral words, but also images. b — Why should migrants and refugees share their stories?

Sharing a story has benefits both for you and the community. Your individual story could inspire someone else. Empower yourself: Storytelling can help you find your voice, have fun and create something new

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Change the narrative: Raise awareness about the situation of migrants and refugees today

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Change hearts and minds: Help people around you understand better your journey and your experiences

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c — What’s your story?

To tell help your story, you can begin by understanding some key elements of storytelling: Point of View: What is the main point of the story and what your perspective?

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Theme: Before you start writing, consider what the main point of your story is. What is the theme you want to get across?

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Paint a picture: Paint a picture that keeps the viewer’s attention and offers a visual introduction to your story. You can use the following three-part storybit framework to incorporate a story of past, present and future:

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Story of PAST: I have… Example: I have traveled through the desert.

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Example: I have lived through a war.

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Story of PRESENT: I am... Example: I am a sister, a mother, a daughter.

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Example: I am not willing to let others define me.

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Story of FUTURE: I will... Example: I will graduate with a degree next year.

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Example: I will overcome the barriers I face.

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Emotional Content: Serious issues that come alive in a personal and powerful way and connects the audience to the story.

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Authenticity: Stay true to your lived experience and audiences will respond to that authenticity with enthusiasm and passion.

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http://www.storynet.org/resources/whatisstorytelling.html

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Storytelling via mock interviews with members of JRS France

Plot3: A plot begins with an unexpected challenge that confronts a character with an urgent need to pay attention, to make a choice, a choice for which s/he is unprepared. The choice yields an outcome – and the outcome teaches a moral.

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Because we can empathetically identify with the character, we can “feel” the moral. We not only hear “about” someone’s courage; we can also be inspired by it. The story of the character and their effort to make choices encourages listeners to think about their own values, and challenges, and inspires them with new ways of thinking about how to make choices in their own lives. d — Storytelling formats

Tangled Routes is open to different types of storytelling formats. Autobiography

a written account of the life of a person written by that person. In other words, it is the story that a person wrote about themselves. A shorter version of an autobiography is a monologue.

Visual storytelling We’ve all heard that “a picture is worth a thousand words” many times: Powerful pictures evoke emotions, and drive a deep engagement. Great resource here: https://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/07/31/visual-storytelling/ Works of art

include any work regarded as art in its widest sense. However, in practice, these terms tend to apply principally to portable forms of visual art, such as sculptures, a painting, an installation.

Poetry

a form of literature that uses the rhythmic qualities of language to evoke meanings. Verses do not have to rhyme!

Digital storytelling a short form of digital media production that allows everyday people to share aspects of their life story. It can be a video or audio only. 3

The 3 Elements of Public Narrative Structure, Originally adapted from the works of Marshall Ganz, Harvard University.

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e — Ethical storytelling: the bill of rights

There are ethical, legal, and personal barriers specific to migrant populations in storytelling. Some migrants may not want their families back home to know about their living conditions abroad. Others may fear surveillance from their home country’s government. Still others may have lived through traumatizing experiences before, during, or even after their journey. There are several options for presenting stories in a way migrants feel safe: Change names of people and places

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Do not include names

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Ensure no data is embedded in digital media that is uploaded (photos, voice recordings, and videos usually have time, date, and sometimes location)

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Take pictures of a person’s back or hands instead of the face

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In oral presentations, have someone else read their story to avoid voice recognition

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To promote a fully empowering workshop experience, we have included a “Bill of Rights” in Appendix 1. Please share these rights with your workshop participants at the beginning of the workshop. Remember, this is not about extracting a story from someone, but to support them along the empowering journey of storytelling.

4 | Wo rksho p Desig n a — Pre-workshop Checklist

Planning your first storytelling workshop can be daunting: Whom should you invite? Which activities will engage your participants? What types of stories will be told? What final products will result from your workshop? To help you along, we’ve made a go-to checklist to assess the needs and resources of your storytelling community. Who is participating? When designing a workshop, you must keep in mind your target audience. A workshop for young, male asylum-seekers will differ dramatically in content and style from a workshop for middle-aged refugee women. Before selecting your workshop activities, you should have a basic overview of who will be participating. Ideally, you are hosting a workshop for a community that you know well as people are usually more comfortable sharing stories with family, friends, and acquaintances. How many participants?

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Age?

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Gender?

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Do you want an open event or a selective participant group (i.e. only women? only youth? only Afghans?)

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What’s their comfort level? Once you identify your workshop’s target audience, you should assess their comfort level with interactive group workshops. If participants already know each other well, less time is needed with get-to-know-you activities that help build trust. If participants regularly attend meetings and other group events, they are likely more at ease speaking publicly and trying new activities. Understanding your community’s comfort level for participating in a group project will help you plan appropriate activities and the workshop pace. How well do participants know each other?

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How often do they participate in meetings, community events, or group workshops?

Are they comfortable participating in mixed gender events?

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Are they comfortable sharing personal stories in a closed group? With people they don’t know?

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What are their languages? To share stories, it is essential to find a common language. Some workshop groups may be multilingual with participants from different countries and regions. In some workshops, there may be a common language: a language from a shared region or country of origin; the language of the host country; or perhaps English. Choosing the right language(s) for your workshop will determine how confident participants are expressing themselves and how well they understand each other. It will also impact whether the stories will be transmitted orally or in written form, depending on their level of literacy in the chosen language(s). n

Mother tongue?

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Level of English?

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Level of your home country’s (or region’s) language?

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Need for translators?

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Writing capabilities in these languages?

What media will you use? Stories can be written, recorded, photographed, sung, danced, sculpted, and more. At Tangled Routes, we encourage you to support migrants to tell their story in the format of their choice. That said, we realize that each storytelling format requires certain equipment and expertise. When choosing the media to be used in your workshop, keep in mind the following general questions: What equipment do you or your host organization have? What equipment do the participants have or have easy access to?

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Which media are you comfortable using? Which media are the participants comfortable using?

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Which media are you and the participants interested in learning more about?

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What resources do you have in your community to help you learn new media techniques? (i.e. local professional? NGOs? Schools?)

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Who is your target audience for the stories? What media format would appeal most to them?

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b — Workshop Plan

After you’ve completed your pre-workshop checklist, you should have a better understanding of the community you’re working with and what type of storytelling will most interest them. Now it’s time to plan your workshop activities. In this section, we will first present introductory information that should be given to all workshop participants. Second, we provide an activity box with numerous ideas for engaging your workshop participants. i Introduction Materials It is important that all participants understand the purpose of your storytelling workshop. For this, we recommend that you review the previous sections on “Why share your story”, “Ethical storytelling”, and “What is storytelling”. The essential topics to present to your workshop attendees include: What is storytelling? Here, we recommend showing participants examples of impactful storytelling (2-3 written stories or videos). We have also included several options in the Activity Box to help the group brainstorm their own examples of good storytelling (see “The best storyteller” and “Two truths & a lie”).

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Why is it important to tell your story?

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What are the ground rules for respectful storytelling? Present the Storyteller’s Bill of Rights (Annex A) and ask the participants to sign a consent form.

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What are the desired outcomes of this workshop? Clearly describe the end product so that participants know what they are working towards. Ideally, you can help define this final storytelling product in consultation with your workshop participants.

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While these introductory details should be discussed at all workshops, it is up to you to decide when and how to integrate them. In the next section, we provide activity ideas for storytelling workshops. If your workshop participants are a more formal group, you may wish to begin your workshop with a straight-forward presentation of the introductory materials. If the group is more dynamic, you may choose to begin with get-to-know-you activities before bringing up the introductory principles. ii Activity Box We’re sharing some of our favorite activities for storytelling workshops. We put numbers on these activities for the sake of making things look neat, but there’s actually no required sequence. You should feel free to mix & match! I HAVE, I AM, I WILL This is the core activity for any Tangled Routes-affiliated workshop. We are grounded in the principle that everyone has a story to tell – be they memories from our past, what’s happening to us now, or our dreams for the future. Building upon these universal themes, we propose three prompts: I have, I am, and I will. A story can be a simple as completing the sentence: I have run three marathons. Or they can begin with a prompt sentence and create a longer story. Goal: Encourage participants to think about the stories that they can share from their past, present, and future.

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How: The framework of “I have, I am, I will” can be integrated into activities as you see fit. For example:

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In the introductory activity “Same-same”, ask people to share something about themselves focused on the past (e.g., “I have visited New York” or “I have seen all seven Star Wars movies”); the present (e.g., “I am someone who loves to be in nature” or “I am very worried about climate change”); or the future (e.g., “I will travel the world” or “I will find the love of my life some day soon”). Similarly, you can choose to focus “Two truths & a lie” on stories from the past, present, or future. For a writing activity, ask all participants to write three sentences: one beginning with “I have…”; one beginning with “I am…”; and one beginning with “I will…”. While the format is simple, you’ll be surprised at the variety of answers that people find! These sentences can later be elaborated into longer stories or can be synthesized into a storybit. They may also lend themselves to some great photo-story opportunities or a script for a video-story.

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GET TO KNOW YOUR STORYTELLERS

Activity #1 — Same-same Goal

Learn each other’s names and start to find things you have in common.

How

Form a circle. Start by saying your name and something about you (e.g., My favorite food is pizza). If others in the circle share the same thing, they raise their hand and everyone changes seats. Continue until all participants have introduced themselves.

Alternative Instead of saying something you like, use an adjective to describe how you are feeling or a personality trait. Activity #2 — Signature “move” Goal

Energize the group and learn each other’s name.

How

Everyone stands up. Start by saying your name and making a body movement, your own signature “move”. The others repeat your name and imitate your movement. Continue until all the participants have made a signature move.

Hint

If people have trouble thinking of a signature move, use the example of Michael Jackson’s moonwalk.

Alternative Once everyone has made a signature move, choreograph a short dance by combining everyone’s moves. Use this dance to re-energize the group between other activities or after coffee/tea pauses. Activity #3 — Mirror me Goal

Build trust between participants.

How

Ask participants to pair up and face each other. One person starts by doing or saying something and his/her partner must repeat exactly that: the movements, the sounds, the facial expressions, etc.). After two minutes, the partners switch roles.

Alternative Those pairs stick together throughout the workshop. They brainstorm together to get possible themes for the stories they want to tell using the help of a sheet with questions the facilitator provides. Activity #4

— My goal

Goal

Establish participants’ expectations for the workshops.

How

After introductions, the first participant says one goal he/she has for the workshop. Everyone who shares this goal can raise his/her hand. Repeat until all participants have shared a personal goal.

Alternative Instead of stating a goal, each participant can suggest a rule for the workshop participants to respect. This can help establish rules for a positive workshop environment. Activity #5

— Two truths and a lie

Goal

Build workshop participants’ sense of community and ease into storytelling.

How

Each participant is asked to tell two things that are true about him/herself and one thing that is untrue. The other participants then guess which of the three items is the lie.

Activity #6

— Find the common link

Goal

Build trust in the group and ease into storytelling via a group exploration.

How

When your group first meets, you might not know what you have in common. To help form the group, begin by asking the participants to find one thing they all have in common (i.e., they are all the oldest sibling, they all have children, they all love chocolate, etc.). Then ask the participants to create short stories about the thing they have in common.

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GET TO KNOW STORYTELLING

Activity #1

— The best storyteller

Goal

Build a personal connection with storytelling and identify elements of good storytelling.

How

Think of who you know that tells the best stories (i.e. a grandmother, aunt, friend, etc.). Describe this person to the group, recount your favorite story he/she tells, and explain why you like the story. Repeat until every participant has shared.

Alternative Ask each participant to tell his or her favorite childhood bedtime story. Activity #2

— Toy story

Goal

Encourage participants to use their imagination when telling stories.

How

Bring a handful of random objects to the workshop (e.g., stones, feathers, keys, small toys, flowers, etc.). Ask each participant to choose one object without thinking much about it and then find a partner. In pairs, they create a short story about their objects they have chosen. The partners can share this story with the entire group.

Hint

If participants have difficulties imagining the story behind an inanimate object, ask if they have seen the children’s movie “Toy Story”.

Alternative After the first pairs have created a story, ask the participants to find a new partner and to imagine a new story. Continue changing partners until everyone has created at least one story together. For an extra challenge, add a time limit (i.e., each pair has three minutes to create a story before they find a new partner). Activity #3

— VIP interview

Goal

Encourage participants to open up and feel comfortable speaking about their own experiences.

How

Ask participants to divide into pairs. One person will play the interviewer (like on a popular TV show or news broadcast); the other partner will be the VIP guest. For 5-10 minutes, the interviewer will ask the VIP guest questions (see the StoryCorps question list for ideas). Switch roles.

Alternative This activity can be completed in pairs or in a group. For the group format, there are two options. In option #1, one VIP can sit “center stage” and all workshop participants can ask questions. For option #2, one pair can do the interview in front of the rest of the group, like they were a talk-show host and his/her guest in front of their studio audience. Activity #4

— 5-sense memories

Goal

Help participants involve sensory details in their stories.

How

Ask participants to think of something that really happened to them, a memory that is easy to evoke, such as coming late for work, what they had for breakfast, shopping, or visiting a museum. Have them close their eyes, recall that memory, and play it a few times in their minds, each time trying to remember more details. Encourage them to use all five senses – sight, touch, hearing, smell and taste. Ask participants to find a partner and sit facing each other. Next have the participants choose a number (1 or 2), close their eyes, and recall their memory. After a few moments of concentration, call out “one” or “two” to announce who will tell their memory first. Repeat. Finally, ask the participants to return to the group and repeat their favorite sensory descriptions that they heard from their partner.

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Activity #5

— Media Conte

Goal

Encourage participants to use visual storytelling tools

How

Place an assortment of photographs on a table and ask each participant to choose one. With a partner, have the participants create a story together linking the photos they have chosen; here, post-it notes and a large paper can be useful to draw the links between the pictures and the story events.

Activity #6

— House of Cards

Goal

Help participants think of emotions that can lead to powerful stories.

How

Prepare small cards with things like “annoyances”, “my most memorable event”, “my treasure” written on them. Place one card on a large sheet of paper and write questions related to that theme. Have participants respond to that theme on post-it notes and attach their ideas on the large paper. After this brainstorming session, ask participants to develop a story using the post-it notes and theme cards that evoked the strongest memory or personal response for them.

Activity #7

— Story Maps

Goal

Create stories about migration -- whether everyday journeys or international voyages.

How

Use a world map to tell your personal story. Start with your birthplace, then move on to places you have lived, traveled to, or would like to visit.

Alternative Use a map of your city or neighborhood to tell a story about how you get to work or what you did last weekend. Activity #8

— Story circle

Goal

Build group cohesion by creating a story together.

How

Form a circle. One participant begins by sharing a the first sentence of a story. The next person in the circle continues the story by adding one sentence. The story continues until everyone has contributed a sentence.

Alternative For an extra challenge, each participant adds only one word or a short phrase instead of a full sentence. SHARE YOUR STORIES

Activity #1

— Take two

Goal

Have the participants consider the tone of their story to assess if it conveys the feelings they want to evoke in their audience.

How

Once a story is created, the participant shares his/her story with the group in the tone that he/she would naturally use. The other participants will give write down their impressions of this first reading (or give oral feedback): How did this story make them feel? Then the participant will present the story in a totally different tone (i.e. angry, sad, humorous, timid, etc.). The other participants will give feedback about how this new reading impacted them or their understanding of the story: Do they feel differently about the actions taken in the story? The characters? The conclusions?

Activity #2

— Questions unanswered

Goal

Help participants think of new aspects to develop in their story.

How

A participant tells his/her story. Afterwards, the other participants ask one questions each about a detail they wanted to learn more about during the story. For example, if the storyteller mentions he has a dog but does not describe the dog, another participant may ask “What’s your dog’s name? Is he big or small? What color is he? Where did you find him?”

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Presenting stories on the stage with JRS France

c — Workshop Wrap-Up

At the end of your workshop, it is important to give participants a sense of closure. To do so, you should ensure that all participants have had the opportunity to: Create a story they are proud of & can share with a wider public: At Tangled Routes, we believe that each migrant’s story is worth sharing. By the end of a workshop, participants should have a final story product that they can share with family, friends, or the wider community if they choose.

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Share their final story with the group: No participant will be forced to share his/her story with the group, but everyone should be invited to share if they want to. This final group sharing can be a closed event for workshop attendees only; a larger event that included the attendees’ family and friends; or a public performance or publication. Of course, Tangled Routes is happy to publish any final stories on our website and to share them via social media if the storyteller so desires.

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Provide feedback about their workshop experience: Participants will have valuable insights regarding the workshop activities that can help you in planning your next workshop. More importantly, they may have personal reflections about their experience during the storytelling process that they would like to share with the group. Some of the Activity Box ideas for introducing participants and setting goals can be adapted to evaluate the workshop (see “Same-same”, “My goal”, and “VIP interview”).

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appendix 1:

a storyteller’s bI LL O F R I G HTS

1. Right to know the purpose of the workshop. 2. Right to ask questions at any stage of the workshop. 3. Right to tell your story in the way and language you want. 4. Right to not reveal personal information to workshop participants or leaders. 5. Right to be respected and supported by workshop participants and leaders. 6. Right to decide how your story will be shared after the workshop. 7. Right to leave out personal details that identify you or others in your final story. 8. Right to view and retain a copy of your story before it is shared publicly. 9. Right to give and revoke consent for the publication of your story. 10. Right to stop participating in the workshop at any moment. Each sentence is a work of art during workshops with JRS France

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appendix 2:

In formed Co nsent F o r m

Before you participate in this workshop, please complete Section A and Section B. Once the workshop is over and you have been debriefed, you will be asked to initial the three statements in Section B, to indicate your agreement. Section A: Consent for the Workshop

I voluntarily give my consent to participate in this workshop as part of the Migrant Monologues Project. I have been informed about, and feel that I understand the basic nature of the project and the purpose of the workshop. I give my permission for the workshop to be audio-taped and for pictures to be taken, and I understand that all the pictures and the audio-tape may be made available on the project website. I understand that I may withdraw from the workshop at any time without prejudice, simply by saying that I no longer wish to participate. No content produced during the workshop will be shared without my consent.

Signature of Participant

Date

Email Address

Section B: Consent to share my story

I voluntarily allow the Migrant Monologues team to share the content I produced during the workshop. I understand that my willingness to share the story will not affect my right to attend and actively participate in the workshop. I understand that I may withdraw consent even after the content has been shared on the website and social media.

Signature of Participant

Date

Email Address Section C: Debriefing

Please initial each of the following statements when the workshop has finished and you have been debriefed. I have been adequately debriefed. Your initials: I was not forced to complete the workshop. Your initials: All my questions have been answered. Your initials:

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appendix 3:

Me e t the Team Elyse Leonard

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@Elyse_Leonard

A dual Irish-American citizen, Elyse is a native of Ohio, USA. She is currently pursuing a Master in Human Rights & Humanitarian Action at the Paris School of International Affairs (Sciences Po) with a focus in migration and project management. Though Elyse graduated with a Bachelor in Political Science from the University of Michigan, she originally began as a dance major and has more than 10 years of performing arts experience. Elyse has worked for Greenpeace Norway, the Fundación para la Justicia y el Estado Democrático de Derecho in Mexico, and Human Rights Watch. This patchwork quilt of experiences has inspired Elyse to search for multidisciplinary strategies to promote migrant rights. Elyse speaks English, Norwegian, Spanish, and French.

Pauline Vidal

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@PCF_Vidal

A French citizen, Pauline is currently pursuing a dual-degree Master’s in International Relations at the Paris School of International Affairs (Sciences Po) and the London School of Economics, focusing on migration issues and European affairs. She has interned for the United Nations Fund for Population in Tunisia and Amnesty International Malaysia. During her year abroad in Malaysia, she worked on the “Domestic Work is Work” campaign for Tenaganita WomenForce, a leading NGO that advocates for migrant rights in Malaysia. She was an Open Society Foundations grantee at the Migration Policy Institute in Washington, D.C. She is passionate about migrant rights, European integration, and the role of youth in local and international governance. Pauline speaks French and English.

Ayşe Gökçek

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@aysegokcek

Ayşe was born in Izmir, Turkey and is currently is working as a Peacebuilding Officer at the Association for Solidarity with Asylum-Seekers and Migrants (ASAM) in Istanbul. In addition, Ayşe is pursuing her Master’s degree in International Relations at Koç University, concentrating on the asylum policies of the Turkish Republic in response to different mass refugee flows in recent decades. After graduating, Ayşe worked as a research assistant at Koç University Migration Research Center from 2013 to 2014. In the summer of 2015, Ayşe worked as a Monitoring and Evaluation intern at Human Rights Watch in New York. Her interests revolve around forced displacement en masse, international refugee law, and immigration and integration policies and practices. Ayşe speaks Turkish and English.

Jennifer Angarita

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@JTAngarita

Born in Bogota, Colombia and raised in Dallas, Texas, Jennifer is currently is pursuing a Master in Policy from Harvard Kennedy School. In 2010, Jennifer graduated from Yale University with an honors degree in anthropology. At Yale, she organized students and community members to advocate for the passage of state- and federal-level DREAM Act legislation. Upon graduating from Yale, Jennifer served as the National Worker Center Coordinator for the AFL-CIO, advocating for worker populations that federal and state labor laws systematically exclude. As a first-generation immigrant, she is committed to expanding and defending the rights of marginalized communities. Jennifer speaks English and Spanish

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“St o r yt el l i n g i s a b o ut c onne c ti ng to othe r p e opl e and h el p i n g p eo p l e to se e wha t y ou se e . � Michael Margolis

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Workshop participants share memories and tea in a story circle.

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Tangled routes storytelling toolkit eng  
Tangled routes storytelling toolkit eng  
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