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insideVOGUE NOVEMBER 2016

MIND’S EYE Back page

“Fashion producer Sylvia Farago has so many crazy stories to tell and certainly doesn’t shy away from telling them” NATURAL SELECTION, PAGE 190

Regulars 42 EDITOR’S LETTER 50 VOGUE NOTICES Behind the scenes of the issue 58 VOGUE.CO.UK What’s online this month 153 CHECKLIST One can’t have enough cashmere, velvet or emeralds 249 STOCKISTS BACK PAGE MIND’S EYE Sofia Coppola is never without her Cartier watch and a roll of Kodak film

In Vogue 69 WHAT’S NEW The people, places, ideas and trends to watch now 77 SECRET SERVICE How Harrods brought its luxury ethos right to Sarah Harris’s front door

COVER LOOK Emily Blunt wears printed cady shirtdress with Swarovski-crystal belt, £2,400, Dolce & Gabbana. Get the look: make-up by YSL Beauté. Eyes: Couture Palette For Smokey Eyes in Tuxedo; Luxurious Mascara For False Lash Efect. Lips: Rouge Pur Couture Lipstick in Corail Poetique. Face: Fusion Ink Cushion Foundation. Hair by Redken: Pillow Proof Blow Dry Express Primer Treatment Cream; Wind Blown 05 Dry Finishing Spray. Hair: Dufy. Make-up: Tom Pecheux. Nails: Elle. Production: Moxie Productions. Digital artwork: Gloss. Fashion editor: Clare Richardson. Photographer: Josh Olins

Vogue Shops

Spy

87 WHAT TO BUY NOW Vogue staffers try the new knitwear and some gym-to-street styles for size

121 MILITARY ATTACHES Chanel’s fashion manoeuvres

View 107 FLYING SOLO Pixie Geldof ’s album is an assured – if haunting – debut, says Nell Frizzell 112 POWER PLANTS The root-and-branch revival of botanical design. By Hayley Maitland 115 CHANGE THE SUBJECT New exhibitions are celebrating an unsung hero of the art world – the sitter. By Hermione Eyre

123 COVER STORY SWAP SHOP Even the classics can get a new-season update, says Naomi Smart 132 EVERYONE’S WEARING… … velvet – for day 139 TRAVEL LOCAL AUTHORITIES Postcards from Amsterdam, Buenos Aires, Lagos and Tbilisi 149 REPORT THE WORLD IS NOT ENOUGH Exploring new frontiers – from a sitting room in south London. By Nicole Mowbray

>36 31


insideVOGUE “My first piece of Burberry was a vintage mac. I thought it was very cool” Phoebe Collings-James, artist HOUSE STYLE, PAGE 160

Fashion and features 160 HOUSE STYLE Designers opt for a chef, a playwright, a ballerina and a gallerist, among others, to model this season’s looks. Photographs by Paul Wetherell 180 COVER STORY “IT TOOK THREE HOURS OF HAIR AND MAKE-UP TO GET ME LOOKING THIS REAL!” Emily Blunt talks to Marisa Meltzer about starring in one of the most anticipated films of the year. Photographs by Josh Olins 190 NATURAL SELECTION The next wave of image-makers is taking a rather spontaneous approach to fashion photography, discovers Lou Stoppard 200 COVER STORY CLOSET HARMONY Seven professionals talk Fiona Golfar through all aspects of their daily attire. Photographed by Laura Coulson 206 TUNNEL VISION Meet the women revolutionising London’s transport system. Louise Carpenter goes underground with Crossrail. Photographs by Jason Bell

TUNNEL VISION Page 206

Beauty

210 A HEAD FOR HEIGHTS Bobs, crops or tumbling curls… which makes the cut among heads of industry and state, asks Nicola Moulton

231 COVER STORY THE NEW FACE OF BEAUTY: YOU The industry is taking a long, hard look at itself. By Nicola Moulton

216 THE LONG VIEW Rose van Cutsem’s country house in the Cotswolds embraces the future as well as the past. By Violet Henderson. Photographs by Kate Martin

239 GREEN PIECES Join the green party

222 COVER STORY ALTERED IMAGES “Whatever else I wear, I always wear a wheelchair…” Three women describe how a life-changing event forced them to reconsider their wardrobes. Photographs by Benjamin McMahon

SUBSCRIBE TO 36

241 BATHROOM CONFIDENTIAL Four women tell Lottie Winter about their morning routines 244 THE RADIANT WAY This season, it’s good to glow 246 TRUNK LINE Louis Vuitton’s new scents are well worth the detour, discovers Nicola Moulton

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Editor’s letter The genuine ARTICLE

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and take great pleasure in clothes should not be viewed as contradictory to working in professions that have nothing to do with fashion. Scientists, doctors, academics, teachers, politicians, accountants and others should be able to be seen to enjoy the vagaries of fashion and style. And not be thought the more frivolous for it. Now we have a prime minister who clearly enjoys thinking about how she dresses – and is not afraid to wear jazzy shoes, bright colours and clothes that draw attention rather than deflect it – there really is no excuse. >

Keeping it real: above, actress Emily Blunt, photographed by Josh Olins on page 180. Left: designers choose a subject to model their pieces – here, architectural historian Shumi Bose for Max Mara – in “House Style”, page 160

JOSH OLINS; PAUL WETHERELL

t

he idea for this Real Issue came to me in the spring. We were working on a feature about the Netflix series The Crown and were having problems getting hold of the clothes that we wanted to photograph the actors in. Part of the trouble was that because we weren’t shooting a conventional fashion story on models, we had poor access to samples from the fashion houses. This was not the first time that I had heard from a stylist, working on a story where clothes would be shot on people who were not models, that they were having difficulty getting the pieces they wanted. Nobody knows better than me the lustre that a great model can bring to pictures. These images play a huge part in making us all love fashion and wanting the clothes for ourselves, and models are not only beautiful but know how to work the clothes and project for photographers. The best models are creative artists themselves, their body being their raw material. But that should not be the only way fashion is seen. Fashion should be something that everybody – no matter their age, size, creed, profession – should be encouraged to enjoy. And it is just as exciting, and certainly as interesting, to see fashion worn by people who have nothing to do with the industry and whose daily lives are far removed from it. So… I thought that it would be interesting for us to put together an issue of the magazine where none of the fashion is shot on models and where we looked in various ways at the subject of what we wear through a more “real” filter. One of my hobby horses is that it is vital that a desire to look fashionable


EDITOR’S letter

But it’s not simple, and the combination of a newspaper commentariat – which is always keen to leap critically on a woman in the public eye who dresses even the slightest bit adventurously – alongside a professional culture that still encourages a conventional conformity, makes it hard for some women to dress the way they would really like to. This is not an environment that encourages young women who love playing with fashion and make-up to aspire to great careers outside of the celebrity arena. It’s changing, but change is slow. It’s been a great issue to work on, from “House Style” (page 160), where we asked leading fashion houses to nominate someone to model one of their autumn looks, to the nuts and bolts of what seven women wear from dawn till bedtime (“Closet Harmony”, page 200). Melanie Reid, who became a tetraplegic six years ago in a horseriding accident and who writes a wonderful weekly column for The Times Magazine on that subject, describes with wit and emotion what it means not to be able to engage in her appearance the way she previously did (“Altered Images”, page 222), and on page 231, Vogue’s beauty and health director Nicola Moulton explores the question of what is “real” anyway, when it comes to the business of beauty. Our cover star Emily Blunt is an actress who has made a reputation for herself portraying relatable women,

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and this month sees her appear in cinemas as the central character in The Girl on the Train – the domestic chiller that has dominated the bestseller lists for more than a year. In it she plays an Everywoman that none of us would want to be – a character far from any kind of idealised Hollywood heroine. Following on from its predecessor Gone Girl, this massive literary success follows the trend for putting deeply flawed women at the core of a story, which must say something (although I am not sure what) about what we enjoy reading at present. Emily gamely agreed to the Vogue shoot with Josh Olins (page 180) only a short time after giving birth to her second daughter, Violet. By the time you read this, the BBC documentary about British Vogue will have been screened. Allowing cameras to film inside the workings of the magazine, with no control over what the final programmes would show, was a strange and somewhat nerveracking experience and, of course, the magazine staff became television personalities for a few hours. So who better to include in this issue than some of them modelling in our wellpriced Vogue Shops section (page 87)? I don’t think any of them have plans to give up the jobs they are extremely good at to start careers as professional models, but it was a fun job-swap for a morning.

Tech-firm founder Sarah Wood, one of seven women revealing 24 hours in the life of their wardrobe (“Closet Harmony”, page 200)

BENJAMIN McMAHON; LAURA COULSON; LAURENCE ELLIS; COCO CAPITAN

Far left: journalist Melanie Reid in “Altered Images”, page 222. Left: Vogue’s Devina Sanghani models for Vogue Shops (page 87). Below: the photographers who champion a more spontaneous aesthetic, on page 190


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VOGUEnotices ALL ABOUT THIS MONTH’S ISSUE

THE THRILL OF THE CHASE This issue’s cover star Emily Blunt (page 180) takes a leading turn as the unpredictable, unreliable Rachel in the film adaptation of Paula Hawkins’s bestselling novel The Girl on the Train, in cinemas this month. Already read the original page-turner? Vogue picks three new thrillers guaranteed to grip. BEFORE THE FALL BY NOAH HAWLEY When a private jet goes down during a flight between Martha’s Vineyard and New York, all but two of its wealthy passengers die – but was the fatal crash truly an accident?

Wish FLITS Vogue tapped four writers native to far-flung cities for this issue’s special travel guide (“Local Authorities”, page 139), but which destinations are our resident experts hoping to visit?

THE CRIME WRITER BY JILL DAWSON A vividly imagined novel about what would have happened if crime writer Patricia Highsmith had enacted her dark fantasies in real life rather than on paper. BY GASLIGHT BY STEVEN PRICE American detective William Pinkerton pursues criminal Edward Shade through Victorian London’s underworld in this work inspired by Arthur Conan Doyle.

LIANA SATENSTEIN

“Odessa, to laze around the Black Sea with no mobile-phone service” FUNMI FETTO

“Cartagena in Colombia with its pastel-coloured walls and its grand colonial mansions”

Benjamin McMahon (right) travelled the length of Britain to photograph three very different women for “Altered Images”, on page 222. “It’s always a pleasure to shoot people whose job isn’t to be photographed,” he says, reflecting on his work in this Real Issue. “You can spend more time getting to know someone. My approach is pretty low-key. Usually me, a camera and a chat.”

MARIANA RAPOPORT

“Kyoto, for the Golden Pavilion and Arashiyama Bamboo Grove”

JANE SZITA

“Belgrade; the day-long train journey to Montenegro’s capital Podgorica is meant to be spectacular” 50

MAD FOR IT In “Natural Selection” (page 190), Lou Stoppard (left), editor of Nick Knight’s multimedia fashion website Show Studio, surveys the young photographers championing a new aesthetic. Stoppard is currently curating a photography exhibition (to open next year at Liverpool’s Open Eye Gallery) documenting the North’s influence on fashion – “from obsessions with Joy Division and Madchester bands to Peter Saville graphics”.

ALBERT WATSON; ALAMY; 4CORNERS IMAGES; GETTY; LAURA COULSON; LINA SCHEYNIUS

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VOGUE.co.uk GET AHEAD WITH WHAT’S HAPPENING ON VOGUE ONLINE

BEAUTY

Face off Make-up doesn’t have to be about artifice. This month, Vogue.co.uk’s beauty editor, Lisa Niven, will be considering how to complement rather than conceal, and profiling the products that aim to enhance instead of exaggerate.

PEOPLE & PARTIES

Good sports Vogue senior fashion assistant Florence Arnold (above) and fashion features editor Ellie Pithers donned activewear for this issue (page 87). They’ll be sharing their shopping lists for the season in our Vogue Shops section, alongside more fashion-team style edits.

OSCAR DE LA RENTA A/W ’16

STREETS AHEAD In honour of the Real Issue, our street-style photographer will be roaming the capital to capture what London’s women are really wearing. Discover how the city’s most stylish residents are adopting the new season’s key trends; be inspired by the workwear looks that caught our eye; and see how autumn’s key pieces are being integrated into real wardrobes.

Whatever your preferred social-media channel, be sure to get the latest news from Vogue first by following us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Google+ and Youtube. Just search for BRITISH VOGUE and MISS VOGUE and join the club.

58

ALASDAIR McLELLAN; LACHLAN BAILEY ALASTAIR NICOL; DARREN GERRISH

SHOPS

BEST IN SHOW As the month of s/s ’17 shows comes to an end, now is the time to reflect on the collections. Consider our new-season cheat sheet the only piece of fashion homework you’ll need for swotting up on key trends and sartorial talking points that will dominate your wardrobe next spring.

ERMANNO SCERVINO A/W ’16

Best-dressed lists typically feature a mix of Hollywood actresses, models and music superstars – an inevitably glamorous bunch whose sartorial prowess may be aspirational but often has little relevance to everyday dressing. This month, we’ll be looking to the real working women whose styles can also inspire.

ANTONIO BERARDI A/W ’16

Back to life, back to reality


HERMÈS BY NATURE


VOGUE the shoe

ALEXANDRA SHULMAN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF CREATIVE DIRECTOR JAIME PERLMAN DEPUTY EDITOR EMILY SHEFFIELD MANAGING EDITOR FRANCES BENTLEY FASHION DIRECTOR LUCINDA CHAMBERS EXECUTIVE FASHION DIRECTOR SERENA HOOD ACTING EXECUTIVE FASHION EDITOR LAURA INGHAM SENIOR CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITORS KATE PHELAN, JANE HOW FASHION EDITOR VERITY PARKER FASHION BOOKINGS EDITOR ROSIE VOGEL-EADES STYLE EDITOR NURA KHAN ACTING SITTINGS EDITOR JULIA BRENARD SENIOR FASHION ASSISTANT FLORENCE ARNOLD FASHION ASSISTANTS BEATRIZ DE COSSIO, KATIE FRANKLIN FASHION BOOKINGS ASSISTANT KATIE LOWE FASHION COORDINATOR POM OGILVY JEWELLERY EDITOR CAROL WOOLTON MERCHANDISE EDITOR HELEN HIBBIRD CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITORS FRANCESCA BURNS, BAY GARNETT, KATE MOSS, CLARE RICHARDSON FASHION FEATURES DIRECTOR SARAH HARRIS FASHION NEWS EDITOR JULIA HOBBS FASHION FEATURES EDITOR ELLIE PITHERS SHOPPING EDITOR NAOMI SMART BEAUTY & HEALTH DIRECTOR NICOLA MOULTON DEPUTY BEAUTY & HEALTH EDITOR LAUREN MURDOCH-SMITH ACTING DEPUTY BEAUTY & HEALTH EDITOR LOTTIE WINTER ACTING BEAUTY ASSISTANT FLORA MACDONALD JOHNSTON FEATURES EDITOR SUSIE RUSHTON ACTING FEATURES EDITOR NICOLE MOWBRAY EDITOR-AT-LARGE FIONA GOLFAR COMMISSIONING EDITOR VIOLET HENDERSON FEATURES ASSISTANT HAYLEY MAITLAND ACTING ART DIRECTOR PHILIPPA WILLIAMS ART EDITOR JANE HASSANALI DESIGNER EILIDH WILLIAMSON JUNIOR DESIGNER PHILIP JACKSON PICTURE EDITOR MICHAEL TROW ASSOCIATE PICTURE EDITOR CAI LUNN SENIOR PICTURE RESEARCHER BROOKE MACE ART COORDINATOR BEN EVANS TABLET & MOBILE PRODUCER LEE WALLWORK CHIEF SUB-EDITOR CLARE MURRAY DEPUTY CHIEF SUB-EDITOR HELEN BAIN SENIOR SUB-EDITOR VICTORIA WILLAN SUB-EDITORS STEPHEN PATIENCE, EMMA HUGHES SPECIAL EVENTS EDITOR SACHA FORBES PERSONAL ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR CHARLOTTE PEARSON EDITORIAL COORDINATOR ELIZABETH WHITE PARIS COORDINATOR SIGRID LARRIVOIRE

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EDITOR LUCY HUTCHINGS ASSOCIATE DIGITAL DIRECTOR EMILY SHEFFIELD CN DIGITAL HEAD OF PHOTO & PICTURE EDITOR GABY COVE NEWS EDITORS LAUREN MILLIGAN, SCARLETT CONLON ACTING NEWS EDITOR KATIE BERRINGTON BEAUTY EDITOR LISA NIVEN ENGAGEMENT MANAGER RACHEL EDWARDS DIGITAL EDITORIAL ASSISTANT NAOMI PIKE ACTING JUNIOR ASSISTANT TAMISON O’CONNOR CONTRIBUTING EDITORS LISA ARMSTRONG, CALGARY AVANSINO, LAURA BAILEY, ALEXA CHUNG, CHRISTA D’SOUZA, SOPHIE DAHL, TANIA FARES, NIGELLA LAWSON, ROBIN MUIR, CHARLOTTE SINCLAIR, PAUL SPIKE, NONA SUMMERS EDITORIAL BUSINESS MANAGER CAMILLA FITZ-PATRICK SYNDICATION ENQUIRIES EMAIL SYNDICATION@CONDENAST.CO.UK DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL ADMINISTRATION & RIGHTS HARRIET WILSON

Vogue is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (which regulates the UK’s magazine and newspaper industry). We abide by the Editors’ Code of Practice (www.ipso.co.uk/editors-code-of-practice) and are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think that we have not met those standards and want to make a complaint please see our Editorial Complaints Policy on the Contact Us page of our website or contact us at complaints@condenast.co.uk or by post to Complaints, Editorial Business Department, The Condé Nast Publications Ltd, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU. If we are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit www.ipso.co.uk


TRIPPIN’ OUT

STEPHEN QUINN PUBLISHING DIRECTOR ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER SALLIE BERKEREY ADVERTISEMENT DIRECTOR LUCY DELACHEROIS-DAY SENIOR ACCOUNT DIRECTOR SOPHIE MARKWICK ACTING SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER VICTORIA MORRIS ACCOUNT MANAGER MATILDA McLEAN DIGITAL ACCOUNT DIRECTOR CHARLOTTE HARLEY BUSINESS MANAGER JESSICA FIRMSTON-WILLIAMS PA TO THE PUBLISHING DIRECTOR DEVINA SANGHANI ADVERTISING ASSISTANT HONOR PHEYSEY FASHION ADVERTISEMENT DIRECTOR (EUROPE) SUSANNAH COE ACTING SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER (EUROPE) BEATRICE CRIPPA ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER US SHANNON TOLAR TCHKOTOUA US ACCOUNT MANAGER KERYN HOWARTH HEAD OF PARIS OFFICE HELENA KAWALEC ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER (FRANCE) FLORENT GARLASCO REGIONAL SALES DIRECTOR KAREN ALLGOOD REGIONAL ACCOUNT DIRECTOR HEATHER MITCHELL REGIONAL ACCOUNT MANAGER KRYSTINA GARNETT ACTING EXECUTIVE RETAIL EDITOR JO HOLLEY RETAIL PROMOTIONS EXECUTIVE CHARLOTTE SUTHERLAND-HAWES DEPUTY PROMOTIONS DIRECTOR POLLY WARRICK ACTING PROMOTIONS MANAGER JESS PURDUE PROMOTIONS ART DIRECTOR DORIT POLLARD PROMOTIONS ART DIRECTOR ABIGAIL VOLKS ACTING PROJECT MANAGER MAJA HAVEMANN CLASSIFIED DIRECTOR SHELAGH CROFTS CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER SARAH BARON SENIOR CLASSIFIED SALES EXECUTIVES/TRAINERS SARAH HAWKINS, OLIVIA OSBORNE ACTING SENIOR CLASSIFIED SALES EXECUTIVE/TRAINER KATHERINE WEEKES SENIOR CLASSIFIED SALES EXECUTIVE JENNA COLLISON CLASSIFIED SALES EXECUTIVES ALICE WINTERS, EMILY GOODWIN HEAD OF DIGITAL WIL HARRIS DIGITAL STRATEGY DIRECTOR DOLLY JONES DIRECTOR OF VIDEO CONTENT DANIELLE BENNISON-BROWN

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MARKETING DIRECTOR JEAN FAULKNER SENIOR RESEARCH MANAGER HEATHER BATTEN RESEARCH MANAGER THERESA DOMKE DEPUTY MARKETING AND RESEARCH DIRECTOR GARY READ ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, DIGITAL MARKETING SUSIE BROWN GROUP PROPERTY DIRECTOR FIONA FORSYTH CONDE NAST INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS NICKY EATON DEPUTY PUBLICITY DIRECTOR HARRIET ROBERTSON PUBLICITY MANAGER MELODY RAYNER ACTING PUBLICITY MANAGER RICHARD PICKARD CIRCULATION DIRECTOR RICHARD KINGERLEE NEWSTRADE CIRCULATION MANAGER ELLIOTT SPAULDING NEWSTRADE PROMOTIONS MANAGER ANNA PETTINGER SUBSCRIPTIONS DIRECTOR PATRICK FOILLERET DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER SHEENA CHANDNANI MARKETING & PROMOTIONS MANAGER MICHELLE VELAN CREATIVE DESIGN MANAGER ANTHEA DENNING PRODUCTION DIRECTOR SARAH JENSON COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION MANAGER XENIA DILNOT SENIOR PRODUCTION CONTROLLER EMILY BENTLEY SENIOR PRODUCTION COORDINATOR KARENINA DIBBLE ACTING SENIOR PRODUCTION COORDINATOR SAPPHO BARKLA COMMERCIAL SENIOR PRODUCTION CONTROLLER LOUISE LAWSON COMMERCIAL AND PAPER PRODUCTION CONTROLLER MARTIN MACMILLAN COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION COORDINATOR JESSICA BEEBY FINANCE DIRECTOR PAMELA RAYNOR FINANCIAL CONTROL DIRECTOR PENNY SCOTT-BAYFIELD HR DIRECTOR HAZEL M C INTYRE DEPUTY MANAGING DIRECTOR ALBERT READ NICHOLAS COLERIDGE MANAGING DIRECTOR PUBLISHED BY THE CONDE NAST PUBLICATIONS LTD, VOGUE HOUSE, HANOVER SQUARE, LONDON W1S 1JU (TEL: 020 7499 9080; FAX: 020 7493 1345). DIRECTORS JONATHAN NEWHOUSE, NICHOLAS COLERIDGE, STEPHEN QUINN, ANNIE HOLCROFT, PAMELA RAYNOR, JAMIE BILL, JEAN FAULKNER, SHELAGH CROFTS, ALBERT READ, PATRICIA STEVENSON JONATHAN NEWHOUSE CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE, CONDE NAST INTERNATIONAL


inVOGUE A head for fashion

VETEMENTS

Cancel the blow-dry: this season it’s all about adding an attitudinal hat, regardless of the occasion. Take Gucci’s dainty, netted style or the velvet jockey’s cap, or maybe you’re more about Vetements’ hard-line baseball cap – the titfer now enables you to triple your style points in seconds. The queue starts here for Miu Miu’s cocktail bucket hat…

GUCCI VELVET CAP, £290

What’s

NEW MIU MIU

THE PEOPLE, PLACES, IDEAS AND TRENDS TO WATCH NOW Edited by JULIA HOBBS

# veg

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; PIXELATE.BIZ

wonky

Forty per cent of a vegetable crop can be cast aside for landfill or animal feed just because it doesn’t look pretty. But no more: the hashtag #wonkyveg is now trending on Twitter; in Leicestershire, boxes of misshapen vegetables can be delivered to your door via Wonkyvegboxes.co.uk; and keep an eye out for the return of restaurant Tiny Leaf, which makes great food exclusively from the mangled and the marred. VH

Custom CHOOS The power of gamechanging footwear is not PIN IT to be underestimated. Enter the latest versions of Jimmy Choo’s classic Jazz court, which can be played two ways: inconspicuously plain (to ride out days in the office); or customised with a pick’n’mix of pop-on jewels for after dark. “Think of it as the ultimate in luxury DIY glamour,” says creative director Sandra Choi. Now, go JIMMY CHOO SUEDE COURTS WITH A SET forth and decorate. OF SEVEN DETACHABLE JEWELS, £1,250

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inVOGUE Letters of intent

Winter WHITE-OUT CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION

Forget head-to-toe black – this season the fashion pack are lightening up. Button up Joseph’s stiffened denim jacket, zip into Louis Vuitton’s zero-fuss boiler suit, pull on Valentino’s chalky tights, or lace up the palest prim booties, as spotted in the Shrimps resort collection.

EACH X OTHER

DIOR

When tongue-in-cheek slogan tees appeared on the catwalks and front row at the couture collections, the high-low mix that defines how we dress now hit its apotheosis. Let Gosha Rubchinskiy, Each x Other or new label 6397 spell it out for you, or create your own custom slogan at the Soho Print Store. Just don’t underestimate the importance of typography. Do your homework with the Saul Bass and Associates archive book (below) – “It contains the ultimate inspirational Seventies American corporate branding, that’s very now,” says rare-book dealer David Owen of Idea (purveyor of the cult “Winona” emblazoned T-shirt).

CHANEL

EDUN

DONNA KARAN NEW YORK

IDEA COTTON T-SHIRT, £25

Over time filmmaker Werner Herzog has turned his attention to the Amazon, the South Pole and the Sahara, but it is the digital landscape that serves as the destination for his latest feature: Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World (right; out October 28). Herzog, who doesn’t even carry a mobile phone, explores robotics, AI and the phenomenon of trolls, capturing the fervour and pride of innovators and early developers. Think of this as your immersive guide to the world we now live in.

OFF-WHITE

IDEA SPECIAL ISSUE: SAUL BASS AND ASSOCIATES (1979) PUBLISHED BY SEIBUNDO SHINKOSHA PUBLISHING; INDIGITAL; MAGNOLIA PICTURES; PIXELATE.BIZ

WATCH: Werner Herzog

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Now that Marc Jacobs, Adam Lippes and Moschino have revisited zebra prints for resort 2017, it’s time to eschew the boudoir connotations and embrace a ravey, late-Eighties-inspired look. Shop Kenzo’s acid-hued collaboration with H&M (in stores November 3), or take the look home with wild wallpaper prints.

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KNOW THIS FACE

Look out for the acting debut of 21-year-old Sasha Lane, who plays a law-bending teenager in American Honey (in cinemas from October 14). Andrea Arnold, the film’s British director, plucked the spring-breaking Texan from obscurity last year: “I went back to university and finished my exams early to begin filming.” The wayward road movie, which also stars Shia LaBeouf and Riley Keough, channels Arnold’s own experiences travelling across America’s Midwest and picked up the Jury Prize at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Authenticity reigns: “I kept asking if I needed to change something,” Lane says, “but the answer was always ‘No. We love how you are.’” The result is a strikingly natural rendition that lingers long after the credits roll. 72

DEANNA TEMPLETON

Sasha Lane


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inVOGUE Sarah Harris with the clothes selected by the personal stylists at Harrods. Photographs: Rick Morris Pushinsky

Personal shopping suite

Secret SERVICE HAIR AND MAKE-UP: AMY CONLEY. SARAH WEARS JACKET, CELINE. T-SHIRT, JOSEPH. JEANS, PAIGE. SHOES, GUCCI

A CURATED WARDROBE, A TOTAL HOME RENOVATION, A BANQUET FOR 5,000 OR FISH PIE FOR TWO… NOTHING IS TOO MUCH (OR TOO LITTLE) FOR HARRODS, FINDS SARAH HARRIS

i

t’s a funny feeling, standing in a room filled with an expertly curated selection of what someone else thinks you might like to wear – and it’s even odder when it’s so accurate. This is the third stage of Harrods Wardrobe Management, which begins with an initial in-store consultation on sartorial likes and dislikes, followed by an at-home visit of wardrobe rifling, to here – Harrods personal shopping suite, an entire room tailormade for you to shop from. I’m not going to lie. When Harrods invited me to become a client for a week and try a selection of its services, I had reservations about its Wardrobe Management experience. I didn’t think I needed it. Trust me, I thought, my wardrobe doesn’t need managing because I manage it. I’m in there filing, editing and sorting on a fortnightly

basis. Do I need help when it comes to shopping? Nope. I know what I want to buy at the beginning of the season. It transpires I was wrong – because having a fresh eye to edit your wardrobe is pretty revealing; for starters it revealed that I have about 75 white shirts. OK, no, not 75 – 50, although I’m reassured by the Harrods team that, since no two are the same and it’s part of my uniform, it’s no bad thing. The process also revealed that I, like most of the other clients they visit at home, wear only 10 per cent of my wardrobe regularly. I also discovered that I have a lot of clothes with swing tags still attached – not because they were mistake buys (I don’t do mistake buys, I don’t mind bragging) – but because I haven’t got around to wearing them yet. It’s far more enjoyable and much less exhausting when you’re not the one

pulling everything out, but sitting on your bedroom chair saying yes or no to everything. Literally everything, as I ascertain, after being slightly taken aback that I’m asked whether or not I wish to keep my spring/summer ’16 Céline khaki jumpsuit – the very one that I spent weeks tracking down, that was finally located My wardrobe doesn’t and shipped to me from Belgium. “Are need managing, I you kidding?” I think, thought. I was wrong when Kate, Harrods’ stylist manager, holds it up to me for affirmation. It wasn’t being singled out; every item is pored over, starting at one end of my wardrobe and finishing at the other. It takes one hour to go through the white shirts alone. Yes, it’s time-consuming, but I could happily sit here and do this for an entire afternoon. Kate has a good > 77


inVOGUE

Tailor -made looks 78

urban myth, like the story of the Egyptian escalator programmed to run at the same speed as the Nile. (Who knows where that nugget comes from; Sebastian, Harrods’ archivist – yes, Harrods has its own in-house archivist – has heard of it, too, but after searching the architect’s notes he can’t find any evidence of it.) Harrods does, however, lay claim to debuting Britain’s first “moving staircase” in 1898. But back to the safe deposit. It exists. Steeped in history, the solid-steelclad room dates back to 1896 and is the least seen and oldest part of the store (even outdating the current terracotta façade). Crafted in a Glasgow shipyard, it was bolted together and lowered into the Knightsbridge soil and, amazingly, everything here remains original, from the three-ton steel Victorian entrance door to the mosaic floor, etched glass, signage, and the still-working black hangers, should that be their preference. Bakelite telephone. It smells like And the service doesn’t end there; school. There are 3,000 safes here, I’m also emailed a PDF lookbook of from small safeboxes (big enough expertly put together outfits, indicating for precious jewellery, important what to wear with what, combining documents and gold bars worth up to both new purchases and the clothes £1 million – don’t have a gold bar? already hanging in my wardrobe (hence They’re available to buy at Harrods the photographs taken Bank) to 10ft-high vaults, during the at-home visit). large enough for, say, a Harrods Harrods occupies 23 motorbike. They has seven vintage acres of selling space; it cost from £300 for a year has more than 300 floors hidden (and up to £10,500 for the departments, and goes as strong rooms); it away under larger deep underground as it is could be the chicest £300 high, which means it has ground level you ever spend, just to some seven floors hidden have that key on a key away under ground level (it even has its ring. There’s also a personal password own water supply from wells bored to gain entry – only known by the safebelow), most of which customers will deposit personnel, the client and never see. For example, the Harrods anyone they nominate to have access vaults – a subterranean warren of to their safe. Several are available for rentable safe-deposit boxes, which I’ve rent, although many are passed down heard people talk of but never actually from one generation to the next. seen. I was beginning to think it was an Next up: Harrods Menu Creation. With 147 on-site chefs, the Food Halls here are unrivalled, and no wonder, since Harrods originally opened as a wholesale grocer and tea merchants. But who needs to browse stacked shelves when there’s a menucreation service ready to whip up anything from dinner for two to a gourmet banquet for 5,000, with everything delivered by Harrods refrigerated vans anywhere within the M25 from Monday to Saturday? Word has it that the Harrods fish pie is legendary (so legendary that one client recently flew two of them to her holiday home in France). If requested it comes not in a disposable tray but in a >

Bespoke fragrance lab

Above: choosing a bespoke scent in the Salon de Parfums, and, inset, the finished product. Below: Sarah’s personalised guide for coordinating her new wardrobe

RICK MORRIS PUSHINSKY

technique. She doesn’t tell me what to get rid of, but asks questions such as, “Do you wear it?” and “Do you love it?” She takes photographs of most items. And so, in this personal shopping suite is her edit of item updates and wardrobe “gaps” (who knew I had any?) presented with tea and coffee, pastries, mini yoghurt pots and an impressive fruit platter. There must be close to 100 items of clothing, shoes and bags hanging up in here, and I like almost everything. Cleverly, there are several variations on some items – tailored tracksuit trousers, for example – with minor differences in cut and huge disparities on price, from affordable to quite astronomical. The “magic mirror” films everything I try on (I circle 360 degrees so all angles are visible); the film is later emailed to me so I can make a better-informed purchase decision or forward it on to friends for their opinion. What I’m particularly desperate to add to my wardrobe from this edit: a black butter-soft leather coat by The Row; the perfect pair of navy wool drawstring tracksuit trousers by Louis Vuitton (although I have lots of black trousers, my wardrobe consultation revealed I’m low on navy); snaffle loafers by Gucci (surprisingly missing from my wardrobe, and now they’re on my feet I don’t know why); a khaki suede trench and khaki long-sleeved silk T-shirt by Céline (in addition to all the Céline skate shoes in grey felt, white leather, navy ponyskin and black silk), and an ivory Neoprene T-shirt by Joseph. Wardrobe Management customers don’t even need to carry their buys home; any purchases are installed in their wardrobes on smart black velvet


inVOGUE

Interior design service

Above: the Harrods Interiors team’s vision for Sarah’s living room. Below: Sarah chooses swatches and samples

however, one should opt for something with spice because it awakens the mind – but avoid this in the kitchen, where something fruitier is recommended, like grapefruit or lime. Other home-fragrance rules? Those reed diffuser sticks should be turned upside-down once a day, and never as a scent-resetting neutraliser) I finally positioned in a corner or up against a choose “sophisticated and seductive” wall but ideally in the middle of a Fleur Narcotique, loaded with jasmine, room so the fragrant air can circulate. peony and orange blossom with base Harrods home services extend notes of transparent wood, moss and beyond fragrance; Harrods Interiors musk, and combine it with centifolia team will redecorate your entire house, rose which, I’m told, is handpicked in taking on anything from a single room Grasse at dawn. Within minutes, to a total renovation, and not only the elements are measured, mixed and with the 600 brands under its roof then whizzed on a magnetic stirring but from international and bespoke machine before being funnelled into suppliers outside the store, too. a bottle engraved with Senior designer Olivia my name. I’m advised to sets to work on a proposal The rose wait three days to allow it for my living room. is, I’m told, After an initial atto settle before I spritz. The worry with an handpicked home consultation, where experience like this is that flick through a Pinterestin Grasse Istyle you’ve made something iPad presentation regrettably abhorrent, but (everything I like is duly at dawn three days later I spray and noted), measurements are it’s a new favourite. taken and a portfolio is put together of Home fragrance is a concept that I ideas and colour schemes. I love the hadn’t much considered before, but Venetian polished plaster walls, which how complicated could it be? Surely it I had considered when my house was amounts to selecting a scent that built and I couldn’t remember why it appeals and popping it in your home, didn’t happen; a bespoke pink marble somewhere, anywhere? It turns out it’s coffee table with brass legs; a Kelly a science, and in this case one that’s Wearstler rug – larger than my existing overseen by a doctor. Dr Vranjes one, which will, I’m told, make the combines the very finest essential oils room look bigger, and a plush tealand natural ingredients for his coloured velvet sofa. There are also collection at Harrods, concocted in swatches here from Harrods’ Fabric his adopted city of Florence. My Library, home to everything from de consultation with Astrid disclosed Gournay’s hand-painted wall coverings that floral scents such as magnolia and to Hermès’s complete fabric collection. orchid work well in hallways and I’d like to move right into the rendering. living areas whereas, in the bathroom, Or, better still, just move into notes of white or green flowers are Harrods. After all, it wouldn’t be the best suited; in a study or office space, first time someone has asked. Q

RICK MORRIS PUSHINSKY

newly purchased Le Creuset dish (in a colour of the client’s choosing to match her own set, of course, because Harrods understands that a hostess might want to pretend she baked it herself ). When it comes to this fish pie, she would certainly want to lay claim to it. Deep-filled with tiger prawns, cod and haddock in a cream sauce laden with dill and topped with Barber’s Cheddar mashed potato, it was the best I’ve ever had. Desserts are also next level – try the frasier, which has a pistachioflavoured centre wrapped in lime icecream with fresh strawberries on a raspberry sponge bed, finished with whipped cream and white chocolate trellis on top. Meanwhile the millefeuille comprising layers of crispy, flaky caramelised all-butter pastry and vanilla crème with piped Chantilly cream is, I think, the best to be found this side of the Channel. Harrods sells more than 125 different types of cheese, while its bakery department boasts 190 varieties of baked goods and cakes, but that might be nothing in comparison to the one billion fragrances (or thereabouts) sold in the ground floor Beauty Halls. If – astonishingly – none enthrall, customers are invited to concoct their very own at Parisian perfume house Ex Nihilo, situated in the sumptuous all-marble enclaves of Harrods’ Sixth Floor 6,222sq ft Salon de Parfums, home to the finest and rarest scents, and bespoke services. After trying some 35 formulas (interspersed with a pot of coffee beans


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VOGUEshops What to buy

NOW Photographs by LAURENCE ELLIS

Working PURLS The news in nine-to-five knitwear? Clever cut-outs and crafty weaves take the lead for winter – as four Vogue staffers attest

Ellie Pithers, fashion features editor, wears woolmix sweater, £225, The Kooples. Silk scarf, £85, Rockins. Cropped corduroy jeans, £90, Gant. Leather courts, £99, Carvela. Gold drop earrings, £169. Link bracelet, £149. Both Another Feather, at Couverture & The Garbstore. Gold-plated ring, £95, Sophie Hulme. Hair: Philippe Tholimet. Make-up: Lucy Bridge. Nails: Trish Lomax. Set design: William Farr. Fashion editor: Julia Brenard

Recast an everyman Aran knit as a city staple via a whisper-thin necktie and genteel courts

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VOGUEshops Alex Whiting, creative producer, Condé Nast Video, wears sweater with cutaway shoulder, £400, Tibi. Silk skirt, £293, Mes Demoiselles. Gold-plated pin, worn as earring, £125, Uribe, at Net-a-Porter.com. Gold-plated ring, on right hand, £125, Sophie Hulme. Gold bead ring, on left hand, £389, Magdalena Frackowiak Jewelry. Small hoop earrings, Alex’s own

LAURENCE ELLIS

Decent exposure: a cold-shoulder sweater in a slouchy cut lends off-duty cool to a liquid-silk skirt

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VOGUEshops Devina Sanghani, PA to Vogue’s publishing director, wears cashmere dress, £275, Cocoa Cashmere. Leather heels, £370, Mango. Bauble earring, £265, JW Anderson. Silver charm bracelet, £150. Gold-plated charm bracelet, £225. Both Links of London. Ring, £4, H&M

LAURENCE ELLIS

How to wear a workaday sweater dress now? Set sculptural jewellery against an ankle-skimming length – and smile

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VOGUEshops Florence Arnold, senior fashion assistant, wears wool sweater with cut-out detail, £294, Frame, at Net-a-Porter.com. Belted wool trousers, £250, By Malene Birger. Hoop earrings, £46, Diane von Furstenberg. Pink enamel and metal ring, £95, Bex Rox. Other ring, Florence’s own

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Ripping yarn: a cream ribbed knit comes into its own when teamed with burgundy paper-bag trousers

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VOGUEshops Ellie wears bib top, £350, Tibi, at Shopbop.com. Silk shirt, £55. Brass and resin bangle, £25. Both Massimo Dutti. Asymmetric ribbed wool skirt, £280, Marques Almeida, at Neta-Porter.com. Trainers, £110, Asics, at Dover Street Market. Stud earring, £19, Finery London

Body DOUBLE The new gym-to-street combinations have the stamina – and style – to go the distance

LAURENCE ELLIS

Training day: reassuringly technical sneakers are the perfect update for classic blue stripes

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VOGUEshops Alex wears leather jacket, £350, Mardou & Dean. Seamless hooded top, £95, Adidas by Stella McCartney. Denim jeans, £242, Redone, at Modern Society. Leather boots, £300, Calvin Klein Jeans. Hoop earrings, £15, Whistles

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Take a base layer top at its word: contour panels and a streetwise hood are a dynamic foundation for an easy leather-and-denim combo

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S T Y L E T H E S E A S O N W I T H N E W PA N D O R A R O S E The PANDORA Rose collection combines a unique blend of metals, blushing with a beautiful rose colour. Explore the new Autumn collection, be inspired and share #TheLookOfYou


VOGUEshops Devina wears ruched top, £420, Ellery, at Browns. Performance leggings, £145, No Ka’Oi, at Matchesfashion.com. Leather boots, £450, Belstaff & Liv Tyler. Gold-plated cuff, £250, Sophie Hulme

LAURENCE ELLIS

Let form-fitting leggings in peppercorn grey do the leg work – and make them pop against a blinding white shirt

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VOGUEshops Florence wears body, £69, Pepper & Mayne. Miniskirt, £30, Mango. Leather boots, £235, Axel Arigato. Silver-plated earrings, £95, Bex Rox. Gold-plated bracelet, integrated with onyx ring, £470, Paula Mendoza, at Net-a-Porter.com. Other rings, Florence’s own. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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Bound angle: recalibrate a sculpting yoga bodysuit for evening with a sharp A-line skirt – and unexpectedly voguish snakeskin boots

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VOGUEview Music may be in her blood, but Pixie Geldof has forged her own artistic identity. Photographed by Retts Wood in the Clapton Hart, E5. Sittings editor: Beatriz de Cossio

Flying SOLO

Pixie Geldof’s debut album is a poised, thoughtful meditation on love, loss and grief. Nell Frizzell meets her

ike Dylan Thomas’s gypsy wife in Under Milk Wood, Pixie Geldof is lolling gaudy in a doorway, a silk petticoat skimming her brown knees, her dark hair swept off her forehead. She scowls at the sunshine, lighting a cigarette. We’ve met in an old east London pub, just a few streets away from where she lives in Upper Clapton with her boyfriend George Barnett, the drummer of indie rock outfit These New Puritans. The fashion plate and former frontwoman of haze-pop band Violet has now recorded her own solo album, I’m Yours. A collection of dreamy, elegiac lullabies and love songs, it’s a haunting, vulnerable offering, reminiscent of Mazzy Star, Cocteau Twins and the Jesus and Mary Chain. Geldof ’s voice takes centre stage in a wash of guitars and sparkling percussion. Recorded in Los Angeles with producer Tony Hoffer, known for his work with Beck, Air and Turin >

HAIR: KARIN BIGLER. MAKE-UP: ANITA KEELING. PIXIE WEARS DRESS, MIU MIU

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RETTS WOOD; ANTHONY CRICKMAY. PIXIE WEARS DRESS, CHLOE. SHOES, TABITHA SIMMONS. RING, ON RIGHT HAND, ANNINA VOGEL

VOGUEview Brakes, it has that open, hot-earth, prairie quality of California. “I absolutely adore LA,” says Geldof. “I started going there to write when I was 19, and I love to drive around the area listening to music. I have a country playlist; people like Kris Kristofferson, Patsy Cline and Gram Parsons. And I listen to Harry Potter audiobooks.” This mix of the musical and the childlike seems typical of Geldof who, at just 25, still has a youthful vulnerability, along with the wit, sensuality, insight and gravelly laugh of someone much older. Because, of course, she has seen a lot. In one of her tracks, “Twin Thing”, she sings to a lost sibling over a soaring guitar, “hoping it’s not forever”. It’s hard not to think of her older sister Peaches, whose drug-related death in 2014 was a terrible echo of that of their mother, Paula Yates, who died from a heroin overdose when Pixie was 10 years old. “I genuinely didn’t think I would ever write anything about grief,” she says, leaning back on the pub bench. “Then I figured out it was happening halfway through the song I was working on, and I’m glad I did it, in a way. What grief comes from is the most enormous thing – it’s wild, uncontrollable.” Has it changed the way she navigates the world? “More than ever before I have a desire for connection with something bigger. I went swimming with sharks. There was this giant in front of me and yet it was so calm. My fear of the ocean and depth has gone completely.” For Geldof to release an album is rather like a Clinton running for president – it’s in her blood, having grown up in a house full of guitars and gone to gigs with her parents as soon as she could walk. And there is an element of the homespun in the way I’m Yours was written. The song “Woman Go

Wild” “happened on the piano with my mate Friars, and the title track was written with my friend Bruno in his kitchen,” says Geldof, playing with her cigarette case. “We recorded the demo on a little microphone, and that’s almost exactly what it sounds like on the record.” While melodies come quickly, Geldof ’s lyrics are often built up, slowly, from diary scribblings or not-

Geldof has a youthful vulnerability, along with the insight of someone much older

“I genuinely didn’t think I would ever write anything about grief” quite-complete thoughts. “There have been songs that I’ve only figured out years down the line,” she says quietly. There must be a certain pressure that comes with both your boyfriend and father being musicians. Does she ever ask for their opinion? “There’s no stopping Dad,” she laughs. “But he writes songs, so he understands that

they’re how you perceive things. Even if you listen to the same sort of music as one another, you’re not necessarily going to write the same sort of music.” Geldof and Barnett have been a couple for six years. The instant they met, they were “together”, she says. “It was immediate and good and it’s just stayed like that. I love that Townes Van Zandt song that goes ‘Close your eyes, I’ll be here in the morning.’ It’s like someone singing you to sleep with the most wonderful promise; about peace of mind in a relationship. It feels like that.” While she admits she’s “obsessed” with kids, she is, she says firmly, only 25. Geldof scoops her chihuahua into a neck-nuzzling kiss and downs her tea. As she picks up her bag, I spot a tattoo on her forearm. It’s a quote from Philip Larkin’s “An Arundel Tomb”: “What will survive of us is love.” Q “I’m Yours” is released on November 4

A life less ordinary

GUTTER CREDIT

Angela Carter’s triumphs and tragedies leap off the page in a new biography “I enjoy being ostentatious and flamboyant and rhetorical and vulgar,” Angela Carter told Vogue in an interview in 1982. “One owes it to oneself and the world.” A contributor to the magazine for more than 25 years, she wrote on a range of subjects, from weddings (“They tell me that marriage, like corsets, is coming back”) to Sixties versus Seventies fashion (“Slowly, woman metamorphoses from a hairy, Afghan flower into something more like a Doric column”). In The Invention of Angela Carter (Chatto & Windus, £25), her first authorised biography, Edmund Gordon traces her extraordinary life. His research included visiting the places that shaped her, from Rhode Island, where she spent a lonely year at Brown University, to the Trans-Siberian Railway (“Read Gogol’s Dead Souls as the best available guide book to Moscow,” she deadpanned in Vogue after her 1971 trip). The result is an intimate portrait of the woman behind the fantastical narratives. HM 109


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BOTANICAL MOTIFS ARE TAKING ROOT THIS SEASON, SAYS HAYLEY MAITLAND

ahitian hibiscus, lilies from the Nile, Chinese peonies… When 18th-century explorers returned from overseas with Wardian cases of tropical flowers, they started a craze for plant collecting. The botany boom reached its peak in the 1800s – when amateur taxonomists combed country hedgerows, magnifying glasses in hand, displaying their findings in meticulous illustrations, and the drawing rooms of great Victorian houses were lined with terrariums of lush ferns, orchids and mosses. For its autumn pre-collection, Dolce & Gabbana drew on the foliage in Palermo Botanical Gardens, and a revival bloomed. Depictions of plants also cropped up throughout the resort collections: from dresses decorated with 3D peonies and gardenias at Giambattista Valli to a parka hand-embroidered with 17th-century botanical designs by Creatures of the Wind. And it’s not just our wardrobes that are blossoming. Look at In Bloom, photographer Ngoc Minh Ngo’s latest book, for inspiration on how to bring the natural world indoors this autumn. Included within its leaves are exquisite plaster casts of flowers (an 18th-century technique) by Rachel Dein and painstakingly detailed sculptures based on Victorian etchings by Carmen Almon. Q

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VOGUEview

Change the SUBJECT THE SITTERS BEHIND EXTRAORDINARY ARTWORKS ARE FINALLY TAKING THEIR PLACE IN THE SPOTLIGHT. HERMIONE EYRE GETS TO KNOW THEM

f

ENDEAVOUR LONDON/GETTY; CLARA DRUMMOND

or a number of weeks in 1997, Jerry Hall sat for Lucian Freud, breastfeeding her son Gabriel, until, due to illness, she missed a couple of sittings. Piqued, Freud replaced her head with that of his studio assistant David Dawson. Being painted by an artist can be a merciless process. Occasionally, it can confer fame, glory, even immortality on the sitter. But traditionally, all the power and adulation has been with the artist, while models were edged out of the history books – even beyond respectability. This autumn, a handful of new exhibitions, from Picasso to Maggi Hambling, put the spotlight on the people who gave their time, strength and grace, and whose personalities as well as their bodies inspired extraordinary work. Clara Drummond, the winner of this year’s BP Portrait Award for her oil of artist Kirsty Buchanan, Girl in a Liberty Dress, is redefining what she calls the classic “Victorian idea of the exploitative artist having dominion over their muse.” Buchanan continues to sit for Drummond, and their relationship is both cerebral and equal. “The conversations we have during the sittings are very important to us,”

Above: Sylvette David with Picasso in 1954. He made more than 60 likenesses of her in just a few months. Below: Girl in a Liberty Dress, Clara Drummond’s BP Portrait Awardwinning painting of fellow artist Kirsty Buchanan

she says (topics range from Mary get bored.” Money has never been Queen of Scots to Icelandic moss). exchanged. “It would change the Now, in a gently radical move, they dynamic. I do feel the element of are publishing their handwritten collaboration isn’t possible if you’re correspondence in facsimile form, paying because it’s a form of control.” which will be featured in an exhibition Winning the BP Portrait Award they have co-curated, Poetry Aldeburgh came as “a complete shock” to at Aldeburgh’s Peter Pears Gallery Drummond. “Because it’s a quiet (November 4 to 6). painting, but perhaps the accumulation The two artists have worked of so many drawings and so many together for six years, hours gives it a patina.” under apple trees in the Traditionally, Even their likenesses are summer, and for a time, transposed – the painting all the in the freezing former resembles both of them studio of Eduardo power has – and yet Buchanan Paolozzi on Dovehouse surprises been with continually Street in Chelsea. Unlike Drummond. “I have plans many sitters, Buchanan the artist for a painting in my head doesn’t struggle with – and then Kirsty arrives silence or self-consciousness. “She and she’s wearing something much grew up on the Isle of Man,” says more exciting than anything I could Drummond, “and her attitude to life have imagined,” says the artist. is one of total independence of mind. Auguste Rodin used his models in She has such a deep interior world a more conventional way. Rarely were that when she sits for me she doesn’t their names included in his work, but > 115


Alexandra Gerstein, curator of the Courtauld Gallery’s Rodin & Dance: The Essence of Movement (October 20 to January 22) believes she can identify one Alda Moreno by her “unbelieveably supple” physique. Gerstein has discovered a photograph of her, complete with trapeze. “Alda probably appeared at the Folies Bergère,” she says. “We know she posed for Rodin, but then for a period of about three years she was lost to him. We see his friends writing to him saying they think they have found her – and then she re-enters his life and he starts making these extraordinarily dynamic sculptures.” We know little more other than that she called him, reverently in correspondence, “Dieu”, and that when she died in the Sixties in reduced circumstances, she was still in possession of two sculptures by Rodin.

t

he attraction between painter and model is as unpredictable as falling in love. When a 21-yearold Brigitte Bardot visited Picasso at Vallauris in the South of France in 1956, no paintings ensued. Two years earlier, a 19-year-old called Sylvette David inspired more than 60 likenesses during a period of a few months. Shy and rather farouche, Sylvette sat for Picasso regularly, posing quietly, smoking or chewing a long piece of grass. Until the age of eight, she had run wild on the Ile du Levant

Above: Rodin’s Dance Movement A (circa 1911) is thought to have been inspired by Alda Moreno, above right, a dancer. Below: Large Interior, Notting Hill (1998) by Lucian Freud. He replaced model Jerry Hall’s head with that of his assistant David Dawson after she missed sittings

with her artist mother, sibling and stepfamily. It was bohemian to say the least – clothes were infrequently worn – which perhaps equipped her well to sit before the artist (although she never posed for him nude). The atmosphere between Picasso and her was “peaceful, inspired, and meditative”, as she says in her beguiling new memoir I Was wicked son. We met through Sarah Sylvette (co-written with her daughter Lucas at the Colony Room, and we Isabel Coulton; Endeavour London, took to one another like ducks to water. £25). She saw no hint of the Minotaur He was like an exotic wild animal. He Picasso. There was no seduction; only was banned from entering America to understanding. He painted her attend his own book launch, on grounds without a mouth, which she felt of moral turpitude! Too Wildean.” referenced her silence. And when he Although Horsley rarely went out rendered her as a wrought-iron without his top hat and an armour of bricolage sculpture, he added, as well immaculate tailoring, he agreed to sit as her recognisable round handbag, a for her naked except for a borrowed key: “I was shut in myself and maybe Hermès scarf. “Taking off his clothes that’s why.” was against his dandy religion. I don’t As a farewell he invited her to take know that he’d have done it for any one of 28 portrait everyone,” she says. And paintings he had made of “The subject yet Hambling is forever her. “I chose the one that associated with Henrietta looked the most like me… chooses the Moraes, her lover and I felt so funny walking out artist, not model who was “100 times into the street with a more alive than anyone else the other in the room at a party” and painting of me by Picasso tucked under my arm, it way around” “totally in command didn’t feel real.” In 1958 wherever she was”. Moraes, she reluctantly parted with it for much like Horsley, was extremely self£10,000. Sylvette has since destructive. “Henrietta was diagnosed disappeared – as an adherent of diabetic, so she took up eating cream Subud, the Indonesian spiritual cakes. That defiance was typical of her.” movement, she renamed herself Lydia In 1999, Moraes finally succumbed – but her work with Picasso will be on to the effects of decades of substance display at the National Portrait abuse, while Horsley died of a drug Gallery’s major exhibition Picasso overdose at the age of 47 in 2010. Portraits (until February 5). Hambling’s life-sized charcoal portrait “The subject chooses the artist, of him is now on show for the first time not the other way round,” Maggi as part of Touch: Works on Paper by Hambling growls magnificently down Maggi Hambling at the British the telephone as she explains how she Museum (until January 29). She thinks came to draw, again and again, that he would have “laughed loudly” to Sebastian Horsley, the Soho artist, have found himself in such hallowed writer and wit extraordinaire. “He surroundings. Her own laughter dies. called me Mother; I called him my “I miss him like hell.” Q

MUSEE RODIN, PARIS, FRANCE; AGENCE PHOTOGRAPHIQUE DE MUSEE RODIN/PAULINE HISBACQ; PRIVATE COLLECTION/THE LUCIAN FREUD ARCHIVE/BRIDGEMAN IMAGES

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COMPILED BY NAOMI SMART. MARK MATTOCK

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A SUPERSIZED MAN’S SHIRT… The go-with-everything appeal of an asymmetric shirt is matched by the supersized man’s shirt – play with both.

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VOGUEspy IF YOU LIKE IF YOU LIKE

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YOUR BIKER JACKET ALLSAINTS LEATHER JACKET, £598

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PIXELATE.BIZ; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; INDIGITAL

As seen in Milan


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TAKE

With his skill for sought-after simplicity, Christophe Lemaire is about to reinvent your wardrobe with his debut Uniqlo U line Photographs by Yaniv Edry Styling by Tamara Rothstein

here are collaborations that are great one-offs. Then there are collaborations that deliver pieces so integral to the wardrobe of a real, fashion-forward yet practical woman (who craves comfort and compliments) that they leave you wanting more. Christophe Lemaire for Uniqlo is a case in point. Luckily for us all, he is now bringing his silhouette-skimming cuts, deliciously feel-good textures and minimal design sensibility to the label fulltime – as artistic director of the new Uniqlo U collection. News of Lemaire’s prior limitededition collections for the Japanesefounded high-street store rippled through the Vogue offices like the party that everyone wants an invite to. Now that Lemaire’s partnership with Uniqlo is permanent, the retailer is in a league of its own.

t

What does that translate to? Just what the discerning shopper looks for: avant-garde designs that stand out at a high-fashion bash, but were acquired for high-street prices. More than that, Uniqlo U comes with an easy-to-adopt philosophy – that clothes can be comfortable, as well as very, very cool. The first autumn/winter 2016 collection is a lesson in these values. In an industrial palette of petrol blue and steel grey with rich, rusty hues, voluminous shapes are contrasted with sleek A-lines, while tailoring offers relaxed rather than rigid structure. Shirting is easy and clean, outer layers are enveloping and snug, and knitwear is feather light yet warm. Job done. Q The new Uniqlo U collection is available in-store from September 30. Visit Uniqlo.com/UniqloU


Far left: soutien-collar coat, £89.90. Light-down shirt-jacket, £69.90. Cargo trousers, £29.90. Vintage leather belt, £14.90. Socks, £2.60. Left: ribbed cashmere sweater, £99.90. High-rise jeans, £29.90. Vintage leather belt, £14.90. This page: light-down jacket, £89.90. Cashmere poloneck, £99.90. Padded rucksack, £14.90. Flared denim skirt, £29.90. All Uniqlo U. Hair: Yaniv Zada. Make-up: Shirley Weiner. Set designer: Kimberley Harding. Model: Suzi Leenaars


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As seen at Paris Fashion Week, a/w ’16

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Gilda Ambrosio, Milan a/w ’16

Everyone’s wearing…

cool-girl VELVET

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hink dressed up for day. Decadent velvet has resolutely shed its fusty reputation – but how are the pin-ups wearing it now? Look to Giorgia Tordini – note how her plush damson robe glistens in autumnal light. Or follow Gilda Ambrosio: the secret to the Italian’s latest street-style look is a draped velvet dress in decadent teal. But whether you opt for the parlour jacket or slouchy strides, this is a trend that dares to say: stroke me. NS FINERY LONDON WIDE-LEG TROUSERS, £89

Giorgia Tordini at Milan Fashion Week

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ROSETTA GETTY SHAWL-COLLAR ROBE WITH SATIN TRIM, £1,210, AT ALEX EAGLE

JIMMY CHOO HEELS, £575

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; PIXELATE.BIZ

GABRIELA HEARST SLIP DRESS, £2,950


VOGUEtravel

EAT

In the romantic location of a Thirties conservatory (left), surrounded by organic gardens, De Kas chef Gert Jan Hageman prepares delicious vegetarian food (inset) according to the daily harvest. At the sleekly stunning Taiko in the Conservatorium hotel, chef Schilo van Coevorden serves sophisticated east Asian fusion dishes. If it’s views you’re after, try Mr Porter, a stylish rooftop restaurant with food and clientele to match.

STAY The 45-year-old Pulitzer hotel – spread over 25 interlinked golden-age canal houses along Prinsengracht – has reopened, revealing not only a cool new look but some tranquil inner gardens in one of the city’s chicest neighbourhoods.

LOCAL authorities Vogue’s real travel guide. By the people who know these cities best

READ Geert Mak’s Amsterdam captures the soul of the place, recounting dreamlike and nightmarish true stories that live up to the city’s reputation as the Venice of the North.

BUY

Amsterdam

TINKA LEENE CAKE TIN, FROM £22, AT THE FROZEN FOUNTAIN

What’s a Zeeuwse knop? Where to find the best stroopwafels? Jane Szita has the answers

Add a touch of Amsterdam style to your own home and pick up a piece of Dutch design at the Frozen Fountain – perhaps Tinka Leene’s cake tin in the shape of a traditional “Zeeuwse knop” (Zeeland button) brooch – or something vintage from its Frozen Classics section.

THE BEST VIEW From the Oude Kerk tower in the Red Light District or, if you want a drink with your view, the Sky Lounge at the Doubletree Hotel. For a great canal perspective, try the terrace at Café de Jaren. The Eye, Amsterdam’s spectacular film museum, has a marvellous waterfront view from its café terrace (right).

JULIEN CAPMEIL; SHUTTERSTOCK

LISTEN

VISIT

90 Years Ms Monroe at the Nieuwe Kerk, one of Amsterdam’s most imaginative museum venues. The exhibition explores her life and legacy in the year of what would have been her 90th birthday, bringing together personal items, photographs and film clips. Until February 5

Fading Lines by Amber Arcades (aka Annelotte de Graaf, a former human rights lawyer) is dreamy, shimmering indiepop with ethereal vocals – perfect for floating along the canals.

ONE MORE THING The historic Lanskroon bakery makes the city’s favourite stroopwafel – the addictive caramel biscuit. 139


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VOGUEtravel

EAT

Georgia is brimming with rich dishes and fresh produce – you’ll never go hungry. Head to Tsiskvili, which overlooks the Mtkvari river, and order khachapuri, the traditional dish of cheese and egg mixed into baked bread. Afterwards, go to Café Linville (above) for a glass of wine. Le Montrachet is a must, too: the neo-bistro’s menu includes produce from the Caucasus mountains, such as black truffles and baby dandelions.

EXPLORE Old Tbilisi is a fascinating part of the capital. Aside from its churches and museums, take note of the architecture – spectacular buildings and their latticework balconies, which appear almost to teeter off ledges. To unwind, stop by the sulphur baths and take the mineral-packed waters.

Tbilisi Liana Satenstein has Georgia on her mind

HIDDEN TREASURE

STAY

Rooms Hotel (above) is one of Georgia’s finest boutique gems. With locations both in Tbilisi’s atmospheric Vera district and the mountainous region of Kazbegi, it has lush greenery, stellar dishes and bohemian decor – all with a Caucasus flair.

LISTEN Experience the slow, cheeky tunes of Mcvane Otaxi, the hypnotic voice of Nino Katamadze (right) or the pop beats of singer Salio.

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TAMUNA INGOROKVA

FREUNDE VON FREUNDEN; SIMON ROBERTS; LEILA CRANSWICK; SHUTTERSTOCK; INDIGITAL

In search of antiques? Spend a weekend day at Tbilisi’s Dry Bridge market, where you can barter for everything from century-old silver Turkmen cuffs to enamel pins from the Soviet Union.

FASHION Tbilisi may have sprung on to the fashion radar courtesy of brothers Demna and Guram Gvasalia of Vetements, but street-style here is a little less casual. A tomboyish suit by local designer Tamuna Ingorokva, accessorised with embellished oxfords by Anouki, and a plexiglassknit handbag from 7II – the current Tbilisi statement bag of choice – looks the part.

READ Delve into the classics. Try The Knight in the Panther Skin by 12thcentury poet Rustaveli. 141


VOGUEtravel EAT

Nok restaurant, part of the Alara concept store in Lagos

The fashionable crowd dine at Nok by Alara (an African fusion restaurant) or RSVP on Victoria Island. For a laid-back brunch, it’s Delis or Casper & Gambini’s. Seeking an indigenous menu? Head to Terra Kulture for jollof rice, fried plantain and pepper soup. No trip to Lagos is complete without a taste of its street food; University of Suya is arguably the ultimate for suya, delicious grilled meat seasoned with pepper. The gorgeous rustic Art Café serves the best coffee in town.

Lagos

Funmi Fetto gets to the core of West Africa’s Big Apple

READ Online, immerse yourself in Nataal, a new site celebrating African fashion and culture. Offline, read And After Many Days by Jowhor Ile – lauded by writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

DANCE “In Lagos, there is always a party,” says DJ Cuppy (above), one of Nigeria’s hottest DJs (she even played at the president’s inauguration). Party central can be found at Sip, Quilox and Club 57. The night only really gets started from 11pm; expect to dance till six.

STAY

FASHION

In Lagos, West Africa’s Big Apple, it’s all about oleku: two clashing ankara fabrics made into iro and buba – a wrap skirt and blouse. Choose your fabric at Ankara Alley in Balogun market and a local tailor at Iponri market will do the rest. Alternatively, wear pieces by Lagos designer and LVMH prize finalist Maki Oh. Michelle Obama, Lupita Nyong’o (right) and Solange Knowles (far right) are all devotees. 142

LISTEN WHAT TO BRING HOME Brush up your haggling skills and head to Jakande Market for traditional wood carvings, metal sculptures, paintings and handmade jewellery.

COMING SOON

Everyone loves Afrobeat star Wizkid. Tiwa Savage, Lil Kesh and Temi Dollface are also worth adding to your playlist.

We can’t wait for the new Christian Louboutin concession to open in Alara – a beautifully curated 3,200sq ft concept store with a roof terrace and art gallery. International brands rub shoulders with African talent: Balenciaga and Babatunde, Delpozo and Duro Olowu. Find, too, exquisite homeware from artisans such as Babacar Niang of Nulangee and Hamed Ouattara.

LOLA AKERSTOM; MICHAEL TROW; DJ CUPPY; CAMERA PRESS; GETTY

Uber-stylish Maison Fahrenheit (left), on Victoria Island, is hip right now. But for understated chic and an antidote to the bustling city, stay at the George (above) in the exclusive suburb of Ikoyi, on Lagos Island.


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VOGUEtravel

VIEW The lighthouse at the top of the Palacio Barolo office building in Monserrat offers superb views of the Congreso de la Nación (the National House of Representatives) and the River Plate. When it was built by architect Mario Palanti in 1923, it was the tallest structure in South America.

READ Written by one of the country’s best-known authors and journalists, Tomás Eloy Martínez, Santa Evita is based on the fascinating – and controversial – life of Argentinian icon Eva Perón.

THE KNOWLEDGE Hidden behind a graffiti-covered wall in the district of Palermo is Tegui, Argentina’s best restaurant (and 68th in the world). It’s the brainchild of Germán Martitegui. Try the wild partridge with pumpkin and mandarin purée and the cumin meringue with green apple and fernet syrup.

Buenos Aires The city’s stately European façade belies its Latin soul. By Mariana Rapoport

STAY Home Hotel epitomises the relaxed, hip vibe of Palermo Viejo’s neighbourhood. With its vintage feel and a prime location just a short walk from BA’s trendiest bars and restaurants, this boutique hotel has a peaceful garden with a pool and a bar for a quiet drink under the stars.

FASHION

Run by chefs Pedro Peña and Germán Sitz, La Carnicería is a parilla (grill) offering signature sharing plates such as honey-glazed sweetbreads and grilled goat’s cheese provoleta with peaches. Don’t leave without a gin and tonic made with Príncipe de los Apóstoles, one of the best gins in Argentina. Also try Casa Cavia, a chic concept store that’s home to a plush restaurant (above and inset) headed by chef Pablo Massey, and Peruvian eatery La Mar, whose ceviche mixto is a variety of fresh fish and seafood with tiger milk and rocoto. 144

LISTEN Argentina has a thriving young alternative indie scene. Check out local bands Francisca & Los Exploradores and Las Ligas Menores.

ART The Malba Museum’s collection includes Antonio Berni’s Manifestación (1934, above) and Frida Kahlo’s Self-portrait with Monkey and Parrot (1942).

COLLECTION MALBA, MUSEO DE ARTE LATINOAMERICANO DE BUENOS AIRES; SANDRA DESAUTELS; SHUTTERSTOCK; GETTY

EAT

BOERR YARDE BULLER

Designers Martín Boerr and Agustin Yarde Buller are known for their streetwise urban chic. Find their label at Tupa, a hidden shop on Lafinur Street, alongside hip local brands such as Erdia, which is famed for its stylish leather totes and handbags.


Æ


VOGUEreport

The world is not ENOUGH FROM THE AFRICAN BUSH TO COPACABANA TO THE FRONT ROW AT DIOR, WILL THE VIRTUAL EVER REPLACE THE REALITY? NICOLE MOWBRAY DONS HER HEADSET TO EXPLORE rouching low amid the sparse vegetation of the African bush, a trio of lion cubs lollop towards me. Our eyes meet. Branches crack. It’s hot, bright and as the evening sun beats down, I spin around to find myself completely alone. Bathed in a golden light, the cubs come within a few centimetres, their already-giant paws crunching through the long grass and off into the distance.

KENNETH WILLARDT/TRUNK ARCHIVE; 360 DESIGN

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Seconds later, the C-shaped curve of Rio’s Copacabana reveals itself from a rooftop swimming pool 16 floors up. It’s a cloudless day and Sugarloaf Mountain is visible at the mouth of Guanabara Bay far in the distance. Then I’m in the middle of a crowd of partygoers dancing the samba in a favela, drinks raised aloft, before riding a thermal, bird-like, high above Ipanema beach on a paraglider, able to gaze up, down and all around as

A Mini Eye virtual reality camera in action at this year’s Academy Awards

seemingly miniature cars and office blocks the size of Lego bricks zip by hundreds of feet below. All I can hear is the whistle of the wind in my ears. If all this sounds unrealistic, that’s because it is. Indeed, it’s rather a letdown to find myself still perched in my south London sitting room when I leave the virtual-reality (VR) world. In VR – the much-hyped, much-talkedabout and certainly much-investedin new storytelling format – the impossible is seemingly made possible. Mind-blowing and incredibly lucrative (more on which later), if 2016 has had one big tech buzz-phrase, it’s VR. The promise is great: simply by strapping on a headset that looks not dissimilar to a pair of skiing goggles, viewers can be instantly transported to another place or time. Want to be on the front row at a fashion show? No problem. Balenciaga’s a/w ’16 show (the first masterminded by change-maker Demna Gvasalia) was broadcast in virtual reality, meaning anyone with a headset could take a seat. Meanwhile, both Raf Simons (in his final show for Dior) and Hussein Chalayan have released 360-degree videos of their shows – and Dior has launched its own VR headset, Dior Eyes. As Chalayan told Dazed magazine earlier this year, “I’m excited about VR because it gives the viewer an experience removed from both space and time.” Whether the medium will revolutionise the fashion industry in the same way that online retail has remains to be seen, but that’s certainly the aim. As well as making luxury more accessible than ever (how many people have the opportunity to sit front row at a Paris show without the aid of VR?), it has cost-cutting potential. Designers can use it to bring sketches to life, providing an immersive 360-degree look at pieces pre-production. Virtual-reality development company Trillenium is using the technology to create a “virtual shop” for its backer Asos, which will enable shoppers to wander “stores” in cyberspace. VR mirrors – long talked about – are coming to fruition, too. The secret to all this is the screen inside a VR headset that plays videos recorded panoramically. These are made using a > 149


VOGUEreport

Top: Hussein Chalayan’s a/w ’16 show was filmed in 360 degrees. Above: Björk’s pioneering “Stonemilker” video. Left: Trillenium is working with Asos to create a “virtual shop” accessible by headset

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ndeed they are, because virtual reality has come a long way from its computer-gaming roots. It’s now seriously big business. Facebook bought premium VR headset manufacturer Oculus in 2014 for $2 billion and, according to the website TechCrunch, more than $1.2 billion was invested in VR technology in the first three months of 2016. Adweek quotes other research predicting that more than 52 million virtual-reality headsets will be sold in America by 2020, and global search queries on Google increased fourfold over the past year. Last November, The New York Times gave away one million of Google’s “Cardboard” viewing headsets to its subscribers, which could be used alongside a smartphone and the paper’s dedicated app to access special VR stories. Similarly, the BBC screened the Rio Olympics earlier this year in VR. If things continue on this trajectory, advocates claim immersive experiences will become the default way we consume everything from news to films. Acclaimed actor and director Jon Favreau has worked on VR projects with Scarlett Johansson, Bill Murray and Christopher Walken. And Hollywood filmmaker Robert Stromberg, who has won Academy Awards for his work on Avatar and Alice in Wonderland, is also the cofounder of Los Angeles-based studio the Virtual Reality Company, which has Steven Spielberg as an adviser. “VR is a completely new medium that has the potential to change the world,” says Stromberg. “As a viewer, you can create a narrative story and

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become either a part of that storyline or observe in a way that you’ve never been able to before… It’s like watching a play. The viewer has the option to choose where they want to look and what they want to see.” It’s making waves in culture, too. The National Theatre has a virtualreality studio, and last year the Barbican held a VR-based exhibition. But it’s Björk who is trailblazing the medium as an art form (her VR exhibition is at Somerset House until October 23). Long hailed as a pioneer in music videos, she last year released “Stonemilker”, a private performance of a track from her Vulnicura album. Shot on location on a remote, windswept Icelandic beach, the video is viewable in full 360-degree VR, providing a virtual one-to-one recital. “One of the strengths of virtual reality is that it has a huge impact on the viewer,” says Farkas. “I don’t think anything can rival the intimacy and the closeness you feel to a story when you are viewing it in this way. The memories you form of being in virtual reality make a deeper, more permanent

and more emotional impact than with other media.” Alejandra Quesada, producer at the Virtual Reality Company, believes VR connects with women more profoundly than with men. “VR seems to heighten women’s senses, their intuition,” she says. “Guys really love VR, but there’s a certain sense of wonderment I’ve seen in every woman who’s experienced it.” VR has revolutionised medicine, with surgeons using it to visualise operations – such as open-heart surgery – before a patient goes into theatre. “Cedars-Sinai hospital here in Los Angeles is working a lot with VR, and many hospitals are integrating it,” says Quesada. “There’s research into stroke recovery using the headsets to aid physical therapy. It’s also been shown to help people with depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, phobias and seasonal affective disorder.” Robert Stromberg goes one step further. “This will be how we will socialise in the future,” he tells me from LA. “This phone call wouldn’t need to happen; we would both choose a place and time, put our headsets on and meet in a virtual space to talk.” Yet it’s the potential for education that Nate Mitchell, co-founder of Oculus, says he is most excited about.

“The memories you form of being in virtual reality make a deeper impact than with other media” “Virtual field trips to museums are already possible, but it will soon be feasible for a class of kids to put on headsets and visit the moon or the Colosseum,” he says. “This is truly hands-on learning.” But could it put an end to plane travel? Stromberg says that when people start having meetings in VR, it will be on the cards. “You will have that option… It will not only potentially save time, but can also give people the chance to do things and experience places they would never have thought possible in their lifetime.” Q

ANDREW THOMAS HUANG; TRILLENIUM

special rig of cameras that film in several different directions at the same time. Each recording is then “stitched” together by a computer to make a spherical picture which, when viewed through a headset, provides an immersive experience, altering the perspective of the video to mimic your body’s movements. “You have some of the biggest companies in the world – Google and Facebook – risking their reputations, and their capital, to make virtual reality the future medium for all of us,” says Jason Farkas, vice president of premium content video for CNN, who spearheads the network’s rapidly growing stream of immersive content, including live VR videos from breaking news events such as the Paris and Brussels terrorist attacks. “The leaders of those companies are willing to throw a lot of money into the technology.”


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VOGUEchecklist

Cashmere, ruffles and glittering heels – make luxe your watchword this winter. Plus, seasonal skin-savers and the perfect weekend escape Edited by JO HOLLEY MARC CAIN WOOLLEN COAT, £455, MARC-CAIN. COM

Get set, glow As the weather turns colder, skin can lose its lustre. Restore radiance with these four hero products

EQUIPMENT LONG FLORAL DRESS, £610, AT HARRODS. COM

BARE MINERALS SKINLONGEVITY VITAL POWER INFUSION, £45, BAREMINERALS. CO.UK

SISLEY BLACK ROSE PRECIOUS FACE OIL, £136, SISLEY-PARIS. CO.UK

DR SEBAGH ROSE DE VIE CREAM CLEANSER,£32, DRSEBAGH.COM

BA&SH SILK DRESS, £320, BA-SH.COM

VALENTINO NAVY WOOL COAT, £2,880, VALENTINO. COM

SWEEP STAKES

GLEN LUCHFORD; PAUL WETHERELL; JODY TODD; PIXELATE.BIZ

Conjure up a sense of occasion with floor-skimming coats and boldly printed maxi dresses

Swing time Meet your new weekday bag. These put a fresh twist on classic shapes.

JEROME DREYFUSS LEATHER, £300, THEOUTNET.COM

SENSAI WRINKLE REPAIR CREAM, £160, AT HARRODS. COM

The Outnet has teamed up with Jerome Dreyfuss to create a collection of nine covetable bags

LONGCHAMP LEATHER, £1,330, LONGCHAMP.COM

SAINT LAURENT VELOURS WITH TASSELS, £760, YSL.COM

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VOGUEchecklist

STRAP HAPPY Timeless and versatile, the MaryJanes to wear now feature velvet, tweed and embellished block heels.

STUART WEITZMAN VELVET, £328, STUARTWEITZMAN.COM

FRILL SEEKER

Embrace ruffles with this super-soft cashmere jumper. £325, Chintiandparker.com KATE SPADE VELVET, £295, KATESPADE.CO.UK

KURT GEIGER TWEED, £99, KURTGEIGER.COM

Set in stone The art of inlay is demonstrated perfectly in this brilliant diamond and smoky-quartz ring by Boghossian. Price on request, Bogh-art.com

Smooth operator Winter hair needs extra care to keep it looking lustrous. Tame frazzled, stressedout locks with these nourishing and smoothing remedies.

Moncler’s new threefloor flagship store on Old Bond Street, designed by Gilles & Boissier, will showcase lines including Moncler Gamme Bleu and Gamme Rouge, as well as the ranges for men, women and children.

KERASTASE L’INCROYABLE BLOWDRY LOTION, £21, KERASTASE. CO.UK

BIRD’S EYE VIEW

Italian label Golden Goose puts an urban spin on athletic footwear.

GOLDEN GOOSE VELVET SNEAKERS, £265, GOLDENGOOSEDELUXEBRAND.COM

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AVEDA DAMAGE REMEDY INTENSIVE RESTRUCTURING TREATMENT, £29.50, AVEDA.CO.UK

RAHUA ELIXIR DAILY HAIR DROPS, £93, RAHUA.COM

PATRICK DEMARCHELIER; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; PAUL BOWDEN

OPEN NOW

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Soft touch

Frond memories Bring botanicals inside with House of Hackney’s palm-print cushion, or try the Rug Company’s alphabet version. £155, Houseofhackney.com; £110, Therugcompany.com

Calvin Klein’s Cashmere Collection is a 23-piece capsule range that will form the backbone of your winter wardrobe. With ribbed turtlenecks, sweater dresses, heavyweight tunics and long-line cardigans to choose from, this is understated, wear-anywhere luxury at its finest. Calvinklein.com

CALVIN KLEIN SKIRT, £690, CALVINKLEIN.COM

CALVIN KLEIN TUNIC, £1,310, CALVINKLEIN.COM

BARCELONA CALLING

Time keeper

WHERE TO STAY The Cotton House Hotel makes the perfect base for a long weekend in Barcelona. Its restaurant and cocktail bar open out on to a lush

The Rolex Lady-Datejust 26 in steel and 18-carat yellow gold is a true investment piece. Buy now, wear forever. £5,350, Rolex.com

ATELIER SWAROVSKI BY ROSIE ASSOULIN CRYSTAL EARRINGS, £249, ATELIERSWAROVSKI.COM

terrace, left, and the rooms, above, make elegant use of the building’s original 19th-century features. There’s a rooftop pool, too. From about £210 a night. Hotelcottonhouse. com

Stone fox Play the green goddess with these striking statement pieces

GEMPORIA EMERALD STACKING RING IN ROSE-GOLD VERMEIL, £41.99, GEMPORIA.COM

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MUZO LOOSE EMERALDS, PRICE ON REQUEST, MUZO.CO

AYA EMERALD AND GOLD EARRINGS, £1,380, AYA. CO.UK

MING JEWELLERY EMERALD AND GOLD CATERPILLAR RING, £18,000, MINGJEWELLERY.COM


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vogue

EMILY BLUNT, PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOSH OLINS. STYLIST: CLARE RICHARDSON. HAIR: DUFFY. MAKE-UP: TOM PECHEUX

Satin bomber jacket, from £625, from a selection, Coach. Cotton T-shirt, £70, T by Alexander Wang. Cropped jeans, £232, AG, at Harrods. Gold alphabet pendants, from £130 each. Gold chain, from £95. All Helen Ficalora

the REAL issue

Real women, real clothes, real life. Yes, fashion regularly invites us to dream, it ignites ideas of glamour and fantasy – but isn’t it also simply about clothes, and speciically the clothes we choose to wear? Whether that equates to blue jeans, a T-shirt and a baseball jacket, a tailored suit cut for the corporate world, say, or a taste for something a little wilder, in this issue we replace models with a series of professional women and explore our abiding relationship with what hangs in our wardrobes


HOUSE

style

AN ICE-CREAM AFICIONADO, A CHARITY DIRECTOR, A BALLERINA… DESIGNERS NOMINATE CREATIVELY MINDED WOMEN TO BE PHOTOGRAPHED IN THIS SEASON’S LOOKS Photographs by Paul Wetherell. Styling by Verity Parker

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Shumi Bose, architectural historian, wears MAX MARA “I don’t always trust myself to be very elegant – I was a tomboy as a kid and am still learning how to be a woman – so if I wear something beautiful, I try to corrupt it with some costume jewellery from Calcutta, or a hairband that my mum knitted. At the moment, I live for batwings.” Wool jumpsuit, £218, Max Mara. Patent-leather and satin sneakers, £575, Roger Vivier. Throughout, hair: Neil Moodie. Make-up: Niamh Quinn. Nails: Pebbles Aikens. Set design: Max Bellhouse. Digital artwork: Tablet Retouch

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Charlotte Ranson, ballerina, wears GIORGIO ARMANI

“Not only is Charlotte beautiful, she is also strong, passionate and determined. Like all great dancers, she knows the meaning of hard work and commitment, as well as the physical challenges of constant training, while her body seems to know no limits in expressing extraordinary, seemingly effortless harmony.” Giorgio Armani Cotton/silk jacket, £1,950. Drawstring silk trousers, £830. Both Giorgio Armani. Sports bra, Charlotte’s own

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Deniz Gamze Ergüven, film director, wears CHANEL “Chanel has accompanied me and the actresses of Mustang, which I directed, ever since the early stages of the film’s life. I think we share a common ideal of women: free and irreverent. A little touch of Chanel – whether it’s a drop of perfume, a watch or an accessory – makes me feel completely dressed.” Cotton T-shirt, £560. Tweed skirt, £3,580. Sequined beret, £600. All Chanel. Beauty note: a subtle smoky eye adds an intriguing sense of sophistication. Try Chanel Les 4 Ombres Multi-Effect Eyeshadow in Mystic Eyes, £40, for an array of iridescent and matt hues

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Quentin Jones, artist, wears GUCCI “I don’t know if I am naturally stylish. I am drawn to things that are visually interesting, but ask myself if I could see someone whom I consider to be chic wearing it. Often the answer is no.” Wool sweater with lace inserts, £2,200. Wool cardigan with silk lining, £1,460. Pleated wool kilt with sequined patch, £1,840. Striped wool sweater, tied at waist, £725. All Gucci

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Skye Gyngell, chef, wears CHLOE “My job dictates that I wear a uniform every day: chef’s trousers and a chef’s jacket. To be honest, I really like that. It’s a great equaliser, and I never worry about what I look like. I’ve always loved Chloé, and I have a lot of the bags – my favourite is a large, very glossy red one that I named pappardelle al pomodoro after the delicious Tuscan breadand-tomato soup. I find beauty in imperfection – I love produce that has character – and I think it’s the same with people.”

“One of the most memorable moments I have shared with Skye was watching her and the team beaver away in my kitchen in Paris for an event for 150 people I was hosting. My three children were constantly under her feet, eagerly waiting for a dip in the mixtures. It was like having your best friend around to help with dinner.” Clare Waight Keller White embroidered silk blouse, from £475. Matching skirt, from £610. Tan leather sandals, from £515. Rings, from £175 each. All Chloé

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Anh Duong, artist, wears DOLCE & GABBANA “I’m 55, and at this stage of my life I’m excited to be photographed and representing women in their fifties. As a little girl I used to dress up and create a world where I felt everything was possible and safe. Today, regardless of age, I’m still doing it with fashion.”

“We have known Anh Duong since forever because she walked for the first time for our 1987/88 autumn/winter show. She is a woman who never stops; she’s passionate about cinema, art and theatre. Right after this shoot she flew to Naples for our Alta Moda show and we danced together every night. She almost seemed like a Mediterranean woman.” Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana Lace pyjama jacket, £1,850. Matching trousers, £1,400. Suede courts, from a selection. All Dolce & Gabbana

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Jane Hutchison, creative director of the Hello Love Studio and founder of the Hello Beautiful Foundation, wears STELLA McCARTNEY “Every October, during Breast Cancer Awareness month, Stella runs a campaign for Hello Beautiful and donates the proceeds to the Foundation. The piece of hers that really stands out in my mind is the post-double-mastectomy bra she has created. It makes you feel so womanly and beautiful during a difficult time.”

“Jane was introduced by a mutual friend in 2014. We wanted to partner with a charity that really helps women through their battles with breast cancer by focusing not only on awareness but also a support network for the patients and their families. The Hello Beautiful Foundation gives women a place to find physical and emotional support.” Stella McCartney Polka-dot-print silk dress, £1,395. Dog-print silk dress, £1,395. Both Stella McCartney. Velvet heels, £625, Jimmy Choo

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Kitty Travers, founder of La Grotta Ices, wears HERMES “Making ice cream is hot work so I need to wear lightweight white clothes that are cool and don’t shed fibres. I’m on my feet all day, so I’m waiting for someone to design non-hideous support socks. My dream workwear is a Parmesanmaker’s uniform, but I love to be dazzled by clever and beautiful fashion design.”

“Kitty embodies a real woman to me – the way she set up La Grotta Ices was full of integrity, passion and poetry. She has a natural grace and understanding of the tradition of her craft, which she employs to create exciting experiences – much like Hermès.” Nadège Vanhee-Cybulski Cotton-poplin shirt, £620. Cotton-organza top, £850. Cropped wool trousers, £1,070. Leather belt and earrings, price on request. All Hermès

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Maureen Paley, gallerist, wears ERDEM “Being in a gallery means that I choose neutral colours, mainly black, to allow the art to do the talking. I’ve developed a style that’s elegant, with a gothic twist. Erdem has a brilliance and wit that is deeply attractive. I also love that he collects art and understands it in the spirit of older designers now departed, like Christian Dior.”

“Before I knew Maureen I bought a piece of art from her gallery, but we met properly through mutual friends. Since then we have had many dinners, talking about everything except dresses. Her eye is so compelling; so, too, her unwavering belief in the new and her ability to see possibility. She’s a total individual.” Erdem Moralioglu Black embroidered silk cape, £3,360, Erdem

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Kim Sion, creative consultant, wears J W ANDERSON “What does ‘real’ mean to me? Being yourself.”

“I’ve known Kim for a long time, but we first met properly on a Fantastic Man shoot with David Sims. She’s smart, strong – she has a tough and a feminine side – but, most compellingly, she has great taste.” J onathan Anderson Leather top, £1,090. Cotton-twill harem trousers, £780. Both JW Anderson

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PAUL WETHERELL


Cheyenne Westphal, forthcoming chairman of Phillips auction house, wears PRADA “I’m very lucky – the art world allows you to experiment with fashion.” Black cashmere poloneck, £700. Black drawstring skirt, £455. Leather heels, from a selection. All Prada


Phoebe Collings-James, artist, wears BURBERRY “I remember buying a vintage mac as a teenager, which was my first piece of Burberry. I thought I was very cool.”

“Phoebe is an exciting and inspiring British artist with a wonderful raw and energetic talent.” Christopher Bailey Cotton jacket, £1,295. Striped cotton/ silk coat, £1,295. Striped cotton blouse, £450. Striped cotton/silk trousers, £595. All Burberry. Beauty note: a perfect canvas is the key to any masterpiece. Blend Burberry Fresh Glow Luminous Fluid Base, £34, into skin for a flawlessly radiant complexion

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Brita Fernandez Schmidt, executive director of Women For Women International UK, wears MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION “My work takes me all over the world, from meeting women in remote villages in Rwanda to refugee camps in northern Iraq, high-powered meetings in government and A-list launches in New York. I am really passionate about building the confidence of women who have suffered the unimaginable – bereavement, torture, sexual violence. Fashion can play a very important role in this for many women across the world.”

“Brita’s dedication and unwavering support of women around the world is inspiring. Passionate, sophisticated and chic to boot, she is exactly the type of woman I’m thinking about when I design.” Michael Kors Silk shirtdress, £1,990, Michael Kors Collection

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Catherine Pawson, interior designer, wears CHRISTOPHER KANE “I introduced myself to Christopher Kane at a party at the American Embassy. My husband, John, had just been appointed to design his Mount Street store, and I embarrassingly took a selfie with him. I have largely lost my way with fashion; I have a tendency to buy clothes that are too small for me as I think I am thinner than I am. I make many mistakes, but I’m always complimented whenever I wear Christopher’s clothes. I’ve actually bought the leather jacket I am wearing in the shoot twice. I lost it once on a flight, and was so bereft that I bought it again.” Cotton and tulle pleated gingham dress, £2,295, Christopher Kane. Leather jacket, Catherine’s own. Black patent-leather heels, £480, Manolo Blahnik

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Polly Stenham, playwright, wears CELINE

“Céline makes you feel beautiful without compromising. The clothes are powerful and elegant, and there’s an artistry that is innate to the brand. Phoebe makes clothes that do what only truly beautiful clothes can – they transform.” Cloqué dress, from £1,910. Leather boots, from £1,450. Both Céline

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Fatima Bhutto, writer, wears MISSONI “We don’t meet often and we are far away from each other in the world – I live out of a suitcase and am always travelling – but the Missonis have always been supportive of me. Fashion is freedom – it’s a place for women to test boundaries and move according to their moods and choices. I can’t say I think too much about it, but I don’t like to be told what to wear.”

“Fatima is an intense woman who looks unique and colourful. Furthermore, she’s an authoritative voice of Pakistan. She embodies the best of Western and Eastern cultures. I find her energy and aura extremely contemporary.” Angela Missoni Striped knit sweater, £610. Matching trousers, £860. Both Missoni

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Fiona Scarry, director of special projects at Rose Uniacke, wears FENDI “I love elegance and clothes that feel structured. My style is quite classic but striking and feminine; I’m mostly inspired by the Forties.”

“I first met Fiona through my daughter [jewellery designer Delfina Delettrez]. Fiona is a friend of hers and loves her work. Personally, I love Fiona’s style – minimal but always with a quirky touch, which really reflects her rigour and brilliant intelligence. To me, she embodies the contemporary British woman.” Silvia Fendi Asymmetric sleeve cotton dress, from a selection. Leather heels, from a selection. Both Fendi

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Es Devlin, set designer, wears LOUIS VUITTON “I call my style ‘minimalist ninja’ – and I’m allergic to anything that I can’t walk really fast in. I wear mainly black, and then as many talismanic amulets as I can fit around my neck.” Studded leather top, £6,500. Sequined dress, £7,500. Red leather parka, to order. All Louis Vuitton

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Kate Unsworth, CEO of consumer technology company Vinaya, wears RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION “As an Eighties baby, I’ve always idolised Ralph Lauren. It’s my go-to for those understatedly chic staples that take me from brainstorming consumer technology ideas in the studio to reading scientific reports in a meeting room to being out and about meeting potential partners or investors. This shoot made me feel like a ballerina – always a bonus.” Fringed suede biker jacket, £5,445. Pleated velvet evening dress, £4,355. Both Ralph Lauren Collection. Leather Chelsea boots, £405, Church’s. Vinaya pendant, Kate’s own. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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Emily Blunt’s career has taken a straight upward trajectory, encompassing action movies, indies, bigbudget musicals and gritty dramas Ponyskin coat, £8,115, Bottega Veneta. Hair: Duffy. Make-up: Tom Pecheux. Nails: Elle. Production: Moxie Productions. Digital artwork: Gloss


It took THREE HOURS of hair and MAKE-UP to get me looking THIS REAL! Straight-talking Brit Emily Blunt has conquered Hollywood, New York, motherhood and stardom. Now she’s set to win over the box office with her lead role in the big-screen dramatisation of Paula Hawkins’s hit novel, The Girl on the Train. Is there anything she can’t do, asks Marisa Meltzer Photographs by Josh Olins. Styling by Clare Richardson

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n a large studio in Long Island City, a neighbourhood of art galleries and warehouses, all is very quiet. Beyond a spread of food, none of which contains even a speck of gluten, behind a breast pump and rails of size 26 Frame Denim jeans, clusters of people have gathered in tight circles to whisper about the need for security on the shoot. For a moment I wonder if Emily Blunt, currently sitting in silence upstairs in make-up, is perhaps a bit of a diva – at odds entirely with how compellingly likeable she is on screen. Then Blunt descends the staircase, newly buttery blonde, 5ft 7in and slender, with those perfectly rosy, perpetually pouting lips. Nestled in her arms is a tiny sleeping baby with fuzzy brown hair. “My little bean finds the photoshoots boring. Can you imagine?” she laughs. It is quickly apparent that the careful vibe on set was to ensure that Violet, just seven weeks old, would be able to sleep. Later, Blunt’s other daughter, two-and-a-half-year-old Hazel, shows up on set, too. She looks just like a blonde version of John Krasinski, Blunt’s actor-writer husband, who is best known for playing the Martin Freeman role on the American version of The Office. Blunt is clearly an easy presence to be around. She laughs a lot. And it

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is a big, conspiratorial laugh, which begs its audience to join in. I tell her it seems almost cruel to have to be photographed just weeks after giving birth. “Let’s just say that there are certain angles that are better than others,” she says, her big, knowing eyes flashing. For the record, she looks better than most people do at their very best. And it is swelteringly hot today. But Blunt is a professional. When she’s being photographed, she gazes intently into the camera as if she’s looking at someone she loves and respects. She moves deliberately, changing her eyes or the purse of her lips with each click of the shutter. I tell her that this cover story will grace Vogue’s Real Issue, documenting the lives of real women. “It took three hours of hair and make-up to get me looking this real!” she jokes. Although she also tells me – and on a shoot for a Vogue cover story it doesn’t get more real than this – that “earlier I started to lactate on these designer clothes and I was like, ‘I need to go and pump!’” Blunt has been on the receiving end of the media’s attitude to “real” female bodies. A couple of months ago, when she was still heavily pregnant, the Daily Mail reported on a trip the actress took to a farmers’ market in California with her husband and daughter. “I was wearing these bright purple harem pants that were stretchy. And my friend, who likes to inform me of these things,

“The article said, ‘Emily Blunt, slumming it, wearing the same purple sweatpants two days in a row’” sent me the link to the article which said, ‘Emily Blunt, slumming it, wearing the same pair of purple sweatpants two days in a row. She must be running out of things to wear,’” she recalls, paraphrasing. “I was like, ‘No shit! Yes! I am!’” The Vogue cover story shot, Blunt and I meet the day after to walk and talk in Brooklyn’s Botanical Gardens. The actress is wearing a floral dress, sandals and brown sunglasses, and when, half a block away, she sees me, she bellows a very British “Hellooo!” as she waves madly. Either no one recognises her

or jaded New Yorkers are somehow accustomed to A-list actors gesticulating in their midst. For the past decade, Blunt’s career has taken a straight upward trajectory, encompassing action movies (Edge of Tomorrow, with Tom Cruise), critically praised indies (Your Sister’s Sister), bigbudget musicals (Into the Woods), and gritty dramas (Sicario). And this month she stars in the film adaptation of the 2015 novel The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins’s psychological thriller which sold 11 million copies worldwide and occupied the number-one spot on the hardback book chart longer than any other book ever. Without revealing too much, the story begins like this: every weekday, Rachel (played by Blunt) catches the 08.04 from Ashbury to London Euston and returns on the 17.56 (the film version is set in New York). And she does this even though, it transpires, she was sacked a couple of months earlier for being drunk at work. Even more disconcerting is her obsession with a couple – she names them Jason and Jess – whose house she passes on her pointless commute. Then “Jess” goes missing, as Rachel reads in the paper, and she believes she has some vital information. Blunt’s approach to portraying a character known to millions – it is Rachel who carries the narrative – was to make her wholly her own. She gave her a backstory. “I always saw Rachel as a party girl before she started really hitting the booze. I thought she was a real good-time girl, and then when she wanted the white-picket-fence life and the baby, maybe that wasn’t a good fit for her,” says Blunt. “Wanting that life is something that becomes an addiction, as opposed to it actually being what was right for her.” It was Blunt’s first time playing an alcoholic. She took the role seriously, and informed it with a great deal of research – partly because it was a stretch for her to relate to the condition. “I don’t have a remotely addictive personality and so I needed to understand the mindset, and that it was an illness, rather than it being a choice,” she says. So she read books on depression and addiction, and talked extensively to two recovering alcoholics. She also watched the > JOSH OLINS


High-voltage sex appeal comes down to earth for great everyday style. All you need to add to Isabel Marant’s slick scarlet mac is attitude Vinyl trench coat, £925, Isabel Marant


Blunt had little intention of becoming an actress. “I was quite inspired to work in the UN and be a translator” Mohair sweater, £980, Fendi. Patentleather skirt, £1,600, Bottega Veneta

JOSH OLINS


television programme Intervention, which takes in everything from crystal meth to sex addiction. Sometimes she almost felt drowned by Rachel. And Blunt does allow herself to look really terrible in the film, with broken capillaries dotting her cheeks, slurred speech and a vile pallor. “John saw it and went, ‘You look like a ghoul!’” she laughs. In an ironic twist for a story so much about wanting and failing to have a child, Blunt found out she was pregnant with Violet a week before filming began. About two months into the shoot, before she had told anyone, she and her co-star Justin Theroux – who is a close friend of hers and Krasinski’s (and husband to Jennifer Aniston) – were blocking out an important scene. “I had to stand up really quickly and was worried I was going to tweak something. I said, ‘Maybe I could just get up slowly?’” Theroux took her aside. She had starred in action films – something didn’t add up. “And then he goes, ‘Are you pregnant?’ And I go, ‘Yes, don’t tell anyone.’ He was like, ‘I knew it!’ So he didn’t tell anyone, not even Jen.” Blunt sounds satisfied at this demonstration of loyalty.

GETTY; REX FEATURES

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he actress met Krasinski in Los Angeles in 2008, where both were working and living. They married two years later on Lake Como (staying at George Clooney’s luxury estate beforehand). Together they live a fairly normal life. Much of Blunt’s off-camera time is spent in pyjamas or jeans, chasing after her daughter. She and Krasinski have the same interests as the rest of us: watching television (The Sopranos or America’s Got Talent – “I just sit there weeping at talented people”), going to the theatre or art openings, and “drinking very cold martinis. John is more into the white wine,” says Blunt. “He has the girl drink.” Spending time with Blunt is genuinely fun. When I almost walk past a ticket booth for the garden, she accuses me of trying to get in for free. “Botanical rebels,” she calls us. And then when we sit down on a bench to further discuss her professional life bursting with high-octane glamour, she sighs,

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“I’m just getting that lovely upperlip sweat.” Blunt could have good rapport with a tree. She and Krasinski only settled in Brooklyn a few months ago, after moving from Los Angeles. She chose the borough because it reminded her of her childhood home. “I grew up in Roehampton, near Richmond Park in London. Richmond Park is remarkable – open and expansive, quite meadow-y – and I remember walking into Prospect Park in Brooklyn and feeling an overwhelming wave of nostalgia,” she says. Plus, John’s family is in the Boston area and hers is in London, and New York was significantly closer than LA to both locations. In fact, her parents are due to arrive tomorrow to meet Violet for the first time. Blunt’s family is tight-knit: she has three siblings and two loving parents – her father is a barrister and her mother a former actress and English teacher. She went to boarding school in Surrey, at Hurtwood House, where she had little intention of becoming an actress. “I really loved languages,” she recalls. “I spoke really good Spanish, which I get from my mum who is a fantastic linguist, and I was quite inspired to work in the UN and be a translator.” Then, at about the same time that she went raving in the arches under London Bridge Station during her school holidays, Blunt made a very brief foray into the music industry, after her mother asked her brother’s friend’s father – who happened to be Pete

She and her husband like to watch America’s Got Talent: “I just sit there weeping at talented people” Townshend from the Who – for work experience for her daughter. Townshend sent Blunt to man a stall at Glastonbury Festival. “I remember just driving off with these random people with long hair, watching my parents’ alarmed eyes as they stood at our front door wondering if they’d ever see me again,” she says, laughing. “I was wearing wellies and denim cut-offs, and when I was there someone actually fell down the toilet. I >

From top: Emily Blunt and John Krasinski at the 2013 Critics’ Choice Movie Awards; as Rachel in The Girl on the Train; with Jennifer Aniston at the 2015 Critics’ Choice Movie Awards, where Blunt won Best Actress in an Action Movie

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“Something that I would have said without a second thought in England became quite a big story over here”

Top: sci-fi action in Edge of Tomorrow, with Tom Cruise (2014). Above: the 2014 musical Into the Woods, with James Corden and Meryl Streep. Right: actionthriller Sicario (2015). Below: with Rosemarie DeWitt in the 2011 indie-drama Your Sister’s Sister

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nameless. It was a rather cheap impersonation, I’m afraid. The tendency was to play her bitchy but I think she’s just really desperate,” Blunt pauses. “And hungry as shit.” In an unexpected turn of events, four years after the film premiered, the actress’s co-star Stanley Tucci became part of her family. One of the guests at her 2010 wedding, Tucci “managed to weasel his way into my life permanently,” she remembers with a fond smile, when he met her literary agent sister Felicity and they fell in love dancing to “this fantastically dreadful Italian guy playing songs on a boat.” They were married two years later and now live in London. And this year, Blunt will be working once again with Meryl Streep, when she takes on one of the best-loved of all British roles, Mary Poppins, in a new screen version of the old classic, directed by Rob Marshall (Chicago, Pirates of the Caribbean). The film is so eagerly anticipated that she can’t say much, but what she will say is that this version is set later than the Edwardian setting of the classic Julie Andrews version and is based on the later books. “She’s really mean to the kids,” says Blunt, “unashamedly so, yet has

this enigmatic masterplan which is what you fall in love with. I want to do something different. It’s a different tone and I feel strongly that the film can stand alone from the original.” This is, of course, a stellar leading female role and Blunt, like every other actress, is all too aware that not enough of these parts are written for women. “There’s such a shortage that when they do arise there’s a bit of a feeding frenzy among my peers,” she says. “It’s a very good thing that we keep talking about the issue. It’s a conversation that needs to continue. Although I would prefer that we actually go in a direction of producing and creating more jobs for women in the film industry as opposed to talking about it.” She doesn’t currently have a production company, but it’s on the horizon.

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ast year Blunt became an American citizen. Shortly afterwards she quipped in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter that after she had watched the Republican debate, she thought, “This was a terrible mistake. What have I done?’’ The joke didn’t go down well with the patriotic American public, and Blunt was hotly criticised by news anchors and Twitter critics alike. “I came under huge fire. I got really upset – the only time I cried over something written about me was then,” she says. “I hate getting into trouble. I hated it as a child, I hate it now. In England we poke fun at our public figures much more readily and we make fun of ourselves a lot. So something that I would have just said without a second thought in England became quite a big story over here in America.” But she will be back home in London for several months next year while filming Mary Poppins. Hazel will go to school in Blunt’s native city. “I’m going to knock out that American accent until it is gone,” she jokes, exasperated that her daughter is now pronouncing “water” with flat American vowels. For all her success and happiness Stateside, Blunt says she misses the British sense of humour, its irreverent attitude and pubs. “And a proper roast,” she says. “Haven’t found one here yet.” Q “The Girl on the Train” is out now

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don’t know if they survived. You’d hope they survived that.” She looks at me and rolls her eyes. “What a way to go!” Her Glastonbury experience didn’t entice her to pursue music further; instead her school drama teacher encouraged Blunt to take part in a play at Edinburgh Festival, and there she found an agent (who is still her British agent today). Ten years have passed since Blunt played the red-headed, highly strung, beleaguered Emily in The Devil Wears Prada and became an international household name. “She was based on somebody I know,” Blunt says of the performance, with a wry smile. “She’ll remain


Note the everyseason style combination that never goes out of fashion: cosy wool and acres of bare leg Camel wool sweater, £695, Bally. Burgundy leather miniskirt, from £550, Coach

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Champion a chunky knit with oldfashioned movie-star appeal. All eyes are currently on Dior’s burnt-orange number Ribbed wool poloneck, £760, Dior

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Fluff your lines: the new, easiergoing silhouette is all about The Row’s fuzzy sweater Black angora sweater, £690, The Row, at Net-a-Porter.com. Black corduroy skirt, £360, Bella Freud. Thanks to the Foundry, Long Island City. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

“There’s such a shortage of stellar parts for women that when they do arise, there’s a bit of a feeding frenzy”


Natural SELECTION A new guard of photographers is bringing a spontaneous, low-key mood to fashion. On these pages they capture the women who inspire them, while Lou Stoppard charts a quiet revolution

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Coco Capitán photographs Ophelia Finke Awarded an MA in photography by the RCA this year, Coco Capitán has already worked with Mulberry and Miu Miu. Here, she photographs the German installation artist Ophelia Finke. “Ophelia is a really good friend of mine,” she says. “We met at university and I was always attracted to her work, as it’s an extension of her own personality – and that makes her fascinating to photograph.” Opposite: leather jacket, from £1,440. Chaps, from £690. Both Alyx, at Machine-A and Selfridges. Patent-leather shoes, from £560, Céline. This page: off-the-shoulder leather jacket, £680, Diesel Black Gold. Mesh dress, £885, Sacai, at Dover Street Market. Vintage tracksuit bottoms, £25, Rokit. Leather boots, from £770, Courrèges. Location: Kenny Schachter/Rove Projects, London. Hair: Syd Hayes. Make-up: Niamh Quinn. Styling: Verity Parker

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Lea Colombo photographs Sylvia Farago Fashion producer Sylvia Farago’s clients include Céline, Gucci and Louis Vuitton. “I was instantly intrigued by Sylvia from the moment we met. She has so many crazy stories to tell you and certainly doesn’t shy away from telling them, which makes her great fun to be around,” Colombo explains. “She also has the best heavy-metal T-shirt collection, of which I am very envious.” Opposite: leather trench coat, £3,250. Jersey trousers, £455. Patent-leather boots, £515. All Balenciaga. T-shirt, Sylvia’s own. This page: leather trousers, £2,445, Louis Vuitton. T-shirt, Sylvia’s own. Make-up: Petros Petrohilos. Production: Streeters. Styling: Katie Franklin

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ow, everyone is a photographer. On an average day, 40 million images are shared on Instagram. Some 300 million users rely on pictures not only to chronicle their friendships, fashion choices, culinary achievements and holidays, but also their emotions, reactions and moods. More pictures are taken every two minutes than were shot during the entire 19th century. Today, we diarise visually – stories are told with filters rather than ink. Fashion photographer Nick Knight sees these changes as seismic. “The accessibility of photography today is allowing a new generation to come in and try things out,” he explains. “Because of social media, people can just pick up their phone and communicate. It’s more of a democracy. It shouldn’t be that only a few people with the right equipment and the right education can speak.” This mass movement has had a trickle-up effect. Visual culture is changing – we consume so many images that there’s an intense thirst for something new, something exciting, something refreshing. Fashion photography is experiencing a shake-up. Younger image-makers, often just a few years out of college or completely self-taught, have ushered in a new, low-key mood. In just a few seasons, talents such as Jamie Hawkesworth, Tyrone Lebon, Harley Weir, Zoë Ghertner and Colin Dodgson have gone from being the new guard to the new establishment, regularly working for Vogue and shooting campaigns for brands such as Alexander McQueen, Céline, Loewe, Miu Miu and Stella McCartney. What’s striking about their work is its simplicity; the everyday backgrounds, the sunlight, the lack of obvious retouching. Hawkesworth, Lebon and Weir are responsible for the now omnipresent #mycalvins series, which features street-cast models alongside famous faces such as Kate Moss and Bella Hadid posing in candid, intimate images that, on occasion, mimic selfies. On top of the images are captions that suggest status updates – “I flaunt/dream/flirt in #mycalvins”. The ads have sparked

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a thousand memes and parodies. How modern. The days when a few highly technically skilled – and largely male – image-makers dominated the fashion landscape are over. The new new guard is coming up – the likes of Oliver Hadlee Pearch, Lea Colombo, Johnny Dufort and Coco Capitán (photographers whose work is shown on these pages), four creatives from the next generation not only championing a new aesthetic but committed to fashion’s current priorities: acceptance, open communication, diversity, optimism and a freethinking approach to gender and sexuality. Their work, alongside that of other image-makers – Brianna Capozzi, Theo Sion (co-founder of the cult magazine Hot and Cool), Gosha Rubchinskiy (who runs his own thriving menswear label), Charlie Engman and Vicki King, to name a few – is a product of the times we live in. Capitán, a young Spanish photographer, explains, “I wouldn’t say that my work is a reaction to the digital life, but it

Unlike the ultra-worked images of yore, the work of these photographers suggests spontaneity definitely informs my practice. Sharing images on digital media has become inherent to our means of communication – we are using them to tell the world who we are, how we want to be seen or even what are we doing now. This makes me, as a photographer, question what it is that I am trying to communicate – and how to make my practice stand out from all that visual noise.” That sense of noise resonates with her peers. “There’s no doubt the new ways in which images are consumed – online platforms such as Instagram – have had an effect on me,” agrees the British photographer Johnny Dufort, who champions an undone aesthetic. “I think the unfinished elements I choose to include in my work come from seeing the speed in which people look at imagery.” In his case, rawness is used to jar or

surprise – a beautiful error among all the carefully “curated” feeds. For fellow Brit Oliver Hadlee Pearch, the key to standing out is messaging rather than just aesthetics. “I add in layers and aspects that I feel mean something. I do think fashion images are important. And we have to stand up. We must play a role in society. A big role. So many people see these images. So we have to comment. To engage.” He feels this responsibility keenly, given the number of people taking pictures each day. Fashion has become fashionable thanks to society’s new obsession with images. “I think for young people, being a ‘photographer’ now is sort of like wanting to be in a band. Fashion is cool. Young people want to be involved in it.” Much of the imagery by these new talents reflects a love for things that are ephemeral – it speaks to a generation who click away spontaneously, and are happy to see their images disappear after 24 hours on services such as Snapchat or Instagram Stories. Unlike the ultra-worked, glamorous fashion images of yore – all toned, stretched limbs, epic backdrops and shiny surfaces – the work of these photographers suggests spontaneity. It recalls carefree snapshots rather than carefully constructed performances – the impression is of a moment luckily captured rather than laboriously set up. A film devotee, who enjoys shooting out and about rather than in the studio, Jamie Hawkesworth relies on little equipment or fuss. His process is informed by his formative student years. He first started taking pictures while studying forensics, but quickly switched courses and people, rather than crime scenes, became his subject matter. “The first camera I got introduced to was a mediumformat RB67 [a flexible camera, which can easily be held in the hand], and from that moment I used it every single day, and learnt it inside out. I kept things extremely simple, only ever using this one camera and hand-printing photos. I think this simplicity naturally moved into the way I approached fashion – it was a familiar way of working.”


In the raw: left, “Earth Angel”, by Harley Weir, Vogue May 2016; below left, Zoë Ghertner’s “Modern Masters”, April 2015; below, Colin Dodgson’s “Moonage Daydream”, May 2016; bottom left, “A Walk in the Park”, Jamie Hawkesworth, April 2016; bottom, “First Light”, by Tyrone Lebon, February 2016

For Colin Dodgson, it’s about a certain passivity. He likes to respond to what naturally unfolds in front of him, rather than attempt to create a mood or event. The aim? Something candid. Images that suggest the subject maybe wasn’t even aware of the camera – a mood that responds to our society’s evergrowing love for voyeurism and intimacy. “More than anything, I want my work to feel personal. If you do something from a deep personal level then it tends to be relatable,” he says. Hawkesworth likes to toy with what is fantasy or aspirational. His pictures regularly feature street-cast characters, often children, alongside models, or place famous faces such as Kendall Jenner in seemingly incongruous, quotidian settings. “Street casts bring a level of authenticity into an idea, and bring an interesting dialogue between the real and the fabricated,” he muses. Lucy Moore, director of Claire de Rouen, a specialist art, photography and fashion bookshop in Soho, sees broader messages and priorities behind this new aesthetic. “The commitment to ‘raw’ imagery is partly intended to communicate a rejection of polish, refinement and perfection – the qualities associated with luxury. It gives the impression of being anti-aspirational.” “Fashion photography will always feed off fashion,” argues Dodgson. Indeed, the catwalk reflects this subtler, easier mood. Jeans rather than dresses dominate. Traditional heels have largely been abandoned.

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esigners such as Phoebe Philo at Céline promote a logo-less, refined luxury, wrapped up with slouch and nonchalance. This season’s buzziest brands, Vetements and Balenciaga, both helmed by Demna Gvasalia, peddle hoodies, ripped denims and oversized shirting and tailoring. You could call it anti-luxury. These labels reject traditional ideas of gender. They may toy with sensuality, but conventional notions of male and female beauty are rejected, as is the oversexualised imagery that dominated fashion for so long. Women > 248 195


Johnny Dufort photographs Lotta Volkova Lotta Volkova styles, casts and walks in Vetements’ shows. “Lotta and I are good friends and collaborate frequently on photoshoots,” says Dufort. “I admire her for not compromising her creative vision in any of the work she does; she is a maverick with a strong and unique perspective on the world, who constantly challenges convention.”

DIGITAL ARTWORK: IMAGINE IMAGING

This page: trompe-l’oeil wool coat, £2,215. Patent-leather courts, £375. Both Balenciaga. Opposite: silk dress, £1,200, Vetements, at Matchesfashion.com. Satin boots, £3,100, Vetements & Manolo Blahnik, at Net-a-Porter. com. Hair: Holli Smith. Make-up: Nami Yoshida. Set design: Sophie Durham. Production: Olya Siniakov at Management Artists. Styling: Lotta Volkova

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Oliver Hadlee Pearch photographs Ilayda Akdogan Filmmaker and photographer Oliver Hadlee Pearch explains why he chose 18-year-old actress Ilayda Akdogan. “I have wanted to shoot Ilayda ever since I saw Mustang. I was really struck by the film and I want to take pictures of people who are making a change in our world. Ilayda, although still young, has a strong view on and presence in Turkey, a region that needs the young to stand up for what they believe in.”

DIGITAL ARTWORK: HOP STUDIOS

Opposite: silk shirt, £1,500, Dior. Sleeveless faded floral-print dress, from £1,970, Céline. This page: embroidered leather dress, £7,435, Alexander McQueen. Baseball cap, from £190, Balenciaga. Drop earrings, £425, JW Anderson. Thanks to Slade Gardens Adventure Playground. Hair: Cyndia Harvey. Make-up: Nami Yoshida. Styling: Verity Parker

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Pilar’s Ludovica Amati silk slip dresses work around the clock. Hair and make-up: Carolyn Gallyer

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CLOSET

harmony From vintage Kenzo to a Justin Bieber sweatshirt – Fiona Golfar talks to seven women about the clothes that work hard to get them through the day and night

Photographs by Laura Coulson. Styling by Julia Brenard

PILAR CORRIAS Contemporary-art dealer and gallerist

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ressing for the everfashion-conscious art world isn’t always easy, but 47-year-old Pilar doesn’t let that worry her. “I think by now I’ve found my style, which is pretty relaxed. I used to feel it was important to dress up to be taken seriously, but I’ve been in my business for more than 20 years now, and I no longer suffer over my clothes,” she says, adding, “I’m my own boss, and I can dress to please myself.” Pilar is as comfortable in a pair of black jeans with a brightly coloured jumper and a leather jacket at work as she is in a knockout Azzedine Alaïa dress; she dresses to suit her mood. Her day can take her from studio visits with artists to lunch with collectors and institutions and, inevitably, a gallery opening or a dinner most evenings. Her style doesn’t just work during daylight hours but can extend to bedtime, too – should she decide to wear one of her favourite slip dresses to work, she’s happy to sleep in it later. >

7am Wake up – a grey

Ludovica Amati silk slip dress 8am Personal training – Intimissimi knickers, La Perla bra, black Nike leggings and tank top, socks from Lululemon and Nike trainers 9.30am Dress for work – a Helmut Lang black silk sleeveless dress, cropped black Alaïa cardigan, black Alexander McQueen leather jacket, flat black Chloé ballerina shoes, Lanvin cross-body bag and a Lanvin tote. I change it every year as it gets so bashed 6pm Dress for dinner at the Tate – a green-and-black silk dress with a fringed silk kimono jacket by Ludovica Amati, a small Lanvin bag and black strappy Gianvito Rossi heels. His shoes are so comfortable, and often at these functions you have to stand for hours 12.30am Bedtime – I sleep in the dress

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MAGDALENA ZERNICKA-GOETZ Academic Although Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, 52, is a professor of mammalian development and stem-cell biology (she works on understanding the development of cell lineages and patterning in the early embryo), she doesn’t spend her days in a white lab coat. The Cambridge academic credits her affection for clothes to her impoverished childhood in Poland, where they weren’t a priority. “I had just two pieces of everything, so when one was being worn, the second was being washed. I think I compensate for that now,” she says.

Magdalena with son Simon outside Fitzwilliam College, in an Iro jumpsuit and Tod’s boots. Hair: Louis Ghewy. Make-up: Celia Burton

7am Wake up in red Milume pyjama bottoms and a pink T-shirt. I stay in this with a pair of socks until my children leave for school 8am Go for a run – black Nike running leggings, a raspberrycoloured Adidas hoodie, socks and Nike trainers 8.45am Shower and dress for work – blue Replay jeans, a silk tunic from Zara, a favourite navy blazer with gold buttons bought many years ago from Kenzo when I worked in Paris, Converse gym shoes, short

YASMIN SARWAR College director The charismatic executive director of high-flying Cardiff Sixth Form College came to England from Malaysia to study for her A-levels and never left; she started tutoring in her conservatory before opening her own school in 2004. From 2010 to 2015 Cardiff Sixth Form College topped the independentschools league tables; Sarwar credits this success to the combination of an Asian focus on academic excellence and a European emphasis on creative thinking. She often has to make public appearances, and recently gave a TEDx Talk. It’s important to Yasmin that she dresses in a relaxed fashion. “Many of my pupils come from overseas,” she explains. “I want them to see me as a maternal figure, rather than as a typical headmistress.”

6am Wake up – dressed in shalwar kameez, a traditional Asian outfit comprising silk drawstring trousers and a tunic top 8am Work out – a Triumph bra and knickers, Adidas tracksuit, T-shirt and Adidas trainers 9am Get dressed for work – red gypsy-style Monsoon skirt, white lace top, black cropped cardigan and a large Louis Vuitton handbag. I prefer not to wear formal clothes during the week; 202

I want to make sure I look approachable 6pm Dress for a school cultural event – a dress from Karen Millen, high-heeled boots from Prada and a Gucci bag. It’s our main social fixture, with the pupils performing glee club, dancing and taking part in musical recitals. Although the school focuses on science, the arts section is crucial for enhancing creativity and innovation 11.30pm Arrive home – change into shalwar kameez and go to bed

socks and an Ally Capellino rucksack. I don’t use a regular handbag as I have to carry all my work and my laptop around 7.30pm Dress for a fundraising dinner – an academic gown, with either a jumpsuit or a midnight-blue Jigsaw shirt, wide-leg trousers and St John heels, plus my grandmother’s ring. It survived the war by being passed secretly from her to my grandfather before she was interrogated Midnight Bedtime – back into my pyjama bottoms and T-shirt

“I want to look approachable”: Yasmin outside the Haymarket Hotel. She wears a Karen Millen dress and Precis bolero with Prada boots. Hair and make-up: Carolyn Gallyer


Sarah pairs her Paul Smith suit and Converse hi-tops with an Unruly logo T-shirt. Hair: Kyoko Odo. Make-up: Carolyn Gallyer

SARAH WOOD Tech-firm founder Sarah, 43, is a mother of three and co-founder of social video advertising company Unruly, which last year was acquired by News Corp for a reported £114 million. Along with her fellow co-founders Scott Button and Matt Cooke, she heads up a company that now employs more than 200 people across 15 offices. For Sarah, clothes are a source of fun, but she firmly believes in the power of black with a splash of colour – which for her comes in the shape of a T-shirt with the Unruly logo in yellow, black or white. Her days are mostly spent in the company’s large, open-plan offices in east London. Not a great fan of convention, she keeps everything she wears piled up on a chair at the end of her bed. “It’s important to me to get my clothes right,” she explains. “One of the biggest issues holding women back in their careers today is a lack of confidence. I think fashion can be a great way to bridge that gap.” >

6.45am Wake up – naked 6.50am Get dressed for work

Not a great fan of convention, Sarah keeps everything she wears piled up on a chair at the end of her bed

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– bra, knickers and ankle socks from Marks & Spencer (my mother still buys my underwear for me), a black Paul Smith trouser suit, an Unruly T-shirt with a crying-for-joy emoji on it, a pair of classic white Converse hi-tops, a long black coat from All Saints 8.30pm Home from work – I take off my shoes before I do anything else. If I don’t fall asleep on one of my children’s beds, I go to my room at the end of the evening and get into my birthday suit

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“I don’t mind colours not working together”

8am Wake up – naked 8.15am Dress for my trainer – Stella

Andrea teams a silk jacket and tie (worn as a belt) by Dries Van Noten with Jimmy Choo heels. Hair: Diana Moar. Make-up: Celia Burton

ANDREA GELARDIN Creative director When you’re working with Lady Gaga, you have to look the part. Together with Ruth Hogben, her business partner at Lobster Eye, Andrea is responsible for the artist’s looks – from creative direction at concerts, the Grammys and the Academy Awards, to album covers and merchandising. “We source art directors, photographers, stylists and every creative that makes up her image,” explains the 33-year-old. “From the moment we hear her new record, our work begins.” Andrea works a street away from her home in Hackney Downs, so has the luxury of popping back several times a day, if necessary, to change outfits. Her weekdays are often filled with creative meetings and attending graduation shows at art colleges, while most evenings find her at fashion or music events. “It’s a vital part of my job to know what’s going on,” she explains. “Everything from watching a performance by You Me Bum Bum Train to something by the Punchdrunk theatre company is a source of inspiration to me.” 204

McCartney knickers, Nike sports bra, leggings, socks, trainers, T-shirt 9.30am Dress for the office – Stella McCartney knickers, bra (who knows where it’s from, I’ve had it for so long), a long black Comme des Garçons skirt (I never, ever show my legs), a Justin Bieber tour sweatshirt, ram’s head rings from Great Frog, JW Anderson pink mirrored plexiglass triangular earrings, a selection of necklaces from all over and MM6 gold platforms Noon Back home to change for a lunch meeting with Lady Gaga – I take off my sweatshirt, for obvious reasons, and switch it for a Rosie Assoulin off-theshoulder top and a small Fendi bag 6pm Art show at Central Saint Martins, followed by a drink with a photographer and a party at Show Studio – a black Junya Watanabe jumpsuit, pink-and-orange silk Prada jacket from a collaboration with Dover Street Market, green Prada heels (I don’t mind colours not working together), vintage Butler & Wilson sparkly earrings, lots of silver rings by Maria Francesca Pepe, a pile of new necklaces I found on the beach near my house in Majorca and a red ponyskin Marques Almeida clutch bag Midnight Bedtime – naked

LAURA COULSON


ANNELI HOWARD Barrister Anneli, 43, specialises in European and competition law. Her schedule is hectic (especially now, she explains, due to so many cases related to Brexit) and she appears in court two to three times a week. Although a barrister wears a wig and gown – “the idea is that we all look the same to the judge” – what she wears beneath needs to be considered. She favours simple, well-cut dresses, and practical footwear. “My clothes are a way of establishing credibility very early on,” she says.

5.45am Wake up in Fat Face pyjamas 6.15am Get dressed for work –

bra, knickers and black tights from John Lewis, a knee-length sleeveless dress with a short, black, matching collarless jacket from Ede & Ravenscroft (in court you always have to wear black, blue or grey). Flat black shoes from Jones, a Smythson handbag and a light mac by TM Lewin Noon Head to court – I add a black gown, wig and a pair of LK Bennett shoes with a medium heel 6pm Conference meeting – I have to speak for 40 minutes, so I change

into a bright red dress by Hugo Boss, then add a red clutch by Smythson and black heels from LK Bennett. It’s fun to be able to jazz it up a bit in the evenings, but it’s important not to look like you’re trying to draw attention to yourself. The law is still a very maledominated profession and you don’t want to appear to be trying to capitalise on how you look 8.30pm Arrive home – I immediately change into some loose, charcoal Sweaty Betty leggings and a T-shirt with a pair of Mahabi slippers 11pm Bedtime: Fat Face pyjamas

“Clothes are a way of establishing credibility,” says Anneli; she wears a Hugo Boss dress under her robes, with Peter Kaiser heels. Hair: Diana Moar. Make-up: Celia Burton

ANNA KEAY Director of The Landmark Trust Forty-two-year-old Anna Keay is a historian and the director of the Landmark Trust, with a PhD in 17th-century British history from the University of Oxford. When it comes to her workday wardrobe, she’s very organised. “I don’t like to waste time faffing,” she says. Anna can require several different outfits in a single day, so she takes what she needs to work. “My days are often split between my office and fundraising meetings, and then on to dressier functions like appearing on television to talk about my work or going to the V&A to give a lecture. I also spend a huge amount of time on building sites climbing ladders, with a hard hat on.” Q

6.45am Wake up – naked 7am Get up – put on a dressing gown 7.15am Get dressed for the office –

Just add a hard hat: Anna wears a Jigsaw dress and Marks & Spencer sandals. Hair: Louis Ghewy. Make-up: Celia Burton

M&S bra, knickers and socks, blue Wrangler jeans, a long-sleeved H&M T-shirt in a plain colour, grey jumper from Jaeger, tennis shoes, Radley handbag, a parka by Jack Wolfskin and a silver Indian necklace. I like simplicity, but I nearly always add a necklace to my outfits. This one was a gift from a friend whose husband was my godfather, and it was his deathbed wish that I have it on my wedding day

Noon Site meeting – a hard-hat, hi-vis jacket and walking boots 5pm To the V&A to give a talk, followed by dinner – a broderie anglaise dress from a vintage shop in Durham, high-heeled sandals from Marks & Spencer and an Indian shawl. Both my parents and my sister were married in India and my sister lives there, so I have quite a big Indian influence in my life 11pm Getting ready for bed – put on dressing gown 11.45pm Bedtime – naked

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Women of Crossrail: from left, talent and resources director Valerie Todd; sponsorship head Sarah Johnson; trainee quantity surveyor Fatima Alghali; global transport guru Isabel Dedring (seated); and civil engineer Linda Miller. “Whenever my teenage sons bring their female friends to visit,” says Miller, “I always say to them, ‘Consider becoming an engineer!’”


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With 26 miles of new tunnels, 40 stations and an anticipated 200 million passengers each year, Crossrail is set to revolutionise transport in London. Louise Carpenter meets the women who have made it happen

n a new tunnel in Stepney Green, 40 metres below London – its path weaving in and out of London’s sewers, the tube network and the foundations of some of the city’s most historic buildings – a group of highly educated, highly accomplished feminists are laughing, chatting and rolling their eyes. For all their various awesome professional achievements – not least their groundbreaking positions in the construction industry, their degrees in engineering (just eight and a half per cent of engineers in Britain are women), the honorary doctorates, the government ministers on speed dial – they still have to wear cumbersome high-vis protection suits made solely to fit men. The atmosphere way beneath the city’s bright surface is charged. Eight giant tunnel-boring machines have created the tunnels that, within just over two years, we will be using every day. Everyone is wearing brass tags with numbers, a hangover identification procedure from the mining industry because, in the event of a fatal fire, brass does not burn “and is used to identify the ashes”. It’s a macabre detail of a meticulous safety programme.

Photographs by Jason Bell

A necklace of lights disappears around the bends, while four spotlights illuminate the cavernous sprayed concrete central space before the tracks fork off. Water sloshes around underfoot, the drainage yet to be completed. The space is cold and high, with the echoing beauty of a concrete cathedral, and the ventilation system creates the feeling of a windy day. It’s easy to imagine Daniel Craig as James Bond running through here: a glint of steel; the bend of a tunnel going into blackness. Each of these five women, in her own way, has played a part in the £14.8 billion Crossrail project that on completion will officially become the Elizabeth line. With 26 miles of new tunnels and 40 stations (10 new), the line will connect Reading and Heathrow in the west with Shenfield in Essex and Abbey Wood in the far south-east of the capital, travelling under the centre of the city, revolutionising its travel network and bringing social and economic regeneration to its outskirts. One and a half million more people will benefit from being within 45 minutes of central London (more jobs, more opportunities) and the trains will carry an estimated 200 million passengers each year. Among the most instrumental of these women in turning the Crossrail dream

(first conceived in the Thirties and then revisited in the early Noughties) into today’s reality, with all its complex funding, is Isabel Dedring, until recently London’s deputy mayor for transport and deputy chair of Transport for London. Dedring, a Harvard-educated American, had been at City Hall during Ken Livingstone’s tenure, when Crossrail was first formed. However, it was only when Boris Johnson became mayor (in 2008, a year after Crossrail was approved) that Dedring was able to gather political momentum for the project. From the beginning, Dedring saw Crossrail – currently Europe’s largest infrastructure project – as a vehicle for real social change, as much about the way we and our children will live our lives in the future as it was about trains and tracks and tunnels. In the early years under Johnson, while securing and protecting Crossrail’s funding (shared between central government, the private sector, Transport for London and the Greater London Authority), Dedring was often the only woman in the room. While male engineers were often getting bogged down in fine focused technicalities, she was bringing the conversation back to a human level, from the knock-on effects of better housing > 207


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director (finding people across the world capable of the myriad jobs – up to 55,000 full-time positions); Sarah Johnson, 35, head of sponsorship (holding the delivery team to account for completion on time and on budget); and apprentices including 25-year-old Fatima Alghali – are helping recalibrate the industry at the very least, through leading by example. Take Todd’s 19-year-old daughter, who was thinking about reading law, did work experience with Linda Miller on the Crossrail Farringdon site and became hooked. Now she is reading civil engineering at University College London. “It’s a real cause of mine,” says Miller. “It is an incredibly meaningful, challenging and valuable career and whenever my teenage sons bring their female friends to visit, I always say to them, ‘Consider becoming an engineer!’” “[Male engineers] want to talk about the trains, the buses, what kind of wheels and engines they have,” Dedring says of a large

“Friends would ask me what train to catch, as if I knew the entire UK timetable” chunk of the arid-seeming transport industry, “[and yet] I love working with engineers because when you find great ones, they’re great to work with.” But for Dedring, who grew up in New York with a communist father (“and I mean a proper communist”), the politics of transport is as exhilarating for a civil servant with a social mission as the creation of the vast, pale concrete contours of tunnels are for an engineer. “It’s not an industry that naturally attracts women but I found I had this vast platform and the opportunity to do something that was very significant.” Dedring, 45, has two small boys, and her husband is chief executive of Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, so they juggle work and travel with childcare and home in north London. She takes the bus to work and places reliability of service above speed of journey (she made Tube travel 30 per cent more reliable when she was at City Hall). As a result of her lobbying, every one of the 40 Crossrail stations will have step-free access. “There is this major disconnect between what the industry likes to think and talk about and what most of us want when we experience transport. I have always talked about the customer, the person walking down the street, taking

the bus – people with heavy suitcases, people with buggies, people with small children, or the elderly, all needing stepfree access – and a lot of those perspectives are seen as somewhat marginal to the running of the network,” she says. “I’ve never wanted to talk about the fact that I’m female – it shouldn’t matter,” she adds, “but in recent years I’ve felt I should because younger women are looking to someone more senior in the industry to say explicitly, ‘This is a more female perspective.’” City Hall created a £30 million fund to invest in public spaces and connections around the Crossrail stations, and Crossrail 2 (currently under discussion) and the more controversial HS2 (which has been supported by new transport secretary Chris Grayling) will both have the capacity to fulfil the same regenerating function, Dedring points out. “Places like Ilford and Abbey Wood are already changing before Crossrail has even opened,” she says. “At City Hall, one of the things we focused on through discussions with local boroughs and community groups was what the local area needed from the station and this affected the designs of some of the stations significantly – including spaces for people to meet and sit, and bicycle parking.” It is this kind of social impact, resulting directly from political policy, that has led Dedring to not rule out becoming a politician herself, aside from her self-confessed shyness (difficult to believe when you meet her). “Politics can be an amazing force for change,” she admits, although it’s as far as she’ll go right now. She was initially Boris Johnson’s environment advisor when he was elected mayor. (“One thing I learnt from him was how important it is to be imaginative in politics, and to find ways to engage people with what you want to do. If you can’t get people interested in and excited about a project, it doesn’t matter what the pie-chart says about how important it is. He once compared a cutting-edge waste facility we were launching to a huge stomach; after numerous efforts people had made to describe this complex technology to no avail, it was this that helped everyone there understand it and be excited about it.”) When in 2011 Boris suggested moving her to transport, she was not keen because of exactly the same stereotype the women of Crossrail are now challenging. Sarah Johnson, who is also head of scheme development for Crossrail 2, says, “In the beginning I’d be at a party and people would say, ‘What exactly is it that you do?’ And I could see their eyes glaze over. Or friends would ask me what train they should get, as if I somehow knew the entire UK train timetable.” When > 248 JASON BELL

FROM LEFT: FATIMA WEARS DRESS, MARINA RINALDI. SHOES, JIMMY CHOO. BRACELET, ALEXIS BITTAR. ISABEL WEARS DRESS, VILSHENKO, AT FENWICK. SHOES, TABITHA SIMMONS. BRACELET, MARNI, AT FENWICK. VALERIE WEARS DRESS, VALENTINO AT NET-A-PORTER. SHOES, TABITHA SIMMONS. EARRINGS AND BRACELET, BOTH MARNI AT FENWICK. RING, STARRS. LINDA WEARS BLOUSE, LANVIN. TROUSERS, MARINA RINALDI. EARRINGS, BUTLER & WILSON. SARAH WEARS DRESS, TEMPERLEY LONDON, AT LIBERTY. SHOES, CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA. EARRINGS, ALEXIS BITTAR

and job opportunities (new transport links often fuel area regeneration), down to pushing for direct access at stations (for buggies and wheelchairs) and more reliability. She admits it’s been an advantage “being an American woman because I’m different enough already. And, because it is slightly chauvinistic, I can say things that perhaps would not be accepted from another white, middle-class male.” “The thing about transport is that it is very male-dominated and very engineerdominated,” Dedring explains the day before we meet underground. We are in her relatively new offices, where she now has a commercial role as global transport leader for Arup (one of the world’s top engineering firms – with a history of tackling particularly complex projects – it was hired by Crossrail to design and oversee the engineering of many of the tunnels and stations), having left City Hall once Johnson’s mayoral term was over. It’s a massive job that will help to bring Crossrail-like projects to cities all over the world. She is impressive – feminine in heels and a dark Hugo Boss shift, her conversation shaped by the energy and pace characteristic of New Yorkers: “When I was at City Hall, I visited sites every Friday and had to wear clothes I could walk at least two miles in,” she remembers, “but I still wore heels in formal meetings. I always need to feel taller when I am surrounded by men.” She’s slightly revamped her work wardrobe since leaving City Hall four months ago, “but I can’t shake off that need to look conservative.” The following day, 56-year-old Linda Miller, a fellow energetic American and civil engineer, currently seconded to Crossrail from construction and engineering giant Bechtel as project manager of Farringdon Station, tells Dedring, as they eye up autumn/winter ’16 florals selected for the Vogue shoot, that when she first started in the construction industry her well-meaning boss said to her, “Dress as close to a man as possible.” These days, Miller supports the female civil engineers and apprentices working their way up the ranks in wearing colour or pattern even on a very testosteroneheavy construction site where gentle misogyny or off-colour remarks can sometimes be felt. She advises them to ask themselves only one question of their workwear: “Would I wear it to a nightclub or a beach?” And if the answer is “yes”, Miller says, “I tell them to get changed immediately.” Crossrail’s proactive employment of women at every level is at 27 per cent, impressive by national standards but still low compared with European countries such as Bulgaria and Latvia (30 per cent). But Dedring and the other Crossrail women – Valerie Todd, 53, talent and resources


“There is a major disconnect between what the industry likes to think and talk about and what most of us want when we experience transport,� observes Isabel Dedring, second left, with, from left, Fatima Alghali, Valerie Todd, Linda Miller and Sarah Johnson. Hair: Terri Capon. Make-up: Amy Conley. Sittings editor: Julia Brenard

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atching the Democratic National Convention on TV, I am transfixed by Hillary Clinton. Dressed in a blinding white trouser suit, a nimbus of blonde hair round her head, she looks like more than a candidate for president: a female superhero, perhaps, or “white hat” – the nickname for the good cowboy in old Hollywood films. Her white suit has a hint of televangelist or even Elvis, that modern semi-deity; while her blonde hair – “We’ve definitely taken it blonder,” confirms her hairdresser, John Barrett – speaks volumes. A “quasi-mystical image of light and vitality” is how Marina Warner 210

describes the blondeness of the fairytale beauty in From the Beast to the Blonde, her study of women in myth and fairy tale. Traditionally, to be blonde wasn’t just to be light-haired, it was to be “fair” as opposed to “foul”. In fairy tales, female hair operates like cowboys’ hats in old movies: the good girl is blonde, the bad girl is brunette. The only exception is Snow White. What it points to is this: hair matters. It matters more for women than it does for men. That may be changing (hello, “coiffeurgate”, the political story of the last silly season in which it was reported that François Hollande’s hair cost the public purse €10,000 a month), and it is almost certainly sexist, but let’s leave all that for now. There are more women in

power than at any other time in history. Hillary Clinton may have yet to confirm her spot, but Theresa May, Nicola Sturgeon, Angela Merkel and Christine Lagarde have already taken up theirs. Imagine if you were one of them doing an outside broadcast. A sudden gust of wind and the day’s headlines are less about the good news you delivered about the economy and instead all about your unfortunate “bad hair day”. Or, heaven forbid, you were so busy helping to run the country that you didn’t have time to dry your hair properly, so you scraped it back into a ponytail and caused a national outcry (Hillary Clinton’s 2011 “scrunchiegate” phase during her tenure as US secretary of state). >

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Can good hair save the world? Is there an appropriate ’do for a female head of state? As more women take on powerful roles, Nicola Moulton looks at the styles in command


Power hair: Arizona Muse, Vogue April 2011

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In addition, the professional world has never been more visual. Even for women whose jobs do not thrust them on to the world stage, chances are they’re giving presentations, appearing in video footage or being photographed at work events. Julie Meyer, an American in London who heads her own venture-capital company, videos weekly economic briefings via her own Youtube channel. She believes the worlds of business and entertainment will become increasingly aligned. “I work

“A ‘pob’ says you’re serious, you get the job done,” says hairstylist Sam McKnight in the technology world where form really is content,” she says. But what if you are employed for your ideas, not your looks, yet you find yourself in a world where you are being judged as much on how you look as what you’re saying? You probably have neither the time nor the inclination to spend as many hours on grooming as a Hollywood celebrity. On the one hand, hair is, as Warner says, one of the key ways to express the self, on the other, it’s hair, legitimate to worry about if you are, say, an actress, but surely not if you are a CEO, a top academic or candidate for president of the United States? Some high-profile women I requested to interview about hair refused. And I found myself thinking that, in their position, I would have too. But others were able to reel off a well-honed strategy without even blinking, hair being just one of many “life hacks” that encompass everything from their travel arrangements to wardrobe management.

“Presentation is very important in my role, and that includes my personal presentation,” says Vivien Ryan, a director at Pricewaterhouse Coopers, who co-authored the “Powerful Women” report, which considered the role of women in powerful positions within the energy sector. “Travel to New York is commonplace and often I’ll be in a meeting the moment we land. My hair is cut monthly so that I can ‘wrap-dry’ it [for the uninitiated: wrap-drying means pushing hair over to the opposite side and using a smoothing nozzle] and style it with a Denman brush. To finish, I spray my hairspray on a Mason Pearson extrastiff brush. I find spraying the brush keeps the spray even and coated throughout, and it can stay for hours. I use a GHD Flight hairdryer when travelling and have a slightly larger one at home so I know exactly how they behave.” Vasiliki Petrou is executive vicepresident at Unilever Prestige. “I have a once-a-week standing appointment with a hairdresser,” she says, “on a Saturday afternoon. My hair then lasts until Wednesday, if I eke it out with a dry shampoo. Then, depending on my diary, I will probably do it myself, using rollers and getting up early to do it properly before work. Volume is the only thing that will make hair look good in a professional environment. It looks ‘done’. I would never put my hair in a ponytail for work. It doesn’t look groomed. It’s not being respectful to the job you’re doing.” Petrou believes the blow-dry-bar trend has helped, “but it’s still very much aimed at young women who want ‘going out’ hair, not at executives,” she says, saying that earlier opening hours and faster turnaround would be helpful.

TOP OF THE POBS A political bob or “pob” is the style of choice for Christine Lagarde, managing director of the IMF, above, and for Hillary Clinton, at the Democratic National Convention, below

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Control freakery is a characteristic to which many powerful women will confess. That’s why the short, masculine haircut is favoured by women in power. It is discreet, nonsexual, and it says “woman able to compete in a man’s world”. It’s also fairly bulletproof against the weather. But what it gains in practicality, it most certainly lacks in imagination. The short bob, known as the “political bob” or “pob”, is the thinking woman’s hairstyle of choice. Angela Merkel, Theresa May, Hillary Clinton and Christine Lagarde are only the most prominent examples in public life. Christine Lagarde’s pob is impeccably chic, as French as an Hermès scarf. It gives her a natural air of authority. Mrs May’s selling point is that she is a safe pair of hands, her catchphrase: “I get on with the job.” Her less chic, more bureaucraticstyle pob reinforces the workhorse message. “A pob says you’re serious, you get the job done,” says the hairstylist Sam McKnight. Nicola Sturgeon’s is an intriguing variation. It’s too spiky to be indifferent; but not quite daring enough to break the mould. To the untrained eye, it appears unmovable and always the same, but, explains her hairdresser, Julie McGuire, there are subtle tweaks according to the messaging required. “Razoring and tapering produces a softer edge to the cut, whereas blow-drying with minimal product achieves a more businesslike effect,” she says. “Nicola prefers a light and layered look for easy maintenance. Monthly visits are enough to keep her going. She’s not high-maintenance at all. She’s very relaxed and enjoys a little bit of sanctuary away from the demands of her high-profile job.” The “favourite shoot”, says McGuire,

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was last year’s Vogue editorial. “Nicola and I then got to play a bit more, and style it the way I like it. A bit more rock’n’roll!” But rock-chick moments notwithstanding, the pob also says that while you are a woman, and therefore true to yourself, you are not too far from a man. It’s as if women leaders feel they still have to give reassurance that they can hack it by assuming some manliness. Elizabeth I, addressing the troops at Tilbury in 1588, said: “I know I have the body but of a weak, feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king.” As she came out to address them she was preceded by a page bearing her helmet on a silver cushion, while she herself was mounted on a white horse, dressed in white and wearing a silver cuirass… somewhat like a 16th-century Hillary Clinton. The pob confers gravitas, as Sam McKnight, the man who practically invented it, knows. When he began doing Diana, Princess of Wales’s hair in 1990 he changed her style from a big Eighties ’do to something more casual: a modern short bob. “But I couldn’t change it too much, because she wanted to be taken seriously. I used to say to her, ‘You looked great in the paper today coming out of the gym with your hair natural.’ And she would say, ‘Yes, I know, but I’m going to visit some OAPs in Newcastle today and they don’t want to see me with gym hair. They want to see that I’ve made an effort.’” More than 20 years on, her daughter-in-law feels no need to crop her long barrel curls. And there are increasing numbers of women out there with great jobs and great – longer – hair. Amal Clooney comes to mind, as does Dambisa Moyo, who sits on the boards of Barclays and >

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ON THE LONG LIST Is there a future beyond the political bob? Some high-profile women are redefining what “professional” hair can look like: Amal Clooney, left, the Duchess of Cambridge, above, and Eva Kaili, a Greek politician and member of the European Parliament, right

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Barrick Gold, and Caroline Dalmeny, who works in nuclear defence. Julie Meyer thinks that it is a generational thing. “Business leaders and politicians wear the short bob because it was around when they came of age in the Eighties,” she says. Approaching her 50th birthday, Meyer herself is comfortable wearing her blonde hair over her shoulders: “Your hair is part of your sexual identity. If you are not comfortable with that, then you are not comfortable with who you are.” “Can you look sexy and feminine and work in the White House?” Dr Pippa Malmgren shakes her head. “I would have to say no. I know I didn’t.” As a former adviser on economic policy to President George W Bush, she knows whereof she speaks. “When you are working at that level, the most valuable commodity is time. If you take your sexuality into the room with you, you’re distracting others – you’re not fixing the problem at hand.” Now in her early fifties, Malmgren has unapologetically feminine hair that tumbles in auburn locks to her shoulders. When I catch up with her she is at an economics boot camp with Britain’s minister for trade, thrashing out the future of postBrexit Britain. She may not have felt able to express her femininity at the White House, but she has no problem with it now. “No one wants to be called ‘honey’ and ‘babe’ in the boardroom. But at the same time, why should you check your sexuality at the door? I’m a former cheerleader from Texas. This is me. I guess I reverted to my natural self when I felt I had enough credentials. When no one would dream of calling me ‘babe’.”


There is a difference in attitude to hair either side of the Atlantic. Over here, you express your seriousness by downplaying your hair – deflating it, even. “When I first went to a British hairdresser,” recalls Malmgren, “he looked at my hair and said, ‘We can fix this, take the oomph out of it.’” It’s as if we believe the more oomph to your hair, the more you are literally an airhead. And the more your hair looks like money and time, the less left-wing you are. No left-wing politician wants to be called a champagne socialist, but shampoo socialist would definitely be worse.

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aroness Lucy NevilleRolfe is Britain’s minister of state for energy and intellectual property. She has found a way to use the “hair effect” to her advantage by turning hers into a bold statement. A striking 63-year-old with a natural ability to captivate an audience, she dyes her hair dark brown with a brightly coloured flash running through the fringe. It’s been blue, green and orange in its time, and is just fantastic. It has also become a signature that means: a) no one is wondering whether she’s had a blow-dry that day or whether or not she’s concealing any grey, and b) she is “confident” and ‘in control”. Think of it as like being an Olympic swimmer – you are always looking for the edge that shaves a millisecond from your personal-best time. A vital millisecond that could make the difference between winning and losing. Or think of your hair as your hardware, says Meyer. “Jony Ive, Bill Gates, they understand the importance of design. Think of your appearance as the design aspect of what you want to get across,” she says.

Thinking of your hair as a kind of iPad is one thing, but knowing whether to go for the hairdo equivalent of an iPad Pro, Air or Mini is quite another. “We don’t have enough examples of what women in power look like,” says Lauren A Rothman, a Washingtonbased image consultant. “We’re breaking the glass ceiling right now so we have to pull examples from women who are not Hollywood-type celebs but are in the world of politics.” She would take “pieces from Margaret Thatcher to Michelle Obama to create what a woman in power should look like right now.” While it’s hard to imagine what the “Maggie Michelle” might look like on someone’s head, in terms of emotional intelligence, it’s on message.

Over here, you express your seriousness by downplaying your hair Mrs Thatcher’s Iron Lady helmet hair gave her what Josh Wood – the hairstylist to many a power-broking west London female executive – calls, “that aura of super-grooming which makes people believe that those in power know what they’re doing. We almost don’t want them to look like us.” On the other hand, there is a part of us that does want them to look like us, for which read: approachable, warm. “Mrs Clinton has to show her great power and her great intelligence,” says John Barrett. But you have to wonder whether she is showing that almost too abundantly already. She could be using her hair to “feminise” her message, soften her, make her more one of the gals. This is the quality

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Michelle Obama has. As the hairstylist Sam McKnight puts it, “Her hair looks confident without screaming ‘power’. She exudes modern, democratic power.” But then Michelle is not a candidate for president, she is the first lady. And it’s striking how many present and former “first ladies” are at ease with dresses and skirts, and longer hair. Samantha Cameron and Sylvia Bongo Ondimba, wife of the president of Gabon, are examples. Long hair gives a message of youth, fertility and plenty. Marina Warner describes the thick blonde plait crowning the head of Yulia Tymoshenko, the former prime minister of Ukraine, as “like a dowry”. Similarly, the Trump women surround Donald on stage like assurances of luxe and plenty, their blonde hair cascading in Botticelli tresses to their breasts. Josh Wood mentions Sarah Palin as a presidential candidate who had “longer, first-lady hair”. But he adds: “That hair would have been whacked off into a bob if she’d got any further politically.” Would we have taken her more seriously as a result? Possibly. Or perhaps we would have seen it as another example of her mind not really being on the job in hand. “The kind of woman who comes on Newsnight doesn’t fiddle with her hair.” We’ve been discussing hair for almost 20 minutes now and Kirsty Wark sounds exasperated. “I’ve got 10 minutes before I go on. I just pop a couple of rollers in and that’s that. And I always use Elnett, because the smell reminds me of my mother.” Hold on a minute… Kirsty Wark goes into verbal battle on behalf of the nation each night wearing an invisible matriarchial helmet? Of course. Forward, Kirsty! Now let’s get on with the serious stuff. Q

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Rose van Cutsem in Bruern House’s “unconventional and unexpected” extension. Hair: John Macpherson. Make-up: Victoria Bond. Flowers: Willow Crossley. Sittings editor: Julia Brenard


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LONG VIEW Rose van Cutsem’s new home in the Cotswolds has been built to last. Violet Henderson finds past, present and future in idyllic coexistence

t ROSE WEARS SWEATER AND TROUSERS, GUCCI. LOAFERS, LAURENCE DACADE. JEWELLERY, LAURA LEE. THANKS TO SARAH AT DAYLESFORD

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he view from Rose and Hugh van Cutsem’s house speaks of a particular kind of English loveliness, where nothing is intemperate. Here, hills of waving barley do not climb but roll (and luxuriously so) beneath a horizon flecked with trees gathered along rippling hedgerows. It is a green, unfolding patchwork that has at its centre the merry, custard-coloured roofs of neighbours – a 10-minute walk, at no great pace, from the ivory front door. And should you walk outside the house – it is a large house, with eight bedrooms and a gravel drive that collects in a circle at its entrance – beyond the long, rectangular stone terrace, ahead of the football goal on the lawn, the fire pit and the wooden benches grouped around it ready for the next party, you’ll find a wildflower garden. It’s a view that you could look at for hours and hours. The Van Cutsems built their house around that view. Rose, 37, has known it all her life. Her parents, David and Clare > 217


Astor, farm most of the surrounding land, and continue to live in the house Rose grew up in, just a bend in the road away. David is the grandson of Nancy Astor, the first female MP to take up a seat in the House of Commons, and a cousin by marriage to Samantha Cameron – who is also a neighbour, as David Cameron’s constituency, Witney, is nearby. “I’m often asked if it’s very stressful living next to your in-laws,” says Hugh, 41, a financier full of well-mannered charm, who spends his week working in London. “It’s genuinely the opposite. They even did the school run this morning.” Rose abounds with equal charisma and her own cheerful capability. As she guides the Vogue team around her home, she warns, “I wouldn’t open any of the drawers or cupboards – I swept the contents of every surface into them this morning.” A later, surreptitious check reveals this to be untrue. In 2005, before Rose moved full-time to Oxfordshire, she cofounded a line of members’ clubs in London for children and their parents called Maggie & Rose, for which she remains a consultant. It was this experience, and her universal popularity, that caught Nick Jones’s attention when he was looking for someone to help him recruit founding members for his then-new venture Soho Farmhouse. A rural retreat for the urban, and a haven for countrydwellers who miss London, it’s located just 14 miles from where Rose now lives. “She was not only brilliant to work with and enormous fun,” Jones remembers, “but also a natural choice, thanks to her unique understanding of the area.” There is a lot of Soho Farmhouse in Rose’s own Bruern House – named after a nearby hamlet, the sort so picturesque that you might find it sketched on the cover of a tourist guide to the Cotswolds. Like Jones’s project, where wood cabins, a spa, a gym and other recreational flourishes are built around a pretty 18th-century farmhouse, here the traditional setting has not been forgotten. The house is four parts conventional Cotswolds, boasting classically balanced Georgian proportions. But the fifth part, which sweeps beneath the first-floor bedrooms so no view is interrupted, is unconventional and unexpected, closest in style to modernist Scandinavian. While

not a replica of Jones’s country cabins at Soho Farmhouse, this turf-roofed box constructed from a medley of oak cladding and floor-to-ceiling Crittall windows certainly has the feeling of them. It has a utilitarian glamour, grounded in the moss-green polished-concrete floor to which the local architectural vernacular could not stretch. And yet, despite this leftfield swagger, Bruern House is first and foremost a family home. Hugh and Rose have three children: Charlie, four; Rafe, seven; and Grace, who is nine, and already used to the limelight. Aged three, she charmed the nation from the front page of every newspaper as the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s cherubic bridesmaid, who stood on the balcony of Buckingham Palace frowning and furious as she protected her ears from the noise of the RAF flypast. The Duke of Cambridge is Grace’s godfather (there is a picture of him in the downstairs loo cradling her as a baby); Hugh has been friends with both the princes since childhood. The family left Shepherd’s Bush in 2008, lured – like many other young families before them – by the possibilities of green space and clean air. Bruern House wasn’t even an idea then; they were enjoying cottage life, the final phase of which was played out on the nearby Cornbury Park estate, with one bathroom and one hot tap that worked. “We adored it!” exclaims Rose, who is, as she describes it, a 15-year-old trapped inside a 37-year-old’s body. It wasn’t until 2009 that a Thirties home that a local farmer had extended breezeblock by breezeblock became available for sale, complete with 50 acres attached to it and, of course, that view. The couple saw their opportunity and wrestled the purchase off a wily developer. It took until 2014 for the farmer to vacate (to pastures greener still) and the many relevant planning applications to be approved, before construction could begin, starting with the demolition of all the buildings occupying the site. As anyone who has ever built anything will know, there will inevitably be hitches in the process. In the end, Rose decided to take matters into her own hands and became the project’s site manager. “In between meetings at Soho Farmhouse I’d come down here every day. It turned out well, because it meant that I then had to >

The house is four parts conventional Cotswolds. But the fifth part is modernist Scandinavian

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Above: Bruern House has welcoming touches at every turn, from tactile rugs to armchairs made for lounging. Below: a classic roll-top bath is brought up to date with copper plating and complementary navy-blue paintwork

KATE MARTIN


Above: Bruern House seen from the wildflower garden. Right: the kitchen, with its wood and marble accents, is the heart of family life

Above left: graphic chevrons and bold stripes in the couple’s walk-in dressing room. Christopher Kane’s patchwork of bright florals completes the picture. Left: the inviting sitting room. “Our friends know our door is always open,” says Rose. Above: sunshine burnishes the honey-coloured hallway

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It’s clear that Bruern House was built for entertaining. (The garden could accommodate a festival’s worth of revellers)

Tea and cake on the south-facing terrace. The family owns 50 acres of the surrounding land


make decisions that were better coming from me than from someone who wasn’t going to live here,” she says lightly, as if overseeing 6,500sq ft of construction was the easiest thing in the world. Building ended in January of this year, with no more hitches. Bruern House is a personal project reflecting not only the places the couple have visited but their foibles and fancies. It is built around a central courtyard because (Rose clears her throat and begins), “I suppose I was influenced by haciendas and times spent in Spain…” She trails off, and starts again. “You know,” she continues with a shrug, “really, there is a courtyard because I’ve always wanted one.” Which seems as fine a précis as any of the joy of building a home. And, in fact, the courtyard was a wise decision. It fills the hall with soft daylight that bounces off the limestone-flagged floor, and in the late-afternoon sun the pale yellow walls (the house is painted in Farrow & Ball’s traditional palette) turn a honeyed gold.

side of their new garage). The pair have been married for 11 years. Later, when we take a tour of the house, they delightedly show me the woodwork in the kitchen, vibrant rugs Rose hauled over from Morocco in suitcases, and bathroom after bathroom decorated with colourful tiles and untreated wood walls, a technique that Rose picked up on her fact-finding visits to Soho House in Miami. In the downstairs study there are three desks. One belongs to the children, one to Rose, who has recently turned her

ROSE WEARS PRINTED SILK JUMPSUIT, ALBERTA FERRETTI. LEATHER SLIDES, BIONDA CASTANA. NECKLACE, LAURA LEE. OTHER JEWELLERY, AS BEFORE

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ruern House has all of the rooms you’d expect to find in a large country house – a proper larder, an even bigger boot room – but none of the draughts and bleeding radiators, as it is warmed instead by under-floor heating from an ecologically sustainable woodburner. It is in the garden, where flowerbeds bud with young rose bushes and purpling lavender (planted by designer Rachel Murphy), that there is a delightful touch of romance: a yurt park for the children. Another of Grace’s godparents, Riccardo Lanza – the party planner capable of recreating ancient Rome for an evening, or orchestrating a flotilla of gondolas the breadth of Venice’s Grand Canal – gave the yurts to her; they were extras from one of his extraordinary events. During our Vogue photo shoot, Rose gamely tries on everything from Erdem’s metallic-blue homage to Edwardian dressing to a very mini Dior coat with Laurence Dacade leather boots, while Hugh watches with a wry smile from the sidelines. When Hugh first met her family, he earned himself the nickname Hunter, because unlike the other boyfriends she’d brought home, he could, and often did, competently stalk a stag and fire a gun (the evidence of which is a quartet of antlers strung across the

KATE MARTIN

Rose sits in the powder-blue drawing room, used for large house parties

hand to writing travel articles for The Sunday Times, and a final desk (the tidiest) belongs to Hugh. Often they all sit together to work. “Oh, God, it’s like school!” Rose groans, sensitive, perhaps, that it may all seem nauseatingly idyllic. Light trouble, though, has been stewing in this household. Rafe, her eldest son, has been decorating newly painted walls with his felt-tip pens. “I call it the Banksy,” says Rose generously of her son’s graffiti. “And although I am pretending to be furious, it does mean that in two years, when the house has stopped moving on its foundations, I can start a major wallpapering project.” There are more plans in the pipeline, and the couple are beginning to collect art. On a wall in the hall is a smattering of closely hung Hugo Guinness linocuts.

“He’s my mother’s first cousin; I love Hugo,” says Rose of the artist who has collaborated with Wes Anderson on a number of his films, including the Academy Award-winning The Grand Budapest Hotel. Dominating the stairwell is a large unframed canvas by Christopher Brooks, a Chipping Norton neighbour and the husband of the former New York fashion girl (now countryside chronicler, style writer and Rose’s spinning partner) Amanda Brooks. The picture is unusual: on a big grey canvas a human skull sits beside a fluorescent bottle of Domestos. “Our cleaner was very confused by it. She asked why we bought a painting of a bottle of Domestos,” says Rose, laughing. Across the large exposed-brick fireplace that commands one end of the kitchen is an oil painting of Sandwich, Nancy Astor’s seaside retreat, which Rose visited so often as a child. “In fact, I’ve a little bit more Nancy memorabilia,” she says, showing me into Grace’s bathroom, where standing before us is a grand, old-fashioned loo, the sort that looks like a throne, built from wicker and wood. “Yes, it’s Nancy’s! I wish I’d taken her bath, too – she had a special tap for salt water.” Whether you’re in the powderblue drawing room, beside the dining table that sits 10 (on chairs from Ikea, reupholstered by Rose in bright-green geometric print), or in the garden (which could accommodate a festival’s worth of revellers), it’s clear that Bruern House was built for entertaining. “We never really plan anything, but somehow that often means we have a full house. Our friends know our door is always open,” says Rose. Willow Crossley, the florist and author who styled the flowers for today’s shoot, reiterates this inviting lack of fuss. And although they haven’t had an official house-warming yet, Hugh says, “We’ve had a few good warm-ups.” The couple had their first house guests for a nearby New Year’s Eve party (there’s always entertainment to be found in Chipping Norton). PR maven Jenny Halpern Prince and her husband, the venture capitalist Ryan Prince, were given a notepad as they walked into the downstairs spare bedroom and asked to write down anything that they thought might be improved. “It came back double-sided with notes,” says Rose, delighted. “Don’t you love that American honesty?” Q 221


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Three women tell Vogue what happened to their wardrobes – and how they saw themselves – following a life-changing experience Portraits by Benjamin McMahon

Melanie Reid, 59, is a journalist. In 2010, she broke her neck and back in a horse-riding accident and is now a tetraplegic Come with me, and I will show you how you dance. For you, choosing new clothes is happy self-seduction; an age-old ritual. For you, it is a waltz between what you are and how you would like to be. And it consists of six simple steps: 1. You see. 2. You lust. 3. You touch. 4. You put it on. 5. You look in the mirror. 6. And then you move. With shoes, it is the same. You see a pair that are good enough to eat. You can no more resist than a magpie can ignore something that sparkles. You caress them. 222

You slip them on. And then you move. That is when you decide. In movement, your relationship with the item of clothing, its viability and its beauty, is finally revealed. Uncovered by your side step, your hair flick, your opening arms and your fluid, private twist in front of the mirror. The bond we have with our own reflection is more intimate than that with a lover. How do you look? Maybe as good as you’d hoped. You can dance with yourself. You’ve found your identity. Or the shoes >


Melanie in the garden of her home near Stirling. The columnist wears a jacket by Phase Eight, a blouse and necklace by Marina Rinaldi, and bracelets by Monica Vinader. Hair and make-up: Caroline Sims. Sittings editor: Julia Brenard

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may hurt like hell. The dress may be My injury took away what was, for me, shapeless. You do not move well together. a vital form of expression – motion. I am It’s not you. now, by definition, permanently still. Once upon a time, until a life-changing Clothes, it dawned on me, when I finally accident, I danced, too. Twirled in front of dared to look in a mirror, do not flourish mirrors, without ever appreciating what like this. Unless you are very, very beautiful, glorious fun it was, or what a basic human Mona Lisa in repose, or styled by experts, freedom it would seem when I could no there is little communication in stillness. longer do it. Like everyone choosing clothes, Clothes need sway and flow in order to show I sought identity, improvement, beauty, the life in the body within; movement reveals confidence and disguise in what I wore. as much as cut, fabric and label. When Then, six years ago, in a couple of seconds we walk and talk our outfits reveal many which I will gnaw with regret for the rest things: defiance, of my life, I tumbled off my horse over pride, comfort, an innocuous jump, landed on my face, and depression, power, broke my neck. I was lucky to survive – confidence, taste, although I’ve never been convinced luck is ambition, disguise, really the best word to calibrate such events seduction, aspiration, – and was left paralysed from the breastbone approachability. I down. My shoulders and arms have about have time to observe 60 per cent of their old abilities; my left these things now. hand is an insensate, largely non-functional As a spectator, claw; only my right hand, with a finger and I see cameos both thumb which retain a degree of both amusing and tender: sensation and grip, represents a precious a woman sitting in relic of my old, normal body. I live in a an airport, carefully wheelchair. I can wave my arms a bit and posed in exquisitely high-heeled shoes, smile; feed myself and make a cup of coffee. achingly cool. And then she gets up and But that’s about it. moves, walking like an adolescent camel or In the immediate aftermath – indeed, a seafront hen-party girl, and you envy her perhaps for a year, which constitutes a short no more. By contrast, sitting recently on a time in spinal injury terms – I deliberately university graduation platform clutching put my physical appearance on lockdown. an honorary degree, I watched hundreds of The critical priorities were to try to regain function with physiotherapy, and to return to work. By continuing to earn, as a writer, I retrieved some economic viability, muscles of a symbolic kind. I wore a uniform of T-shirts, struggled in the gym, never looked in a mirror, and typed furiously with two fingers. Only several years later, with the harsh realisation that paralysis was – yes, really was Melanie Reid skiing in – incurable, did I properly Val Thorens in the midstart to seek a new identity Eighties: “The days as woman in a wheelchair. of two ski holidays a season. Check out the And that’s when it really came gold Dynastar skis!” home to me. Who was I? How was I to dress? And how, oh how, could I ever stop mourning the body young women totter across in front of me that I had lost? From where would the for their certificates, 99 per cent of them on strength come to forge positives from so vertiginous heels, stumbling like endearing many pressing negatives? kid goats, but happy, happy, happy because Paralysis, I discovered, robs you of many they were going to look good in the different ways of expressing yourself. Your pictures later. These girls brought tears to presence, your height; in fact all the subtleties my eyes – children raking in the dressingof physical movement and body language. up box for adulthood, one last time, a final Suddenly, you are noticeable in a crowd rite of passage before it is for real. not for your face or your figure or your Perhaps the loss of the joy in movement clothes, but because you are in a wheelchair. means more to me than it would to others.

Before paralysis, I was more than 6ft tall. Never willow-slim, but strong and fit, with a 36in-long inside leg that gave me effortless presence. My height was my identity. Over the years I had grown to love myself, and developed a style that I felt good in. With those legs, it always had to be trousers. Lean jeans, mostly, with boots or flat brogues, jackets over layered tops, and earrings and scarves for femininity. I felt – and in selfimage, above all, perception is reality – that it gave me a leggy dynamism, tomboyish but attractive, capable. It was a message of power and independence, which suited my sense of self, my lack of reliance on men. My height eventually blessed me with some physical arrogance. Once upon a time, I danced like you. Movement was essential to my identity. Like 95 per cent of the world, I am no stand-alone, serene beauty. I made the best of my appearance with a smile, bouncy hair. And by keeping moving. Stand tall, talk with your hands and arms, address tall men eye to eye (it can disconcert them), drop a hip to speak to smaller men. Don’t get trapped by bores. Don’t stay too long in one place. Step out one long leg and swing tactfully to another conversation. And some energy, I hoped, would twirl behind me. Like every woman, I had long-perfected that almost unconscious once-over in the mirror before I left home. Does this jacket suit or shall I wear the other? Sure about these boots? Then, on autopilot, the drill: front view, side profile, then the glance over the shoulder for as much of a back view as possible. Finally, the spin back round on the heels, hair flick, chin raise – and the glimpse of the me I hoped others would see, in motion, clothes swaying, big tall warm bird. OK, that’ll do, good to go. That poignant old mix of insecurity, insouciance, bravado. It’s all gone. The saddest thing is that now I can’t even remember how to twirl. I’ve lost the muscle memory. Silly, really, isn’t it, that you could forget something like that? There is a special corner of hell reserved for many disabled people, then, and it’s the

Before paralysis, I was more than 6ft tall. My height was my identity… It was a message of power and independence

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MELANIE REID’S “SPINAL COLUMN” APPEARS IN THE TIMES MAGAZINE

space in front of the mirror where you search for yourself. How do I choose clothes to face another day when I have lost my legs, my power and my entire physical identity? When I’m 4ft tall, crotchheight in a crowd, and cannot see over people’s heads? There is no body left to hang clothes on. Oh, my carer helps me put on pretty stuff, clothes good enough to eat, but when I turn to the mirror, I just see a wheelchair and a parody of a woman. I don’t recognise myself. I’m not there. Some mornings, I hold hypothetical, morally dubious debates with myself. Perhaps it would be preferable to be blind. Then I could still dress proudly, knowing I still looked nice. No need to feel embarrassed, or worry about pitying glances. I could Melanie getting to know sustain myself privately in the her new horse, “dear old dark with internal, imagined Terry”, at a cross-country pictures of myself. competition in Lanarkshire, 2008 When life changes dramatically, of course we reflect it in our wardrobes: the conventions change. There is always the possibility of a of sombre clothes after bereavement, the reboot. You can, at will, swap your look day exhibitionist ones after divorce, an expensive by day, season by season. You need never garment as a reward for surviving cancer. be bored. Clothes are reinvention. But not This is where it gets interesting, because the to me they’re not. Whatever else I wear, psychology of choosing clothes after a life- I always wear a wheelchair. With clever changing accident or illness varies according dressing one can disguise a body’s blemishes, to how old you are now and how old you but nothing disguises a chair. Imagination were when you became disabled. Attitudes and creativity have their limits. have revolutionised in My solution is this century. Many limited, predictable, younger disabled told in two women have fewer sentences. I armour hang-ups, wear great my redundant clothes, and wield lower limbs with mobility aids as dark, inconspicuous fashion accessories. I leggings and boots. admire and envy them Then I try to put hugely. For them, some flair and disability is a form colour and shape of diversity, on a par into the top half. with gender, sexual Forgive me: this orientation, race and faith. They accept it. was an invitation to a dance, not a reason For me, struck down in my fifties, I cannot for gloom. I want everyone to celebrate life come back from the blow. The sociologists and possibility. But I need to tell you that all would coolly diagnose me as suffering from that separates me from you, and our shared the so-very-last-century concept of spoiled love of clothes and the desire to look good, identity. But hey! Can you blame me? are those two brutal seconds of my fall. A I cannot find beauty or vanity or sexual random accident. We live in a world that is allure in a wheelchair. I can look smart – tyrannised by ideals of beauty and physical but that’s an entirely different thing. perfection. They are unattainable. You must And it’s complicated. The magic of instead enjoy your body, imperfections and fashion lies in its power to offer constant all, by putting nice clothes on it. Your body

All that separates me from you, and the desire to look good, are those two brutal seconds of my fall

is beautiful, believe me, because it works. Enjoy every moment twirling in the mirror, and stop the drip, drip acid of self-criticism. You can move, you can do the dance, and in every step you express your style and identity. Never take it for granted. Appreciate it in a way that I didn’t until I lost it. As society changes, self-image for disabled people will get easier. Young people are far more bold and fair. Straws build on the wind. A company called Rollitex is now making the edgiest jeans for people in chairs. Katie Ellis, formerly a fashion buyer for the White Stuff, has started the Able Label, innovative quality clothes for people with disabilities. Paraplegic Sophie Morgan models for Stella McCartney. There are movements afoot in both Britain and America to put pressure on the fashion industry to become more representative. Britain’s Models for Diversity campaign seeks the eye-boggling goal of a legally enforced ratio of one disabled model for every three able-bodied ones – to be applied across media, magazines, advertising and shop displays. And good luck with that one, we may well say now – but perhaps we will judge how far the world has come when one in four shop-window dummies are wearing prosthetics and sitting in wheelchairs. By such time even I may have found an identity and started dancing again. If only in my head. > 225


Charlene Rodrigues-Batchelor, 33, is a journalist living in London. For several months during 2014 and 2015 she lived in Yemen, covering the conflict there In August 2014 I packed my bags, Arabic books and camera, and travelled 4,000 miles to Yemen. Since 2011 I’d been watching with a mixture of hope and despair from foreign desks in London as the Arab Spring swept through Syria, Libya and Egypt to this country at the foot of the Arabian Peninsula. Born in India but raised in the Middle East, I’d long felt an affinity with the region, and wanted to be on the ground out there covering what was happening. So, in July 2014, I found a job on an English newspaper in the Yemeni capital, Sana’a. My Yemeni friends in London gave me contacts and told me of the country’s conservative foibles. I felt prepared, but knew the transition wouldn’t be easy – my family were apprehensive, too, especially my husband, who worried about my safety. Living in London, I’d never much considered my daily “look”, which mostly consisted of pencil or wide-leg trousers paired with sweaters. I simply put on whatever suited my mood, the weather or the occasion – I loved to dress up for dinner parties, gigs or the theatre. Relocating to Yemen would mean not only a complete change of lifestyle but also clothes; swapping hats for headscarves, and wearing an abaya (a long loose-fitting black robe that conceals the body and clothes). The abaya was already familiar to me, as my mother had to wear one in the Eighties when we lived in Saudi Arabia – she thought it parochial and believed that it impinged on women’s freedoms. Perhaps naturally, I too expected it to feel repressive: a curtailment of my right to express myself through my clothes. Yet when I arrived in Yemen, I somehow found the same garment – synonymous with anonymity – offered me psychological protection. In a country known for journalist and aid-worker kidnappings, I felt inconspicuous, shielded. The abaya enabled my easy entry into government buildings, streets and markets. There was another benefit, too: not having to choose what to wear each time I left the house gave me so much extra time. And this new world I was inhabiting was instantly mesmerising. In Old Sana’a were Unesco-listed gingerbread-style houses, busy spice souks, colourful bazaars and stalls selling calligraphy, wood carvings and stained-glass windows. Narrow streets thronged with shops selling tea, coffee, 226

falafels and everyday basics. There was an immaculate beauty to the people, too. The majority of men dressed in thawbs (white robes) with a jambiya sword strapped to their waist, and traditional scarves draped around their neck or head. Women wore the abaya and some chose to obscure their faces with a long niqab (the veil that covers the face). Yet even with their identities obscured, building friendships with other women was not difficult. There was an unspoken trust and familiarity, the type of trust you can only witness, and not explain. But the country was inching closer to war. In September, a month after I arrived, the

Charlene taking a dhabaab (local bus) in the Yemeni capital

Houthis, a Zaydi Shia group from the north, besieged Sana’a and took over key government institutions. Women’s rights and freedoms fell under greater scrutiny. Suddenly, women in the capital were compelled to wear black headscarves and niqabs. If they resisted, they were harassed or interrogated at the university gates or their workplaces. I began obscuring my face whenever I was out of the house, ensuring I was completely covered except for my eyes, feet and hands. There didn’t seem much point in wearing make-up any more. I longed for the freedoms I had taken for granted in London – of slipping into a pair of running shorts and trainers to sprint

around the park, or strolling down the street in jeans or a dress – especially when it was warm (wearing an abaya in 50-degree heat, common during the summer months, was almost impossible). My walks through the narrow alleys of Old Sana’a, which had been so joyful in those first weeks, now reminded me of my mother’s frustrations when I was a child. Several months into the conflict, businesses came to a standstill. Historic buildings, homes and infrastructure were ravaged by airstrikes. Neighbours and residents fondly recalled a time when women walked about freely and swam in the warm Aden seas without covering up. Those days were gone. I wasn’t alone in lamenting the new strict dress codes. In our newspaper office, some women were reluctant to take off the niqab because of male presence, while others were unbothered. And at women-only gatherings (during Eid, say, or at weddings), the faces of women I’d previously only caught sight of veiled were revealed; their flawless skin, luscious hair and lightcoloured eyes, which wrinkled when they laughed and expressed utter despair when discussing Yemeni politics. It saddened me to think of all this beauty being hidden. At events like these, conversation often turned to impassioned debates on the niqab. While middle-aged and older women were generally tolerant of the garment, they conceded they found it difficult to single out themselves in family or school photographs. Young educated women, however, were a lot more vocal of their dislike. The niqab is not an original Yemeni tradition, they would tell me, nor is it religiously binding in the Koran. And yet I learned to appreciate the abaya and hijab. Far from being generic, women found ways to really make them their own: luxury versions – with diamanté studs, embroidery or patterns – were much sought after; while others opted for elegant empire-line styles or those that could be cinched and gathered with drawstrings to give them shape. I returned to London in March 2015 after airstrikes made it too dangerous to remain, but even now it is hard to predict the future of Yemen or its culture. Young Yemeni women challenged my preconceived notions of associating covering up with seclusion and backward societies; for them the abaya represented their fight against sexual harassment, resistance to Western influences and developing their own style. While others hope to be niqab-free. Like everything else, only time will tell. > BENJAMIN McMAHON


Suddenly, women in Sana’a were compelled to wear black headscarves and niqabs. If they resisted, they were harassed or interrogated

Charlene, photographed in the Alice House, NW6. She wears a dress by Tibi and her own jewellery. Hair and make-up: Adele Sanderson. Sittings editor: Florence Arnold

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Lillie, photographed in the grounds of Holborn’s BPP University. She wears a Dior jacket with Altuzarra trousers and Church’s shoes. Hair and make-up: Adele Sanderson. Sittings editor: Beatriz de Cossio

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Lillie Rage, 25,

GETTY

began modelling aged 15, before deciding to become a solicitor in 2014 For seven years, modelling was a feature in my life. It supported me through art school and then university in London, where I read English literature. But I always knew I wanted to do something else. People on my modelling assignments were sometimes confused by this. To many, embarking on a traditionally “serious” career and caring about clothes were mutually exclusive interests. They’re not, of course. That’s why in 2014, I decided to spend two years retraining as a solicitor; the career I knew I’d really love. I’ve always valued contrast and diversity in life, I believe we owe it to ourselves to not only try different things but to think in different ways, a philosophy I try to reflect in my clothing choices. To these ends, I’ve often dressed “unsuitably” for the occasion. I’ve been known to go jogging in a vintage crochet top and once rocked up to Glastonbury in a business suit. It’s not intentional or a bid to stand out; I simply dress how I want. But since pursuing a career as a solicitor, I have thought far more about clothes than I did while modelling. On the first day of my legal work experience, I made the mistake of borrowing a friend’s white shirt and wore illfitting trousers. As a result, I spent the day feeling insecure and uncomfortable. It was a stark reminder of the extent to which what we wear affects the way we feel. A model’s job is to be a blank canvas and portray the narrative of a fashion company; they have little or no say in their styling. (I learnt this when, on one of my first jobs, I snuck off to apply lip liner and mascara over the minimal make-up the artist had applied. Understandably, the director of the shoot scolded me.) In the shoots I have taken part in, I’ve never felt that the final picture truly represents who I am. But that’s part of the job of being a model – it is not supposed to. Perhaps this explains why, now my legal training has finished and I’m working in various solicitors’ offices, I’m more concerned that my outfits express my character. While my off-duty model attire was a pair of ankle boots, a slip dress and a grey jumper, here I have to dress formally in shirts and jackets, especially when volunteering at court or meeting with a pro-bono client. And yet, I’ve been surprised to discover that I actually enjoy the challenge of dressing within a professional workplace’s guidelines. In some ways, clothing restrictions force me to be more creative, because I don’t want to feel

BENJAMIN McMAHON

Lillie at a London store opening in 2013

like a corporate “suit”. I try to retain a hint of individuality amid the formality of the dress code; whether that’s some glitter in my eyeliner, a velvet suit jacket, or an unusually cut shirt. This means that when leaving the office to go out I don’t need to change too much. Because I try to keep a little vestige of my personality, retain a sense of my identity. Out of the office, my style is pretty constant. I have about 10 pairs of similar black boots and lots of the same style of dress. I’m a creature of habit: when I find a style I like, I tend to buy lots of variations on the theme. For example, at the moment I have seven silk paisley bandanas, all in different colours. I grew up near Portobello Road and so am passionate about finding unique vintage clothes, which I blend with high-street buys and designer hand-medowns. I rarely dress up to go out, but may change one aspect of an outfit, by adding a sequin jacket or my favourite black pointed boots to something I’ve been wearing all day.

I’ve often dressed “unsuitably”… I’ve jogged in a vintage crochet top and once rocked up to Glastonbury in a business suit Like the fashion industry, the landscape of the legal profession is continually evolving, so engaging with one’s environment is equally crucial to both a commercial lawyer and someone working in fashion. A lawyer is also expected to embody a brand and its ethos, but unlike modelling, your character and mind are essential to the work you do. In this new world of white shirts and sensible shoes, acts of sartorial rebellion are even more noticeable. During work experience at one law firm, I noticed that a partner was wearing smart lizard-skin cowboy boots and knew instantly we would get on. The boots were subtle; she knew the rules of the workplace and how to very slightly subvert them to reveal an element of her personality. At another, I noticed my supervisor was wearing a smart but slightly unconventional jacket. In many ways, this embodies what the law is all about – having the creativity to find inventive solutions within a strict framework. Q 229


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YOU NICOLA MOULTON INVESTIGATES HOW WE’RE ALL BENEFITING FROM BEAUTY’S CURRENT REALITY CHECK few years ago, Benefit, the make-up company that has cornered the market in cute, honest and quirky products, launched a mascara called They’re Real!. It became, like so many of its launches, a cult buy, promising such supreme thickening and lengthening that – as its name irreverently suggests – people will wonder if you’re actually wearing false lashes. “No,” you will cry in mock-horror, “they’re real!” But the real joke in

JAMES COCHRANE; PAUL BOWDEN

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naming a mascara They’re Real! is not that you’re denying you’re wearing false lashes – it’s that you’re pretending those luscious, fluttery lashes are the ones you were born with, rather than a thick layer of jet-black lash-lengthener. At the time, false lashes were having a moment. Shu Uemura had launched a lash bar in its Covent Garden shop; the members of Girls Aloud brought out their own signature lashes; beauty blogs were full of tips about

cutting up eyelash strips to create “naturallooking effects” for day; gossip columns revealed how the Kardashians would regularly wear three sets at once in order to create their own desired effect. In some ways that was the moment when the balance of modern makeup tipped: through something so rudimentary as gluing synthetic hair fibres on to your eyelids, the popular definition of beauty became more about artifice than nature. > 231


PAUL BOWDEN; GETTY

VOGUEbeauty Of course, eyelashes weren’t the only need to admit that shit so it doesn’t thing. They were the latest in a long have to be so taboo – because we’re all line that included hair extensions, doing it anyway.” acrylic nails, fillers and Botox that Prenna Jones laughingly describes allowed women to undergo ever more how she does “get a bit irritated when radical transformations. Prior to that, I read interviews with some of my since the Eighties at least, a woman’s celebrity clients where they say, ‘Oh no, beauty had been all about enhancing I never have any work done to my face,’ what you were born with rather than and I think, ‘What? You have a lot!’ I see replacing it with something new; inner where they’re coming from, but still…” beauty and outer beauty inextricably This persistent element of secrecy linked. “Feeling beautiful has to do definitely suggests women are still with the feeling that everything is right. It is a total experience – emotional and psychological, as well as physical and aesthetic,” wrote Deborah Hutton in the Vogue Beauty Book of 1982. Back then, women were disinclined to talk about their blonde highlights. Even a decade ago, a fake tan was still a beauty secret. These days, with beauty vloggers doing everything from shaving their faces to filming their bikini wax online, it seems very few subjects are off-limits. “Botox still does seem to have this enormous stigma,” says the aesthetician Dr Frances Prenna Jones. But she also agrees – “one thousand million per grappling with the idea of what “real” cent” – that in the past decade there has beauty might be. The fascinating thing been a radical shift in how open women about the injectables debate is that, as are to talking about work they’ve had Prenna Jones points out, high-profile done. “It used to be like a witch hunt, clients seem much more willing to the media wanted to ‘out’ people who’d admit to things such as chemical peels had surgical treatments,” she says. “But and laser treatments than to injections. that’s changing. What I see now is So while adding a foreign substance, women in their forties coming to such as filler, is frowned on, removing me because friends have recommended layers of skin (with lasers, for example) it. Ten years ago, you didn’t get personal is somehow acceptable. On some recommendations psychological level, because people weren’t the idea of “natural” having such open “I read interviews – whatever that means conversations about – is somehow always with clients procedures.” (In fact, thing to be more who say, ‘Oh no, the she says, so furtive prized, and the thing were people about I never have any that’s most alluring. the appointments, they Even online, where work done,’ and make-up used to request her tutorials and name didn’t come up on I think, ‘What?’” Instagram beauty posts their bank statements.) are mostly about Celebrities are starting to be more learning how to apply products, or using upfront about it, too. Until recently, the make-up as an aid to transformation, party line for Gwyneth Paltrow, Nicole often the natural looks are the most Kidman, Cameron Diaz and many popular. Make-up artist and beauty more was that they had tried injections vlogger Lisa Eldridge’s “No Make-up but no longer have them. The younger Make-up” tutorial is one of her most generation is more outspoken – either popular posts by far – nearly 3 million for or against. Iggy Azalea, the 26-year- views on Youtube – far more than her old rapper and model, recently made celebrity makeovers on Alexa Chung headlines with her attempt to remove or Rosie Huntington-Whiteley. the stigma around cosmetic surgery: “I Alessandra Steinherr is beauty think, in 2016, people should be more director of Glamour magazine but also accepting of the fact that both famous has a huge following for her Instagram and non-famous women are having beauty posts – mainly selfies in cosmetic procedures,” she said. “That’s which she details the make-up she is just the reality and I think more people wearing. But she found that her most

CLINIQUE PERFECTLY REAL MAKEUP, £23

THE ESTEE EDIT BY ESTEE LAUDER FLASH PHOTO GLOSS, £15, AT SELFRIDGES

Above left: Lisa Eldridge’s “No Make-Up Make-Up” tutorial has had 3 million views. Above right: VSCO Cam – the filter of choice for many celebrities

overwhelmingly popular posts were about natural beauty. “By far my two most ‘liked’ posts have been one where I am literally wearing no make-up and you can see my pores, and one that’s a split screen showing the difference between me with make-up and without. I think what people respond to best is authenticity. It upsets me when people comment and say, ‘You’ve clearly retouched your skin’, because that is something I would never do.” If “is she or isn’t she wearing makeup?” was once the most asked question in beauty, it has been replaced by “has she or hasn’t she filtered her selfie?” “I filter my pictures. I’ve never pretended otherwise,” says Steinherr. “I don’t see it as right or wrong. It’s just showing the best side of yourself. But I’m the first to admit I might take a hundred photos before I get one I’ll use.” Beauty filters are big business: the most popular, Facetune, launched in 2013 and within a year had become the number one paidfor app in more than 80 countries. (In Britain it costs £2.99.) It’s easy to use and its effects are undeniably impressive: with options to reshape, blur, refine > 233


VOGUEbeauty

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ut one positive to be taken from the spotlight on selfies is that the beauty industry is responding with a renewed interest in “real women” in its advertising campaigns, with some brands attempting to broaden the question of how “reality” can relate to the beauty world, and how much inspiration or fantasy still feels relevant. “We see a lot of stereotyping in the beauty industry, not just in imagery,” says Mark Bleathman, vice president of personal care at Unilever UK and Ireland, the multinational that owns brands including Dove, Tresemmé and Sure, as well as more recent acquisitions such as Ren and Dermalogica. As a company, Unilever has a well-publicised mission to “have a purpose beyond the functional”, citing a report showing that brands with purpose are now some of the best-performing worldwide. The company made headlines when it published a report of its #Unstereotype campaign, which revealed that only three per cent of ads feature women in managerial or professional roles, and so – unsurprisingly – nearly half of all women say they do not identify with them. Dove has, as Bleathman says, 234

Above: faces from Bobbi Brown’s new street-casted Be Who You Are advertisements

BENEFIT THEY’RE REAL! BIG SEXY LIP KIT, £24.50

long been “ahead of the curve on this”, making headlines back in 2004 when it launched its first, and now much referenced, Campaign for Real Beauty, featuring women of varying shapes and sizes wearing nothing but white underwear. It’s also a strategy adopted by Boots for its No7 brand, which has committed to a new level of “reality” in its communications. For some years now it has featured only “real” women (ie not models) on television as well as in print, and recently banned airbrushing from its ads, too. But a new campaign, breaking this autumn, features the author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. She has written a script documenting her own struggle to reconcile a love of make-up with a quest for gender equality and – for a beauty ad at least – it feels powerful and radical. She agreed to appear because, she says, the brand’s philosophy appealed to her – the idea of democratising beauty. “I think much of beauty advertising relies on a false premise – that women need to be treated in an infantile way, given a ‘fantasy’ to aspire to,” she says. “The world is full of beautiful women, with different kinds of beauty, and more honest advertising can be exciting and attainable. Real women are already inspired by other real women, so perhaps beauty advertising needs to get on board.” Charlotte Tilbury, whose brand has found traction with beauty-buying women in record time, has maintained from the start that the idea of make-up should not be at odds with qualities like ambition and self-esteem. She often quotes a Harvard and Boston University study led by Nancy Etcoff,

lecturer and author of Survival of the Prettiest: the Science of Beauty – the first major academic research into how make-up can influence others’ perceptions of a woman’s personality. Scientists asked participants to rate the same faces with and without make-up for attractiveness, likeability, competence and trustworthiness. “For the first time we have found that applying make-up has an effect beyond increasing attractiveness – it impacts first impressions and overall judgements of perceived likeability, trustworthiness and competence,” said Etcoff. Even at the very glossiest end of the spectrum, Bobbi Brown has made a move to using real women in her beauty campaigns, celebrating 25 years in the business with a new Be Who You Are campaign, featuring a super-chic street casting of more than 40 women, including a graphic designer, a yoga instructor and a schoolfriend of one of Bobbi’s sons. The idea, says Brown, is that the beauty shots should be “rooted in self-confidence” – her guiding principle for the brand at the start. But injecting personality into beauty isn’t easy: the mystique of a pretty face is part of the appeal. And the challenge with this kind of advertising is not to be tokenistic; to convey a positive message that doesn’t make women feel patronised. It’s a hard balance to strike, which is possibly why campaigns such as these are very much the exception, not the rule. “I do think there’s a space for inspirational beauty advertising,” says Mark Bleathman. “I don’t think the campaigning should diminish the importance of appearance and confidence. It’s just that appearance shouldn’t be the only thing, not even in the beauty industry.” If only there was a filter you could use for that. Q

AKINTUNDE AKINLEYE

“More honest advertising can be exciting…” Writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, photographed here for Vogue April 2015, will feature in the latest No7 campaign

and “patch” (creating, say, a virtual skin graft, to replace an area of problem skin with clear skin) your image. VSCO Cam is the one most selfie-loving celebrities are said to use and PS Express, the app from the people behind Photoshop, is also popular. But beauty insiders currently think the best filter is on Snapchat. It doesn’t have a name but it’s denoted by a grey emoji. One 25-year-old told me she won’t send her boyfriend a picture without using it, while another twentysomething deploys a double-filter process: “I put the Sunset filter on Facetune, then layer over a filter on Instagram, too.” The apps are regularly criticised in the media for the “unreal” images they allow young women to portray; only recently, Snapchat was upbraided for a feature that allows the whitening of faces. Campaigners for the positive portrayal of women in the media, including the All Party Parliamentary Group on Body Image, have flagged these apps as a potential concern.


“LEAVES HAIR SOFT AND SMOOTH“

“DRIES HAIR SUPER FAST“

“LIGHT AND POWERFUL“

“MY HAIR WAS SO SMOOTH, SO SHINY“

January 2016 – very.co.uk

January 2016 – argos.co.uk

May 2016 – argos.co.uk

August 2015 – boots.com

THE PREPARE TO BE BLOWN AWAY. Available at John Lewis, Argos, Very.co.uk and selected larger Boots stores.


100 years of

HIGH NOTES As Italian luxury brand Acqua di Parma celebrates its 100th anniversary, we take a look back at its timeless essence Both Boralevi and Gastel capture the elegance and culture of hen Baron Carlo Magnani, the refined heir of an aristocratic family from the Italian city of Parma, Parma; a city entrenched with history and bursting with art and called upon a master perfumer to create Colonia beauty. Gastel has taken a stunning array of one-of-a-kind Acqua di Parma in 1916, he could have had little idea that it photographs that play on the idea of duality – each one a celebration of Parma’s majestic past would fast become an integral part of and also its stylish present – to create Parma’s heritage and a world ambassador “Colonia is more a visual journey that explores the city’s for Italian craftsmanship. Acqua di Parma’s timeless success is no than just a perfume: works of fine art. His impressive exhibition is heightened by Boralevi’s mystery: for 100 years it has cultivated the it’s a lifestyle” tantalising tales of the place’s origins finest essential oils and utilised the Italian GABRIELLA SCARPA, in a novel written especially to mark expertise of elegance to produce sophisticated PRESIDENT, ACQUA DI PARMA Acqua di Parma’s centenary year and fragrances of unrivalled quality. offering a rare glimpse into the unique In celebration of a century of splendour and Italian artistic heritage, a new book, Essere Parma, showcases ambience of the city. The marriage of these two artistic Acqua di Parma’s opulent legacy and commitment to supporting endeavours creates a totally immersive experience which will Italian culture, alongside the architectural and artistic significance transport you to the heart of Parma, a site that embodies the of the city of Parma, with a novel by Antonella Boralevi and a photo height of Italian luxury. Q book by acclaimed international photographer Giovanni Gastel. For more information visit Acquadiparma.com

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VOGUE PROMOTION

A journey through time THE MOMENTS WHEN ACQUA DI PARMA MADE A SPLASH

1916 Carlo Magnani blazes a perfume trail with the first Italian cologne, Colonia Acqua di Parma – a fresh and modern scent unlike any other of its time. The subtle sophistication was an instant favourite among Italy’s high society as the pinnacle of luxury fragrance. FIRST COLONIA BOTTLE

1930 Always on trend, Colonia Acqua di Parma launched its signature deco-inspired bottle with a classic black stopper, becoming the must-have accessory of the decade.

ACQUA DI PARMA COLONIA

1950

GIOVANNI GASTEL, FROM THE BOOK ESSERE PARMA (MONDADORI ELECTA); ARCHIVIO CLAUDIO PARMIGGIANI

TOP: MONUMENTAL LIBRARY, MONASTERY OF SAN GIOVANNI EVANGELISTA. ABOVE: ESSERE PARMA, PUBLISHED BY ACQUA DI PARMA AND MONDADORIELECTA. BELOW: SHADOW SCULPTURE (2010), BY CLAUDIO PARMIGGIANI

Acqua di Parma attained international success, winning the hearts of Hollywood’s elite after being invited to experience the delicate accord at traditional Italian tailor shops.

2016 Note di Colonia launches: a collection of three fragrances contained in a reinterpretation of Colonia’s first bottle, that encapsulate the essence of 100 elegant years and celebrates Acqua di Parma’s cultural splendour with references to some of the greatest Italian classical composers.

ACQUA DI PARMA NOTE DI COLONIA I, II, III


VOGUEbeauty Pair Christian Louboutin Nail Colour in Zermadame, £36, with showstopping sandals Dior’s palettes combine wearable neutrals with on-trend shades. 5 Couleurs Designer in Khaki Design, £43 A soft wand means YSL Beauté Full Metal Shadow The Mats in Fur Green, £21, centre, glides easily over the eye

Khaki is a wearable and flattering way to go green. Paint 3INA The Colour Mascara in 106, £8.95, on to the tips of your lashes to update your daytime look

For a glimmering flick, try Dolce & Gabbana Glam Liner Intense Liquid Eyeliner in Wild Green, £27 Urban Decay Moondust in Zodiac, £14, centre, is the perfect silky, shimmering eyeshadow

Burberry Nail Polish in Cadet Green, £15, is our favourite for autumn. Looks great on short nails

Beautifully buildable, Kiko Milano Water Eyeshadow in Olive Green, £8.90, gives you the choice of a sheer veil of colour or an impactful smoky eye

An eyeshadow that, for the adventurous, doubles up as a brow colour. Giorgio Armani Eye & Brow Maestro in Khaki, £27 Darkly shimmering Chanel Stylo Yeux Waterproof in Pacific Green, £19, has impressive staying power

PAUL BOWDEN

Green PIECES

FROM KHAKI TO OLIVE, TURN OVER A NEW LEAF THIS AUTUMN, SAYS FLORA MACDONALD JOHNSTON

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VOGUEbeauty

Tansy Aspinall, on left, with friend and business partner Victoria van Holthe

BATHROOM confidential FOUR WOMEN, WHOSE NEW BUSINESSES DEMAND THEY LOOK POLISHED AND PROFESSIONAL, REVEAL HOW THEY START THE DAY. BY LOTTIE WINTER TANSY ASPINALL & VICTORIA VAN HOLTHE, BOTH 27

DVORA; PAUL BOWDEN; PIXELATE.BIZ

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ansy Aspinall – who, with her friend Victoria, co-founded jewellery company Tada & Toy – spends an impressive 60 minutes on her morning routine, which begins around 8am. “Mornings are a struggle for me. I even shower at night so I can sleep longer.” That 60 minutes starts with a 15-minute five-step skincare regime of a hot-cloth cleanse, exfoliator, eye cream, hydrating serum and a high-factor SPF. She tends to just leave her hair, and has developed a signature look that’s “thick and a little wild” so as not to have to style it in the mornings. After that, it’s all about the make-up: a full face consisting of concealer, blusher, highlighter, bronzer, mascara, eyeliner, eyebrow gel and lip balm, to create, says Tansy, a “very natural but polished look”. Victoria van Holthe describes her body clock as “the complete opposite” of Tansy’s. She “jumps out of bed” at 6.30am and heads straight to the nearby Sangyé Yoga School. Once back and showered, her beauty regime takes a brisk 20 minutes. She washes her face in the shower and skips moisturiser, simply applying a highfactor SPF. Hair is rough-dried upside down “for volume” and then scraped into a ponytail. “I cycle everywhere, so a ponytail is the best way to avoid helmet hair.” Make-up takes up the remaining 10 minutes, involving a tinted moisturiser, foundation, blusher and mascara. “I never put lipstick on in the morning, only if I’m going out at night.” >

LAURA MERCIER SECRET CAMOUFLAGE CONCEALER, £27.50

NARS BLUSH IN ORGASM, £23

KIEHL’S ULTRA LIGHT DAILY UV DEFENSE SUNSCREEN, £35

BOBBI BROWN POT ROUGE FOR LIPS AND CHEEKS IN BRUSHED ROSE, £20

SHU UEMURA ROUGE UNLIMITED LIPSTICK IN UNIVERSAL RED, £19.50

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VOGUEbeauty JANINA DIAMOND ULTRAWHITE WHITENING TOOTHPASTE, £11.50

DAWN RUSSELL, 41

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awn Russell, founder of 8G, a green-juice boost in a soluble tablet, has her morning down pat, starting with hot water and lemon at 7am. Her preschool-run regime takes just 10 minutes, with exercise scheduled in after drop-off. “Twice a week I do hardcore circuit training for an hour – I’m drenched in sweat by the end.” Make-up is kept to a minimum, as Dawn prefers to book regular grooming appointments and keep her morning routine simple. In the 10 minutes she spends on her face, she uses French pharmacy brands – “They chime with my belief that beauty products should be hardworking” – and Dr Lancer’s The Method three-step skincare regime. The remaining time is spent on teeth and downing her 8G Greens drink, which she describes as “better than a facial”. Then it’s just a sweep of bronzer and a dab of lip balm, and she’s ready to go.

8G GREENS DIETARY SUPPLEMENT, FROM £19 FOR 20 TABLETS

BUXOM FULL-ON LIP POLISH IN KATIE, £14

LANCER SKINCARE THE METHOD: NOURISH, £105

LIZ EARLE CLEANSE & POLISH HOT CLOTH CLEANSER, £14

DIOR DIORSHOW MASCARA, £25

CHANTECAILLE LIQUID LUMIERE IN LUSTRE, £33, AT SPACE NK

AESOP FABULOUS FACE CLEANSER, £33

AVEENO DAILY MOISTURISING HAND CREAM, £5.49

CLARE ZERNY, 37

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GREG FUNNELL; PAUL BOWDEN; PIXELATE.BIZ; TIM JENKINS

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hree times a week, Clare Zerny, founder of Queen of Tarts, a Hackney-based catering company, starts her day at 5am with a personal training session. She then showers and spends 30 minutes on skin, hair and make-up. This morning routine used to take an hour, but what took the time was patching up blemishes that have now cleared with age. Now her teeth take up a third of her morning prep (10 minutes), something she’s focused on since starting her vlog. “I’m a bit obsessive when it comes to my teeth,” she says. Since her braces came off six months ago, the regime involves electric toothbrush, flossing and the application of a whitening product. Hair takes minimal time as she tends to blow-dry only her fringe, leaving the rest to air-dry. “I use Aussie 3 Minute Miracle treatment every time I wash my hair; it’s so good at frizz-fighting that I don’t need to blow-dry.” The remaining 12 to 15 minutes are spent on make-up, mainly layering Diorshow Mascara which, Clare says, is worth the time spent: “People stop me in the street and ask what I’ve put on my lashes.” She finishes with a ritual application of hand cream, “then continue to apply it like a nervous tic throughout the day”. Q


VOGUEbeauty KIKO HYDRA PRO GLOW MOISTURISING CREAM, £20.90

L’OREAL PARIS PURE CLAY GLOW MASK, £7.99

THE ESTEE EDIT BY ESTEE LAUDER RADIANCE ACTIVATOR TREAT+PREP+ GLOW, £38, AT SELFRIDGES

Time to reflect

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JILLIAN DEMPSEY LID TINT, £22

MAISON MARGIELA REPLICA FILTER IN GLOW, £45

TOPSHOP GLOW

HIGHLIGHTER, £9 he difference between a believable and an artificial glow in make-up is all down to shimmer. Backstage this season there was a noticeable lack of it. Instead, the focus was on post-gym skin, imbuing cheekbones, eyelids and lips with an endorphin-induced sheen. For a noticeable difference, we advocate layering glowinducing skincare with ultra-dewy make-up. Kiko Hydra Pro Glow contains a blend of radiance-boosting antioxidants, while L’Oréal Paris has combined three clays with red algae – known for its brightening properties – for a multitasking radiance mask. Rosie for Autograph Amazing Radiance Cream provides instant brightening, The Estée Edit Radiance Activator contains energising pink peony, sea lavender and vitamins, and Decléor Orexcellence Energy Concentrate Youth Mask encourages natural exfoliation for surface glow. On to make-up, and Illamasqua has launched Corruptor, a clear gel that gives a wet look to existing make-up. St Tropez’s Instant Tan Gloss – a hint of bronze with a high-wattage sheen previewed at the s/s ’17 shows – is out in January, while LA make-up artist Jillian Dempsey’s glossy Lid Tints will arrive in time for Christmas. Even traditional highlighters are taking a step away from the sparkle – Topshop Glow Highlighter gives a dewy finish and Revlon PhotoReady Insta-Fix Highlighting Stick adds a hint of creamy radiance.

REVLON PHOTOREADY INSTA-FIX HIGHLIGHTING STICK, £10

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THERE’S NEVER A DULL MOMENT THIS SEASON WITH NEW GLOW-GETTING SKINCARE, MAKE-UP AND EVEN A FRAGRANCE, SAYS LOTTIE WINTER

ROSIE FOR AUTOGRAPH AMAZING RADIANCE CREAM, £18

FILTER REQUIRED

Now firmly established at Martin Margiela, John Galliano is sprinkling his magic dust over the brand’s fragrances. As well as four totally new scents in the Replica collection, there are two Filters which will subtly transform any existing fragrance: Glow will give a perfume a sparkling, uplifting element, while Blur will add mellowness and warmth. Galliano, with characteristic romanticism, describes the idea as “hi-fi, lo-fi, with a sci-fi finish”. Replica eau de parfum, £110 each; Filter, £45 each.

GLOW TO GO

DECLEOR OREXCELLENCE ENERGY CONCENTRATE YOUTH MASK, £55

Home of the speedy – and naturally lifting – “facial workout” massage, Face Gym opens its first flagship boutique on the King’s Road this month. The two floors will include four Face Gym treatment pods, and also a “skin food bar” devised by sought-after London facialist Alexandra Soveral, where you can blend your own facial oils to maintain the “postworkout” glow at home.

PAUL BOWDEN; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; PIXELATE.BIZ

FRANCESCO SCOGNAMIGLIO

The radiant WAY


The lip balm that makes you smile. 100% natural eos lip balm is paraben-free and packed with shea butter and jojoba oil to keep your lips looking and feeling soft, smooth and perfectly moisturised every day. Find your favourite eos flavour at major retailers and pharmacies. evolutionofsmooth.com

95% Organic 100% Natural Certified organic by Oregon Tilth


VOGUEbeauty

LOUIS VUITTON’S NEW SCENT COLLECTION TAKES THE WEARER ON A VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. BY NICOLA MOULTON

e had to deliver something truly exceptional, of course, that’s what everyone is expecting – but also something you could only find at Louis Vuitton.” So says Jacques Cavallier Belletrud, the house’s master perfumer, at the launch of its debut collection of seven fragrances. The scents, all decadently flowerinfused, use “the best raw materials you can find in the world – there is

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no synthetic scent of cappuccino or flowers that only exist on the moon,” says Cavallier Belletrud. The bottles have been designed by Marc Newson, and, importantly for a brand that believes beautiful things should last a lifetime, are refillable. Rather than seeing perfumes as a way of bolstering sales of fashion and accessories, Louis Vuitton’s approach, explains Cavallier Belletrud, “is that we will take care of perfume clients

in the same way that we take care of those who are buying leather goods or watches or fashion.” Hence this: a 5ft tall, hand-crafted trunk that’s appeared in Louis Vuitton boutiques housing the most emblematic raw materials found in the scents, so clients can be taken on an olfactory journey, or sate their curiosity about the scent of raw amber. For perfume lovers, it’s a treasure trove – but the real gems are the scents themselves. Q

JODY TODD

Trunk LINE

The perfume trunks can be found in selected Louis Vuitton boutiques. Below: Rose des Vents (based on rose de Mai), one of the seven fragrances in the collection – the others are Apogée (lily of the valley), Contre Moi (vanilla), Dans La Peau (leather), Matière Noire (patchouli and agarwood), Mille Feux (raspberry and leather) and Turbulences (tuberose). Eaux de Parfum, £180 each


< 195 NATURAL SELECTION

look like people, rather than objects, in the work of Capitán and fellow rising female photographers such as Lea Colombo. “I think that we are getting further and further from sexualising every subject in our imagery,” says Capitán. “In the past, photography – and especially fashion photography – was pretty much limited to the male gaze. Now it is much more open to an individual and genderless vision.” Self-taught Colombo is more strident. “I don’t know if the notion of flipping the gaze, or if the assumption that the gaze is necessarily always male, is relevant any more. I think it’s quite reductive to assume that,” she argues. It’s easy to read much of this work as political – as a pointed rejection of past fashion photography. But it’s part of a broader change. The women in front of the camera, as well as behind it, are shifting. Photographer Collier Schorr straddles the fashion and art worlds. Her work is tender yet strong, and fits well within the current climes. “If the figure is already plastic then retouching is just polish. I was always aware that fashion models had bodies that were out of my reach. I accepted that,” she muses. Today’s top models are less doll-like than before: women such as wild-haired Mica Arganaraz, pixie-cum-skinhead Ruth Bell and Lineisy Montero, an advocate for natural black hair. Their success runs in tandem with this more “authentic” style of photography. “‘Realness’ communicates what is particular about a situation or a person. We’re more interested than ever in personalities, especially in model personalities,” adds Moore.

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odgson says that his best work comes when he is shooting with someone who has energy. “Personalities are coming back to the forefront. I love that. I think that has come through the internet age – people are now more likely to put themselves out there. The openness of Facebook and Instagram has changed things. When I can relate to people, the work becomes more personal. If the people are real to me, they need to be presented as such. It’s not enough just to look good.” But perhaps it’s the effort rather than the ease behind the social-media picture boom that these photographers are responding to. Our personal photo collections are now as tweaked and Photoshopped – every angle or tone considered and cultivated. Maybe these new fashion images – with their “realness” – are appealing as an antidote. A certain digital apathy does

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< 208 TUNNEL VISION

explain why so many of this generation of photographers have turned to old-school methods, such as shooting with film or frequenting the darkroom. It also explains the renewed interest in tangible objects such as lookbooks, zines and catalogues. To more established image-makers this can read as nostalgia. Nick Knight explains, “I remember a very similar feeling in the air back in the Nineties when people like David Sims, Glen Luchford and Corinne Day started. It was a desire for real photography, rather than photography that was manipulated or overproduced or very advanced.” Luchford himself agrees: “To state the obvious, the Nineties seem to have developed a kind of Camelot quality. I guess that’s because it was the last period when fashion ran as a cottage industry. That allowed more freedom creatively – there was less to lose. Fashion today is a tough business, very demanding, a little crazy, so I’d imagine the desire to return to the old is perfectly natural. It’s safer and more romantic.”

B

ut change must come. It always does. “Imagery always moves. It will always segue. High and low, real and unreal,” argues Schorr. These constant tides are one of the reasons she feels at home in the fashion industry right now. “The glass ceiling still exists in the art world. It doesn’t in the fashion world. It can’t, because fashion always needs to move. Art can sit comfortably in a museum for the rest of its life.” To Knight, the change is cyclical and amusingly predictable. “There’s always a strange 20-year loop in fashion. We’re always looking back – 20 years ago is fashionable, 15 is not,” he laughs. “So, we’re looking to the mid-Nineties at the moment, in 10 years’ time they’ll be looking back to 2005 and loving what was done then. Things go out of fashion but then come back because a new generation grows up and they remember what they loved when they were adolescents, and bring that back.” Luchford also acknowledges this cycle. “The pendulum always swings back and forth; it never sits still. When there is an action, there is a reaction. Of course after years of polished, over-stylised imagery, we’d naturally swing back.” “I think the very nature of fashion means there are always going to be shifts and changes and many different points of view,” agrees Hawkesworth. “We need them all so there can be lots of conversation.” When it comes to understanding the mood or moment, today’s fashion photography speaks thousands of words. Q

she did her masters in transport planning and engineering, there were only three women out of 40 in total on the course. Valerie Todd has 1,000 ambassadors going into schools around London and is actively running placements, internships and competitions designed to encourage young girls to think about engineering, surveying or designing in the construction industry: “A lot of people still think it’s getting dirty and holding a shovel,” says Todd. “But you are building something beautiful that will last for centuries and help people enrich their lives.” She is thrilled her own daughter, Melissa, could one day create engineering beauty where once there was just earth. Says Dedring of the many projects she worked on at City Hall: “I was given a lot of excuses like, ‘We don’t have money for that’ or ‘Someone else has set my budget’ or ‘I’ve allocated all my money.’ There is always money. It’s about the desire to find it and be creative. There would be this slightly boys’ club tone to some of the discussions and I’d think, ‘Hang on! Have I not made my point in the right way?’ So I ended up becoming more forceful. And that’s easy at my level of seniority but not if you’re junior, so it’s not about having more senior women per se, it’s about having women at every level.” Fatima Alghali is Crossrail’s 400th apprentice. She is training to be a quantity surveyor and one day wants to take her skills back to Sierra Leone, where her family originated, to help regeneration there. She remembers the first time she went into a Crossrail tunnel, an oxygen tank around her waist in case of emergency: “You’re so deep underground, you feel like you’re in a different realm.” The specially commissioned tunnelboring machines, now all scrapped, were like massive cheese graters, with sensor equipment picking up tiny millimetres of movement (vital if there were foundations of buildings nearby) and huge “heads” with biting teeth that cut through the earth. As it turns out, these formidable machines were also “women”. Following a competition calling for names that conjured inspiration and achievement, the machines were called: Ada (Lovelace), Phyllis (Pearsall), (Queen) Victoria, (Queen) Elizabeth, Mary (Brunel), Sophia (Brunel), Jessica (Ennis-Hill) and Ellie (Simmonds) – the last two “Olympians” having created the Stepney Green tunnels. So when you are travelling across London in 2018 and beyond, reading your book, or going to an evening class that once took too long to get to, or moving with a pram or a wheelchair from platform to pavement with greater ease, you have years of effort from the women of Crossrail to thank – both the human and the mechanical kind. Q


VOGUE INFORMATION IN THE USA: CONDÉ NAST Chairman Emeritus: S.I. Newhouse, Jr. Chairman: Charles H. Townsend President & Chief Executive Officer: Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr. Artistic Director: Anna Wintour IN OTHER COUNTRIES: CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL Chairman and Chief Executive: Jonathan Newhouse President: Nicholas Coleridge Vice Presidents: Giampaolo Grandi, James Woolhouse, Moritz von Laffert, Elizabeth Schimel Chief Digital Officer: Wolfgang Blau President, Asia-Pacific: James Woolhouse President, New Markets and Editorial Director, Brand Development: Karina Dobrotvorskaya Director of Planning: Jason Miles Director of Acquisitions and Investments: Moritz von Laffert GLOBAL President, Condé Nast E-commerce: Franck Zayan Executive Director, Condé Nast Global Development: Jamie Bill THE CONDÉ NAST GROUP OF BRANDS INCLUDES: US Vogue, Vanity Fair, Glamour, Brides, Self, GQ, GQ Style, The New Yorker, Condé Nast Traveler, Allure, Architectural Digest, Bon Appétit, Epicurious, Wired, W, Golf Digest, Teen Vogue, Ars Technica, Condé Nast Entertainment, The Scene, Pitchfork UK Vogue, House & Garden, Brides, Tatler, The World of Interiors, GQ, Vanity Fair, Condé Nast Traveller, Glamour, Condé Nast Johansens, GQ Style, Love, Wired, Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design, Ars Technica FRANCE Vogue, Vogue Hommes International, AD, Glamour, Vogue Collections, GQ, AD Collector, Vanity Fair, Vogue Travel in France, GQ Le Manuel du Style, Glamour Style ITALY Vogue, L’Uomo Vogue, Vogue Bambini, Glamour, Vogue Sposa, AD, Condé Nast Traveller, GQ, Vanity Fair, Wired, Vogue Accessory, La Cucina Italiana, CNLive GERMANY Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Myself, Wired SPAIN Vogue, GQ, Vogue Novias, Vogue Niños, Condé Nast Traveler, Vogue Colecciones, Vogue Belleza, Glamour, AD, Vanity Fair JAPAN Vogue, GQ, Vogue Girl, Wired, Vogue Wedding TAIWAN Vogue, GQ MEXICO AND LATIN AMERICA Vogue Mexico and Latin America, Glamour Mexico and Latin America, AD Mexico, GQ Mexico and Latin America, Vanity Fair Mexico INDIA Vogue, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller, AD PUBLISHED UNDER JOINT VENTURE: BRAZIL Vogue, Casa Vogue, GQ, Glamour, GQ Style RUSSIA Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Tatler, Condé Nast Traveller, Allure PUBLISHED UNDER LICENCE OR COPYRIGHT COOPERATION: AUSTRALIA Vogue, Vogue Living, GQ BULGARIA Glamour CHINA Vogue, Vogue Collections, Self, AD, Condé Nast Traveler, GQ, GQ Style, Brides, Condé Nast Center of Fashion & Design CZECH REPUBLIC AND SLOVAKIA La Cucina Italiana HUNGARY Glamour ICELAND Glamour KOREA Vogue, GQ, Allure, W, GQ Style MIDDLE EAST Condé Nast Traveller, AD, Vogue Café at The Dubai Mall, GQ Bar Dubai POLAND Glamour PORTUGAL Vogue, GQ ROMANIA Glamour SOUTH AFRICA House & Garden, GQ, Glamour, House & Garden Gourmet, GQ Style THE NETHERLANDS Glamour, Vogue THAILAND Vogue, GQ, Vogue Lounge Bangkok TURKEY Vogue, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller, La Cucina Italiana, GQ Style, Glamour UKRAINE Vogue, Vogue Café Kiev

The merchandise featured editorially has been ordered from the following stores. Some shops may carry a selection only. Prices and availability were checked at the time of going to press, but we cannot guarantee that prices will not change or that specific items will be in stock when the magazine is published. We suggest that before visiting a shop you phone to make sure they have your size. In case of difficulty, contact Vogue’s Merchandise Department (020 7499 9080). Where unspecified, stockists are in London or general enquiry numbers are given.

A Adidas by Stella McCartney Adidas.co.uk Alberta Ferretti 020 7235 2349 Alexander McQueen 020 7355 0088 Alex Eagle 020 7589 0588 Allsaints.com Anouki.com Aracano.com Axelarigato.com B Balenciaga 020 7317 4400 Bally.co.uk Barbour.com Baumundpferdgarten.com Bella Freud 020 7935 0777 Belstaff.co.uk Bexrox.com Beyondretro.com Biondacastana.com Bottega Veneta 020 7838 9394 Brownsfashion.com Burberry.com By Malene Birger 020 7486 4000 C Calvin Klein Jeans 020 7434 0141 Cartier.co.uk Carvela 020 7781 7480 Céline 020 7491 8200 Chanel 020 7493 5040 CH Carolina Herrera 020 3441 0965 Chloé 020 7823 5348 Christian Louboutin 0843 227 4322 Christopher Kane 020 7493 3111 Church-footwear.com Coach 020 7479 7940 Cocoacashmere.com Courreges.com Couvertureandthegarbstore. com D Diane von Furstenberg 020 7499 0886 Dieselblackgold.com Dior 020 7172 0172 Dolce & Gabbana 020 7659 9000 Dover Street Market 020 7518 0680

E Erdem 020 3653 0360 F Fendi 020 7927 4172 Finerylondon.com Thefrozenfountain.nl G Gabrielahearst.com Gant.co.uk Giorgio Armani 020 7235 6232 Thegreenvase.com Gucci 020 7235 6707 H H&M Hm.com Harrods 020 7730 1234 Helenficalora.com Hermès 020 7499 8856 Houseofhackney.com I Idea Ideanow.online Isabel Marant 020 7499 7887 J J&M Davidson 020 3096 2233 Jimmychoo.com J-w-anderson.com K Karenmillen.com Thekooples.co.uk L Lauraleejewellery.com Laurence-dacade.com Levi.com Liberty.co.uk Linksoflondon.com Loewe 020 7499 0266 Louis Vuitton 020 3214 9200 M Machine-a.com Magdalenafrackowiak.com Mango.com Manolo Blahnik 020 7352 3863 Mardouanddean.com Maria-black.uk Massimodutti.com Max Mara 020 7499 7902 Michaelkors.com Missoni 020 7823 1910 Misssixty.com Miu Miu 020 7409 0900 Modern Society 020 7729 0311 P Pacifictotecompany.com Penkridgeceramics.com Pepperandmayne.com

Petershamnurseries.com Prada 020 7647 5000 Proenzaschouler.com R Ralph Lauren Collection 020 7535 4600 Ralph Lauren Home 020 7590 7990 Rockins.co.uk Rodarte.net Roger Vivier 020 7245 8270 Rokit.co.uk S Saint Laurent 020 7235 6706 Salvatore Ferragamo 020 7629 5007 Selfridges.com The-sleeper.com Sophiehulme.com Stella McCartney 020 7518 3100 The Store Farmhouse 01608 691030 T Tabithasimmons.com T by Alexander Wang 020 3727 5568 Tibi.com Turnbullandthomas.co.uk W Whistles.com Z Zadig-et-voltaire.com

Vogue is published monthly by the proprietors, The Condé Nast Publications Ltd, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU. Printed by Wyndeham Group. Vogue is distributed by Condé Nast & National Magazine Distributors Ltd (Comag), Tavistock Road, West Drayton, Middlesex UB7 7QE (01895 433600; fax 01895 433605). Subscription rates for one year (12 issues), as follows. UK: £47.88. Overseas: Eurozone, ¤99; rest of Europe, £80; rest of world, £119. USA: $129 (USPS/ISSN 463390). Airfreight and mailing in the USA by agent named Air Business, c/o Worldnet Shipping Inc., 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Periodicals postage paid at Jamaica, NY 11431. Customer enquiries, change of address and orders payable to: Vogue Subscriptions Department, Tower House, Lathkill Street, Market Harborough, Leicestershire LE16 9EF (0844 848 5202, Mon to Fri 8am-9pm). Online orders: Subscription.co.uk/vogue. Manage your subscription online 24hrs a day by logging on to Subscription.co.uk/help/condenast. Email subscription queries to vogue@subscription.co.uk. US Postmaster: send address changes to Vogue, Air Business, c/o Worldnet Shipping Inc., 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Subscription records are maintained at The Condé Nast Publications Ltd, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU. Air Business is acting as our mailing agent. Printed by Wyndeham Group. Colour Origination by CLX Europe Media Solution Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. All prices are correct at time of going to press but are subject to change. Manuscripts, drawings and other materials submitted must be accompanied by a stamped addressed envelope. However, Vogue cannot be responsible for unsolicited material. The paper used for this publication is based on renewable wood fibre. The wood these fibres are derived from is sourced from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. The producing mills are EMAS registered and operate according to the highest environmental and health and safety standards. This magazine is fully recyclable – please log on to www.recyclenow.com for your local recycling options for paper and board. Copyright © 2016 THE CONDE NAST PUBLICATIONS LTD, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU VOGUE.CO.UK

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Cadogan Gardens Chelsea SW3

A magnificent and extremely well-appointed lateral apartment with its own private front door immediately accessible from raised ground floor entrance level. Entrance Hall • Drawing Room • Library/Study • Kitchen • Bedroom with Bathroom, Steam Shower and Dressing Room Ensuite • Cloakroom • EPC Rating D

L E A SE H OLD

P R IC E O N A P P L I C AT I O N

020 7937 7787 www.fgconsultants.com 4 Pembroke Mews, London W8 6ER


A discreet, gated development of 68 elegant apartments and 4 exceptional penthouses. Located immediately adjacent to Holland Park, the most desirable neighbourhood in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. Five star hotel style concierge services with 24-hour security and secure underground car parking. Extensive amenities including club room, cinema, library, wine cellar, 20 metre swimming pool, spa, yoga room and gym. Completion Spring 2017. Prices upon application.

H O L L A N D PA R K V I L L A S . C O M +4 4 ( 0 )20 7758 318 8

A joint venture between four partners

Sales representation


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CGI of retail at Circus West

Circus West, chosen for their quality and individuality, are the florist Philippa Craddock, butchers Allens of Battersea, restaurant Pedler Cru and wine shop Vagabond. As Mark Hutton says, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We are creating a fantastic community here and for everything we do, we put people first. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be incredible.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Additional services for residents include the 5,300 square foot riverside Residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Club, the perfect spot to eat, drink, meet with your neighbours, read and watch films; the Village Hall, which will hold cultural and social events, from yoga to wine tasting; and a gym and spa, due to open in the summer of 2017. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more, all these facilities are available to both home owners and those who are renting a property, ensuring that anyone who lives within the development is able to benefit from the super lifestyle this vibrant new neighbourhood will offer. In an innovative move, a bespoke app will

allow residents to check out the events timetable, sign up for classes, get in touch with each other, organise their concierge services and deal with maintenance issues efficiently. The watchword is connectivity â&#x20AC;&#x201C; both in terms of fostering social interaction and providing transport links to the rest of London. Several train and tube stations are within walking distance, and a complimentary shuttle bus will run from Circus West to Sloane Square and Vauxhall. A Thames Clippers River Bus will follow in the autumn of 2017, ahead of the new tube station in 2020. Battersea Power Station is opening its doors to its first-ever residents. Whether you are renting or buying, now is the time to be one of them and pioneer a new future at this very special place. To enquire about sales and lettings at the new development, visit bpsestates.co.uk or call Battersea Power Station on 020 7062 1840


PICTURE YOUR HOME P I C T U R E

M A R Y L E B O N E

If you can picture living in a luxurious, beautifully appointed apartment at The Chilterns, on Chiltern Street in the heart of Marylebone Village, you’ll understand why there are only three apartments remaining. After all, you’re only moments from boutiques, galleries and world-class dining; in addition, you’re minutes from Mayfair and the Regent’s Park - and within The Chilterns itself, you have your own private art gallery, five-star concierge, spa, gym and cinema. So discover The Chilterns – and picture yourself living the perfect luxury life in Marylebone.

thechilternsw1.com

For more information about The Chilterns or to arrange a private appointment, please contact Oksana d’Offay on +44 (0)20 3770 2100 or email oksana@thechilternsw1.com


DESIGN MUSEUM TASTE THE WORLD Cultural flavours in the capital

INSPIRING HOMES

A new home for this iconic Institute

PROPERTY INSIGHTS With research expert Tom Bill

Some of our most spectacular properties

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Prime Performance Despite the Brexit headlines, there are bigger forces at play in the London property market

While the UK’s vote in favour of Brexit triggered some short-term uncertainty in the prime London property market, it is important not to overstate its impact. Price growth had been slowing for two years in prime central London, an area broadly confined to zone 1 on the London tube map. It is a similar story in prime markets between zones 2 to 6, with weaker growth in areas like Barnes, Hampstead and Canary Wharf. More affordable boroughs, such as Waltham Forest and Lewisham, have fared better and continue to post stronger growth. Why the slowdown? Well, despite the headlines focussing on the impact of Brexit, a much wider range of issues has impacted performance. The slowdown in central London followed a period of strong growth as the market cemented its reputation as a safe-haven following the financial crisis. Robust growth led to robust headlines and the London property market became more interesting to politicians in need of additional tax revenue. Ensuing stamp duty rises acted as a fur ther brake on the market, leading to a stand-off between sellers, who were reluctant to cut asking prices, and buyers, who faced increased purchase costs. Ironically, the surprise of the EU referendum result has led to more realistic pricing. While the market remains weaker than 12 months ago, most sales are continuing, provided asking prices have adjusted to the more subdued market conditions. What has also become clear since June is that demand to be in London remains very strong. Weak Sterling is an added incentive for some buyers. As an EU deal takes shape, the UK’s absence from the bloc is unlikely to deter many from living in one of the most significant cities on the planet. In this current market, the prosaic truth is that buyers are primarily seeking good value. Fur thermore, we are not building enough homes in Greater London. This structural undersupply par tly explains the relative robustness of prices in London following the economic and political fallout from the referendum. From an investor’s perspective, it should also be remembered that there are few satisfactory answers to the question “where else do I put my money?” The bond market? If your yield is not negative it will probably be as low as it has been in several centuries. Hedge funds? Even the smartest investors in the room are struggling to second-guess central bankers and the main indices don’t make good reading. Stock markets have been pumped up by QE money and looked due a correction this summer.

TOM BILL Knight Frank Residential Research +44 20 7861 1492 tom.bill@knightfrank.com

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Advertorial Feature | Knight Frank

Securing a double-digit return on a London proper ty investment is not as straightfor ward as it once was. But if your homework goes beyond the latest newspaper headlines, buying bricks and mortar in London remains a sound decision, Brexit or no Brexit.


Eaton Place BELGRAVIA, SW1

4

Situated in Belgravia, just moments from Knightsbridge and Sloane Square, is this spectacular stucco-fronted four-bedroom listed maisonette, which has been beautifully redesigned to create a home of the utmost elegance and sophistication. Spread over 3,000 sq ft, this larger-than-average apartment has high ceilings and luxurious proportions throughout. A colour palette of complementary natural taupe, oyster and light stone greys creates a serenely balanced environment and tasteful entertaining spaces. Highlights of the apartment include the master bedroomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stunning walk-in wardrobe, a marble-clad vanity, bespoke marbled kitchen with brass finishes and the exceptional paved courtyard terrace with seating area. GUIDE PRICE: ÂŁ8,700,000 | EPC: N/A Knight Frank Belgravia +44 20 7881 7722

Advertorial Feature | Knight Frank

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Taste the world London’s panoply of global cuisine continues to diversify, reports Chris Madigan, and offers capital-dwellers a taste of everything from Soviet street food to Basque pintxo plates

Chris Madigan writes for The Telegraph, The Times and Brummell

In the bad old days, the question of what regional cuisine Londoners favoured boiled down to: ‘What shall we eat tonight: Indian? Chinese? Italian?’ Now, we have an ever more diverse array of flavours to choose from. This year, it’s a disputed territory that tops the trend list: Euskadi, or the Basque Country. With restaurants in San Sebastián and nearby – including Mugaritz, Asador Etxebarri, Azurmendi and Arzak – featuring prominently in the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list in recent years, this should come as no surprise. Basque food satisfies the continuing passion for small-plate sharing (with its version of tapas, pintxos) and the desire for state-of-the-art kitchen techniques applied to traditional dishes. Basque food has intense colour and flavour: sweet peppers and cherries, salty bacalao and roasted meats. The latest arrivals are Eneko at One Aldwych, with a menu designed by Eneko Atxa of Azurmendi, following in the footsteps of arguably the world’s greatest female chef, Elena Arzak, who, as the name implies, trained the chefs at Ametsa With Arzak Instruction, at The Halkin hotel in Belgravia. With a branch of the less high-end Sagardi chain (Basque, but from Barcelona) opening in Shoreditch, as well as established restaurants such as Donostia and Lurra in Marylebone, there is enough Basque food in London now to sustain a multi-venue txikiteo, or pintxos crawl. Another nation well represented in the World’s Top 50 is Peru, and the London love of ceviche and other regional dishes doesn’t look like abating any time soon. Now, though, it’s a case of following regional cuisines: Casita Andina in

Soho is Ceviche boss Martin Morales’s ode to the Andes, while Chicama, in Chelsea – from the people behind Pachamama in Marylebone – concentrates on Nikkei cuisine, a fusion of Peruvian and Japanese food. There are also whole trends built around a single dish from distant parts. First, there was Korean kimchi; now, it’s Taiwanese gua bao – steamed clam-shaped buns that form a sandwich. While pork belly, peanuts, greens and herbs are the traditional filling, Bao in Soho and Fitzrovia, and Mr Bao in Peckham offer chicken, prawn, aubergine or mushroom versions. More surprising, perhaps, is the growing popularity of food from the former Soviet Union. The grandiose Samarkand on Charlotte Street serves Uzbek food, which reflects the country’s g e o gr a p h i c a l p o s i t i o n between the Middle East, Asia and Russia with dishes such as plov (rice, vegetables and lamb), samsa (lamb or sweetpotato filo parcels) and baklajan (aubergine caviar). But at Zima, in Soho, chef Alexei Zimin has introduced a real ‘who knew?’ concept – Russian street food (although, at a minimum of £30 for caviar, sour cream and potatoes, it must be a very well-heeled street). Other dishes are based around scallops, crab claws and venison. Zima is just one example of the blurred

The other democratisation trend is that central London no longer hogs all the best food.

Zima Soho Peter Lane Photography

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The Dairy Clapham

Bone Daddies Soho and Old Street

boundaries between street, or ‘dirty’, food – snacks, sometimes indulgent ones, to accompany an evening of drinking and socialising – and the more traditional sit-down focus of an evening. Areas like Kensington have places such as Dirty Bones (fried chicken, waffles, burgers etc) and Bone Daddies (ramen and other Japanese food), sharing clientele with the likes of Ours, the new restaurant by Michelinstarred chef Tom Sellers. Notting Hill sees new openings as diverse as The Chipping Forecast fish and chip shop and modern Mexican from Latin America’s Best 50 Restaurants chef Eduardo Garcia at Peyotito. The other democratisation trend is that central London no longer hogs all the best food. The team behind Hawksmoor made Chiswick one of the first locations of its Foxlow brasseries. Two new Ivy Cafes (featuring Ivy Covent Garden favourites such as shepherd’s pie) are the latest name for St John’s Wood and Wimbledon, the latter of which also gets a Dip & Flip (Canadianstyle poutine and burgers, both served with gravy), the first of which opened in Clapham. South London has turned from culinary wasteland to gastro heartland. Dulwich has modern British at Franklins and The Palmerston, sushi and cocktails at Yama Momo and the crucible for talented young chefs that is Toasted, with a Meatliquor hipster-burgery to come to the area the founders are from. Clapham, too, has a vibrant scene dominated by The Dairy, which is focused on the produce of quality British suppliers (particularly heritage vegetables and fermented, pickled and preserved ingredients), and sister restaurants The Manor and the new Counter Culture, which combine several trends with pintxos-style plates of dishes, including fermented heritage vegetables in an out-of-centre location.

Advertorial Feature | Knight Frank

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Designs on London The 21st-century reinvention of an institution that helped shape the city’s cultural landscape is very timely, says architecture expert Jonathan Bell

O

Jonathan Bell is editor-at-large at Wallpaper

pening in 1989, London’s Design Museum was at the vanguard of the designer decade – an era of matt-black devices, chromed furniture, bold fashions and the burgeoning cult of the designer name that changed the way we saw our interiors forever. In the UK it led the way in turning our attention to leading industrial designers of the day who are now household names. People like Phillipe Stark, James Dyson and Tom Dixon who taught us to see good design as a work of art. This consumerist frenzy wasn’t the museum’s raison d’être, of course, but rather to celebrate the neglected field of industrial design. Its origins were in the V&A, where, for many decades, industrial objects had fallen bet ween the curatorial cracks. Buried i n t h e m u s e u m ’s basement, it started life as the Boilerhouse, cofounded by Terence Conran and Stephen Bayley in 1982. In 1989, the collection graduated to its own purpose-designed space in a former banana warehouse on Shad Thames, given a gleaming white Modernist-style overhaul by Conran’s own architecture studio to stand in stark contrast to the abandoned brick husks and patches of waste ground that lay around it. The Design Museum grew with the area, as loft-living transformed riverside London and its curatorial team breathed new life into the everyday, rediscovered forgotten designers

The new building triples the exhibition spaces and adds an auditorium as well as dedicated education areas

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Advertorial Feature | Knight Frank


and introduced the burgeoning big names of the 1990s movement to an eager public. It was the heyday of Starck, Dyson, and Dixon as well as Marc Newson, and Ron Arad, all of whom came to prominence as the museum gained cultural traction. The deep dive into mid-century nostalgia had barely started, so exhibitions on Ray and Charles Eames, Giò Ponti, Arne Jacobsen, Eileen Gray, Dieter Rams and Buckminster Fuller drew enthusiastic audiences and gave fresh insight into the art behind the object. Blockbuster shows on Zaha Hadid, Paul Smith and Peter Saville cemented reputations, while the Design Museum helped launch the careers of renowned young designers such as Barber & Osgerby, Tord Boontje, Thomas Heatherwick and more. Now the space at Shad Thames has closed and the museum is preparing its new home in Kensington. Renowned architect John Pawson, who contributed an exhibition to the museum in its V&A days, has overseen the £80m refurbishment of the striking former Commonwealth Institute. His typically restrained palette preserves the full drama of the 1962 structure’s tented roof, while new adjoining housing blocks by architectural giants OMA and AHMM have effectively bankrolled the project. Why move? Shad Thames had infamously inflexible exhibition floorplates and diminishing space for back office and education. While its comprehensive shop and Blueprint Café – the first of many such designer-driven eateries now scattered along the Thames – were famed, relatively low levels of passing traffic kept visitor numbers well below Tate levels. The new building triples the exhibition spaces and adds an auditorium as well as dedicated

education areas, with partnerships from furniture-makers Vitra and lighting specialists Concord creating a wor thy backdrop for the objects themselves and making the museum an essential destination. A new chief curator, Justin McGuirk, will join Deyan Sudjic, the director since 2006, as the institution

gains fresh prominence, elevating London’s creative profile and educating us all about the role of design in our everyday lives. The museum will continue in its tradition of bringing London’s young design talent to an increasingly engaged international audience, while educating on design’s most prominent figures. All photos The Design Museum

Advertorial Feature | Knight Frank

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On Your Side From bespoke mortgage advice to accessing the best fixed-rate deals, with Knight Frank Finance you’re among experts, says Managing Partner Simon Gammon

Knight Frank Finance, our mortgage broker and advisory service, was formed

support and to ensure they are given the right advice. Through our excellent

only nine years ago, but it’s growing fast. This year, the team will arrange over

market knowledge, contacts and expertise, Knight Frank Finance can provide

£2bn of lending for our clients. We are a ‘whole of market’ broker, dealing with

our clients with deals that meet all their requirements, at the best possible price.

more than 140 lenders with access to the best possible deals to suit each individual’s needs. In the post-Brexit environment, and with the recent fall in the Bank of England base rate to 0.25%, we have seen a significant upturn in borrowers reviewing their loans – even if their current ones have some time to run. Many have taken the opportunity to remortgage, taking out longer-term fixed-rate deals. This can guarantee monthly payments for five years or longer at historically low rates of close to 2.0%. For these clients, peace of mind has never been more competitive. Recently, we have seen an increase in overseas clients, attracted by the pound’s fall in value against international currencies. From a tax point of view, it may be more efficient for these clients to have a mortgage than buy a property in cash. We are also seeing sharp rises in interest from wealthy foreign buyers when a significant tax change leads them to look beyond their own borders. Similarly, the uncertain global political climate has affected the number of foreign nationals looking to buy in the UK. The biggest change we have seen post-Brexit has not been the individuals looking to borrow, however, but lenders’ appetite to lend. Some banks have reduced their loan-to-value ratio, in expectation that house prices will start to fall, while others have become more conservative in their general lending criteria. It is therefore more crucial than ever that we keep close to the lenders and up to speed with any changes so we can help our clients navigate this ever-evolving market. Our expertise and contacts help us narrow down the best deal for our clients, from those looking for bridging loans to high-net-worth individuals wanting a specialist high-value mortgage, or those raising finance to fund building a house. Although Knight Frank is usually associated with the premium property market, we are happy to help at every level, from first-time buyers to those downsizing once children have left home. We handle all types of loan requirements, from £100,000 to tens of millions. At no point since the recession began has it been more difficult to get a mortgage, due to increasing government restrictions on lenders. The process has become increasingly drawn out, and a greater amount of paperwork is now required. As a result, many more buyers are turning to the broker channel for

SIMON GAMMON Knight Frank Finance LLP +44 20 7268 2581 simon.gammon@knightfrankfinance.com

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Advertorial Feature | Knight Frank


Upper Cheyne Row CHELSEA, SW3

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An incredibly rare studio house, quietly tucked away in the heart of Old Chelsea. The main feature of the house is the living area which has a ceiling that is three stories high. There are six bedrooms that include a beautiful master suite and a lower ground floor staff flat. Further luxuries include a mezzanine dining area, study, playroom, wine room and cinema. In addition, the house has parking for two cars, a patio garden and a 21 ft west-facing roof terrace.

GUIDE PRICE: ÂŁ10,500,000 | EPC: D Knight Frank Chelsea +44 20 3463 0149

Advertorial Feature | Knight Frank

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OUR EXPERTISE THEREâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S A HUMAN ELEMENT IN THE WORLD OF PROPERTY THAT IS TOO EASILY OVERLOOKED. At Knight Frank we build long-term relationships, which allow us to provide

respected, where everyone is invited to contribute to the success of our

personalised, clear and considered advice on all areas of property in all key

business and where theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re rewarded for excellence. The result is that our

markets. We believe personal interaction is a crucial part of ensuring every

people are more motivated, ensuring your experience with us is the best that

client is matched to the property that suits their needs best â&#x20AC;&#x201C; be it commercial

it can be. Together, Knight Frank and Newmark Grubb Knight Frank have a

or residential. Operating in locations where our clients need us to be, we

global platform of more than 14,000 people across 417 offices in 58 countries.

provide a worldwide service thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s locally expert and globally connected.

Our London footprint spans across the capital with a network of 30 London

We believe that inspired teams naturally provide excellent and dedicated

Sales and Lettings offices to ensure we have all your property needs covered.

client service. Therefore, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve created a workplace where opinions are

OUR PUBLICATIONS Knight Frank produces award-winning publications and market updates, our suite includes:

CONTACT US To find your nearest London office or to speak to one of our expert property consultants, visit our Knight Frank London website below:

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Advertorial Feature | Knight Frank


R E M A I N I N G P E N T H O U S E AT T H E R I D G E R E V E A L E D

This September award winning Surrey Developer, Halebourne Group, launch the remaining Penthouse show apartment. The Ridge is a collection of just ten newly built mansion apartments in Sunningdale. Set in a prime location a short walk to Sunningdale Village and train station providing links into London Waterloo in around 50 minutes. Finished to the highest of specification The Ridge offers stylish, luxurious finishes and boutique style living including: ●

Concierge Service.

Secure basement parking with large lockable storage unit.

Private outside space to all apartments.

Lift access to all floors.

Bespoke Italian kitchens.

Share of Freehold.

The completed development now houses two show apartments available to view seven days a week 10.00am-4.00pm.

T H E

R I D G E

R I D G E M O U N T

R O A D

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION - PLEASE CONTACT apearson@savills.com 01344 295375 savills.com

tony.walker@struttandparker.com 01344 623411 struttandparker.com

S U N N I N G D A L E


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IT’S BEAUTIFUL HERE, ISN’T IT..., BY LUIGI GHIRRI (APERTURE)

SACAI COTTON T-SHIRT WITH PLEATED BACK, £345, AT NET-APORTER.COM

THE DIVINE MISS M, BY BETTE MIDLER, IS PERFECT FOR APERITIVO HOUR

CARTIER STEEL CLE DE CARTIER WATCH, FROM £4,050

I can wear this Cartier watch anywhere. I like the weight of it, and the fact that it’s not too dainty

I love that these pink paper anemones never die THE GREEN VASE PAPER ANEMONE STEM, FROM £30

My brother makes these cheerful totes in Los Angeles from scraps of sailing-boat canvas. They’re perfect for work or the beach

Sofia Coppola LABORATORIO PARAVICINI HAND-DECORATED PLATE, FROM £79, AT ARTEMEST.COM

My friend gave me these beautiful ceramic cherries, which I keep on my desk

PACIFIC TOTE COMPANY TOTE, FROM £79 WOMAN WITH BLUE BOW (1977), BY JO ANN CALLIS

PENKRIDGE CERAMICS CERAMIC CHERRIES, £132

MARC JACOBS BEAUTY LE MARC LIP CREME IN SO SOFIA, £24

Palazzo Margherita is my family’s little hotel in Basilicata, near Puglia. My father renovated it. It has beautiful, comfortable rooms designed by Jacques Grange, and the best food. I love going there to relax and CASA DRAGONES be pampered TEQUILA, £225, AT 31DOVER.COM

There’s a raspberry-coloured version of this Donald Judd stool, which we use as a bar, in a corner of our apartment in Paris. I heard the artist had one in his shower!

COMPILED BY NAOMI SMART. ANDREW DURHAM; JO ANN CALLIS/COURTESY THE ARTIST AND ROSE GALLERY, SANTA MONICA; JUDD FOUNDATION; GUY THOMPSON

WHEN I’M TAKING PICTURES, I USE AN OLD CONTAX AND THIS KODAK FILM

THE FILM DIRECTOR REVEALS WHAT’S INSPIRING HER NOW


Beyond Perfume

louisvuitton.com


PLEASE TURN THE PAGE TO VIEW SUPPLEMENT


VOGUE PROMOTION Day or night, black is always on-point. This hardworking pencil dress gets a modern makeover teamed with a quirky roll-neck Sweater, £20. Dress, £45. Both V by Very, at Very.co.uk

TUNG WALSH


MORE DASH THAN CASH A sense of ceremony pervades fashion this winter: it’s time to dress up and venture out. Avail yourself of the season’s gloriously sensual delights – from soft, crushed velvet to oil-slick patent leather, spooling silk to generously stuffed satin (if nothing else, you need a sugary-hued padded jacket in your coat cupboard now), there’s a tactile dimension to this season’s important looks that will prove irresistible. Equally seductive is the new mood of worldliness, galvanised by military-infused utilitywear and vast tracts of mountain-ready shearling. Keeping it real has a renewed cachet – and in that vein, who better to showcase the off-beat, streetwise attitude than our cover girl, rising music star Dua Lipa? Hers is an energy we felt summed up the best of this season’s sporting designs. Over the following pages we’ve shaped a wardrobe wish list to keep spirits high as temperatures drop: from the slickest cool-girl bomber jacket to the ultimate dress-code digest. Your RSVP is no longer in doubt – say yes to everything.

EDITOR ELLIE PITHERS ART DIRECTOR PHILLIP SAVILL SUB-EDITORS LUCY OLIVIER, STEPHEN PATIENCE, VICTORIA WILLAN MERCHANDISE EDITOR HELEN HIBBIRD SUPPLEMENT CO-ORDINATOR JENNIE GRAHAM CONTRIBUTORS FLORENCE ARNOLD, LOTTIE WINTER EDITOR-IN-CHIEF ALEXANDRA SHULMAN PHOTOGRAPHERS PAUL BOWDEN, GETTY, JASON LLOYD-EVANS, ALASDAIR McLELLAN, PIXELATE.BIZ, REX FEATURES, MITCHELL SAMS COVER PHOTOGRAPHER LAURENCE ELLIS FASHION EDITOR JULIA BRENARD HAIR PHILIPPE THOLIMET MAKE-UP LUCY BRIDGE NAILS TRISH LOMAX SET DESIGN WILLIAM FARR DIGITAL ARTWORK JANVIER PARIS ON THE COVER DUA LIPA WEARS SEQUINED TOP, £55, V BY VERY. CREPE TROUSERS, £380, TIBI. GOLD AND DIAMOND EARRING, £315, STONE PARIS, AT MYTHERESA.COM. GOLD-PLATED EYE RING, £95, SOPHIE HULME. SILVER-PLATED RING, £40, FOLLI FOLLIE © 2016 The Condé Nast Publications Ltd, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU. Printed by the proprietors, the Condé Nast Publications Ltd. Vogue is distributed by Condé Nast and National Magazines Distributors Ltd (Comag), Tavistock Road, West Drayton, Middlesex UB7 7QE. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part, without written permission, is strictly prohibited. Not for resale

1


VOGUE trends DOROTHY PERKINS FAUX-SUEDE BOOTS, £45

NEXT WOOL-MIX JACKET, £60

VERONICA LAKE IN SO PROUDLY WE HAIL, 1943

HOBBS SILK BLOUSE, £99

GABRIELE FRANTZEN SNAKE BRACELET, £105, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM

GANNI CAMOUFLAGE RUCKSACK, £115

RED HERRING WOOL-MIX COAT, £69, AT DEBENHAMS

H&M COTTON DRESS, £40

MR & MRS ITALY WOOL POLONECK WITH PATCHES, £210

STYLE NOTE Cinched at the waist with an ornamental belt, the military greatcoat is promoted from outdoor cover-up to all-day dress. See Burberry for inspiration

BURBERRY

V BY VERY CROPPED JACKET, £45

MANGO LEATHER BELT, £20

T BOO P CAM TOPSHOP VELVET, £82

2

ZARA LEATHER, £90

MHL BY MARGARET HOWELL LEATHER, £285


V BY VERY FAUX-SUEDE HEELS, £30 MILITARY POLISH AT NEW YORK FASHION WEEK

AG COTTON JUMPSUIT, £327, AT HARRODS

JUMPER 1234 CASHMERE SWEATER, £168

DUTY CALLS

NEW LOOK RESIN EARRINGS, £5

Take your orders from autumn’s military mood as combat khakis and regimental regalia conquer fashion’s front line UTERQUE CREPE TROUSERS, £115

FRENCH CONNECTION COTTON-MIX SHIRT, £69

DOLCE & GABBANA

HILFIGER DENIM COTTON JACKET, £150

RIVER ISLAND FAUX SUEDE, £70

KENZO & H&M LEATHER, £120

HUNTER ORIGINAL RUBBER, £135

3


VOGUE trends

E UBL DO Y M AM W H traditional

MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION

son’s it the Revis ce: this sea ffer ie so two-p ed co-ord n check resh spin o af o-five nine-t g suitin

ZARA TWEED TOP, £30. MINISKIRT, £30

TOPSHOP UNIQUE WOOL BLAZER, £295. MINISKIRT, £125

KAREN MILLEN WOOL TOP, £90. PENCIL SKIRT, £99

ALI M ACGRAW, 1967 BAUM & PFERDGARTEN TWEED SKIRT, £139

V BY VERY COTTON SHIRT, £28

BY MALENE BIRGER LEATHER BAG, £200

ISABEL MARANT WOOL MINISKIRT, £280, AT MATCHES FASHION.COM PREEN

FRENCH CONNECTION COTTON-MIX COAT,£185

LUISA CERANO COTTON-MIX TROUSERS, £249, AT ANGELABEER.COM

4


RUSSELL & BROMLEY SUEDE SLIPPERS, £215

THEORY LEATHER BAG, £305

NEW LOOK WOOL-MIX MINISKIRT, £20 A STREETSTYLE TAKE ON TONAL PLAIDS

CHECK PLEASE

H&M WOOL-MIX COAT, £100

V BY VERY FAUX-LEATHER BELT, £18

Reboot heritage dressing in co-ordinating tweeds, mix-and-match weaves, or head-to-toe historic checks

NEXT TURTLENECK SWEATER, £25

LUCY FOLK CROCHET AND PEARL BRACELET, £120, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM

STYLE NOTE Rich metallics studded with freshwater pearls transform traditional tweeds into something rich and strange COMPTOIR DES COTONNIERS TWEED COAT, £240

ANNA & ALEX BRAIDED EARRINGS, £175, AT AVENUE32.COM

CHANEL

TOMMY & GIGI LEATHER BOOTS, £160

MOTHER OF PEARL WOOL TOP, £345, AT FENWICK

5


VOGUE trends GANT WOOL SWEATER, £125

MASSIMO DUTTI PLEATED SKIRT, £65

V BY VERY PLEATED MIDI SKIRT, £35 HOMESPUN KNITWEAR AT PARIS FASHION WEEK

ALPINE REFRESH

E FRE W F L Osweeping

Bring après-ski to the city with reimagined intarsia knits and cosy winter shearling

floorg, From ee-grazin es to kn skirt tak uid e a lang ear off-pist knitw H&M STUDIO MAXI SKIRT, £50

V BY VERY CHUNKY-KNIT SCARF, £18

MIH JEANS WOOL SWEATER, £275

PETER PILOTTO

SANDRO QUILTED GILET, £315 M&S COLLECTION EARRINGS, £12.50

HOT FUZ Z BODEN SUEDE BOOTS WITH SHEARLING LINING, £149

6

MANGO FAUX-SHEARLING MULES, £60

SEE BY CHLOE SHEARLING-TRIMMED BOOTS, £315, AT MYTHERESA.COM


MANGO KNITTED SKIRT, £36

STYLE NOTE Look to the Chloé catwalk, where oversized sweaters with ring-pull zips ruled V BY VERY FAUX-SHEARLING JACKET, WITH DETACHABLE COAT HEM, £100

MAJE WOOL SWEATER, £280 LONGCHAMP SILK SCARF, £185

CHLOE

SOPHIA LOREN, 1978

UGG SHEEPSKIN RUCKSACK, £225

MES DEMOISELLES MIDI SKIRT, £215 TOPSHOP COTTON SWEATER, £55

FRENCH CONNECTION WOOL-MIX POLONECK, £85

PENELOPE CHILVERS SUEDE AND SHEARLING SHOES, £299

UGG SHEARLING BOOTS, £145

MONTELLIANA SHEARLING-LINED BOOTS, £228, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM

7


VOGUE trends WAREHOUSE VINYL COAT, £249

JULIA RESTOIN ROITFELD GETS THE GLOSS

DIESEL VINYL JACKET, £330

THE SHINING

KURT GEIGER LONDON PATENT-LEATHER BOOTS, £180

JESSIE HARRIS SILVER DROP EARRINGS, £250

VALENTINO

From lacquered sheen to silvery shimmer, a glossy finish injects punk spirit into polished dressing

RIVER ISLAND FAUX-LEATHER BOOTS, £70 BA&SH COTTON BLOUSE, £275

MM6 COATEDDENIM MINISKIRT, £165

MARC CAIN VINYL JACKET WITH FAUX-FUR COLLAR, £249

OFF D G R I atent now?

ar p k shirt to we How lumberjac gloss Slip a w-season ake e t over n lamorous g a e r g fo un on gr

8

THE KOOPLES WOOL MIX, £185

LEVI’S COTTON MIX, £65

V BY VERY VISCOSE, £28


KIM NOVAK IN KISS ME, STUPID, 1964 ISABEL MARANT PATENT-LEATHER BELT, £195, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

NEXT FAUX-LEATHER SHOES, £38 TOPSHOP METALLIC BOMBER JACKET, £75

MAJE VINYL DRESS, £229

STYLE NOTE Embrace rich burgundy and cherry red, then contrast with creamy silk or crochet

TOPSHOP VINYL MINISKIRT, £45

GANT PATENT-LEATHER LOAFERS, £120

BIMBA & LOLA LEATHER BAG, £110

COACH SILK BLOUSE, £350

LK BENNETT PATENT-LEATHER BOOTS, £275

V BY VERY FAUX-LEATHER DRESS, £39

ISABEL MARANT

ZARA LEATHER MINISKIRT, £60

9


VOGUE trends

SUGAR PUFFS

Satisfy your sweet tooth with this season’s candy coating: delectable quilted jackets in bubblegum hues and chocolate-wrapper foils

URBAN OUTFITTERS POLYESTER, £96

HUNTER ORIGINAL GOOSE DOWN , £260

TOPSHOP BOUTIQUE POLYESTER, £110

DIESEL GOOSE DOWN, £260

NEXT POLYESTER, £75

RIVER ISLAND COTTON MIX, £85

10

CARVEN

ANDREAS KRONTHALER FOR VIVIENNE WESTWOOD

WAREHOUSE POLYESTER, £150

MARQUES ALMEIDA

UNIQLO ULTRA-LIGHT DOWN, £60


Sitting pretty: off-duty neutrals demand a candy hit. Sugar-pink boots add fizz to proceedings Silk top, £145, Topshop Unique. Metallic shorts, £26, Zara. Faux-leather boots, £109, Charles & Keith. Gold-plated earrings, £123. Multiband ring, £84. Both Maya Magal, at Harvey Nichols. Black marble ring, £20, Whistles. Pinky ring, £5, H&M. Hair: Philippe Tholimet. Make-up: Lucy Bridge. Nails: Trish Lomax. Set design: William Farr. Digital artwork: Janvier Paris

Hear my

song At 22, singer Dua Lipa has the fierce focus and first-rate voice to steal the pop crown, says Ellie Pithers Photographed by Laurence Ellis Styled by Julia Brenard

VOGUE spotlight


Fashion’s Nineties fixation shows no sign of waning: urban proportions and old-school layering make this Warehouse combination a prized buy This page: pink cotton jumpsuit, £49. Black crêpe evening dress, £99. Both Warehouse. Suede sneakers, £99, KG Kurt Geiger. Hoop earrings, £6, Accessorize. Stud earring, £35, Maria Francesca Pepe. Bauble ring and matching bracelet, £8 for set, H&M. Swarovski-crystal and palladium-plated bangle, £79, Swarovski. Silver ring, £50, Pandora

Frill seeker: sweeten an autumn sweater dress with a hint of girlish ruffle at the collar Opposite: sweater dress, £266, 3.1 Phillip Lim. Smocked cotton blouse, £85, Cecilie Copenhagen. Drop earring, £8 as part of set, Accessorize. White-gold ring, £285, Alexia Jordan. Silver bangles, £240 each, Dinny Hall

LAURENCE ELLIS


VOGUE spotlight

P

op has a habit of recycling its stars. For Shirley Bassey, read Adele; for Kate Bush, Florence Welch. Lulu has largely been recast as Pixie Lott. But what about Dua Lipa, newly minted purveyor of “dark pop”, as she describes her music? “I love Pink and Nelly Furtado – the honesty and truth in their lyrics. I also love Kendrick Lamar and Chance the Rapper. I wanted to try to put those two influences together in my music: descriptive, dark lyrics, with the raw elements of hip-hop in the verses, going into a poppy chorus. So it becomes pop with a twist, that element that nobody else has,” she says earnestly, before dissolving into a throaty laugh. “At least, I’d like to think so.” She knows so. Bar the odd episode of selfdeprecation, Lipa is on a course to prove there’s no pop star quite like her. When we meet on the Vogue cover shoot, the 22-year-old is fresh off a plane from Helsinki, having spent the last week playing shows in Kosovo, Albania, Sweden and Finland in support of her breakout hit “Be the One” and summer banger “Hotter than Hell”. Tomorrow, she will fly to New York to record a radio show. “It’s nice to get everything going in America. Everything’s been so UK- and Europe-based.” She pauses, before giggling again, revealing a set of perfect pearly teeth, “Sounds so weird to say that.” Lipa is focused, make no mistake. Polite, well-spoken, highly poised, on set she is the consummate professional; she gamely balances a piece of acetate on her head for almost an hour at the photographer’s request to get the requisite moody effect. Between shots she posts a teasing selfie on Instagram (300,000 followers and counting) and checks her emails for updates on the imagery for her debut album, shot by Rankin. She tells me how, at the eleventh hour, she has just pushed back the release of said self-titled album from September to next February, because she didn’t feel ready. “I wanted to put more work into it,” she explains. “I really wanted to put the album out with a bang – do a proper tour, be fully prepared, take it to the next level.” Her self-possession most likely comes from having spent the latter part of her teenage years unsupervised. Born and raised in London, she moved to her parents’ homeland of Kosovo aged 11, before persuading them to let her return to Britain at 15 to pursue her musical ambitions. She moved into a flat with a family friend in Kilburn and attended the Sylvia Young Theatre School at weekends – it was a formative experience that eradicated the childhood disappointment of being denied entry to the school choir because of her deep, resonant voice. “It was a huge learning curve,” she says, “but I was having the best time.” Before long she was posting demos and covers on Youtube and gaining a social-media following (alongside waiting tables at Soho’s La Bodega Negra). The first song she wrote

“For Glastonbury I wore a white leotard with black bees on it, with a long pink mac and chunky boots. That was fun” was “Hotter than Hell” – a catchy floor-filler that was well-received when she performed it recently on The Tonight Show to a late-night audience of millions. Her parents accompanied her on the trip to the States – their first. “They think it’s pretty crazy, but they come travelling with me when they can. As much as they wanted me to go to uni, they’ve always been very supportive,” says Lipa. “And you have no idea how excited my mum is about this shoot.” On that note: a word on Lipa’s finely honed style. “I’m heavily influenced by the Nineties – I love juxtaposing a slip dress with trainers

and a vintage leather jacket,” she says. A fan of Marques Almeida and Palace skatewear, as the sun sets in Dalston she looks every inch the off-beat popstrel in marabou-trim heels, a frilly MSGM top and Topshop jeans – “with the cut that looks like the Vetements one. Bargain.” Her on-stage persona is more risqué. “For Glastonbury I wore a white leotard with black bees on it, with a really long pink mac and chunky black boots. That was fun.” Will success go to her head? “My life is still super-normal. I still have the same group of friends; my family keep me grounded.” Last week in Kosovo she played a gig to 18,000. The ticket sales will go directly to a charity she has co-founded, the Sunny Hill Foundation, aiming to support young people living in Pristina. “I’d like to help as much as I can and this is just the beginning,” she says. “The Kosovo show was pretty special. But I don’t have, like, micro-pigs in my ride or anything. I’m keeping it pretty real.” Q 13


Sporting casuals have new mileage when teamed with Mango’s supercharged sequins Sequined camisole, £30, Mango. Cottonmix trousers, £40, River Island. Suede courts, £185, Bimba & Lola. Gold-and-rhodiumplated earrings, £195, Uribe, at Net-a-Porter. com. Necklace, £7, H&M. Gold-plated Eye ring, £95, Sophie Hulme


For full seasonal splendour, sweep a burnt orange eyeshadow across eyelids and pair with a matt lip. Try Kiko Milano High Pigment Wet and Dry Eyeshadow in Pearly Apricot, £5.90, for a silky sheen Sweatshirt, £95, Adidas by Stella McCartney. Blouse with frill neck, £165, Claudie Pierlot. Earrings, £22, Finery London. Transparent D-ring bracelet, £85, JW Anderson. White-gold ring, £285, Alexia Jordan

LAURENCE ELLIS

VOGUE spotlight


MISS SELFRIDGE EMBROIDERED VELVET, £85

RUSSELL & BROMLEY VELVET, £295

ASOS.COM BROCADE, £42

DUNE BROCADE, £120

KURT GEIGER LONDON BROCADE, £230

BAROQUE STARS

Jewel-bright velvets, lavish embroidery and precious brocade vie for the spotlight on statement ankle boots 16


VOGUE shoes NO ER IN BRA OTS BO

MIISTA LEATHER, £220

DUNE SUEDE, £120

MANGO SUEDE, £80

IN AT GROUND LEVEL

AUTOGRAPH LEATHER, £85, AT MARKS & SPENCER

Fall for the charms of spaceage metal, the new petite heel and anything-but-basic black

BIMBA & LOLA LEATHER, £110

WHISTLES LEATHER, £165

DUNE LEATHER, £75

LIQ ME UID TA L HOBBS LEATHER, £169

OFFICE FAUX LEATHER, £62

LK BENNETT LEATHER, £195

KURT GEIGER LONDON LEATHER, £170

ZARA FAUX LEATHER, £30 FINERY LONDON LEATHER, £119

CHARLES & KEITH FAUX LEATHER, £49

EET SW D AN LOW

MIISTA EMBELLISHED, £150

17


VOGUE shoes BY FAR SUEDE, FROM £215

RIVER ISLAND SUEDE, £55

SU N MU SET LE S

NEXT FAUX SUEDE, £28

JEFFREY CAMPBELL SUEDE, £103, AT SHOPBOP.COM

DORATEYMUR SUEDE, £355, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

TOPSHOP SUEDE, £79

PER SU AKS E SN

UGG PONYSKIN AND LEATHER, £140

ZARA FAUX SUEDE, £30

JOSHUA SANDERS GLITTER AND FAUX FUR, £205, AT AVENUE32.COM

KURT GEIGER LONDON EMBELLISHED SATIN, £160

CONVERSE & PATBO EMBELLISHED, £85

HUMMEL GLITTER, £130, AT HANON

ASOS.COM BROCADE, £25

J BY JASPER CONRAN JEWELLED FAUX SUEDE, £45, AT DEBENHAMS

PRETTY BALLERINAS SEQUINED, £139

PA R T FEE Y T

BODEN PONYSKIN, £79.50 FRENCH SOLE LEATHER, £120

RUSSELL & BROMLEY GLITTER AND VELVET, £195

18


SOFT TOUCH

OFFICE £60

Elegant velvet is the after-dark proposal to champion now

TOPSHOP £46

M&S COLLECTION £29.50

19


VOGUE looks

OWN THE NIGHT Stymied by an invitation? Consult our guide to deciphering dress codes and prepare to strut into party season in a haze of luscious velvet, dazzling sequins and sensuous silks M&S COLLECTION DIAMANTE EARRINGS, £12.50

BL ACK TIE

BAUM & PFERDGARTEN BROCADE MIDI SKIRT, £249

Floor-length and fabulous gets a velvet reboot in luxuriant shades of sapphire, ruby and tourmaline

LK BENNETT SUEDE SANDALS WITH CHAIN DETAIL, £250

KATE SPADE NEW YORK SWAROVSKI CRYSTAL BROOCH, £130

H&M VELVET MAXI DRESS, £80 OASIS PLEATED VELVET DRESS, £75

GANNI VELVET MAXI DRESS, £335, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

NEW LOOK VELVET WRAP DRESS, £30

OFFICE METALLIC SANDALS, £58

MASSCOB DRAPED VELVET DRESS, £300, AT MATCHES FASHION.COM

20


BAUM & PFERDGARTEN VELVET BLAZER, £199 ZARA CHIFFON DRESS, £26

ASOS.COM LACE DRESS, £95

NO 1 BY JENNY PACKHAM BEADED DRESS, £199, AT DEBENHAMS

RIVER ISLAND TASSEL EARRINGS, £12

MARNI COCKTAIL RING, £130

STYLE NOTE Maxed out on maxis? A statement midi still ticks the boxes without losing any alleyes-on-me flair

NEXT SATIN MIDI SKIRT, £55

REISS SUEDE HEELS, £165

E TA K R E C O V llishment,

mbe chet atic e o Dram erstated cr akes for d m n t u lve egy che ve at or lou hic exit str ac

FROM LEFT, BLAKE LIVELY, KARLIE KLOSS AND TONI GARRN

INDIGO FOR M&S COLLECTION EMBELLISHED VELVET JACKET, £59

UTERQUE CROCHET JACKET, £145

V BY VERY SEQUINED JACKET, £50

21


VOGUE looks RUSSELL & BROMLEY VELVET FLATS, £195

V BY VERY SEQUINED SHIFT DRESS, £68

TOPSHOP TULLE AND LACE DRESS, £89

CO C K TA I L Let shimmering sequins, precious brocades and whimsical feathers update classic combinations

OFFICE METALLIC COURTS, £68

ZARA VELVET BLAZER, £80. TROUSERS, £60

STYLE NOTE Meet your new go-to party pieces: a cocktail suit and slim sandals exude no-fuss confidence

NEW LOOK DROP EARRINGS, £10

POPPY DELEVINGNE

SIREN BY GILES DEACON ASYMMETRIC SHOULDER TOP, £65, AT DEBENHAMS

LUCY CHOI LONDON GLITTER, £225

22

V BY VERY VELVET CLUTCH, £22

CANVAS BY LANDS’ END BROCADE DRESS, £180

FAITH GLITTTER, £39, AT DEBENHAMS

KG KURT GEIGER GLITTER, £120


BUTTERFLY BY MATTHEW WILLIAMSON FEATHER SKIRT, £160, AT DEBENHAMS

SOPHIA WEBSTER EMBELLISHED CLUTCH, £350

KURT GEIGER LONDON MESH COURTS, £230

NEXT SEQUINED SKIRT, £38

FRENCH CONNECTION PAILLETTE MINIDRESS, £185

NEW LOOK JACQUARD MINIDRESS, £40

JON RICHARD DROP EARRINGS, £16, AT DEBENHAMS

OLYMPIA SCARRY NEXT LUREX SKIRT, £35

IRIS & INK EMBELLISHED BANDEAU TOP, £175, AT THEOUTNET.COM

TW KATE SPADE NEW YORK GLITTER, £235

V BY VERY GLITTER, £28

BIMBA & LOLA GLITTER, £185

INK LE TOE S

23


VOGUE looks SANDRO SATIN BLOUSE, £209

MASSIMO DUTTI LEATHER SNEAKERS, £75

TOPSHOP UNIQUE SILK DRESS, £295

V BY VERY EMBROIDERED BOMBER JACKET, £50

WAREHOUSE SATIN BLOUSE, £120

SMART CASUAL Laid-back silks find their perfect partner in crisp denim

MANGO ASYMMETRIC DROP EARRINGS, £10

BIMBA & LOLA LEATHER BAG, £110

IRIS & INK SATIN TOP, £125, AT THEOUTNET.COM

SHOUROUK BEADED EARRINGS, £290, AT MATCHES FASHION.COM

K SIL TE R O U kaboo

pee her via a Whet ut-outs or this c ow, b t n ala ps nonch n’s go-to to r o o f s y a la e s ll to p have a

CALVIN KLEIN JEANS BOMBER JACKET, £165

PRINCIPLES BY BEN DI LISI CREPE COAT, £99, AT DEBENHAMS

ATP ATELIER LEATHER MULES, £270 LEVI’S DENIM JEANS, £90

24


WHISTLES PONYSKIN LOAFERS, £180 NEXT SUEDE COAT, £199 AUTOGRAPH LEATHER TOTE, £99, AT MARKS & SPENCER

HILFIGER DENIM FAUX-FUR COAT, £240

ETRE CECILE EMBROIDERED DENIM JACKET, £250

STYLE NOTE A leopard-print coat adds rock’n’roll glamour to the most casual outfit, but zebra is gaining ground as a shortcut to offbeat cool

BY FAR SUEDE MULES, FROM £255

AURELIE BIDERMANN BAKELITE EARRINGS, FROM £240

TOPSHOP UNIQUE DRESS, £175 WAREHOUSE DRESS, £89

SL STR IP EAM Fluid sil

k for au takes sha t u mn – w p e with s ear tat for ins ement mule tant im s pa c t

WHISTLES DRESS, £350

SIENNA MILLER

25


NEW HORIZONS Conident yet quirky, this seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mood is cleverly reflected in the debut collection from V by Very. Think sunset sparkle, daytime power dressing and bold pieces that you will want to wear again and againâ&#x20AC;Ś Photographed by Tung Walsh Styled by Lucy Bower


VOGUE PROMOTION Go for gold in a look that steals the show, whether as dresseddown daywear or nonchalant for night-time Jumpsuit, £59. Belt, £18. Boots, £42. All V by Very, at Very.co.uk. Hair: Nao Kawakami. Make-up: Catherine Le Sant. Models: Annabell Häfner, Lidia Judickaite. With thanks to Cotton House Hotel, Barcelona


Walk on: Seventies prints meet biker chic with coated skinny denim, platform boots and a floaty wide sleeved classic Blouse, £32. Jeans, £32. Boots, £42. All V by Very, at Very.co.uk

TUNG WALSH


VOGUE PROMOTION

Play date: casual comfort is this season’s mantra. Whether it’s sweet lace or a more structured look, the mood is undone and carefree Annabell wears dress, £30. Lidia wears sweater, £32. Jeans, £35. All V by Very, at Very.co.uk


VOGUE PROMOTION

Ladylike luxe: lashings of lace and a pussy bow could make this little number primly demure, but there’s no chance of being mistaken for a wallflower in this bold hue Tunic, £38, V by Very, at Very.co.uk

TUNG WALSH


Sky high: if monochrome is your go-to uniform, hit a shape refresh with a geometric slant. Pair this knit with never-ending velvet boots for a look that hits the right sartorial note Sweater dress, £32. Roll-neck, just seen, £18. Tights, £12. Boots, £48. All V by Very, at Very.co.uk


Give winter the cold shoulder in a leopard-print coat – the dependable winter classic that’s best worn in that easy French way Coat, £70. Blouse, £32. Jeans, £32. Boots, £42. All V by Very, at Very.co.uk


VOGUE PROMOTION

On the edge: transitional dressing doesn’t have to be a chore. Keep shapes simple but add interest with texture – mesh, leather and chunky boots mean business Lidia wears sheer top, £18. Leather trousers, £200. Annabell wears Bardot top, £18. Studded jeans, £32. Boots, £42. All V by Very, at Very.co.uk

TUNG WALSH


We’re coveting fringing and ruffles, but in a geeky-schoolgirl kind of way – think Clueless meets Cruel Intentions Annabell wears roll-neck, £18. Skirt, £32. Jacket, £70. Tights, £12. Boots, £42. Lidia wears roll-neck, £18. Dress, £42. Tights, £12. Boots, £40. All V by Very, at Very.co.uk

TUNG WALSH


VOGUE PROMOTION Cold play: inject a shot of burgundy into your winter wardrobe and feel warm and fuzzy all over Coat, £80. Belt, £20. Both V by Very, at Very.co.uk


VOGUE PROMOTION

Studs, zips and subtle sparkle – more is more, as long as the silhouette stays clean. Channel your inner glam with a look that’s sophisticated, but ready to rock’n’roll Top, £22. Skirt, £30. Both V by Very, at Very.co.uk

TUNG WALSH


VOGUE style

ON THE BEAT

THE KOOPLES COTTON T-SHIRT, £65

NEW LOOK COTTON HOODIE, £20

ROCK CHIC

KIN BY JOHN LEWIS LEATHER BOOTS, £109

PANDORA SILVER RING, £99

UTERQUE LEATHER TROUSERS, £295

Meet three street-style stars who are rarely out of focus – and learn how to decode their fashion footprints

GILDA AMBROSIO

FRENCH CONNECTION WOOL-MIX SWEATER, £85

The 24-year-old Italian with a sheet of black hair rarely puts a (Loewe-clad) foot wrong. The co-founder of Attico, a Milan-based brand that specialises in vintagelooking peignoirs, Gilda’s streetwise styling lends her look a tomboyish edge.

SUSAN CAPLAN GOLD-PLATED EARRINGS, £169 KENZO & H&M SILK KIMONO, £150

BOLD STRIDES

OPEN KIMONO

LEVI’S EMBROIDERED JEANS, £110 LOEWE SUNGLASSES, £295

KAREN MILLEN LEATHER BAG, £235

JAEGER WOOL TOP, £125 LORIBLU PATENT HEELS, £136

MODERN RARITY HERRINGBONE TROUSERS, £120, AT JOHN LEWIS MANGO LEATHER HEELS, £70

GERARD DAREL LEATHER CLUTCH, £120

37


VOGUE style MANGO FAUX-SUEDE COAT, £70

BELT UP

ZARA ZIP DETAIL TOP, £50

V BY VERY COTTON-MIX SWEATER, £32

KIT & ACE CASHMERE SWEATER, £345

ASPINAL OF LONDON LEATHER CLUTCH £295

JEAN QUEEN

J&M DAVIDSON LEATHER BELT, £160

NEXT SKIRT WITH STITCH DETAIL, £26 ROCKINS SILK SCARF, £150

J CREW PONYSKIN TOTE, £298

BIMBA & LOLA PATENT-LEATHER BOOTS, £245

H&M PATENTLEATHER BOOTS, £100

MIH JEANS FLARED JEANS, £225

PERNILLE TEISBAEK

COACH LEATHER WRISTLET, £125

MANGO FAUX-LEATHER JACKET, £60

The Danish girl next door, 32, is a master of tonal layering, favouring fawns and greys that always look elegant. To ensure that beige isn’t boring, elevate an outfit with a considered flash of graphic metal. Extra points if it’s a statement-making belt.

ORANGE SHOT FOLLI FOLLIE GOLD-PLATED BRACELET, £105

FURLA LEATHER HEELS, £345

38

M&S COLLECTION WOOL-MIX SKIRT, £35 UNIQLO U CASHMERE POLONECK, £100


RETRO FABULOUS MODERN RARITY COTTON SHIRT, £120, AT JOHN LEWIS

MARKS & SPENCER WOOL SWEATER, £89 MARNI CLIP EARRINGS, £280, AT MATCHES FASHION.COM

KATE SPADE NEW YORK GLITTER MARY-JANES, £295

MARC CAIN VELVET TROUSERS, £149

LEANDRA MEDINE

ASOS.COM JACQUARD COAT WITH FAUX-FUR CUFFS, £90

Better known by her blogging moniker, the Man Repeller, Medine, 27, specialises in clothes to make the boys bluster. An eclectic mixer of textures, prints and glitter, she always adheres to the principle that the accessories maketh the outfit.

LINKS OF LONDON DROP EARRINGS, £95

RIVER ISLAND FAUX-SHEARLING JACKET, £65

ATEA OCEANIE COTTON-MIX SHIRTDRESS, £299, AT BOUTIQUE1.COM

SHEAR JOY V BY VERY BRETON SWEATER, £22

AG DENIM TROUSERS, £197, AT HARRODS

SUPER STRIPES

SIMON MILLER LEATHER BAG, £315, AT AVENUE32.COM

H&M DENIM JEANS, £40

ANYA HINDMARCH STICKERS, FROM £65 EACH UTERQUE LEATHER LOAFERS, £90

H&M SUEDE BOOTS, £60

39


OKA WALL LAMP, £275 DESIGN PROJECT BY JOHN LEWIS DISPLAY UNIT, £699

CALVILL COPPER WALL CLOCK, £80, AT ETSY.COM

FARROW & BALL SHOUCHIKUBAI WALLPAPER, £112 A ROLL LOEWE RUBBER KEY FOB, £75

GRACE BY GRACE CODDINGTON EAU DE TOILETTE, £70

LOEWE

BIBA VASE, £130, AT HOUSE OF FRASER

CRAFTS COUNSEL Be it rough-hewn or intricately woven, multifaceted artisanship brings Loewe’s highly curated aesthetic home IKEA ROCKING CHAIR, £145 OLIVER BONAS CUSHION, £26

LOEWE

HABITAT CERAMIC VASE, £35

40


OKA MIRROR, £185 OLIVER BONAS CUSHION, £26

NINA CAMPBELL WALLPAPER, £72 A ROLL, AT OSBORNE & LITTLE

H&M PORCELAIN PLATE, £5

MAGPIE HABIT

GUCCI

Step into Gucci’s antique-strewn palazzo: vintage-inspired finds amp up the eccentricity

URBAN OUTFITTERS RUG, £150

BORDALLO PINHEIRO CERAMIC JUG, £65, AT LIBERTY

GUCCI

MARKS & SPENCER CABINET, £499 ROCKETT ST GEORGE DUCK FEET LAMP, £145, AT LIBERTY TROUVA MARBLE TRAY, £20

MARKS & SPENCER TABLE LAMP, £109 BIBA TRINKET BOX, £35, AT HOUSE OF FRASER

HOUSE OF HACKNEY LIMERENCE FABRIC, FROM £85 A METRE

41


VOGUE living

STATELY MANNER

OKA DAMASK CUSHION COVER, £75

Look to Miu Miu’s silk-velvet brocades and tapestry prints for a lush twist on aristo furnishings

ANTHROPOLOGIE TUMBLER, £10 BONPOINT EAU DE TOILETTE, £40

OKA FRAMED FERN PRINTS, £195 FOR A SET OF FOUR

CABBAGES & ROSES ALDERNEY RASPBERRY WALLPAPER, £48 A ROLL MARKS & SPENCER SERVING BOWL, £19.50

OLIVER BONAS VELVET CHAIR, £425

MIU MIU

MRS MOORE COFFEE POT, £120

HOUSE OF HACKNEY FLORIKA WALLPAPER, £145 A ROLL

MIU MIU

MARKS & SPENCER CAKE STAND, £49.50

42

NEXT WINE GLASS, £16 FOR FOUR


LINEA SERVING PLATTER, £28, AT HOUSE OF FRASER

ANTHROPOLOGIE RUG, FROM £198

OLIVER BONAS PLANT POT, £6

MARKS & SPENCER VASE, £29.50

HABITAT CERAMIC ORNAMENT, £100

FLYING TIGER IPAD COVER, £5

CHLOE

FRENCH CONNECTION LAUNDRY BASKET, £55

THE BASKET ROOM BEADED BASKET, £20

BOHO GRAND Chloé’s richly textured collection reboots the bohemian dream – contrast idiosyncratic pattern with earthy tones

DOUGLAS FITCH CERAMIC PIE DISH £135, AT THE NEW CRAFTSMAN

URBAN OUTFITTERS HAND-WOVEN ROCKING CHAIR, £270

BITOSSI CERAMIC FIGURE, £85, AT LIBERTY

CHLOE

ANTHROPOLOGIE CUSHION, £78

43


VOGUE beauty

NEW TRICKS

GROWNUP GLITTER Glitter isn’t just for Christmas. At Burberry, make-up artist Wendy Rowe reinvented the sparkly stuff to dazzling effect, creating a disco-chic look influenced by the sequin embroidery in the a/w ’16 collection. The trick is to throw caution to the wind. “It needs to feel effortless,” Rowe says. Opt for large glitter particles and sprinkle with abandon – or if that sounds too much of a statement, a glistening highlight on the eyelids will do the trick.

BURB ERRY

ALTUZARRA

From refined sparkle to bold berry lips, winter beauty can’t resist the lure of the unexpected

THE NEW NUDE Forget garish nail art and loud, show-off colour. Beige shades backstage at Altuzarra, Diane von Furstenberg and Marques Almeida were as elegant as they are easy to replicate. As Adam Slee, global nail ambassador for Rimmel London, points out: “This is an enhanced natural look that adds a beautiful freshness to the nail.” An added bonus: the subtle shades mean chips go virtually undetected.

NAILS INC NAIL FILE, £6.99, AT VERY.CO.UK

ESSIE NAIL POLISH IN IN THE MOOD RING, £7.99, AT SUPERDRUG

MARGARET DABBS NAIL POLISH IN SWEET PEA, £14 TOPSHOP GLITTER, £7.50

44

RIMMEL SUPER GEL IN ENGLISH ROSE, £5.99


TWEEZERMAN CLASSIC LASH CURLER, £16

EYLURE VEGAS NAY LASHES IN PRETTY PERFECT, £5.95

BOTTEGA VENETA

SPIDER GIRL Clumpy lashes have made their presence felt for a few seasons now, but the a/w ’16 catwalks took the trend to new levels with full-on spidery looks at Marni, Jason Wu and Dior. Meanwhile, at Carven, top and bottom lashes were given intense volume and length to doll-like effect. Apply a volumising, jet-black mascara and style with a lash comb – or for real impact, opt for strategically placed false eyelashes.

WILD BERRIES How to semaphore new-season confidence? Plump for deep red lipstick, as seen in patent gloss form at Dior, as a matt ruby stain at Edun, or painting a sophisticated sheen over mouths at Bottega Veneta. A word of caution: it takes laser-cut precision to upgrade the look from gothic to glamorous. Opt for a sharp lip-liner to create a crisp outline before filling in with a highly pigmented lipstick. Pat some clear lipgloss over the top for optional shine.

KIKO CREAMY COLOUR COMFORT LIP LINER IN SANGRIA, £5.90

CHANEL ROUGE ALLURE INK IN EXPERIMENTE, £26

BOBBI BROWN LUXE LIP COLOR IN PLUM BRANDY, £25

CARVEN

SENSAI 38°C MASCARA, £23, AT HARRODS

45


ALEXANDER McQUEEN

JON RICHARD HAIR CLIP, £20, AT DEBENHAMS

ANTHROPOLOGIE HAIR-GRIP SET, £14

HAIR HABERDASHERY From romantic, vintage-inspired slides to gothic clips, this season’s most glamorous looks came with all the trimmings

ALDO HAIR PIN, £15

MARC JACOBS SWAROVSKI-CRYSTAL HAIR CLIP, £135, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM LULU FROST HAIR COMB, £58

CHLOE & ISABEL CRYSTAL-PAVE HAIR PIN, FROM £25

PLUIE SILVER-PLATED HAIR COMB, FROM £110, AT SHOPBOP.COM

ACCESSORIZE HAIR SLIDE, £8

CHLOE & ISABEL BUN CUFF, FROM £35

46


VOGUE beauty FLETCHER’S COTTAGE SPA ARCHERFIELD HOUSE, EAST LOTHIAN What better way to clear your mind of the stresses of everyday life than with the bracing breeze of the North Sea and a host of Sisley spa treatments? Particular highlights include the Fletcher’s Cottage Signature Treatment (a full body massage) and the Bath Hut Experience (take a bath drenched in hand-harvested local seaweed and mineral salts). Wellbeing is only enhanced by an entrancing walled garden and views over the Firth of Forth. The best part? There are crackling log burners and candlelit baths in every suite. Archerfieldhouse.com

SOLENT HOTEL & SPA HAMPSHIRE Portsmouth may not spring to mind when planning an indulgent escape, but the area offers some impressive landmarks that are often overlooked by holidaymakers – Porchester Castle is a stirring medieval example – making the area particularly quiet all year round. Slightly inland is the Solent Hotel & Spa, with a vast menu of specialist treatments including an anti-ageing Le Remedi Hand Treatment and a Natura Bissé Vitamin C massage, which soothes stiff joints and improves balance and circulation. For those still unconvinced of Portsmouth’s potential: it makes the perfect pitstop should you want to pop across the Channel. Shirehotels.co.uk

VU SPA THE SWAN HOTEL, CUMBRIA Only recently have the spa services of the Lake District matched the serenity of the landscape. The boutique Swan Hotel comes highly recommended, in part due to its coveted location – nestled next to the small village of Newby Bridge at the southern tip of Lake Windermere – but also due to its impressive Vu Spa. Go for the Skin Hydrator Body Wrap, and be sure to pick up a juice from the in-house juice bar, then nestle in the new Nests – luxury, self-contained cottages that come equipped with cosy fireplaces, hardwood kitchens and Egyptian-cotton sheets. Swanhotel.com C-SIDE SPA COWLEY MANOR, GLOUCESTERSHIRE With 55 acres of woodland and meadows for guests to enjoy, Cowley Manor is a firm favourite with Cotswoldsfrequenters. Its C-Side Spa makes it an even more enticing proposition, especially given the new menu of Emergin C Scientific Organics treatments that utilise the latest in skincare technology to provide hard-hitting, results-driven facials. High points are the Anti-Ageing Apple Stem Cell Treatment (100 per cent of clients noticed improvement in the appearance of crow’s feet), and the Detox Facial, which uses a range of potent super-ingredients such as kombucha, seaweed, French clay and grape extract. Cowleymanor.com

GETAWAY PLAN

Stop checking the exchange rate and enjoy the very best of Britain’s home-grown luxury spas QMS SKIN SPA THE LOWRY HOTEL, MANCHESTER Conveniently located on the banks of the River Irwell, the Lowry is a mere hop and skip away from some of Manchester’s most recognisable sites, such as the John Rylands Library and Manchester Art Gallery. After a busy day’s sightseeing, the Lowry’s on-site QMS Skin Spa will come as welcome respite. Star treatments include everything from the

Collagen Rejuvenation facials and beautiful body treatments, to the customised spa bar, which allows you to create your own unique treatment. Thelowryhotel.com

SENSE SPA THE ROSEWOOD, LONDON A stone’s throw from bustling Holborn, the Rosewood hotel couldn’t be more of an inner-city oasis. Classical music serenades guests in the cobbled courtyard

and the terrace restaurant wouldn’t look out of place in the South of France. But without doubt the most tranquil spot is the hotel’s Sense Spa with its bamboo walls, wooden walkways and rippling water features creating the sense of a Zen retreat. With an impressive menu of Maison Caulières and Sodashi treatments, seven treatment rooms and a relaxation lounge, it isn’t hard to forget about the city stress. Rosewoodhotels.com 47


VOGUE stockists

LINKS OF LONDON GOLD-PLATED BANGLE, £225

SIMONE ROCHA CRYSTAL EARRINGS, £195, AT MATCHES FASHION.COM

LE SPECS SUNGLASSES, £75

FINISHING TOUCHES Don’t leave the house without them

SOPHIE HULME CRYSTAL BRACELET, £250

SHRIMPS FAUX-FUR CLUTCH, £265

SOPHIA WEBSTER BROCADE MARY-JANES, £350

48

STOCKISTS The merchandise featured editorially has been ordered from the following stores. Some shops may carry a selection only. Prices and availability were checked at the time of going to press, but we cannot guarantee that prices will not change or that specific items will be in stock when the magazine is published. We suggest that before visiting a shop you phone to make sure they have your size. 3.1 Phillip Lim 020 7591 1320 Accessorize.com Adidas by Stella McCartney Adidas.co.uk Aldoshoes.com Alexiajordanjewellery. com Anthropologie.com Anyahindmarch.com Aspinaloflondon.com Atpatelier.com Aureliebidermann.com Ba-sh.com Thebasketroom.com Baumundpferdgarten.com Bimbaylola.com Boden 0844 873 0000 Byfarshoes.com By Malene Birger 020 7486 4000 Cabbagesandroses.com Calvin Klein Jeans 020 7434 0141 Canvas by Lands’ End Landsend.co.uk Ceciliecopenhagen.com Charleskeith.com Chloeandisabel.com Claudie Pierlot 020 7408 1030 Coach 020 3141 8901 Comptoirdescotonniers. co.uk Converse.com Debenhams.com Diesel.com Dinnyhall.com Dorothyperkins.com Dunelondon.com Farrow-ball.com Fenwick 020 7629 9161 Finerylondon.com Flyingtiger.com Follifollie.com Frenchconnection.com Frenchsole.com Furla.com Ganni.com

Gant.co.uk Gerarddarel.com Habitat.co.uk H&M 0344 736 9000 Hanon-shop.com Harrods 020 7730 1234 Harvey Nichols 020 7235 5000 Hilfiger Denim 020 3144 0900 Hobbs.co.uk Houseoffraser.co.uk Houseofhackney.com Hunter Original 020 7287 2999 Ikea.com Jaeger.co.uk Jandmdavidson.com Jcrew.com Jessieharris.co.uk Johnlewis.com Jumper 1234 020 7486 4800 J-w-anderson.com Karenmillen.com Kate Spade New York 020 7287 1581 Kin by John Lewis Johnlewis.com Kitandace.com Thekooples.co.uk Kurt Geiger 020 7781 7480 Lespecs.com Levi.com Liberty 020 7734 1234 Linksoflondon.com Lkbennett.com Loewe 020 7499 0266 Longchamp 020 3141 8141 Loriblu.com Lucychoilondon.com Lulufrost.com Maje 020 7493 5530 Mango.com Marc-cain.com Mariafrancescapepe.com Marks & Spencer 0333 014 8555

Marni.com Massimodutti.com Mes Demoiselles 020 7486 4800 MHL by Margaret Howell 020 7033 9494 Mih-jeans.com Miista.com Missselfridge.com MM6 020 7493 2533 Mrs-moore-vintage-store. co.uk Mr & Mrs Italy Mmi.it Thenewcraftsmen.com Newlook.com Next.co.uk Oasis-stores.com Office.co.uk Oka.com Oliverbonas.com Osborneandlittle.com Pandora.net Penelopechilvers.com Prettyballerinas.com Reiss.com Riverisland.com Rockins.co.uk Russell & Bromley 020 7629 6903 Sandro-paris.com Shrimps.co.uk Sophiawebster.com Sophiehulme.com Susancaplan.co.uk Swarovski.com Theory.com Tibi.com Tommy & Gigi 020 3144 0900 Topshop.com Trouva.com Ugg.com Uniqlo.com Urbanoutfitters.com Uterque.com V by Very Very.co.uk Warehouse.co.uk Whistles.com Zara.com


VOGUE PROMOTION

Metallics take centre stage, no matter the mood. Pair with an ankle boot and step out into the light Tunic, £28. Boots, £40. Both V by Very, at Very.co.uk

TUNG WALSH


VOGUE PROMOTION We own the night: short, sharp and playful is this season’s take on the Seventies. A frill here, a sequined stripe there, and you’ll be the belle of the disco ball Lidia wears dress, £45. Shoes, £28. Annabell wears tunic, £28. Boots, £40. All V by Very, at Very.co.uk. Visit Very.co.uk

TUNG WALSH


Vogue november 2016 uk