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CHEERS! HOST A KNOCKOUT NEW YEAR’S PARTY p51

November/December 2015

COLOR

TIRED OF RED AND GREEN? UPDATE YOUR HOLIDAY PALETTE

PLUS,

LUXE GIFTS YOU’D LOVE TO GIVE— OR GET p29

Style

Season for the

MAKE YOUR HOME GLOW FROM TREETOP TO TABLETOP

5 CARING WOMEN CHANGING THE WORLD p87


H A N D -T R I M M E D THE NEW GRAND WHITNEY CHANDELIER


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ON ALL DINING S T O R E W I D E S AV I N G S G O I N G O N N OW

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Š 2015 Hunter Douglas Ž is a registered trademark of Hunter Douglas


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Alabama Birmingham Bromberg & Co. 205.871.3276 Table Matters 205.879.0125 Arizona Phoenix Cornelia Park 602.955.3195 California Los Angeles Haven and Company 310.476.3060 Pasadena Salutations Home 626.577.7460 Portola Valley Ladera Garden & Gifts 650.854.3850 San Francisco Gumps 800.284.8677 San Mateo Draeger’s 650.685.3700 Colorado Denver Hutch & Fig 720.287.4320 Greenwood Village Homefest 303.741.3920 Connecticut Middlebury The Shoppes at Whittemore Crossing 203.528.0130 Stamford Juliska Flagship Store 203.316.9118 Florida Jacksonville Beach Pineapple Post 800.680.8018 Naples Gattle’s 239.262.4791 Pensacola Duh 850.439.0640 Georgia Atlanta Erika Reade 404.233.3857 Fragile Gifts LLC 888.354.4438 Augusta Charleston Street 706.738.6298 Mish Mash Interiors 706.814.7380 Illinois Chicago Crosell & Co. 312.266.4500 Tabula Tua 773.525.3500 The Perfect Setting - Chicago 312.202.1260 Glen Ellyn Marcel’s Culinary Experience 630.790.8500 Naperville Occasions 630.355.5045 1RUWKÀHOG Peachtree Place 847.441.7585 Oak Park Careful Peach Boutique 708.383.3066 Peoria The Bronze Frog 309.692.4707 Vernon Hills Kenzy Gifts and Decor 847.816.6959 Indiana Indianapolis Charles Mayer & Co. 317.257.2900 Kansas Wichita The Plaid Giraffe 316.683.1364 Kentucky Lexington LV Harkness 866.225.7474 Louisville Mercantile 502.899.1699 Owensboro The Bakers Rack Inc. 270.684.6130 Massachusetts Cohasset Fleming’s 781.383.0684 Hingham La Petite Maison 781.741.8393 Martha’s Vineyard Juliska Island Store 508.562.4010 Michigan Ann Arbor Bed & Butter 734.436.8905 Birmingham The Italian Dish 248.593.8299 Grand Rapids Papers Plus 616.458.6116 Harbor Springs Savoir Faire 231.242.0224 Kalamazoo Initial Attraction 269.341.4444 Minnesota Edina Ampersand 952.920.2118 Wayzata Five Swans 952.473.4685 Mississippi Ridgeland BellaChes 601.605.2239 Tupelo Reed’s 662.842.6453 Missouri Kansas City Halls 800.624.4034 Saint Louis Sallie Home 314.567.7883 Nebraska


Omaha Borsheim’s 800.642.4438 New Jersey Princeton Hamilton Company Jewelers, Inc. 609.683.4200 New York Brooklyn The Kitchen Clique 718.692.2260 Chappaqua Breeze 914.238.1900 New York Gracious Home 212.901.6300 North Carolina Chapel Hill South 919.240.5475 Greensboro The Extra Ingredient 336.299.9767 Raleigh Quintessentials 919.785.0787 Winston-Salem Schiffman’s 336.272.5146 Ohio Cincinnati Camargo Trading Co. 513.561.0842 Goldsmith Cardel 877.871.2339 Columbus Relish House 614.725.3978 Dayton Morning Sun Florist 937.434.8090 Dublin Thalia & Dahlia 614.336.8582 Oklahoma Duncan Distinctive Décor 866.936.3267 Norman Tulips 405.217.9322 Oklahoma City BC Clark Jewelers 405.840.1134 Ontario Toronto William Ashley China Corp. 416.964.9111 Pennsylvania Doylestown F.X. Dougherty Home & Gift 800.834.3797 Pittsburgh Contemporary Concepts 800.285.8594 Louis Anthony Jewelers 412.854.0310 Wayne Little House Shop 610.688.3222 Tennessee Franklin The Registry 615.595.2323 Johnson City Gourmet & Co. Inc. 423.929.9007 Texas Amarillo Et Cetera 888.220.2227 Austin Breed and Co. 512.474.6679 Boerne Jac’s 830.249.3003 Fort Worth PS The Letter 817.731.2032 Houston Berings 713.665.0500 Indulge 713.888.0181 Kuhl-Linscomb 713.526.6000 Ingram The Creek Boutique 830.367.3281 Virginia Annadale Ann Sandra 703.354.2110 Charlottesville The Happy Cook 434.977.2665 Richmond Fraiche 804.282.4282 Washington Bellevue Table Top & Home 425.454.7322 Wisconsin Middleton Chauette Home 608.836.5366 Milwaukee Past Basket 414.247.9976 The Home Market 414.755.2165 Minocqua Ann Marie’s 800.706.9993 JULISKA.COM • 888.414.8448


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FROM THE EDITOR

P

laying favorites? Usually, it’s just not my style. This month, though, I’m going to make an exception. I truly do love one room more than any other in this issue. It’s a space in New York City’s annual Holiday House (page 66) that celebrated Traditional Home’s 25th anniversary last year. As a special favor to me, the very talented

designer Matthew Patrick Smyth created a sitting room that encapsulates traditional design, deftly incorporating different periods and showing the breadth of what Traditional Home covers. “Fine English furniture, a

touch of midcentury modern, Swedish, Anglo-Indian, ’70s French, as well as new contemporary pieces were all included to show that classic, quality style never loses its visual value,” Matthew says. I couldn’t agree more. Of course, other rooms in this issue are sure to win your heart as well—and get you in the holiday spirit. You can’t beat the inspiration of Kim and Cliff Deetjen (“Sugar and Spritz,” page 94), who love Christmas so much that they designed the family room of their Vermont home to be “holiday central.” Cliff even created a special stage for the Christmas tree—a large bay with an eyebrow arch window. The tree is decorated with “every ornament the boys have made since kindergarten,” Kim says, in a pretty red-and-white palette that honors the couple’s Scandinavian heritage. Sons Alex and Ben, however, are all about the family’s other Scandinavian-inspired tradition: whipping up batches of spritz and rolled sugar cookies using recipes from Kim’s Swedish grandmother. Speaking of cookies, they’re also a big part of the season at David and Kristi Spouse’s home in Seattle (“Holiday Plumage,” page 110). Kristi and her mom are famous for their scrumptious cutout cookies—and for their flat-out love for Christmas. “I look forward to the whole season,” Kristi says. “Our house never looks more beautiful than when it’s decorated for the holidays.” Kristi and the kids get the tree up before the Thanksgiving turkey has even hit the table, meshing the decorations with Kristi’s yearround palette of peacock blue, charcoal gray, and white for a bright, sophisticated look. Want a different twist on the holiday palette? Take a look inside Jim and Mollie Reinhart’s Virginia home (“In the Pink,” page 118), where shots of blush and rose look so good that it makes you wonder if Santa should reconsider the red suit. Or check out designer Scot Meacham Wood’s tartan scheme (page 58). You just might go mad for plaid. You’ll also find some amazing gift ideas (page 29) and inspiration for a knockout New Year’s Eve party (page 51). And don’t miss this year’s installment of our Classic Woman Awards (page 87). After you meet these five amazing women, hear their stories, and see what they’re doing to improve lives, you’ll feel a whole lot better about the year to come. Wishing you all a joyous holiday season.

Ann Omvig Maine, Editor in Chief traditionalhome@ meredith.com

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November+December 2015

Happy Holidays! There’s no better way to celebrate the season than with a visit to the Holiday House, Manhattan’s premier designer showhouse to benefit The Breast Cancer Research Foundation. Traditional Home is proud to support this year’s Holiday House, 2 East 63rd Street, open November 11– December 2. Visit holidayhousenyc.com for details on tickets and events.


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Contents November+December 2015 Volume XXVI Issue VIII

On the cover Interior design by Janie Molster; photograph by Kip Dawkins. See page 118.

Features 94 Sugar and Spritz | A flurry of cookie baking warms a Scandinavian Christmas at this family home in snowy Vermont.

102 Chart-Topping Christmas | The fresh, youthful palette in the home of a Virginia songwriter and vocalist is music to the eyes.

110 Holiday Plumage | Dressed in peacock-pretty

94

holiday finery, this Seattle home gives a happy new meaning to blue Christmas.

118 In the Pink | After a look at the candy-color palette in this house, you just might wonder if Santa should rethink the red suit.

126 All Is Bright | With five kids in the family, all might not be calm at the Paschke house. But their Illinois home is a feast for the senses. ➤

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November+December 2015


November +December 42 New+ Next 29

Gift Guide What to give (and get!) this holiday

34

Classic Update Upgrade happy hour with one of these elegant bar cabinets

38

Profile Alexa Hampton talks classicist style and her new accessories collection

40

Showroom All of the Bunny Williams Home collection comes together in one beautiful showroom

42

Market There’s no better way to ring in the season than with chic new design finds

Departments 24

118

TraditionalHome.com Your guide to online holiday inspiration

51

Great Gatherings Annette English’s party plan for ringing in the New Year with guests

58

Decorating Designer Scot Meacham Wood shares his favorite tips for decking the halls

66

Showhouse Tour Celebrate the season in style with inspiration from the Holiday House Designer Showcase

87

Classic Woman Awards Meet five amazing women with a mission to change lives

134

Pets Gifts for the animal lovers on your list

152

I Am Traditional Rebecca Proctor, creative force at MacKenzie-Childs

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November+December 2015

51

Every Issue 16 136

From the Editor Reader’s Resource

To find the perfect gift for that special someone, visit traditionalhome.com/2015GiftGuide


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ON THE WEB

traditionalhome.com

V I S I T U S O N T H E W E B F O R H O L I D AY D E C O R AT I N G I N S P I R AT I O N , F E S T I V E R E C I P E S , A N D M O R E PRODUCED BY JULIANNE HILMES

Traditional Home Loves the Holidays! Ready to deck the halls? Whether you’re adorning your mantel, hanging wreaths, trimming trees, or draping garland, inspiration is just a click away. We’ve pulled together all our favorite holiday homes, festive menus, and decorating ideas into one place. There’s a lot of holiday to love when you go to traditionalhome.com/holiday

2015 Holiday Gift Guide There’s a little something for everyone here, so you can spread cheer in no time. Visit traditionalhome .com/2015giftguide

FOLLOW US: on facebook facebook.com/tradhome

on twitter @traditionalhome

on pinterest pinterest.com/traditionalhome

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Holly & Ivy Video Series

TRADhome Mag Don’t miss our latest issue of TRADhome mag! With all original content, this free digital edition is jam-packed with fab entertaining ideas to get you through this busy season, plus tips from design insiders. Head to tradhomemag.com

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November+December 2015

Simple Decorations

Holiday Table

With a few supplies from the crafts store, you can whip up easy but elegant holiday crafts. You’ll find 5 craft ideas at traditionalhome.com/crafts

Dress your dining table in holiday finery. For inspiration, see a sparkling setting by Senior Style Editor Krissa Rossbund at traditionalhome.com/holidaytable

Senior Style Editor Krissa Rossbund decorated a dining room for a home tour, and it is full of simple but clever holiday decorating ideas. Find a series of videos with Krissa’s ideas at traditionalhome .com/hollyivy


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ANN OMVIG MAINE

BETH McDONOUGH

EXECUTIVE EDITOR MARSHA A. RAISCH ART DIRECTOR MICK SCHNEPF MANAGING EDITOR MICHAEL DIVER

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, INTEGRATED MARKETING STACY SHAPIRO FELDMAN

EDITOR IN CHIEF

EDITORIAL SENIOR DESIGN AND LIFESTYLE EDITOR JENNY BRADLEY PFEFFER SENIOR STYLE EDITOR KRISSA ROSSBUND SENIOR DESIGN AND MARKETS EDITOR TORI MELLOTT MARKETS AND SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR KARI COSTAS ASSOCIATE STYLE EDITOR CLARA HANEBERG ASSISTANT MARKETS EDITOR ASHLEY HOTHAM SENIOR ARCHITECTURE EDITOR AMY ELBERT SENIOR ART AND ANTIQUES EDITOR DORIS ATHINEOS SENIOR ARTICLES EDITOR SALLY FINDER WEEPIE CONTRIBUTING FOOD EDITOR STEPHEN J. EXEL ASSOCIATE ARTICLES AND WEB EDITOR JULIANNE HILMES RESEARCH EDITOR JANICE CURRIE CONTRIBUTING COPY EDITOR LINDA RYBERG OFFICE COORDINATOR KIM CALLAHAN ART SENIOR ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR BRENDA CORT SENIOR ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR JOE WYSONG ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY COORDINATOR CINDY MILLS

PUBLISHER

ADVERTISING SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER VICTORIA HUBBARD LUXURY GOODS DIRECTOR JILL ESTERMAN HOME FURNISHINGS DIRECTOR LORI SHELDON DIRECT MEDIA ADVERTISING DIRECTOR GRACE CHUNG BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER STEPHANIE BARREZUETA NATIONAL TRAVEL DIRECTOR MELISSA LUEBBE ADVERTISING BUSINESS MANAGER EDWARD HAYES ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER SOPHIA THID ADVERTISING SALES ASSISTANT CHERYL CORBIN ATLANTA, SOUTHEAST SUZANNE COOPER, SCOOP MEDIA CHICAGO, MIDWEST AND CANADA DENISE KAISER CHICAGO, MIDWEST AND TEXAS TRACY SZAFARZ CHICAGO SALES ASSISTANT HEATHER TWEEDY DETROIT PAUL MALLON, FOCUS MEDIA & MARKETING LOS ANGELES, WEST COAST KIMBERLY ALLEN LOS ANGELES SALES ASSISTANT BLAIR SHALES SAN FRANCISCO, NORTHWEST ERIN MERVIS-HOPPE, POPPY MEDIA NEW YORK 212/557-6600 | ATLANTA 770/998-0996 | CHICAG0 312/580-1619 DALLAS 312/580-1618 | DETROIT 248/205-2570 | LOS ANGELES 310/689-1695 SAN FRANCISCO 415/990-2825 | TRAVEL 212/499-6704 | DIRECT MEDIA 212/499-6778

PREPRESS DESKTOP SPECIALIST CARI WASMUND PHOTO STUDIO MANAGER DAVE DeCARLO CONSUMER INSIGHTS DIRECTOR MARK BEQUEAITH TEST KITCHEN DIRECTOR LYNN BLANCHARD

MARKETING INTEGRATED MARKETING DIRECTOR AMY SOULE INTEGRATED MARKETING MANAGER SARA ROSSI CREATIVE DIRECTOR, INTEGRATED MARKETING MAUREEN GILLESPIE SENIOR DESIGNER, INTEGRATED MARKETING AMBER WOLFF SENIOR RESEARCH MANAGER CHERYL CAREY RESEARCH MANAGER ERIN KENNEDY

CONTRIBUTORS EDITORS AT LARGE, ANTIQUES LEIGH KENO, LESLIE KENO EDITOR AT LARGE ELEANOR ROPER ENTERTAINING RACHEL HOLLIS DESIGN CATHY WHITLOCK GARDEN ELVIN MCDONALD ILLUSTRATION KATHRYN KUNZ FINNEY, CARSON ODE

NEWSSTAND JENNIFER HAMILTON ASSISTANT CIRCULATRION DIRECTOR LESLIE SHAEFFER PRODUCTION DIRECTOR JOHN BEARD SENIOR PRODUCTION MANAGER MICHAELA LESTER ADVERTISING OPERATIONS MANAGER MARCIA PERSON BUSINESS MANAGER TRISH SCHRODER

ATLANTA LISA MOWRY BALTIMORE EILEEN A. DEYMIER BOSTON ESTELLE BOND GURALNICK CHARLESTON, SC SANDRA L. MOHLMANN CHARLOTTE, NC ANDREA CAUGHEY CHICAGO ELAINE MARKOUTSAS, HILARY ROSE CONNECTICUT STACY KUNSTEL FLORIDA SALLY MAUER, ELEANOR LYNN NESMITH LOS ANGELES DARRA BAKER NEW YORK BONNIE MAHARAM PARIS LYNN MCBRIDE PORTLAND, OR BARBARA MUNDALL SAN FRANCISCO HEATHER LOBDELL SEATTLE LINDA HUMPHREY

Editorial Offices: Traditional Home, 1716 Locust St., Des Moines, IA 50309-3023; e-mail us at traditionalhome@meredith.com; or fax 515/284-2083. Traditional Home assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials. SUBSCRIPTION HELP: Visit traditionalhome.com/myaccount; email us at trhcustserv@cdsfulfillment.com; or call 800/374-8791. Our subscribers list is occasionally made available to carefully selected firms whose products may be of interest to you. If you prefer not to receive information from these companies by mail or phone, please let us know. Send your request along with your mailing label to Traditional Home, P.O. Box 37508, Boone, IA 50037-0508. Copyright Meredith Corporation 2015. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

MEREDITH NATIONAL MEDIA GROUP

PRESIDENT TOM HARTY EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENTS

PRESIDENT, PARENTS NETWORK CAREY WITMER PRESIDENT, WOMEN’S LIFESTYLE THOMAS WITSCHI PRESIDENT, MEREDITH DIGITAL JON WERTHER CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER NANCY WEBER CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER MICHAEL BROWNSTEIN GENERAL MANAGER DOUG OLSON SENIOR VICE PRESIDENTS

CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER ANDY WILSON DIGITAL SALES MARC ROTHSCHILD INNOVATION OFFICER CAROLYN BEKKEDAHL RESEARCH SOLUTIONS BRITTA CLEVELAND VICE PRESIDENTS

BUSINESS PLANNING AND ANALYSIS ROB SILVERSTONE CONTENT LICENSING LARRY SOMMERS CORPORATE MARKETING STEPHANIE CONNOLLY CORPORATE SALES BRIAN KIGHTLINGER DIGITAL VIDEO LAURA ROWLEY DIRECT MEDIA PATTI FOLLO BRAND LICENSING ELISE CONTARSY COMMUNICATIONS PATRICK TAYLOR HUMAN RESOURCES DINA NATHANSON STRATEGIC SOURCING, NEWSSTAND, PRODUCTION CHUCK HOWELL

CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER STEPHEN M. LACY PRESIDENT, MEREDITH LOCAL MEDIA GROUP PAUL KARPOWICZ VICE CHAIRMAN MELL MEREDITH FRAZIER IN MEMORIAM — E. T. MEREDITH III (1933–2003)

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November+December 2015


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P E O P L E , P L AC E S & P R O D U C T S YO U S H O U L D K N OW A B O U T

PRODUCED BY TORI MELLOTT

What’s

MICHELLE NUSSBAUMER

ALESSANDRA BRANCA

MADELINE WEINRIB

On Your List?

BARRY DIXON

MARK D. SIKES

MELANIE COURBET

MARY McDONALD

RON WENDT

34 CLASSIC UPDATE

38

PROFILE

CHARLOTTE MOSS

40

SHOWROOM

42

MARKET

h

November+December 2015 T

29


+

NEW NEXT GIVE ’N’ GET

Perfect Presents

Ron Wendt Gifts to Give: This talented NYC event planner offers a bouquet of old-fashioned garden roses and a bottle of Vin de Constance tied with a vintage ribbon. (Klein Constantia’s 2008 vintage, $57.95 at sherry-lehmann.com) Gifts to Get: Antique garden objects in stone, bronze, or terra-cotta. (Maybe Ron would like this circa-1900 “Draped Goddess” French sculpture by Gossin Frères, $24,500 from innergardens.com.)

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As the holiday season draws near, don’t let your gift list get the best of you. We’ve asked a few of our favorite designers, event planners, and shopkeepers what they like to give and get. From jewels to handbags to fine wines, their suggestions give you a host of ideas that are sure to delight even the trickiest person to please. And to make your holiday completely stress-free, we’ve asked them to create beautifully wrapped packages to complement the treasures. Everyone will be clamoring to be on top of your “nice” list!

Alessandra Branca

Barry Dixon

Gifts to Give: A true bibliophile, the Chicago interior designer loves to give treasured vintage books to her closest friends. (Check out argosybooks.com for classic, first-edition, and other rare books.) Gifts to Get: She loves vintage linens. (Ms. Branca, if your local source runs low, we recommend the “Dijon” cocktail napkins by Julia B. Couture Linens, $95 for a set of 8; juliab.com.)

Gifts to Give: “Something overthe-top luxurious that the recipient would love but would not have purchased for herself,” says the Virginia-based interior designer. “Every year I choose a different designer and gift the ladies on my staff with handbags!” (Maybe this year they’ll receive the “Byzantine Intrecciato Nappa Shoulder Bag,” $2,100 from bottegaveneta.com.) Gifts to Get: “In a way, the same. My wonderful Bottega Veneta briefcase comes to mind. I would not have bought it for myself. A timeless, luxurious splurge.”

November+December 2015


Michelle Nussbaumer

Melanie Courbet Gifts to Give: “The MarieAntoinette breast bowl, as I think it has heritage, but it also embodies the savoir vivre culture that I relate to,” says this NYC shopkeeper. (She’d choose this “Bol Sein” version by Sèvres; $2,250 from ateliercourbet.com.) Gifts to Get: “Objects, photographs, or drawings created or made by my friends.”

Gifts to Give: “My Rock Candy bronze, gold, and turquoise cuff for women and my tiger’seye and bronze humidor for men,” says this Dallas designer, known for her amazing shop. (Bronze, gold, and turquoise cuff from Michelle’s Rock Candy Line, $575, at ceylonetcie .com or call 214/742-7632) Gifts to Get: “Flowers… everyone knows my favorite florist is Cartier.”

Mary McDonald Gifts to Give: “I tend to like hand towels of all kinds and therefore collect them when I see them, for myself and for gifts,” says the L.A. interior designer. Gifts to Get: “Something sort of funky, like a vintage frog paperweight or a little box or dish.” (Hint: Mary might like the “Walton” or “Chamberlain” gemstone brass boxes, price upon request, at addisonweeks.com.)

Madeline Weinrib Gifts to Give: “I love to give gifts I design,” says the NYC textile designer. “I will be giving hand towels that I have made in Afghanistan by women widowed from war.” (“Embroidered Hand Towel” by Madeline Weinrib, $95 each at barneys.com) Gifts to Get: “Charitable gifts; how wonderful to provide meals for those in need!”


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Mark D. Sikes Gifts to Give: “I’ve been giving the same thing for years: Santa Maria Novella Pot Pourri Silk Sachets in navy blue —and they have to be navy blue,” says the L.A. interior and fashion designer. “They make the stockings smell beautiful and everyone loves them!” (“Pot Pourri Silk Sachet Blue,” $52 each from santamarianovellausa.com) “I also love to give RTH saddle brown leather tote bags. You can get them monogrammed, and they come in the chicest muslin bags.” (RTH “Square Tote” in signature cognac leather, $380; call 310/289-7911) Gifts to Get: “Books! Books! Books! It doesn’t even matter if I might already have one of them, I will enjoy them!”

More Books, Please!

Charlotte Moss Gifts to Give: The NYC-based designer prefers giving “books that I have read and enjoyed throughout the year, or something handmade by a craftsman.” (We spotted these handcrafted vintage paper items by Jennifer Collier, $62–$215, at jennifercollier.co.uk that might pique Charlotte’s gift-giving imagination!) Gifts to Get: “Charitable contributions are the best. I don’t need a thing.”

Mrs. Howard Room by Room: The Essentials of Decorating with Southern Style by Phoebe Howard Designer Phoebe Howard’s newest book is brimming with beautiful interiors. As the title suggests, each chapter focuses on one room of the house, where Howard delves deeper into the design process for each space as she dispenses anecdotes and design advice along with photos from more than a dozen projects. (Abrams, $50) —Julianne Hilmes

Monograms for the Home by Kimberly Schlegel Whitman Lifestyle expert Kimberly Schlegel Whitman wants you to mark your belongings, but no permanent markers allowed. In her new book, she shows that the centuries-old art of signing off with a two- or three-letter embroidered, engraved, or stamped emblem makes a statement about confidence and style. (Gibbs Smith, $40) —Krissa Rossbund

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ENJOY A SOUND INVESTMENT IN QUALITY AND STYLE

For over 70 years, Sherrill has created the finest home furnishings for the most discerning clients. View our portfolio at sherrillfurniture.com

Handcrafted in the USA


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NEW NEXT CLASSIC UPDATE

Happy hour gets an upgrade thanks to the elegant bar cabinet WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY KARI COSTAS PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN BESSLER

Mad Men may have poured its last Old Fashioned, but the art of drinking is alive and well. The original liquor cabinet was a piece of furniture called the cellaret, a small, movable wine cooler that came into fashion in mid-18th-century England. These chests quickly made their way to the American colonies, where they served as an important fixture in the stylish parlors and dining rooms of the wealthy, particularly in the South. Made from mahogany or walnut and lined with metal, cellarets took on varying shapes—square, round, octagonal—and came with heavy locking lids to protect the contents from theft. As cabinetmakers like Thomas Sheraton developed dining room furnishings, cellarets were often integrated into sideboards. And when the flow of alcohol was curbed in the 1920s, the need for secure storage proved all the more important. These specialized cases became the perfect place to keep liquor out of sight (but, of course, never out of mind). ➤ The “Cleo Bar Cabinet” from Hickory Chair is a handsome piece of furniture with ample space to stock a full bar (hickorychair.com). The “Fern” decanter is by William Yeoward (michaelcfina.com); Ralph Lauren Home makes the “Durban” cocktail shaker and nut bowl (ralphlaurenhome.com).

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GROHE EUROCUBEÂŽ

Designed with the needs of cooking enthusiasts in mind, new GROHE EurocubeÂŽ exudes architectural appeal with cutting-edge, geometric styling and quality professional features that seamlessly blend together to combine superior functionality with a uniquely cubic design. GROHE.COM/US


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Our Designers Say… | “Downing” by West Elm “I’m obsessed with this piece! It is not only following form and function, but the current colors of brushed brass and white are on point and what is trending now in case goods, accessories, and fine art.” —David Brian Sanders, Los Angeles

“Downing” westelm.com

“Riesling” armanicasa.com

| “Riesling” by Armani Casa “I love the lightness and geometric preciseness of this piece. The shagreen finish is lovely. I would use it standing by itself in a niche or at the end of a long hallway where you could get a distance perspective of it.” —Tom Stringer, Chicago

| “Dillon” by Kelly Wearstler “I love this cabinet because it not only has the old school glamour of being a cocktail cabinet, it also brings in the aesthetic of Jean Prouvé with the edgy circular cutout details, making it both modern and an instant design classic.” —Martyn Lawrence Bullard, Los Angeles

| “Knowledge” by Kindel Furniture “This elegant bar cabinet is perfect for a library or living room. The clean lines and simple splayed gilt legs are a striking contrast to the chinoiserie lacquer design. It is sculptural but useful and would look stunning outfitted with crystal barware and pretty decanters.” —Amanda Reynal, Des Moines

“Dillon” kellywearstler.com

“Knowledge” kindelfurniture.com

| “Lasalle” by Mitchell Gold &

Bob Williams “This little bar has such big appeal! It references midcentury design without feeling dated or gimmicky, and the rich wood, raised-diamond parquet pattern, and antique brass accents make it feel truly luxurious. I can see this piece in so many different settings.” —Bradley Bayou, Los Angeles

| “Jet Set” by Bernhardt “This updated bar cabinet boasts leather-paneled doors that give a chic and custom feel, while retaining the functional elements of adjustable glass shelves and ample storage. I love tucking a bar cabinet into a quiet corner and styling the top with a collection of found objects to make a personal statement when the piece is not in use.” —Bennett Leifer, New York

“Lasalle” mgbwhome.com

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“Jet Set” bernhardt.com


BRING YOUR STYLE INTO VIEW

TM

Custom Shades, Blinds & Drapery

Handcrafted in the USA Since 1946 | Showrooms Nationwide | theshadestore.com | 800.754.1455


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NEW NEXT PROFILE

Gilded cameos placed against an antique mirror add depth. A collection of obelisks gives height and polish to a carved console, while a stool cast in resin shows off intricate classical detailing.

A Well-Traveled Room

Inspired by Grand Tour souvenirs, designer Alexa Hampton unveils a new accessories collection with Maitland-Smith BY TORI MELLOTT PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN BESSLER A self-described “classicist,” interior designer Alexa Hampton knows a thing or two about priceless treasures, so it’s only natural that her new 54-piece accessories collection with Maitland-Smith (maitlandsmith.com) would recall an earlier age. “I am particularly fond of Grand Tour souvenirs,” Hampton says, referring to items collected by Europeans who traveled to architectural ruins in the 18th century seeking exposure to classical antiquity. “I called upon the forms of the columns, urns, and tazzas that these tourists collected,” she says, explaining the inspiration behind her designs. “I used much of the same material used to make these souvenirs, such as marble, bronze, and brass.”

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Her new line includes stone urns and obelisks, brass candlesticks, and a variety of boxes, including a stunning piece inlaid with white clamstone. Hampton likes to create items that are functional as well as attractive. For example, she says, beautiful trays can serve as a hard surface atop an ottoman so drinks can be placed there. “Boxes are wonderful tools to hide clutter,” she adds, “and candles in strategically placed candlesticks provide romantic lighting.” Accessories bring layers and depth to a room, she says, noting that they should be placed “in a deliberate manner.” Beyond these beautiful pieces, Hampton credits “the people who fill the room” as the best accessory of all.


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Hop onOver One Bunny. One building. One beautiful showroom.

BY TORI MELLOTT PHOTOGRAPHY BY JONNY VALIANT

When designer Bunny Williams created her home line in 2008, the products were sprinkled in specialty stores across the country but never housed in one location that carried her brand exclusively. All that has changed with the opening of Bunny Williams Home, a dedicated space for her designs on the third floor of NYC’s Fine Arts Building, 232 E. 59th St. (Never fear, Bunny fans—her numerous lines, from beds to benches and mirrors to mantels, are still available through select retailers and major design centers, and via bunnywilliamshome.com.) Williams couldn’t be happier. “Bunny Williams Home is an expression of my design philosophy,” she says, adding that the space will reflect her eclectic designs and provide an outlet for special pieces she and her team create “that are difficult to find but so needed in the market.” A champion of the mix, Williams notes, “Each piece in the collection is so different, and yet it all works beautifully together.” She says the showroom allows visitors to visualize the pieces together, mixed with one-of-a-kinds and great art. “I want them to combine our furniture with their favorite pieces.” Williams (seated) and her team (from left to right), Audrey Margarite, Jennifer Potter, and Betsey Roberts, in front of a wall of pillows, some made from Williams’s new line of fabric for Lee Jofa. (leejofa.com)

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Cobalt Lamp

Bamboo Bed

“Sophia” Bench


INTRODUCING THE 2016

©2015 Benjamin Moore & Co. Benjamin Moore and the triangle “M” symbol are registered trademarks, and Paint like no other is a trademark of Benjamin Moore & Co.

COLOR OF THE YEAR

Simply said... SIMPLY WHITE O C -1 1 7 2016 Color Trends Book is now available at your local Benjamin Moore store. benjaminmoore.com


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A Bit of Cheer

The holidays are here! Take a break from the festivities and rest your eyes on these new design finds. BY TORI MELLOTT

Quintus

Feminine Appeal The newest furniture collection from Quintus (quintushome.com) is an elegant exercise in simplicity. Jobi Blachy, the company’s owner, says each of the 15 new pieces features a design element that is “soft and curved, even slightly feminine.” A new collaboration with Rocky Mountain Hardware adds flair to the furniture, such as the polished nickel nailhead trim on this “Sasha Bergere” chair, a highlight of the collection.

| Ambriz Jewelry

Texas isn’t all buckles and boots. Inspired by the country life, Fredericksburg-based accessories designer Adolfo Ambriz brings a sterling kick to the pieces he crafts. The silversmith’s designs range from stately monograms and buffalo and Indian coins to crosses and the classic and ubiquitous Texas star. And when all-silver is too much shine, the artist weaves leather and braided horsehair for a dose of rugged and handsome charm. (ambrizjewelry.com) —Krissa Rossbund

RB Manville

Hip to be Square Seasoned designer Richard Baron Manville found inspiration in his arsenal of vintage handkerchiefs when he decided he wanted to create something personal. So the man who has previously been a creative force behind home fragrance collections and even Barbie doll accessories started his own company, RB Manville (rbmanville .com). His new collection of silk decorative pillows and pocket squares boasts a rainbow of colors and graphic patterns. Manville sees the assortment as “something you might find in a collector’s drawer. Each is like a treasured gift.”

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| Kneen & Co.

Good spirits are sure to find you when you dine on dinnerware decorated with symbolic designs that represent eternity, protection from evil, and unconditional love. The Alif collection from Hering Berlin—in collaboration with illustrator Laura Serra—brings the essence of ancient Asia to your 21st-century table. Available in three colors and patterns, each piece is handcrafted in fine porcelain. (kneenandco.com) —Ashley Hotham


MASTERS OF MODERN FALL 2015 COLLECTION

800.789.5401

MGBWHOME.COM


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William Yeoward

Charm School For his third collection with Jonathan Charles (jonathancharlesfurniture.com), designer William Yeoward melds two British traits—a reverence and appreciation for antiquities and a knack for infusing quirky charm into almost anything. This new group features light wood finishes such as grayed oak, washed acacia, and white oak. Be on the lookout for Yeoward’s signature polka-dot inlay, which makes a few cameos in unexpected places!

Deck the Halls with a Classic Stark/Sherrill Canet

Dynamic Duo Stark (starkcarpet.com) has partnered with interior designer Sherrill Canet for a new collection of furniture. The line is a mix of upholstered pieces, desks, étagères, coffee tables, chests of drawers, and side tables. Combining classic forms with captivating finishes was the end goal for both partners. “Every piece included was designed to blend seamlessly with any architectural period and style,” notes Canet.

Shipped from the woods of northeast Maine, this fragrant balsam fir holiday wreath is handcrafted by New England’s family-owned Whitney Wreath. “The Classic” is created with freshly harvested balsam and adorned with berries, live variegated boxwood greens, and a bow. Each 22- to 24-inch wreath includes a metal hanger; $42.95, free shipping within the continental U.S. (traditionalhome.com/wreath or call 800/273-0982; item TC15, code 3TH11).

Neiman Marcus

It’s not really the holidays until the famous Neiman Marcus Christmas Book is unveiled—more specifically, when NM’s “Fantasy Gifts” are revealed. From limited-edition sports cars to bespoke fragrances—each year the experience is more fantastical. This year, design icon Iris Apfel is loading up a five-foot-tall ikat-embellished trunk with heaps of glorious accessories and vintage finds inspired by her personal collection. The gift includes lunch and a styling session with Apfel ($80,000 for the package). Bonus: The company will donate $5,000 to The Heart of Neiman Marcus Foundation. As Apfel says, “More is more, and less is a bore!”

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| Gien

Playful and full of color, this new tableware collection from Gien (gien.com), a manufacturer of French faience (glazed ceramic ware), and ceramic artist Olivier Gagnère will bring fun to your table. The “Allure” line includes dinner, dessert, and canapé plates, along with teacups and saucers. Many of the designs—tulips, heraldry, polka dots, and linked clovers—were inspired by Gien’s archives and are emblematic of the company’s heritage and vision for the future.


©2015 The Container Store Inc. 24292

W E L C O M E T O Y O U R N E W F AV O R I T E R O O M

INTRODUCING SM

It’s not just a closet. It’s an escape to the way things should be. It’s the promise of an organized life.

TCS Closets™ – exclusively for you – only at The Container Store. We’ve carefully crafted every detail of our new custom, built-in closet collection to deliver the uncompromised style and definitive organization solution you deserve. Get started with an in-store or in-home consultation and take advantage of our exceptional service and quick turnaround SM

from design to installation. After all, we believe that an organized life is a better life.

LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE

CONTAINERSTORE.COM/TCSCLOSETS

855-827-5623


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Charlotte Olympia

Me-Wow! We like it when fashion designers start dipping their toes into the world of home decor—especially when the designer is a favorite like Charlotte Olympia (charlotteolympia.com). Known for her whimsical and sometimes downright zany footwear, this Brit with a cult following is taking the plunge into home with a signature candle. Featuring Olympia’s iconic gold “Kitty” face, the black candle’s scent is a harmonious mix of Indonesian patchouli, neroli, vanilla bourbon, and hints of oak—just purrr-fect!

| Irving & Morrison

Internationally recognized fabric designers Carolina Irving and Penny Morrison have teamed up to form a line of decorative home accessories under the name Irving & Morrison (irvingandmorrison.com). This dream team specializes in everything from silk lampshades and cushions to ottomans and rugs. Their creations—a fusion of English country charm and bohemian flair—are all handcrafted, using one-off fabrics from around the globe. —A. H.

York Wallcoverings

Keep on Rolling America’s longest-standing and largest wallpaper manufacturing company, York Wallcoverings (yorkwall.com) is celebrating its 120th birthday by introducing new collections from design favorites Candice Olson, Waverly, and many others.

Bookcase

Oscar + Elson

Since taking the reins as creative director almost two years ago, Carolina Irving has been infusing the Oscar de la Renta home line (oscardelarenta.com/house-home) with her highbrow-gypsy vibe; she is a master at transforming proper, seemingly stuffy designs into the impossibly cool. Having already added a fine china pattern and loads of home accessories, Irving is focusing on expanding the existing rug line. Joining the extensive offerings are seven hand-knotted woolen rugs produced by the company’s partner for a decade, Elson & Co.

Kitchen By Mick De Giulio Designer Mick De Giulio creates elegant and high-functioning spaces that cater to today’s kitchen-centric living. From inspired use of materials to clever storage solutions, here’s a peek at how the master does it. (Pointed Leaf Press, $85) —Amy Elbert

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Tell your story with traditional farmhouse aesthetics from the Oak Hill collection. Just one of many carefully curated design

movements from the 150-year design anthology that is DXV. To learn more, consult your designer or visit dxv.com. DESIGN CONSULTANT: Holly Hollingsworth Phillips


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Hunter Douglas

Simply Lovely Light Control Need dining room shades lowered at sunset or bedroom blinds up at 7 a.m.? Hunter Douglas (hunterdouglas.com) has your back with PowerView motorization. The secret is an app-based control and scheduling program that moves the shades throughout your home—even if you’re far away—according to the time of day, season, and personal preferences. The wireless system operates from the stylish palm-size Pebble control that comes in a range of colors to complement your decor, as well as from mobile devices such as a smartphone or a tablet. (The user-friendly screen displays make operation easy and fun.) Added bonus: You can adjust your shades from anywhere in the world that wi-fi is available. That technology, along with Hunter Douglas’s vast array of custom window fashions, makes light control a simple and stylish fix. —A. E.

Pick a Rosy Posy

The recipients of Traditional Home’s 2015 Classic Woman Awards (see page 87) are all winners—and so is this year’s Classic Woman Rose, an exquisite vibrant-pink selection from the breeder of the ever-popular Knock Out® Roses. The abundant, beautifully cupped blooms stand out against dark, glossy green leaves all season long, bringing beauty to your garden and your bouquets. Also setting this carefree climber apart from other roses is its superior resistance to black spot, powdery mildew, and rust. Vigorous, bushy plants grow up to 6 feet tall, or can be pruned into well-behaved shrubs. It’s a rose sure to bring a smile, just like this year’s Classic Woman Award honorees, who have devoted their lives to making the lives of others a whole lot brighter. Please order online at thgardenstore.com or call 800/420-2852. Item MM066661, code THG10; $32.95 each plus shipping. Your rose will be shipped bareroot at the proper time for planting in your zone beginning in early spring of 2016, weather permitting. Recommended for zones 5–9S&W. Order early; quantities are limited and are reserved on a first-come, first-served basis. Sorry, we are unable to ship to Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, APO/FPO addresses, or addresses outside the United States.

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SHOWROOMS

CA - LAGUNA NIGUEL Tuttles Carpet One - 949.831.1332 tuttlescarpetonelagunaniguel.com CA - LOS ANGELES Carpet Studio - 310.785.0270 carpetstudioinc.com CA - LOS ANGELES Melrose Carpet - 323.653.4653 melrosecarpet.com CA - SAN CARLOS California Carpet - 650.591.3355 calfloor.com CA - SAN FRANCISCO California Carpet/Galleria Design Studio - 415.487.3636 calfloor.com D.C. - WASHINGTON Georgetown Carpet - 202.342.2262 FL - NORTH MIAMI BEACH - AVENTURA Carpet Boutique - 305.944.1015 carpetboutiquemiami.com FL - CORAL GABLES Carpet Boutique - 305.445.1939 carpetboutiquemiami.com FL - MIDTOWN MIAMI Carpet Boutique - 305.325.1919 carpetboutiquemiami.com GA - ATLANTA Myers Carpet - 404.352.8141 myerscarpetatlanta.com GA - DALTON Myers Carpet - 706.277.4053 myerscarpet.com IL - CHICAGO Home Carpet One - 773.935.9314 homecarpetone.com IL - NORTHBROOK Lewis Floor & Home - 847.835.2400 lewisfloorandhome.com MD - BETHESDA Georgetown Carpet - 301.654.0202 MD - TIMONIUM Greenspring Carpet Source - 410.561.9200 greenspringcarpetsource.com MA - BOSTON Dover Rug - 617.266.3600 doverrug.com MA - NATICK Dover Rug - 508.651.3500 doverrug.com MA - ROCKLAND The Rug Merchant - 781.331.5505 therugmerchant.com NJ - RIDGEWOOD Wostbrock Home & Floors - 201.445.0807 wostbrockhome.com NJ - SUMMIT Cove Carpet One Floor & Home - 908.273.0220 covecarpetonesummit.com NY - BROOKLYN Better Carpet Warehouse - 718.855.2794 bettercarpetwarehouse.com NY - LONG ISLAND - SYOSSET Country Carpet - 516.822.5855 countrycarpet.com NC - CHARLOTTE Halls - 704.376.8501 hallsflooring.com NC - GREENSBORO Carpet One By Henry - 336.379.1018 carpetonebyhenry.com NC - WINSTON-SALEM Carpet One By Henry - 336.831.0530 carpetonebyhenry.com TN - NASHVILLE Myers Carpet - 615.777.3344 myerscarpet.com TX - HOUSTON Rug Mart - 713.784.0300 rugmarthouston.com VA - FAIRFAX Georgetown Carpet - 703.273.2500

INTRODUCING

BONAIRE & CURACAO

FROM THE STANTON SISAL COLLECTION

From top to bottom: Bonaire Summer with Golden Wheat Cotton Binding Curacao Putty with Oyster Linen Binding Bonaire Wheat with Cocoa Cotton Binding Curacao Honey with Persimmon Cotton Binding Bonaire Desert with Tanner Eastwood Binding

stantoncarpet.com | 866-311-1019


BR I L LIANCE

©2015 Swarovski Lighting, Ltd.

BY

H A N D

This tradition of excellence is continued with the ornate detail of Filigrae, shown above. SCHONBEK.COM

Filigrae FE7006-76A


GREAT GATHERINGS

First in Line

WITH ROOTS DOWN UNDER, ANNETTE ENGLISH KNOWS HOW TO PUSH THE NEW YEAR INTO ACTION WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY KRISSA ROSSBUND PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL GARLAND

B

y the time the crystal ball drops to announce the new year in the United States, the champagne bubbles and flicker of fireworks have dissipated in almost every other part of the world. But for designer Annette English, who hails from Australia but is now based in Los Angeles, living near the tail end of the International Date Line is no reason to make the party less special. On New Year’s Eve, her guests are treated to an elegant environment that takes a look at the recent past and toasts what’s to come.

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GREAT GATHERINGS

Silver Bells

Class of Brass

Casually Formal

A nod to the new year without overwhelming (and expected) confetti and noisemakers, silver bells with tags suggest a midnight ring. The placemat is made from Christopher Hyland’s “Hermes” fabric in Silver-Grey.

Topped with white taper candles and white roses, an assortment of mismatched brass candlesticks from Dish Wish (dishwishevents .com) casts a flickering glow down the center of the holiday table.

Napkins made from Christopher Hyland’s “Diapason” fabric are casually secured by a hammered TableArt napkin ring and rest on Kelly Wearstler’s gold-and-white “Hillcrest” plates and gold-rimmed charger for Pickard.

Cut Classics

Winter Whites

Cheese Whiz

Modern-day wine tasting oftentimes happens in crystal glasses without any decorative frills, but on New Year’s Eve when extra twinkle is required, stemware from Baccarat’s “Diamant” collection fills the bill.

As softly colored as snow, an arrangement of spider mums, hydrangeas, and anemones by The Enchanted Florist (theenchanted florist.org) dazzles in a ribbed container that was painted gold for the festive event.

An impressive wedge of creamy Roquefort enhances a fennel, orange, and grapefruit salad. Only blue cheese aged in limestone caverns in the French town of Roquefort can carry the title “King of Cheeses.”

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PHOTOGRAPHS: FOOD, PETER KRUMHARDT

The “Disc” chandelier by Property Furniture descends over the organic edge of the acacia-wood slab table by Dao Design and custom dining chairs with hair-onhide seats. The “Giacomo” buffet is from Scala Luxury, and the “Abo Savanne” silk rug is from Mansour Modern. Gold metal saucers and gold flatware are from TableArt. Gift boxes and paper are from Paper Source.


GREAT GATHERINGS

Get the Look

Menu

Napkin in gray, “Basketweave” napkin ring, and white/silver “Basketweave” placemat, all from Chilewich. “Opal” dinner plate and “Trellis Opal” salad and bread plates by Kim Seybert through DeVine Corporation.

Napkin in black, “Basketweave” napkin ring, black “Tuxedo Stripe” placemat and fringed “Imprint” placemat, all from Chilewich. “Swirl Gold” salad plate and “Hammersmith Gold” dinner plate, both from Mikasa.

“I grew up celebrating the new year in the middle of summer,” says Annette. “So the festivities were big and lasted for days near the water. New Year’s Eve is one of my favorite holidays and when I like to entertain friends with something that’s memorable.” Content to let her guests’ high spirits provide the spark for the party, she intentionally keeps her table subdued and without the usual novelties. A hushed scheme of gray and brown glows with luxurious gold accents. Decadent flavors fill the menu: bruschetta topped with goat cheese and cherries and sprinkled with thyme, a festive caviarlaced pasta with shrimp, Osso Buco, fennel and winter-citrus salad, and layers of white/ dark chocolate mousse with raspberries.

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Goat Cheese and Cherry Bruschetta

Creamy Angel Hair Pasta with Shrimp and Caviar

Osso Buco with White Wine and Port Sauce

Baby Greens with Fennel, Winter Citrus, and Roquefort

White and Dark Chocolate Mousse with Raspberries

Goat Cheese and Cherry Bruschetta This will quickly become one of your go-to party hors d’oeuvres; it comes together in minutes, deftly blends tangy and sweet flavors, and spans every season.

16 (½-inch-thick) diagonally cut French baguette slices 2 tablespoons olive oil Salt 4 ounces good-quality goat cheese (chèvre) 16 to 24 canned or frozen black sweet cherries, drained, rinsed, and halved; or pitted fresh cherries, halved 3 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves

Preheat large grill pan over medium-high heat. Brush bread slices with olive oil; sprinkle with salt. Grill bread, oil side down, 3 to 5 minutes or until grill marks form and edges are slightly charred. Transfer grilled bread to plate. Spread bread with goat cheese; top with 2 or 3 halved cherries. Drizzle with honey. Sprinkle with thyme leaves. Makes 8 servings. Recipes by Chef Mary Moran (marypaynemoran.com) TIP Glossy, golden-yellow star fruit makes a showy

garnish for a champagne toast. The “Diamant” cut crystal champagne flutes and “Harmonie” fluted crystal ice bucket are from Baccarat. Napkin in flax, “Basketweave” napkin ring in white, both from Chilewich. “Alligator” service plate, dinner plate, and rimmed soup plate and crystal-edged “Silk Collection” placemat in bronze, all from Prouna.

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November+December 2015

For more recipes and cooking tips, go to traditionalhome.com/NewYear

PHOTOGRAPHS: FOOD AND PLACE SETTINGS, PETER KRUMHARDT

We assembled variations on the table scheme to give you options that are equally stylish.


Whatever luxury means to you, you’ll find there are some incredible options to consider when it comes to planning a memorable break in Scotland. Whether it’s for a special occasion or simply to enjoy the country’s finer things, Scotland’s luxury offering is truly unparalleled - you are only limited by your imagination! Fill your days in Scotland with some of the more luxurious leisure activities, from a round of golf followed by a visit to a deluxe spa, to an afternoon of country sports on a Highland estate. Be swept away by Scotland’s beauty as you travel across the air on a hot air balloon, or keep your feet firmly on the ground as you hit the cities’ designer stores and fashionable boutiques. And when it comes to the end of the day, relaxing in front of an open fire with a warming dram is the perfect way to unwind.

visitscotland.com/luxury


Inverlochy Castle Hotel and Restaurant, Fort William

For those looking for a luxurious getaway, Scotland certainly delivers with its range of glamorous accommodation. Take your pick from opulent city centre hotels to historic castles and grand stately homes. Indulge in exquisite dining at a range of eateries, including the country’s 15 Michelin-star restaurants. You’ll find there are many incredible luxury foodie experiences that will excite your taste buds.

Explore the country’s independent fashion and accessory stores and treat yourself to truly stunning clothes from some of Scotland’s top designers. Find out how quality textiles such as tartan, tweed, wool and cashmere are handmade in Scotland.


DECORATING

Tartan, Tried and True

HOLIDAY DECORATING TIPS FROM DESIGNER SCOT MEACHAM WOOD WRITTEN BY JENNY BRADLEY PFEFFER PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN MERKL

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hough he’s a Southerner through and through, designer Scot Meacham Wood has a Scotsman’s love for all things plaid. It’s no wonder, then, that his new eponymous line of fabrics, furnishings, and accessories is chock-full of tartan treasures—from throw pillows to tufted sofas—each with a modern take on the classic pattern. This holiday season, the San Francisco-based designer gives us a peek inside his petite, plaid-clad home in the City by the Bay ➤

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Designer Scot Meacham Wood’s cozy living room pays homage to his love of all things tartan.


yourself

for


DECORATING

“I buy faux wreaths and weave fresh greenery into them. Here, I used fresh magnolia leaves with Douglas and Noble fir branches, oranges, pears, green apples, crabapples, and pinecones.”

Yin and Yang

Set a Foundation

Mix and Match

“Just ‘handsome’ can be overwhelming and just ‘elegant’ can feel museumlike and cold. Combining them—and balancing the masculine and the feminine—creates a beautifully designed space.”

“I collect china—like this blue-and-white Transferware from England—in the same way I buy clothes. I make sure I have all the basics covered and then have a great time buying accessories.”

“Add layers to your holiday table. This year, I used a vintage tartan shawl, charming Ralph Lauren salad plates, and antique stag-handled flatware from Asprey in London to dress the table.” ➤

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Y O U R H O M E S AY S A L O T A B O U T Y O U . W E ’ R E H E R E TO L I S T E N . Your home is a reflection of you. Ferguson’s product experts are here to listen to every detail of your vision, and we’ll work alongside you and your designer, builder or remodeler to bring it to life. Request a one-on-one consultation with us today.

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DECORATING

Find Balance “My true leaning at the holidays is ‘more is more,’ but I’m also an editor. Every room has one big, serious Christmas decorating moment supported by several small items. It’s all about balance.”

Surprise Guests “When you inject interiors with a bit of whimsy— those great moments of design surprise—it helps create an interesting conversation. Spaces then don’t feel overwrought, but attended to.”

“My love of tartan is a complicated onion to peel,” says Meacham Wood. “It has military connotations, but there is a lush, romantic part as well.” The designer’s new line is available at scotmeacham woodhome.com.

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No Chimney? No Problem! “When you don’t have a mantel, you have to improvise!” A bookcase—including one doubling as a bar (“a bar is all about options and access”)—is a great place to hang stockings. ➤


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DECORATING

and shares his tips on decking the halls, Meacham Wood-style. “I love using the house to create something new and different each Christmas,” the designer says. “This year, it’s all about my love for Edwardian style and my own Southern heritage. I ended up pulling many of my ideas from historical references from the South in the early 1800s and used simple, fresh greenery mixed with interesting woodsy details.” With visions of tartan dancing in his head, of course. And why not? “Tartan and Christmas go together like, well, like tartan and Christmas,” he says with a laugh.

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“I love to bring the holiday season into the more private parts of our house,” says Meacham Wood. “Sometimes just adding fresh wreaths in the windows can make all the difference in a room.”

Lighten Up

Reuse and Recycle

It’s in the Delivery

“Our bedroom is full of such dark, saturated colors. I thought the lemons would add an amazing accent color for the holidays. I love the contrast of the brown cloves on these citron-yellow lemons!”

“As I finish decorating the trees and garlands, I set aside the ‘debris’ to use for gift wrapping. Little leftover ornaments and sprigs of greenery are my favorite way to finish off wrapping presents.”

“Both God and the devil are in the details. It’s as easy as layering a small piece of greenery onto a dessert plate or adding a bit of ribbon to a serving piece. The key is to use one color for consistency.”

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This holiday season, give a gift of lasting change. Visit gifts.care.org


SHOWHOUSE TOUR

Sparkle and Shine

NEW YORK CITY’S HOLIDAY HOUSE EXCITES WITH CELEBRATORY INTERIORS WRITTEN BY CLARA HANEBERG

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER RYMWID

ant another reason to celebrate? Of course you do! Special occasions are the inspiration for designers’ rooms in the annual Holiday House Designer Showcase. Themes from Bastille Day to the Kentucky Derby—or even the entire winter season—are your ticket to enchantment. Plus, it’s all for a good cause: Proceeds benefit The Breast Cancer Research Foundation. Each year since 2008, this New York City mansion on 63rd Street between Fifth and Madison avenues has been transformed into an imaginative showhouse that pushes design boundaries. Here’s a look back at last year’s spaces to whet your palate for this year’s edition, open November 11 through December 2. ➤

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SHOWHOUSE TOUR Amy Lau (preceding page) Influenced by Baccarat’s extravagant cut crystal, Amy Lau designed a “gallery de glacé” showcasing the French company. Having just celebrated its 250th anniversary, Baccarat—which created that stunning chandelier above the table—was deserving of a fabulous dinner party. Along with the sparkly treelike centerpieces, stemware, candlesticks, and vases ornament the table set for 20. Even the chairs—designed by Philippe Starck for Baccarat—flaunt thick-cut crystals. Lau collaborated with Katie Bunting to create the custom cowhide rug.

Ally Coulter The existing wood-paneled walls and decorative barrel ceiling stimulated Ally Coulter’s Roman holiday-infused design. “Its Italian architecture reminded me of the great palazzos I’ve visited during my travels,” she explains. Antiques and large-scale art counter Fendi Casa’s modern furnishings—note the black silk sofa and set of three bronze-mirrored coffee tables. A rich palette teams with sumptuous textiles, including a fox-fur throw, to complete the opulent atmosphere.

Carleton Varney Dubbed “Deck the Front Hall,” Carleton Varney’s Christmas-theme entry is an ode to the late Dorothy Draper. A portrait of the iconic decorator—who threw the most lavish holiday parties—is perched on an easel behind Frontgate’s lipstick-red leather chairs. The “Fazenda Lilly” floral pillow fabric, mirrored chest, and white-fur throw all nod to Draper’s design aesthetic. To brighten the entrance, Varney employed a silver-and-gold palette for the ornaments and gift wrap. “I wanted to inject as much sparkle and light as possible,” he says. The artificial tree and pinecone-adorned garland wrapping the staircase railing are from Frontgate. ➤

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THE SUB-ZERO AND WOLF KITCHEN DESIGN CONTEST GLOBAL WINNER FOR TRADITIONAL KITCHEN DESIGN Seven internationally renowned designers and architects selected their picks for the most innovative and inspiring kitchens from nearly 1,700 submitted designs.

1ST Place Traditional Kitchen Award | Chelsea Townhouse DESIGNER: WILLIAM SUK WITH BRYAN EURE

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A building only 16 feet wide? That was only the most obvious challenge for William Suk and Brian Eure, as they began designing a kitchen for a 135-yearold townhouse in Manhattan’s vibrant Chelsea neighborhood. The kitchen project was part of an entire building renovation. The original kitchens in 1880s townhouses were dark spare rooms in the basement. Today people entertain and JVUNYLNH[LPU[OLRP[JOLUZV[OLÄYZ[[OPUN>PSSPHTHUK)YPHU did was move the kitchen up to the entry level of the home.

complements the honed Calcutta marble counters and pewter SPTLZ[VUL ÅVVYZ >P[O KPYLJ[ HJJLZZ [V [OL NHYKLU V\[ZPKL they planted herbs and boxwoods that might almost make you feel as if you’re in London’s Notting Hill. Sub-Zero and Wolf appliances made the renovation project LHZPLY·[OL`Ä[PU[VTHU`KPMMLYLU[HLZ[OL[PJZMYVT[YHKP[PVUHS to modern, and the millworkers like working with them. The refrigeration actually became part of the wainscoting of the kitchen. The house is six stories tall, and there are Sub-Zero HUK>VSMHWWSPHUJLZVUHSTVZ[L]LY`ÅVVYMYVTH>VSMNHZNYPSS in the garden to a wine fridge in the media room to a beverage center and ice maker on the parlor level.

The homeowners, avid entertainers, wanted a kitchen that would accommodate a large amount of prep space— modern in function yet nodding to the building’s rich past. Not surprisingly, they designed a galley-style layout to allow MYLLJPYJ\SH[PVU[OYV\NO[OLRP[JOLUHUKZ[PSSÄUKLUV\NOZWHJL for food prep and appliances. To keep the kitchen as classic ;OLOVTLV^ULYZ^LYL[OYPSSLK^P[O[OLÄUHSYLZ\S[^OPJO^VYRZ as possible, suitable to the historic nature of the house, they as well for everyday usage as it does for entertaining up to 80 used white paneled cabinetry and a warm gray island that people. It adds a fresh new chapter to the townhouse’s history.

See all 53 regional winning designs and find ideas for your dream kitchen at subzero-wolf.com/kitchens


SHOWHOUSE TOUR

Matthew Patrick Smyth To celebrate Traditional Home’s 25th and Schumacher’s 125th anniversaries, Matthew Patrick Smyth created a room encapsulating traditional design over the last 25 years using fabrics and trims from the firm’s latest collection. “Fine English furniture, a touch of midcentury modern, Swedish, AngloIndian, ’70s French, as well as new contemporary pieces were all included to show that classic, quality style never loses its visual value,” Smyth says. Schumacher’s beaded trim lining the silk draperies set the white, gray, and bottle-green color scheme in motion. A down sofa upholstered in a subtle herringbone anchors the sitting area. The midcentury wood chair by the fireplace is from the designer’s private collection. Michael Aram’s gold-plated bowl accents the Regency console. A bronze globe chandelier caps the elegant assembly.

study isn’t your typical equestrian room. “I went against the men’s-club look, taking traditions and elements from the day and deconstructing them,” Hamilton says. Fuchsia satin armchairs and diamond-quilted padding on the daybed and chimney breast are reminiscent of jockey silks, while drapery pelmets with oval cutouts mimic the shape of a racetrack. For Southern charm, plantation shutters were placed in front of the bookcases flanking the fireplace. Note the lamps with stirrup bases and the feathered ceiling pendant resembling a Derby Day hat. ➤

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Watch a video showing more of these spaces at traditionalhome.com/HolidayHouse

PHOTOGRAPH: SMYTH INTERIOR, JOHN GRUEN

Patrick J. Hamilton This Kentucky Derby-inspired


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Noelia Ibáñez Channeling a snowy afternoon in Central Park and her “fascination with light and spirituality,” Noelia Ibáñez from ByNoelia converted the walk-in closet into a cosmic kitchenette. The ceiling’s digitally printed wallcovering and polishednickel pendant bring the winter solstice premise to life. A metallic backsplash and a 3D relief composed of silver tile amp up the shine. Chrome modular tables and an acrylic chair swathed in a Fendi Casa fur throw sit pretty atop a shaggy sheepskin rug. The stainless steel appliances are by Gaggenau.

Kara Mann Luxurious materials—including leather, fur, and touches of gold—mingle happily in Kara Mann’s moody living room. “I wanted to home in on that feminine-yet-gritty feel,” the designer explains. Reminiscent of snowfall at dusk, smoky-gray walls highlight the shimmery drapery fabric and metallic threads in the rug. Prioritizing comfort, Mann reupholstered the pair of antique Victorian chairs in handmade bouclé. A minimal ceiling light casts brilliant shadows while lilac-marble coffee tables with multiple legs add whimsy.

Lillian August The library’s dark paneling prompted Richard Cerrone, Rhonda Eleish, and Lisa Hyman to dress the space in a light palette of winter whites layered with lush textiles, greenery, and gold accents, evoking a lavish holiday aura. Linen sofas with nailhead detail by Lillian August for Hickory White flank an acrylic-and-brass coffee table. A lamp from Baccarat accessorizes the bar, embellished with a tufted-leather panel. Willem de Kooning art and the bookshelf’s decorative objects lend a collected feel. The 1960s Murano glass chandelier is captivating. ➤ 72 Th

November+December 2015


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SHOWHOUSE TOUR Gary McBournie Don a caftan and grab a cocktail! This tropical sitting room transports guests to an early-1960s Caribbean resort with its enchanting tent fashioned from McBournie’s own striped fabric. “My goal was to convey a timeless sense of tropical glamour,” he says. Bamboo blinds, jute carpet, a teak credenza, and distressed-wood chairs incorporate texture and enhance the relaxed atmosphere. Facing sofas encourage conversation while a lighted cocktail table adds a modern twist. Coral accents, floral pillows, and a brass fish sculpture reiterate the beach vibe. The sun ornament on the far wall is the designer’s favorite.

Michael Tavano Using furniture from Roche Bobois, Michael Tavano designed a vibrant pied-à-terre based on Bastille Day. Employing France’s national colors, the designer juxtaposed the red Lucite ceiling with Roche Bobois’s textured blue rug. The salon-style window treatment wrapping the room was influenced by rope dresses from the French fashion house Balmain. To create the cascading centerpiece overhead, Tavano linked together three different sizes of the same pendant. A portrait fabricated from wire mesh embellishes the far wall.

2015 Holiday House Traditional Home is proud to again support Manhattan’s premier designer showhouse to benefit The Breast Cancer Research Foundation. This year’s Holiday House is open November 11–December 2, and is located at 2 East 63rd Street. Visit holidayhousenyc.com for details on tickets and events.

Special thanks to the designers and artisans who participated in the 2014 showhouse—their beautiful rooms made it a success: Ally Coulter, Amy Lau, Noelia Ibáñez from ByNoelia, Caleb Anderson, Carleton Varney, Guillaume Gentet, Dineen Architecture + Design, Gary McBournie, Iris Dankner, Justin Shaulis, Kapito Muller, Kara Mann, Laura Krey, Lillian August, Linherr Hollingsworth, Louis Navarrete, Matthew Patrick Smyth, Michael Tavano, Natalie Kraiem, Pamela Banker Assoc., Patrick James Hamilton, Rachel Laxer, and Taylor Hannah Architects. For information on items in these showhouse rooms, see sources on page 136

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Louis Navarrete Emulating the theatricality of Mischief Night, this magical escape is ideal for catnaps and conversation. “I wanted the room to feel like a cabinet of curiosities,” Navarrete says. Farrow & Ball’s “Drawing Room Blue” drenches the walls in color, while luscious blue velvet on the sofa and intricate embroidery on the canopy acknowledge the holiday’s elaborate costumes. A shipwreck-inspired chandelier by Warren Muller is suspended above the octagonal regency table.

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PHOTOGRAPH: MCBOURNIE INTERIOR, PETER J KUBILUS

Sincere Thanks Our gratitude to Baccarat, Farrow & Ball, Lillian August, Michael Aram, Michael C. Fina, Roche Bobois, 1stdibs, Frontgate, Gaggenau, Savant, Badilla Painters, Robert Allen, and Fendi Casa for their sponsorship of the 2014 Holiday House.


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TODAY THERE ARE 79 LIVING RECIPIENTS OF THE

MEDAL OF HONOR LEO K. THORSNESS, MAJOR US AIR FORCE On April 19, 1967, Thorsness was flying his F-105 “Wild Weasel” on a mission deep in North Vietnam. He and his wingman destroyed several surface-to-air missile (SAM) sites, when his wingman was hit by intense antiaircraft fire. The pilot and his backseater were forced to eject from their damaged plane. While circling above them, Thorsness saw an enemy MiG-17 fighter setting up a gunnery pass on the downed airmen’s parachutes. Although the Weasel was not designed for dogfights, Thorsness attacked the MiG and destroyed it with bursts from his gatling gun. He continued fighting off other MiGs to protect the downed Americans, flying through a barrage of North Vietnamese SAMs to engage four more MiGs, hitting one and driving the remaining enemy planes away. Dangerously low on fuel, Thorsness was able to return to base that day, but just two weeks later he was shot down over North Vietnam and became a prisoner of war in the “Hanoi Hilton.” He endured years of torture. When the war ended, Thorsness was finally released and sent back to America. And on October 15, 1973 President Richard Nixon presented him with the Medal of Honor saying “We’ve been waiting for you for six years. Welcome home.” Sharing his commitment to “Do what’s right – help others,” Thorsness began speaking on his personal mantra in 2002 and inspiring others through his story of selfless sacrifice. Thorsness’ story exemplifies the courage and humility of the Medal of Honor Recipients. They are true heroes.

Congressional Medal of Honor Society www.cmohs.org

Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation www.cmohfoundation.org

GW New York MOHF Co-op Program www.gwnewyork.com/moh


Photo courtesy of Nick Del Calzo from the book “Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond The Call of Duty.” (2011)

Congressional Medal of Honor Society www.cmohs.org

Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation www.cmohfoundation.org

GW New York MOHF Co-op Program www.gwnewyork.com/moh


Congressional Medal of Honor Society www.cmohs.org

Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation www.cmohfoundation.org

GW New York MOHF Co-op Program www.gwnewyork.com/moh


MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENTS ESTABLISHED A FOUNDATION WITH A UNIQUE MISSION The Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation was chartered by Recipients in 1999. The Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to perpetuating the Medal of Honor’s legacy through awareness, outreach, and education. The Foundation strives through its programs and initiatives, and the personal contributions of the Recipients in communities across America, to promote the behaviors and values shared by servicemen and Recipients. Today the number of living Medal of Honor Recipients is at its lowest point in history. And the Foundation faces a tough challenge, maintaining a heritage that is quickly vanishing. While each of the Recipients is quick to point out that, since the Medal can only be received for war-time heroism, they hope that there will be no new Recipients, we as Americans are rapidly losing some of our greatest heroes and role models. The New York Times bestseller, “Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond The Call of Duty” (2011), captures many stories of the Recipients. And living history videos can be found on the Foundation website. The Foundation is dedicated to preserving their memory and inspiring generations of Americans young and old. But more must be done.

Congressional Medal of Honor Society www.cmohs.org

Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation www.cmohfoundation.org

GW New York MOHF Co-op Program www.gwnewyork.com/moh


RECIPIENTS ENGAGE COMMUNITIES & EDUCATE THE YOUTH OF AMERICA They do so through speaking in public and at private events, teaching in our schools, and recognizing fellow Americans (not in military service) who emulate the values they so strongly believe in with a citizen medal -- recognizing them for their personal acts of heroism and selfless sacrifice. Thorsness and his fellow Recipients believe that the mark of a true hero is to have the moral courage to do what needs to be done because it is the right thing to do. They believe that every person can change fate by acting on their convictions with selflessness and courage. It is the mission of the Foundation to spread this message. The Character Development Program was initiated by Medal of Honor Recipients specifically to take their message to the schools. This unique curriculum is available free from the Foundation. The Foundation’s new book, “Choosing Courage: Inspiring Stories of What It Means To Be a Hero” (2015), tells Recipient’s stories for children 10+. The Citizen Honors Program is managed by the Foundation and receives nominations from across the country regarding acts of heroism. Medal of Honor Recipients consider all those who are nominated and ultimately select the few most deserving to bestow upon them the Citizen Honors Medal.

Congressional Medal of Honor Society www.cmohs.org

Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation www.cmohfoundation.org

GW New York MOHF Co-op Program www.gwnewyork.com/moh


Congressional Medal of Honor Society www.cmohs.org

Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation www.cmohfoundation.org

GW New York MOHF Co-op Program www.gwnewyork.com/moh


THE MEDAL OF HONOR Created during the American Civil War and signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln, the Medal of Honor is bestowed on those in military service who display valor above and beyond the call of duty. Since the medal was created, there have been fewer than 3,500 Recipients.


OUR TRUE HEROES NEED HELP TO SPREAD THEIR MESSAGE The Medal of Honor Foundation strives to reach the American public. Too many are unaware of the Medal of Honor and the values it really stands for; courage & sacrifice, commitment & integrity, and citizenship & patriotism. Help is needed to increase their reach, so Recipients can touch more Americans and inspire the kind of selfless courageous acts that average people can take part in every day when extraordinary circumstances call for action. Individuals can change fate. They can change America and change the world for the better. It’s a powerful message and one that deserves our support. To find out more about how your organization can become a corporate sponsor of the Medal of Honor Co-op program contact: MOHF Co-op Program Officer moh@gwnewyork.com +1-212.335.0362 For more information on supporting The Medal of Honor Foundation contact: CMOHF cmohf@cmohfoundation.org +1-703.469.1861

“Any nation that does not honor its heroes will not long endure.” - Abraham Lincoln

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CLASSIC WOMAN AWARDS

W R I T T E N BY S A L LY F I N D E R W E E P I E P H O T O G R A P H Y BY KAT H RY N G A M B L E

Life-changing. That sums up the recipients of our 11th annual Classic Woman Awards. Each was confronted with someone else’s need, and each decided to commit a huge piece of her own life to fill it. Meet these incredible women who are giving it their all—hope to cancer patients, meaningful employment opportunities to people with disabilities, and a chance at a better future to kids in their neighborhood and on the other side of the world. Lenox’s “Pearl Beads” commemorative plate; wallpaper: Kravet’s W3136-30 from the Joseph Abboud collection

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VALERIE JENSEN PROSPECTOR THEATER

Kravet’s “Gentil” armchair in “Lux Lizard Anthracite”; wallpaper: W3078-11

VALERIE JENSEN Prospector Theater (prospectortheater.org) Ridgefield, Connecticut Sometimes life gives you flying monkeys. But you don’t have to let them knock you off your yellow brick road. Valerie Jensen had her share of can-I-just-hide-under-the-bed encounters before she was even Dorothy’s age. The first came right after the birth of her younger sister Hope in 1979. “Because Hope has Down syndrome, the doctors told my parents to leave her at the hospital,” Valerie says. “My parents said absolutely not.” They made Hope a part of the family from Day One. The rest of society, however, did not. “I was very bitter toward everyone who excluded people with disabilities,” Valerie says. “I felt fire when people used the word retard.” She didn’t just sit around and smolder, though. First, Valerie took the helm at Sphere, a Ridgefield, Connecticut, nonprofit that provides opportunity for disabled people, especially through the performing arts. It helped. But not enough. “They needed more challenge,” Valerie says. “What they really needed was full-time employment.” The problem, though, is this: Employers aren’t clamoring to hire the disabled. More than 68 percent of people without disabilities participate in the labor force, compared with 17 percent of people with disabilities. “I knew there needed to be a business with a wide range of job types for all abilities,” Valerie says. The solution to providing those jobs came one day as she was stopped at a red light in the heart of historic Ridgefield. She glanced at the town’s former movie theater, which was about to be torn

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MAIMAH KARMO TIGERLILY FOUNDATION

Kravet’s “Etude” chair in “Watermill Lemon”; wallpaper: W3272-2

down. “Lightning struck,” she says. “There it is. The answer.” Valerie set about raising the nearly $30 million needed to refurbish the old building and turn it into a state-of-the-art movie house, the Prospector Theater, a nonprofit that would provide educational and employment opportunities for adults with disabilities. “It so needed to get built that it was almost like it built itself,” Valerie says. Donors stepped up to pay for the building. Job applications poured in. And on opening night, in November 2014, Valerie and the gang rolled out the pink carpet (it’s her “passion color”—thus the pink hair), ushers put on their pink top hats, and the show was on. “People were amazed,” Valerie says. “They’re saying, ‘The door was opened for me. Someone greeted me.’” And even better than the star treatment, Valerie says, those audience members interacted with people with disabilities—“people who are usually invisible, people who are usually excluded from the workforce.” And those people shattered expectations. “I heard audience members saying, ‘I never thought this person could do this,’” Valerie says. “Family members were in tears. All at once someone believed in the person they love.” The really amazing thing is this now happens every day at the Prospector. It’s kind of like Valerie’s favorite movie, The Wizard of Oz. “I love the idea of people watching the movie back in 1939 and seeing the screen come alive in Technicolor,” she says. “My hope is that when people walk into the Prospector Theater today, they have the same experience when they see our integrated workforce. Seeing them and the theater flourish is more than I ever dreamed—it’s magical.”


CLASSIC WOMAN AWARDS to help them. In 2007, her grassroots efforts grew into the Tigerlily Foundation, named after a flower that loses its petals then blooms again. The nonprofit, which now boasts 300 volunteers, educates young women around the world about breast health, supports them through treatment and recovery, and empowers them to be their own best advocates. Learning programs include peer education, live Twitter chats moderated by the Tigerlily Foundation, webinars where doctors and survivors can connect, and Pink Power Alerts—weekly texts that provide information on healthy living. The foundation also works with health care providers to help them incorporate information about young women’s breast health into their practices. Support efforts include Hope Bags for young women diagnosed with breast cancer and financial assistance to patients and their families. Additionally, empowerment programs promote fitness and help young survivors navigate life after breast cancer. Maimah is a tireless advocate, taking on various speaking engagements and lobbying on Capitol Hill for women’s health initiatives. “I love supporting these women,” she says. “The experience of breast cancer taught me to be a fearless warrior. It gave me the gift of my ‘soul purpose.’ I now appreciate every moment of life.”

JANE NEWMAN The Thorn Tree Project (thorntreeproject.com) Warwick, New York JANE NEWMAN THE THORN TREE PROJECT

Kravet’s “Victor” chair in 33150-1611 from the Echo Heirloom India collection; wallpaper: W3136-30 from the Joseph Abboud collection

MAIMAH KARMO Tigerlily Foundation (tigerlilyfoundation.org) Reston, Virginia The day she found a lump in her breast, Maimah Karmo says, “I felt the world turn a couple of shades darker. I thought, Are you kidding me?” She was only 31. After fleeing war-torn Liberia at age 15 with just a suitcase, Maimah had just reached solid ground—she had a good job, some money, a house. But now this. She went to one doctor, then others. “They said I was too young to have breast cancer,” Maimah says. “I knew they were wrong. I knew my body didn’t feel right.” When a biopsy was finally done, the news was grim: Maimah did have breast cancer—and it was aggressive. She went through surgery, chemotherapy, radiation. “I watched everything I had built over the past 16 years fall apart,” she says. “I lost faith in God. I lost faith in everything.” For three months, she became more and more depressed, tired, and hopeless. “One day I fell to my knees in the shower. I was bald, skinny, exhausted from the treatment. I just cried and cried and cried,” Maimah says. “That night, I said to God: Why is this happening? Please show yourself to me.” The next morning she felt a new sense of purpose—to make people realize that women under age 40 can get breast cancer, and to help young women going through that ordeal. She began telling her story, reaching out to other cancer patients, and raising money

Standing alongside a broken-down Land Rover in the bush of Kenya, Jane Newman felt fear creeping up her spine. It was 1999, and Jane was a New York advertising executive who had come to Africa on a lark. She was riding with a friend who was temporarily working in Nairobi and wanted to get his car to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. “We were not supposed to be out there—we were told it was too dangerous,” Jane says. “The road was unbelievably bad. We hadn’t seen anyone for two hours. Then an entire wheel comes off the Land Rover. We’re stranded out in the bush. I thought, This is it.” Instead of being the end, though, it turned out to be the beginning—of an amazing global friendship. “Two kids walk up to us, then a mother, then more kids, and finally an elder,” Jane says. “They didn’t speak English, but we figured out that they were telling us that we were only one kilometer from their village. So we limped on in.” Later, Jane’s friend was able to hitch a ride on a passing truck to get parts while she waited in the village. “I was queen for a day—actually for the two days until the Land Rover was fixed,” Jane says. She was so touched by the Samburu people’s kindness that when she retired and planned a trip to Africa in 2001, she decided to visit them again. As her stay stretched to four weeks, she learned how the nomadic Samburu lifestyle and poverty prevented most kids from attending school. “Their one wish was that more children get an education,” Jane says. “So I thought I’d help.” She and some friends pooled their cash, and in 2002, the first “mobile preschool” class was held under an acacia tree—and The Thorn Tree Project was born. Previously, there were no preschools for nomadic children. Today there are 15 preschools that move with the Samburu people. Then, there were only 130 children attending grade school. Now there are 1,500. Then, no one graduated from high school, technical school, or college. Now 160 students are in the Thorn Tree scholarship program, and 32 students who were the charity’s first kindergartners have earned degrees. Some are getting jobs and sending money home. Others have returned to work as nurses and teachers.


CLASSIC WOMAN AWARDS

MARY K. HOODHOOD KIDS’ FOOD BASKET

MICHELE STUMPE CHILDREN OF CONSERVATION

Wallpaper: Kravet’s W3136-30 from the Joseph Abboud collection

Kravet’s “Cristina” chair in “Versailles-E25604”; wallpaper: W3270-5 from the Echo Heirloom collection

“The community is delighted. It’s been so successful,” Jane says. “But it’s a huge responsibility. We’re doing something that affects their culture. We have to get it right.” That means Jane, whose plan for retirement had been “Do nothing the rest of my life,” is working seven days a week for the charity, half the time in New York and half in Kenya. She’s OK with that, though. “We’re talking about people’s lives,” she says. “The children are adorable and want to learn. I love them so much.”

They did, and during Thanksgiving week of 2001, Mary K. and her little band of quickly recruited volunteers sent 125 kids at Straight Elementary home with food for supper. “By the end of the year, we were feeding 180 kids,” Mary K. says. She left the soup kitchen to devote all her time to growing the sack supper program. Grow it she did. Kids’ Food Basket, the state’s largest childhood anti-hunger program, now provides an evening meal to 7,000 kids from more than 35 schools in Grand Rapids, Muskegon, and Holland, Michigan. Since its inception, about one million sack suppers have been served. “So my lesson is don’t ever take no for an answer when it can make a difference in someone’s life,” Mary K. says. It’s hard to say no to Mary K. This dynamo has been all about helping others since she was a kid. Her first good deed was going with her dad to deliver sleds to girls at a reformatory at Christmastime. As an adult, she spent more than 20 years with God’s Kitchen. And since 1980, she has done it all from a wheelchair. Mary K. sustained neck and spinal cord injuries in a car crash that left her a quadriplegic at age 27. “After I was injured, I had a lot of time to think,” she says. “I decided that I would not let my disability deter me or define me.” A month after she was released from the hospital, she was volunteering—and convincing others to help too. She’s recruited an army of volunteers—250 community members give of their time each day to raise funds, pack meals, and deliver suppers to pickup points. “The thing that makes me most proud is that 33 percent of the work is done by people under the age of 18. And 78 percent of ➤

MARY K. HOODHOOD Kids’ Food Basket (kidsfoodbasket.org) Grand Rapids, Michigan When a little girl from your neighborhood school is found digging through the garbage for food to take home for supper, the problem of childhood hunger in America gets real—really fast. “I had to do something,” Mary K. Hoodhood says. She met with the principal at the Grand Rapids, Michigan, elementary school—and got some more bad news: Melony, the girl digging in the trash, wasn’t alone. Dozens of her schoolmates also could not count on having an evening meal. Mary K. immediately went to the head of the local soup kitchen where she worked and pitched a plan for a kids’ sack supper program. “They said no. There was no money. They couldn’t support it,” Mary K. says. “But I couldn’t sleep thinking about those hungry kids.” She went back the next day. “Just let me try it,” she insisted. “I know I can raise the money.”

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CLASSIC WOMAN AWARDS kids at the schools we serve have had a chance to volunteer,” she says. “They’re helping themselves and their community.” They’re also following the example of a leader who isn’t about to just lament the world’s problems. “This isn’t rocket science,” Mary K. says. “We can talk about the problem of childhood hunger or we can make a sandwich and feed a kid.”

MICHELE STUMPE Children of Conservation (childrenofconservation.org) Atlanta, Georgia Changing the world is hard. And that used to be really frustrating for Michele Stumpe. “I didn’t have a ton of money. I had a career. I had a family. I had all these obligations that I couldn’t walk away from,” Michele says. “I felt helpless.” Then she got a change in perspective, courtesy of Dad. “He told me, ‘Honey, quit hoping to change the world and focus on changing one person’s life,’” Michele says. “Maybe I was only throwing one pebble, but the ripple effect from that pebble can create a tidal wave of impact.” Michele’s tsunami of change is a charity she founded in 2009 called Children of Conservation, which both educates African children and helps wildlife. Animals have always been her soft spot. An opportunity to help at the zoo first drew her to volunteer work when she was just 13. As she gave of her time, she also gave her heart—to the great apes. Through the years, that love hasn’t waned. Michele and husband Kerry spent their honeymoon volunteering at a wildlife sanctuary in Cameroon, a trip they repeated again and again. “At first it was all about the animals,” Michele says. “Then we got to know the workers at the sanctuary. We wondered why their kids weren’t in school. We learned that there’s no public education. It would take a year’s salary for a sanctuary worker to send a child to private school—$300 to $500. They couldn’t afford it. But Kerry and I could.” The Stumpes paid for three kids to go to school that year. Now, through Children of Conservation, about 120 kids in five African countries are going to school. All of them will have their education paid for through high school and college as long as they continue to get good grades and their parents continue to work for wildlife. “The kids are my heroes,” Michele says. “Kids like Michael Tangue, who was part of the first group we sent to school. He was just a little boy who volunteered at the sanctuary; now he’s at university studying accounting and is in the top 10 percent of his class.” Children of Conservation is so important to Michael that he traveled four hours to be at the sanctuary for the scholarship announcements this year. “He gave a speech to the kids about responsibility,” Michele says. “About how people on the other side of the world who don’t know them believe in them, and how they have an obligation to study and an obligation to promote the value of conservation.” Working with animals, you see, used to be looked down on in Cameroon. “Cleaning up gorilla poop was not considered a noble profession,” Michele says. “But now they see kids going to school because their fathers are animal keepers. And no one goes to school unless their father has a noble profession. We’re changing the social norms in regard to conservation.” By helping animals, Michele is also helping people. “It’s so empowering,” she says. “All I’ve done is paid $300 for this kid to go to school, but his life is changed, his parents’ lives are changed, the whole village is changed. And this is pretty doable for almost anyone, no matter how busy they are. We all can make an impact. We all can change one person’s world.”

With heartfelt thanks to sponsors Kravet, Lenox, and Simon Pearce, whose support makes our Classic Woman Awards possible. For more information, visit traditionalhome .com/Classic Woman2015

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WRITTEN BY AMY ELBERT

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN BESSLER

PRODUCED BY KARIN LIDBECK-BRENT

A FLURRY OF COOKIE BAKING WARMS UP


sugar and spritz

A SCANDINAVIAN-FLAVORED CHRISTMAS

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Family room An eyebrow-arch bay window adds “a little bit of whimsy,” says

homeowner and architectural designer Cliff Deetjen. Pine board walls and ceilings, built-in shelves, and a loft space contribute to the casual farmhouse feel. “We knew the kids would grow up in the family room, and that holidays would be spent there,” Cliff says. Doors on each side of the fireplace connect to a home office. Decorations include cookies made with a vintage wood press. Preceding pages A board-and-batten family room addition steps forward from the original stone cottage. Cliff and Kim Deetjen and sons Ben (front) and Alex are avid skiers. The family dog, Liefke, is a Stabyhoun.


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im and Cliff Deetjen’s romance was just blossoming when a quick detour foreshadowed their life together. “We were driving to Boston on I-93, and Kim made me stop so she could run out and grab some winterberries growing in the median,” Cliff says. “I knew right then what I was in for.” Cliff didn’t object too strenuously, however. He’s an architectural designer and Kim is an interior designer, and they both have an eye for nature’s artwork and—it turned out—also share a love for the holidays. Now married 22 years, Kim and Cliff still search the roadsides for wild berries and branches to decorate their South Burlington, Vermont, home—especially for Christmas. And their two sons, Alex, 16, and Ben, 13, often get recruited for the hunt too. Collecting greens and berries is just a small part of the Deetjens’ holiday celebrations, which kick off in earnest on Thanksgiving weekend. The whole clan, including visiting relatives, drives to a tree farm in Middlebury, Vermont, to choose a Scotch pine, a tree admired for its needle retention. That’s followed a few days later by a local outing to buy a fir tree to grace the family room. (“As big as we can find,” says Cliff.) “We get the trees early because we love

Christmas so much,” he adds. Echoing that sentiment, Kim adds, “We’ve been known to leave our trees up till February because it breaks our hearts to take them down.” The Scotch pine goes in the living room of their 1940s stone cottage and is decorated with glass balls and other special keepsakes. “It’s more formal and doesn’t have the boys’ handmade ornaments,” Kim explains. Those kid-crafted decorations (“Every ornament the boys have made since kindergarten,” says Kim) cover the family room tree. Kim is of Swedish descent and Cliff’s heritage is Norwegian, so a Scandinavian-inspired red-and-white palette dominates the holiday scheme. Foot-tall white and silver snowflakes and clusters of red poinsettia blooms (kept fresh in florist water vials) poke from branches, balancing the size of the tree and bringing cohesiveness to its decor. Heart-shape cookies Kim makes using a vintage wooden cookie press from Switzerland add Old World charm. Cliff designed the 850-square-foot family room (with input from Kim and the boys) knowing it would be “holiday central.” He even created a special stage for the Christmas tree—a large bay with an eyebrow arch window. “That window faces our view west to Lake Champlain and the Adirondacks beyond,” he says. “The afternoon and evening light is just phenomenal.” November+December 2015 T

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The view looking in from the road is just as magical. The arch is repeated on the board-and-batten exterior, gently crowning the twinkling tree inside. Snow—a given in northern Vermont—clings to the copper roofline and caps the hedges across the front yard. The family room features a cozy, carpeted loft (accessed by a ladder) above the fireplace, where Alex and Ben would set up their electric trains and hone their Lego building skills. “Now that the boys are older, it’s pretty much a Lego museum,” Kim says. “We knew the family room would be a place where the boys would grow up,” Cliff says of the 2005 addition. “We really wanted it to be a room where we could all be together.” The television is in a cabinet near the fireplace, built-in desks for the boys are across the room, and Kim and Cliff share an office space under the loft. More holiday traditions play out in the Deetjens’ large kitchen— another room renovated with holiday activities in mind. Shortly after Thanksgiving, Kim stirs up multiple batches of butter-rich dough for spritz and Scandinavian rolled sugar cookies using her Swedish grandmother’s recipes. The dough is refrigerated until close to Christmas when Kim and a Swiss-born girlfriend, as well as both women’s sons, gather around the Deetjens’ huge island for a cookie-baking marathon. “She brings her traditional Swiss recipes and I do my Swedish


Kitchen Enlarging the kitchen allowed for more natural light and created sight lines through the house. A back entry with stone floor connects with a food pantry with a frosted glass door labeled “feed” and a mudroom labeled “tack.” The cowhide chairs in the foreground were imported from Switzerland. Back entry The Deetjens collected stones from the Lake Champlain area and had them installed as a floor. The table is a repurposed exterior balcony railing topped with a stone slab. Kitchen sitting area Kim lights candles on a tabletop tree. Staircase Fish-inspired balusters adorn the staircase to a new master suite.

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Dining room The doorway between the kitchen and dining room was widened to better connect the rooms. The dining room walls are finished with a navy-tinted Venetian plaster. Master suite A custom pencil-post bed from Cloude Quenneville faces a barn-style sliding door and a tulip-motif wall light from Sweden. Bedside “Boston Swing Arm” sconces are from Circa.


cookies,” Kim says. “The boys definitely participate.” Not that they mind, she adds. “They ask why we don’t make them year-round.” Once cookies are baked and eggnog whipped up, the Deetjens and friends gather for a tree-lighting ceremony in the European tradition. Candles clipped to a freshly cut tabletop tree sitting near the kitchen island are lighted, and everyone toasts the holidays. Kim’s annual baking sessions were a big reason the Deetjens designed a 15-foot island when they renovated and allowed plenty of space for people to gather. “We knew we needed a huge island and two ovens so we would be able to do our cookie thing,” Kim says. Daily life revolves around the island too. “While I’m cooking, my husband, who is an avid fly fisherman, is tying flies at the island,” she explains. “And I might have design plans from work spread out on the other end of the counter. Plus the kids are doing their work. That was the intent—to have a place where we could all gather and be able to work on whatever we have going.” The island is topped with honed Danby marble from Vermont. “It’s one of the hardest marbles in the world and is the choice of most chefs,” says Kim, who often uses Danby for her professional restaurant and hotel projects. Perimeter counters are topped with Vermont soapstone. “We tried to source materials locally as much as possible,” Cliff says. That includes stones used for the back entry floor, which

the Deetjens and their friends collected over the years from the Lake Champlain area. “Cliff sent me a heart-shape stone when we were dating, and that’s incorporated into the floor,” Kim says. “The stones have some dimension to them but they’ve been worn smooth by the water. They’re wonderfully therapeutic to walk on.” Walls in the kitchen addition are white-painted horizontal shiplap boards, and floors are white oak, giving the room an inviting Scandinavian farmhouse feel. Cliff designed whimsical fish-motif balusters for the staircase that leads from the kitchen to the new master suite. His first templates looked a bit too much like trout, he admits, so it was back to the drawing board. “He’s a fisherman, so his mind was on trout, but mine was on my heritage,” Kim says. “I wanted to emulate what you might see on a chalet in the mountains.” Scandinavian charm flows upstairs where a sliding barn-style door opens to the gabled master suite with slanted ceilings and a cozy window seat. “We’re in the profession, so we see a lot of things, but we didn’t want to do what we do every day for other people,” Kim says. “We wanted to do things differently. We wanted everything to have meaning to us.”

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Architectural designer: Cliff Deetjen Interior designer: Kim Deetjen For more information, see sources on page 136

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WRITTEN BY KRISSA ROSSBUND PHOTOGRAPHY BY GORDON BEALL PRODUCED BY EILEEN A . DEYMIER

Chart-Topping Chrıstmas


IN A VIRGINIA HOME, A FRESH, YOUTHFUL PALETTE IS MUSIC TO THE EYES

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tephanie Stack’s vocal cords are warmed up, and she is ready to let loose with all her favorite Christmas carols. After five years of working in TV news as a producer, her professional life changed when she embarked on a second career in music as a vocalist and songwriter, recording tracks titled “Crazy Love” and “What I’d Rather Do” that reached No. 34 and No. 57, respectively, on the adult contemporary and pop charts. When the holidays draw near, Stephanie aims to hit the high notes of Yuletide decorating, creating a scheme that is a memorable backdrop for the Christmas activities she shares with her husband, Larry, and their sons, Leighton, 12, and Everett, 8, in their Alexandria, Virginia, home. “We always dreamed of a home like this, and Christmas allows us to celebrate its grandeur,” Stephanie says of the 1936 Charleston-style house in Alexandria’s Belle Haven enclave. (She and Larry bought the

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home from Marvin and Margaret Bush, President George H.W. Bush’s son and daughter-in-law.) “I love watching our boys tiptoe down the stairs Christmas morning to see what’s waiting for them.” The interiors of the previous owners already sang a traditional and attractive tune, but Stephanie wanted a remake that reflected the exuberant voices of her young children. Interior designer Kelley Living room to foyer and dining room Designer Kelley Proxmire used a light palette of green, blue, and yellow to create a color flow throughout the open layout. Light blue ceilings create additional visual continuity. The foyer features a new trellis-pattern wallpaper. Veranda One of the features that drew the Stacks to the 1936 house was the veranda. Adorned with festive greenery and a decorated Christmas tree, it beckons guests indoors for lively holiday gatherings. Family Stephanie Stack with sons Leighton (left) and Everett. Preceding pages The dining room is formal with a chandelier of crystal horseshoes dangling above the table, but the chairs from Hickory Chair are covered in practical, easy-wipe leather.


Proxmire composed the visual melody. Known for her keen understanding of color—and for using it boldly—Proxmire splashed the Stacks’ interiors with an invigorating and youthful scheme of apple green, pool blue, and sunny yellow that, truth be told, appears to herald spring more than winter. But the light palette embraces the elegance of Christmas, casting extra sparkle on everything shiny, and contrasting dark greenery with brightness. “The starting point was a diamond-pattern fabric that Stephanie and Larry loved,” Proxmire says of the blue-and-green geometric textile used on a wing chair in the living room. “I pulled the palette from that fabric, and added brown to the mix.” The holiday decoration is established on the expansive front entry veranda, where the railings are draped with evergreen and magnolia swags embellished with gold bows. A simple boxwood wreath adorns the original entry door. The focal point is a massive

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Christmas tree at the far end of the veranda that reaches nearly to the ceiling and is grounded with a ruffled burlap skirt. Energized by a vibrant new color, the dining room shows off its glossy white architectural details with a perky green that bathes the striéd walls and covers the dining chairs. During the holidays, the stimulating hue contrasts the darker holiday greenery used in wreaths that hang in the windows as well as the floral arrangements displayed as a swag and in urns on the fireplace mantel. Living room The neutral living room bursts with pops of bright color. A

Greek-key border edges apple-green silk drapery panels. A blue-and-white fabric with ribbon embellishment dresses the ottoman and a pair of throw pillows on the white sofa. Foyer Piped in blue, a lettuce-green settee sits against the Manuel Canovas trellis wallpaper. Sunroom A pair of mismatched chairs—one a stately armchair upholstered in tree-patterned linen from Schumacher and the other a wooden wing chair with a brown linen cushion—flank a nailhead-studded table.


Family room The Christmas tree

takes center stage in this welcoming room that sees activity on a daily basis. Evergreen swags adorn all three windows in the room with small wreaths encircling whimsical reindeer heads crafted from brown papiermâchÊ. A geometric rug from Stark Carpet grounds an assortment of happy patterns that energize the design. Fun times Constructing gingerbread houses is a holiday treat.


Painted brown to add a bit of drama and to balance the light colors throughout the rest of the house, the sunroom is dressed for the holidays with a mix of textures including a twig moose head that hangs over a Parsons-style table, wreaths that adorn a pair of ceramic lamps, and a large rush basket filled with wrapped gifts. With well-appointed rooms and a holiday decorating scheme that blends with them harmoniously, the Stack house is primed for everything Christmas: reflection, celebrations, and music. “My husband and I are not from Alexandria, but it’s the only home our boys have ever known,” says Stephanie, whose Christmas single “Under the Mistletoe” is due to release this holiday season. “My hope is that they save the special images of Christmases here in their heads, share them with their own families someday, and bring their families back. We plan to live here for a very long time.”

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Interior designer: Kelley Proxmire For more information, see sources on page 136

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W R I T T E N BY S A L LY F I N D E R W E E P I E

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN GRANEN

PRODUCED BY LINDA HUMPHREY


DRESSED IN ITS PRETTY-AS-A-PEACOCK HOLIDAY FINERY, THIS SEATTLE HOME GIVES A HAPPY NEW MEANING TO BLUE CHRISTMAS

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Living room Kristi Spouse likes traditional shapes

with a modern twist. Peacock-blue velvet chairs and a gray velvet sectional mesh with a white geometric-base coffee table, all by Jonathan Adler. “Shagariffic” carpet from Stanton puts texture underfoot and contrasts the espresso flooring. Decorations More touches of blue mingle with white and sparkling silver in Kristi’s holiday decor. Family David and Kristi carry on her family’s tradition of going all out for Christmas, and it’s heartily embraced by their kids—Emma, 16; Reagan, 14; and Jackson, 10. Preceding pages “We have an awesome guy—actually the guy who’s our window washer—who puts up our exterior lights every Christmas,” Kristi says. “I love how, with the lights and the wreaths on the dormers, the house looks so East Coast traditional. But then you walk in and it’s a surprise—a fun mixture of traditional and contemporary elements.”

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id I just walk into the Christmas shop at Macy’s? Young David Spouse had to wonder the first time he took his future wife, Kristi, home from high school. “It wasn’t even Thanksgiving, and my mom had the house completely decked out,” Kristi says. “The tree, the garland, the parties—Mom was extravagant when it came to the holidays.” Turns out, the apple—or in this case, the Christmas ball—doesn’t fall far from the tree. These days, it’s Kristi who goes gonzo for the holiday, lavishly decorating the home she shares with David and their three children before the Thanksgiving turkey ever hits the table. The boys, Reagan and Jackson, are just as ho-ho-hopeless. “Now they’re the ones who start it all every year,” Kristi says. “ ‘When are you going to pull out the tree, Mom? Is it time yet?’ They decorate it themselves—doing a beautiful job. All I have to do is give them little tips.” Kristi, an interior designer, pulls head-elf duty in picking out the decor—Christmas and year-round. After previously living in a neutral house, with color making its primary splash in a blue bedroom, she knew she wanted more peacock in her home’s palette


when the family moved into a new place near Seattle’s Lake Washington. “It’s so soothing and pretty, it shouldn’t just be kept in a bedroom,” she says. “Blue makes sense here too because we live just a few blocks from the lake and have a beautiful view. I love looking out at the water—and bringing that watery feel into our rooms.” Peacock velvet on armchairs in the living room and a graphic navy fabric on porter chairs in the kitchen sitting area make this a house of blues every season. The rich hues pop against gloombusting white walls—perfect for overcast winter days in the Pacific Northwest—and Kristi’s other accent, sophisticated charcoal gray. New pieces mingle with antiques, including a pine grandfather clock that David bought as a birthday gift for his wife years ago and Sitting room “S” marks the spot for a cozy chat zone with a front-row seat

to all the cookie-baking action—Kristi is famous for her scrumptious cutout cookies. Porter chairs from Kim Salmela in a navy pattern are a perfect match for the blue Christmas tree and the console table from One Kings Lane. The letter wall hanging is from Joss & Main. Kitchen White-painted custom cabinets and an expanse of beveled white subway tile keep the winter doldrums at bay in the Spouse kitchen. Kristi opened it up to the former family room and transformed that space into a light-filled sitting area.

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Dining room Old and new, white and blue mix in the dining room, where an antique pine armoire contrasts a sleek custom table from Modshop. Hits of blue on chargers and napkin ties bring on the peacock—as do craft-store feather wreaths wrapping glass hurricanes. Dining chairs from Modshop echo the soft gray from the living room sectional; chandeliers from Wayfair add a glam touch.


a pair of warm pine armoires. “It’s a good mixture of things,” Kristi says. “I have very eclectic tastes. I like rooms to look like things were collected over time. And I love a glamorous feel that’s still comfortable and practical for kids and dogs. Nothing is off-limits.” At Christmas, Kristi’s traditional-meets-contemporary mix and her palette’s blues are augmented by seasonal dressings like peacock ornaments on the big tree in the living room and peacockfeather wreaths around glass hurricanes on the dining table. And in the sitting area off the kitchen, there’s an even bigger Christmas surprise. “I wanted something blue for the corner by the navy chairs,” Kristi says. “Then I found it—a perfect artificial tree. The whole tree actually is navy blue. I love it.” All the ornamentation sets a festive backdrop for the true star of the holidays: fun with family and friends. There’s the annual family trip to downtown Seattle to take in holiday decorations and a show— last year it was A Christmas Story, The Musical at the 5th Avenue Theatre. Then there’s Kristi’s annual holiday party for friends, who can count on going home with great memories, along with festive little packages of tea that are a nod to David’s British heritage.

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Kristi’s family comes over on Christmas Day, and the gettogether with David’s relatives follows, appropriately, on Boxing Day, the British celebration that traditionally takes place on December 26. “The kids look forward to seeing their cousins,” Kristi says. “And my mom still does stockings for everyone, even grown-up me.” All of the festivities are made even sweeter by another tradition: Christmas cookies. “My mom and I will always get together to bake a ton of them. We make all kinds, but I’m kind of famous for my cutout cookies. My friends always ask: Do you have any cookies left?” Of course the answer is yes. Kristi’s Christmases will always be abundant—with cookies, hospitality, and, as is tradition, adornments to rival the Christmas shop at Macy’s. “I look forward to the whole season—having the kids home, all of the little things we do together,” Kristi says. “I love our house at Christmas. It never looks more beautiful than when it’s decorated for the holidays. The atmosphere couldn’t be more special.” Interior designer: Kristi Spouse For more information, see sources on page 136


THE HOUSE IS VERY TRADITIONAL, BUT I WANTED TO MIX IT UP AND BRING IN SOME CONTEMPORARY ELEMENTS. I LOVE A GLAMOROUS FEEL THAT’S STILL COMFORTABLE. —interior designer Kristi Spouse

Bedroom Gray moves to the palette’s forefront in the bedroom, where an antique bed is outfitted with coverings from T.J.Maxx, Target, and Z Gallerie. Walls are “Silver Cufflink” by Ralph Lauren. Powder room An ornate mirror by Rosenberry Rooms and a classically patterned wallpaper give the powder room a traditional look that’s contemporized by today’s hot neutral—gray. And you can’t go wrong with moose figurines for a little Christmas fun.


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WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY E L E A N O R LY N N N E S M I T H P H OTO G R A P H Y BY K I P DAW K I N S

A VIRGINIA FAMILY READIES FOR SANTA CLAUS WITH A YUMMY CANDY-COLOR PALETTE. MAYBE SANTA SHOULD RETHINK HIS RED SUIT.


Entry hall Wide ribbon weaves through the garland’s greenery along the stairway banister. The Duncan Phyfe sofa is a family heirloom that was refreshed with new upholstery and paint. Fireplace Embroidered stockings hang on the family room mantel, which is decked out with greens and fruit. Family room Chairs and a nailhead stool are from Lee Industries. Side table In the sunroom, a trio of silver trees complements the abstract painting by Frankie Slaughter. Preceding pages In the sunroom, the Christmas tree pops against cloud-soft draperies made with “Cordelia Sheer” fabric in Bone from Schumacher.


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he stockings are always hung by the chimney with care at the home of Jim and Mollie Reinhart—an important ritual that dates to the birth of their first child. “When our son was born, we got an embroidered stocking for his first Christmas,” Mollie recalls. Then along came two more children—and two more special socks. “No matter where we lived, we had a place for those three stockings.” Family time and traditions are important all year long for Mollie and Jim, whose Georgian-style brick home sits high atop a hill overlooking the Kanawha Canal and James River in Virginia. Ten years ago, they purchased the prime lot and turned to Richmond architect Charles Aquino to design a house that would suit their active young family but still be in keeping with the established neighborhood and Virginia’s rich architectural heritage. When it came to decorating her new home, Mollie had some definite goals. “I wanted beautiful and unforgettable but, more important, it had to be comfortable, livable, and practical.” She found her muse in Janie Molster, a Richmond interior designer. “I admired Janie’s work, but when she told me she had five children, I knew she would understand what I wanted in a family home.” The house exudes an aura of openness and warmth, beginning with the entry, where Molster made the most of a classic center hall with a welcoming sitting area. “A round table is predictable,”

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the designer says. “I prefer comfortable seating in a foyer. It ensures the space will be more than just a place to drop your keys.” In the Reinharts’ entryway, she added a special touch by painting and upholstering an Empire sofa that had belonged to Mollie’s great-grandmother. The rooms flow from one to another, united by a clean and contemporary decorating scheme that creates an air of vitality and a sense of measured calm. “Everything should look beautiful and be accessible,” says Molster. A sunroom just off the front entryway where deep bay windows allow natural light to flood the room is a prime example of the house's cheerful and bright style. Molster made the space even livelier with shots of pink that bring a casual flair and make it a perfect spot for the Christmas tree, an extravaganza of ornaments ranging from blush to deep rose. A patterned rug in shades of pink was the starting point for the room, Mollie says. “The rug was the first item Janie and I purchased together.” A rattan chair introduces a rustic yet sophisticated touch, while pink-and-chocolate fabric adds a modern vibe. The whole color scheme inspired the Reinharts’ holiday decor. “I love experimenting with color and using color liberally in an open floor plan,” Molster says. “You can have a varied palette as long as the level of intensity is the same and there is some contin-

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Dining room The stone pedestal table from Artifacts International with chairs from Artistic Frame anchors the dining room, which opens to the entry hall. Family room A large framed archway links the family room with the kitchen. The sofa and chair are from Lee Industries, the table lamps from Flambeau Lighting. Breakfast room Festive ivy topiaries wrapped in burlap complement the large gold magnolia wreath and the “Serena� drum chandelier from Oly.


Master bedroom The “Nori Lizard Bench”

from Interlude at the foot of the bed and Stark’s “Ellipse” carpet add modern elements that blend with the traditional “Versailles” chandelier from Arteriors. Family Mollie and Jim Reinhart and their children, Porter, Caroline, and Hunter, sit on the sunny rear terrace with their pets, Bella the Welsh terrier and PJ the cat. Exterior A simple wreath and garland enliven the classical portico and balustrade of the red brick home.


uum of color.” The rich jewel tones of the blues and greens in the family room and the verdant hue of the grass-cloth wallcovering in the dining room carry through into the master bedroom. Molster follows the same approach for the holiday decorations, weaving colors and textures seamlessly from room to room. Garlands festooned with blue and green silk ribbons add a holiday touch to the pair of trumeau mirrors that flank the arched opening to the kitchen. Matching ribbon on the wreath above the kitchen sink creates a subtle connection. Molster’s visual vocabulary for the holidays is expressive yet tranquil. Delicate paper snowflakes and old-fashioned ribbon candies counter oversize contemporary pink balls on the sunroom Christmas tree. A large gold magnolia wreath brings seasonal flair to the sunny kitchen nook. “We love baking cookies and working on holiday projects around the breakfast table,” Mollie says. “Right from the start, Janie was a joy to work with,” she recalls, noting that the two saw eye-to-eye on the big picture as well as the smallest detail. Molster concurs. “It’s great when you have an ongoing relationship with a client and you know just what she would like,” the designer says. “Setting the stage for Christmas for the Reinharts was a piece of cake.” With pink frosting no less. Interior designer: Janie Molster Architect: Charles Aquino

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WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY ELAINE MARKOUTSAS PHOTOGRAPHY BY WERNER STRAUBE

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CHRISTMAS EVE IS A FEAST FOR THE SENSES AT A LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, HOME h

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Living room bay window A skirted custom banquette is clad in Old World Weavers silk velvet with a Greek key tape border. Christmas tree Meet Adler, a West Highland terrier. Living room fireplace An elegant George Smith sofa from London mingles with lacquer, faux tortoise, and brass tables. Homeowner Interior designer Shelley Johnstone Paschke. Preceding pages Orange and gold accents dress the living room mantel. A garland studded with clementines trims the front door.

ll may not be calm on Christmas Eve in this classical mid-20th-century home in Lake Forest, Illinois. With a family that includes five kids— from preteen to college-age—there’s a lot going on. But the holiday vibe is as low-key as it is picture-perfect: holiday playlist cued up and candles flickering, with fresh tulips, roses, and aromatic greens laced throughout. And it’s happy, boosted by sunshine-orange accents, starting with the clementines woven into the evergreen garland that frames the front door. “Even the type on my Christmas cards is orange,” says interior designer Shelley Johnstone Paschke, who created the warm, welcoming home she shares with husband Brett and their blended family: her sons, Hunter, 20, and Ford, 17, and Brett’s sons, Will, 15, and Luke, 14, and his daughter, Lauren, 12.

“Fresh flowers and candles are very important to me. That feels like home,” Shelley says. Just no poinsettias, please. Her mom owned a floral shop, and she saw plenty of those when she and her sister were growing up in Madison, Wisconsin. Simplicity, elegance, and attention to details are the hallmarks of Shelley’s style, and that doesn’t change when she’s decorating for the holidays. “I like to keep it clean and fresh, with beautiful pinecones and greens, apricots and oranges, gold accents.” A formally set dining table notwithstanding, that even means going a bit rogue on the food. “We don’t do the big roast,” she says. “We like hors d’oeuvres: shrimp, cashews, fun dips.” Then it’s sandwiches and light fare to save room for homemade grasshopper pie. “There are no rules,” Shelley says—and that applies to decorating too. “Go with what’s comfortable.” Fancy details sprinkled

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Dining room A chandelier from Niermann Weeks sparkles above

the antique mahogany table. The walls are upholstered in a Fortuny-style damask and antique chairs are upholstered in chocolate-colored Edelman leather. Table setting An embroidered linen placemat from ShellKare is topped with antique greenand-gold Staffordshire china and a Lenox soup bowl. Foyer Swags of greenery and holiday owers dress up the staircase and an antique console table. Sideboard Vintage opaline lamps sit on an antique mahogany-and-satinwood sideboard. Trellis room A starburst mirror from Mecox hangs above a banquette covered in an Old World Weavers velvet and trimmed with Samuel & Sons Greek key-motif tape.


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Library Inspired by a vintage tortoiseshell box,

Shelley had decorative painters replicate the look on the ceiling. An antelope-pattern carpet from Stark anchors vintage rattan chairs with chevron linen cushions. Shelley converted the top of a Brunschwig & Fils tea table into a backgammon board. A Salvador Dali lithograph hangs among vintage boxes. Solarium A tufted “Kames” sofa from Crate & Barrel is flanked by painted wicker chairs with checked cushions.


through rooms feel casually elegant. Rich embellishments are informed by Shelley’s stint in London, where she studied at the Inchbald School of Design and was exposed to dressmaker details such as Turkish corners, knife pleats, and application of trims on pillows and lampshades, as well as lacquering, gold leafing, and the creation of soft tinted ceilings and cashmere walls. With her global experiences, she happily embraced the idea of layering. In fine European interiors, “nothing is from the same place,” she says. Shelley adds to that collected look with antiques and finds from travels, rounding out with custom-designed pieces. For the living room, she designed a banquette to blend with upholstered pieces and antiques she purchased in London. Those are teamed with mid-20th-century modern glass and brass tables, with notes of faux tortoise and chocolate lacquer.

Classical motifs like Greek keys are consistent throughout, and animal prints are repeated fun choices. “I love the juxtaposition of traditional and modern,” she says. “That keeps it timeless and fresh. The brass is a little ’70s vibe.” To dress a room that was enclosed during remodeling, Shelley had a trellis applied to the walls and painted the ceiling the vivid hue of an Hermès box. “I love bursts of color in fairly neutral spaces,” she says. She couldn’t imagine living in any other home. “It’s comfortable and pretty and also functional for our busy, modern lifestyle,” Shelley says—particularly at Christmas. “It was important to make the house a place we all love. And everyone loves being here.” Interior designer: Shelley Johnstone Paschke

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Wine About It Chateau La Paws’s wines go down easy, but also give back—to North Shore Animal League America, the world’s largest no-kill shelter. The company’s bottle labels feature real shelter dogs. (from $13, chateaulapaws.com)

November+December 2015


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Reader’s Resource

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE STORIES SHOWN IN THIS ISSUE, CONTACT THE PROFESSIONALS AND SOURCES LISTED HERE. CONTACT INFORMATION HAS BEEN VERIFIED, BUT WE CANNOT GUARANTEE THE AVAILABILITY OF ITEMS OR SERVICES. NO INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE ABOUT ITEMS NOT LISTED.

Pages 66–74 SHOWHOUSE TOUR: SPARKLE AND SHINE Holiday House New York, New York Interior designer: Amy Lau, Amy Lau Design, 601 W. 26th St., Suite M272, New York, NY 10001; 212/645-6168, amylaudesign.com. Page 66. Dining room—Wall and ceiling paint (“White Dove” #OC-17); trim finishes (Studio Finishes Latex Metallic Glaze #620 in tint “Gold Dust” #PT-270): Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Area rug (custom design by Amy Lau, based off of crystal tile cut pattern from Baccarat archives): Kyle Bunting, kylebunting.com. Tall fruit bowl on table holding pomegranates (“Mille Nuits” #2613004); console tables at end of room (“Starck Console” #2105708); console top (“Starck Console Top”/Clear Mirror #2105724); vases holding flowers on consoles (“New Antique Vase” #2802230): Baccarat, us.baccarat.com. Flowers (custom arrangement of magnolia leaves and flowers by Remco van Vliet): Van Vliet & Trap, vanvlietandtrap.com. Sofa seen in mirror (“Jules Leleu Settee,” c. 1920); slipper chairs (“Jacques Quinet Pair of Chairs”): Maison Gerard, maisongerard.com. Sofa fabric (“Dash on Plushy” #4020/108); slipper-chair fabric (“Echo” #5013/03): Dedar, dedar.com. Dining table: Design Compendium, designcompendium.com. Tablecloth: Stark, starkcarpet.com. Dining chairs (“Glass Class Chair”/Slate Grey #2601023, by Philippe Starck); chandelier (“48-light Zenith chandelier”/ Special Affair Red and Clear #2805248): dinner plate, large (“Mille Nuits” #2104544); dinner plate, small (“Mille Nuits” #2103963); pampilles plate, small (“Mille Nuits” #2607897); bowl (“Mille Nuits” #2602774); crystal stemware with red knob (“Harcourt” #2802271); red tumblers (“Mosaique” #2103909); fluted stemware (“Harcourt 1841”); red champagne flutes (“Mille Nuits Flutissimo” #2105458); candleholder with red mirror shade (“Our Fire” #2806709, by Philippe Starck); votive, clear (“Eye Votive” #2103850); votive, red (“Eye Votive” #2802309); decanter with handle (“Oenology” #2100403); large vase (“Harcourt Abysse High Vase” #201220); balustre vase (“Harcourt Balustre vase, Medium with Red Ring” #2802260); 3-light candelabra (“Medaillon” #1920391): Baccarat, us.baccarat.com. Flatware (“Malmaison”): Christofle, christofle.com. Interior designer: Ally Coulter, Ally Coulter Designs, 55 Byram Shore Rd., Greenwich, CT 06830; 203/531-4785; New York/Los Angeles, 646/785-6405, allycoulter.com. Page 68. Living room—Sofa (“Memoire 3-Seater Sofa”); fabric (“Parmenide”/Black #TOP 1012); cream-striped pillow (#VIP 620 in Bronze); silver pillow (leather intrecciato “Lux”/Black #822/SL); black pillow (“Orylag”/Black); throw (black and bronze fox fur throw); area rug (“Meg”/Champagne, custom size); coffee tables (“Regina”/Bronze Shadow and Mirror #D 120/D 90/ D 60); round black vase with calla lilies (Fendi Murano Diamond Vase”/Black #D.28); silver vase (“Fendi Murano Diamond Vase”/Steel #D.21); candle beside gold vase; pair of black vases on coffee table (“Fendi Murano Poseidon”/Black #H.20); black ottomans in front of mantel (“Cat Pouf”/Black Pony): Fendi Casa, fendi.com. Sconce (“Mille Nuits Wall Sconce” #2606396): Baccarat, us.baccarat.com. Andirons (“Colossus Zig Zag Andirons”): John Lyle Design, johnlyledesign.com. Photograph above mantel (Dreaming): by Robert Farber, farber.com. Old World Master painting: Otto Naumann Ltd., ottonaumannltd

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.com. Piano: Steinway, steinway.com. Interior designer: Carleton Varney, Carleton Varney Ltd., 5715 Georgia Ave., West Palm Beach, FL 33405; 561/585-1855, carletonvarney.com. Page 68. Stairs and landing—Wing chairs (“Derby” #142082); champagne flutes (“West Egg” #142200); cabinet (“Ainsworth Eglomise Bar Cabinet” #141452); garland (“Estate Pre-Lit Corner Swags” #45733 and “Estate Pre-Lit Garland #45728); centerpiece (“Williamsburg Holiday Centerpiece” #141666”); candleholders (“Antique Mercury Glass, Set of Three” #67132); candles (“Battery Operated Dream Candles” #46955); tree (“Deluxe Frasier”); tree skirt (“Deck the Halls” #141455): Frontgate, frontgate.com. The original is in designer Carleton Varney’s office. Pillows on wing chairs (“Fazenda Lilly,” an original design by Dorothy Draper): Dorothy Draper Fabrics and Wallcoverings, dorothydraperfw.com. Throw: discontinued. Print on easel: Dorothy Draper, by John Singer Sargent.

hardware (custom): Anthony Lawrence Belfair, anthonylawrence.com. Black pedestal (custom): Daniel J. Murphy, 201/497-5347. Large bird sculpture on pedestal (by Masatoyo Kishi): designer’s collection. Mantel: original to house. Art above mantel (Whitewater): by Victor-Raul Garcia, victorraulgarcia.com. Horse, bowl, vintage candlesticks on mantel: designer’s collection. Floor lamps flanking mantel (“Small Tribeca Iron Floor Lamp” #CL1002, by Clodagh): Circa Lighting, circalighting.com. Wooden chair in front of mantel (Edward Wormley for Dunbar Arm Chair); round containers holding logs: designer’s collection. Lantern on floor by mantel (“Photophore Candle Light,” by Anasthasia Millot); andirons (polished bronze andirons by Jacques Jarrige): Valerie Goodman Gallery, valeriegoodmangallery.com. Tall vase on table (“Turrin Large Vase” #670775): Crate & Barrel, crateandbarrel .com. Gold bowl on table (Gooseberry Tea Strainer” #110230): Michael Aram, michaelaram.com.

Interior designer: Matthew Patrick Smyth, 136 E. 57th St., Suite 901, New York, NY 10022; 212/333-5353, matthewsmyth.com. Page 70. 25th Anniversary room— Paint (“Decorators White” #CC-20): Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Carpet (“Tonga”/Deep Sea): Merida, meridameridian .com. Sofa (“Givenchy” #1028): Anthony LawrenceBelfair, anthonylawrence.com. Sofa fabric Watou Herringbone”/Bone #66441); teal pillow on sofa (“Venetian Silk Velvet”/Peacock #62740); black-andwhite pillow (“Serengeti”/Tigre Blanc #68901): Schumacher, fschumacher.com. Taupe pillow (antique velvet): designer’s collection. Art behind sofa (Night Fishing, by Emilia Dubicki): Fred.Giampietro Gallery, giampietrogallery.com. Sofa end tables (sculptural brass with smoked glass top): Lerebours Antiques, 213/3082275. Floor lamps flanking sofa (“Pask Pharmacy Lamp” #TOB1200, by Thomas O’Brien): Circa Lighting, circalighting.com. Items on end table (“Rock Bon Bon Dish” #175954): Michael Aram, michaelaram.com. Coffee table (“Lucca Studio Brompton Coffee Table” #ST6737): Lucca Antiques, luccaantiquescom. Sculpture on coffee table (abstract metal sculpture by Curtis Jere): Florian Papp Inc., florianpapp.com. Ice bucket on coffee table: designer’s collection. Vase on coffee table (“Rikki Vase” #670652): Crate & Barrel, crateandbarrel.com. Lounge chairs (“Scrolled Back Bridgewater Chair” #712): Anthony Lawrence Belfair, anthonylawrence.com. Lounge-chair fabric (“Courtrai Glazed Linen”/Dusk #65160): Schumacher, fschumacher.com. Small round tables beside lounge chairs (brass faux bamboo tables with ebonized circular tops): Lerebours Antiques, 213/308-2275. Armless chairs (English Regency-style): David Duncan Antiques, davidduncanantiques.com. Chandelier (“Limited Edition French Bronze Globe Chandelier” #LEL4114): Lucca Antiques, luccaantiques .com. Console (“Regency mahogany and marble-top console, c. 1820); clock on console (Charles X): Florian Papp Inc., florianpapp.com. Table lamps (“Large Fluted Spire Table Lamp” #CHA8906): Circa Lighting, circalighting.com. Photograph on console (vintage); art in front of photo (Watermark #16, by Beatrice Caracciolo); photograph on console base (vintage print); box on console base (antique); bronze bowl on console base (vintage): designer’s collection. Black bowl on console (“Sona” 12-inch vessel #134247): Michael Aram, michaelaram.com. Mirror (custom): Daniel J. Murphy, 201/497-5347. Drapery (“Sargent Silk Taffeta”/ Travertine #22675); drapery trim (Maria”/Jet #69000); Roman-shade fabric (“Lompret Linen Herringbone”/ Haze #65301): Schumacher, fschumacher.com. Drapery

Interior designer: Patrick James Hamilton, Patrick James Hamilton Designs, patrickdesign@aim.com, www. askpatrick.blogspot.com. Page 70. Derby Day study—Wallcovering (“Shang Extra Fine Sisal”/Green Tea #T41162); ceiling wallcovering (“Carolina Raffia”/Straw #T13039): Thibaut, thibautdesign.com. Trim paint (“All White” #2005): Farrow & Ball, farrow-ball.com. Upholstery on fireplace surround (“Gaucho” #1-1142-197); drapery (“Smaragd” #1-6528150); drapery valance (“Pisano” #1-6313-488); sheer fabric on Roman shades (“Poesie” #WE6025/081 by Soleil Bleu): JAB Anstoetz, jab.de. Drapery tiebacks (“Illustra” #P079-02, Accessories by Ulf Moritz for Sahco): through Donghia, donghia.com. Blinds; plantation shutters: Hunter Douglas, hunterdouglas .com. Hanging light (“Egret”): ABYU Lighting/Steven Wine, abyulighting.com. Area rug (“Solid Silk” #V-93, Casual Collection): Carini Lang, carinilang.com. Desk behind red chair (“Waterfall Desk” #W4193): Wisteria, wisteria.com. Lamps on desk (“Westbury” #RL3183, by Ralph Lauren Home): Circa Lighting, circalighting.com. Art above desk (Green Calder, mixed media): by Dan Romer, danromerart.com. Framing: Lowy Framing, lowy1907.com. Fuchsia chairs (“Fenton” #N1711, discontinued): Bernhardt, bernhardt.com. Chair and pillow fabric (“Smaragd” #1-6528-663): JAB Anstoetz, jab.de. Custom embroidery: Michael Savoia Inc., villasavoiainc.com. Table to right of red chair (“Lincoln”): Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, mgbwhome.com. Gold end table by red chair (“Turtle Table”): John Lyle Design, johnlyledesign.com. Coffee table (“Mid-Century Egg Table” #T11286): Wisteria, wisteria.com. Pair of white vases on coffee table (KPM porcelain): private collection. Flowers: NDI, ndi.com. Geometric sculpture on coffee table (“Polished Polyhedron Sculpture,” discontinued); throw on daybed (cashmere): Williams Sonoma Home, Williams-sonoma.com. Daybed (custom design by Patrick Hamilton Designs): fabrication by Avery Boardman, averyboardman.com. Daybed fabric, body (“Cheeky Plain” #CH2789/080, by Chivasso); daybed fabric, cushion (“Palazzo Velvet” #CA1175/070, by Chivasso); custom bolster pillow (“Maestro” #CA1172/070, by Chivasso): through JAB Anstoetz, jab .de. Floor lamp (by Phoenix Day Lighting & Fixtures): through A. Rudin, arudin.com. Chests by daybed (“Kent Three-Drawer Chest” #353-113): Bernhardt, bernhardt .com. Lamp on chest (“Eliot Table Lamp” #ARN3013, by Aerin): Circa Lighting, circ alighting.com. Photo frame: Pottery Barn, potterybarn.com. Flowers: NDI, ndi.com. Fire screen (“Matrix”/Polished Bronze, custom): John Lyle Create, johnlylecreate.com. Art above fire screen ➤


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An extraordinary portfolio inspired by the most pivotal design movements of the past 150 years. Bathroom and kitchen collections re-imagined to elevate the everyday. DXV by American Standard. Born of Quality and Craftsmanship. Honoring the past. Imagining a beautiful future. Visit DXV.com to get inspired.

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(Pother, oil on canvas): by Aaron Smith, aaronsmithart .com. Book on coffee table (Arabian Horses, by Judith E. Forbis): Assouline, assouline.com. Interior designer: Noelia Ibáñez, ByNOELIA, 1053 Second Ave., New York, NY 10022; 646/287-5279. Page 72. Winter Solstice kitchenette—Wall paint (“Wevet” #273, as a floor paint): Farrow & Ball, farrow-ball.com. Image for ceiling wallpaper (custom): Novo Arts, novoarts.com. Ceiling wallpaper (custom digital mural on bling ground): Wolf-Gordon, wolfgordon.com. Chandelier (“Zanadoo Large Chandelier” #89989): Arteriors, arteriorshome.com. Flooring: existing. White area rug (custom Tibetan sheepskin area rug): Patterson, Flynn & Martin, pattersonflynnmartin.com. Acrylic armchair (“Uncle Jim”/Crystal, by Philippe Starck): Kartell, kartellstorela.com. Throw on chair (fox silver white fur); silver-patterned pillow on rug (“Orylag Cushion” 50x50 cm): Fendi Casa, fendi.com. White satin pillow on rug: Gracious Home, gracioushome.com. Mirrored table (“Kidney Shaped Modular Table” #AFS1015.Chrome, and “Large Modular Chrome Table” #AFS0976.Chrome.0): Kravet, available through Kravet showrooms. Vase (“Diamond Vase” in Murano glass): Fendi Casa, fendi.com. Flowers: Flowers By Special Arrangement, flowersbyspecialarrangement.com. Silver wallpaper on wall behind chair (“Topkapi” #VP 860 01, Mille Millions Collection by Elitis): Donghia, donghia.com. Cabinetry (“Tetrix Glass Cabinet Collection”); countertop (“White Prestige Glass”): Scavolini, scavolini.us. Coffee machine (“Fully Automatic Coffee Machine” #CM 210 710); speed microwave oven (400 Series, 24-inch Combi-Microwave Oven #BM 450 710/BM 451 710): Gaggenau, gaggenau .com/us. Crystal vases on shelf above sink (“Spirale”): Baccarat, us.baccarat.com. Sink (overmount 18x18-inch stainless steel sink): Barazza, barazza.co.uk. Faucet (“Eve with LED Light”): KWC, kwcamerica.com. Backsplash tile (“Madison Plata” #P34706011-100111752): Porcelanosa, porcelanosa-usa.com. Sculpture at end of counter (The Birth of the Universe, marble, custom): by Heras Castán, herascastan.com/en.

JULISKA Inspired by the gathering of family and loved ones over food, passionate artisans, and centuries of European design, Juliska is committed to providing beautiful things for the home. Juliska is not about trends; it’s about loving life, living well and always finding reasons to celebrate! www.juliska.com

Interior designer: Kara Mann, Kara Mann Design, 40 Wooster St., 5th Floor, New York, NY 10013; 212/2039501, and 20 W. Hubbard St., 2nd Floor, Chicago, IL 60654; 312/893-7550, karamann.com. Page 72. Living room—Wall paint (“Brassica” #272); baseboard paint (“Railings” #31): Farrow & Ball, farrow-ball.com. Area rug (custom): Holland & Sherry, hollandandsherry.com. Rug runner (vintage): Kea Carpets and Kilims, keacarpetsandkilims.com. Drapery: Pierre Frey, pierrefrey.com. Drapery tiebacks (“Masai”): Houlès, houles.com. Leather sofa (vintage, by Christopher Hodsoll): 1stdibs, 1stdibs/dealers/ christopher-hodsoll/. Throw on sofa; coffee tables (lilac marble): vintage. Tray on coffee table (lacquer with leather handles); selenite on coffee table; pillow on chair (product line varies): Flair, flairhomecollection.com. Ceiling light over sofa (“Rudi”): Roll & Hill, rollandhill .com. Available through Lukas Peet Design, lukaspeet .com. Pair of chairs by mantel: vintage. Chair fabric: Toyine Sellers, toyinesellers.com. Table between chairs (“Collage Side Table”): David Wiseman, dwiseman.com. Mirror over mantel (“Caragh Pheasant Mirror”): Fairtlough, fairtlough.com. Sconces (“Triscota,” by Christophe Côme): Cristina Grajales Gallery, cristinagrajalesinc.com. Table to right of mantel (“Louxter Chest” #Loux 2011, by Christian Astuguevieille): Holly Hunt, hollyhunt.com. Interior designers: Richard Cerrone, Rhonda Eleish, and Lisa Hyman, Lillian August, 32 Knight St., Norwalk, CT 06851; 203/847-1596, lillianaugust.com. Page 72. Sitting room—Wall paneling: existing. Ceiling upholstery (“Bespoke Twill”/French Knot #DE12950): Holland & Sherry, hollandandsherry.com. Chandelier (mid-century Murano): Eleish van Breems Antiques, evbantiques.com. Area rug (1880 Tabriz; silk foundation cotton pile/ivory ground with blues): F.J. Hakimian, fjhakimian.com. Pair of sofas (“Wright Mid Sofa”/COM #1365247): Lillian August, lillianaugust.com. Sofa fabric (“Hacienda”/White #DE10926, Temuco Collection); white-on-white pillows (“Concierto”/Ecru #DE10375); blue plaid pillows (“Gallant”): Holland & Sherry,

hollandandsherry.com. Throw on sofa back (Sandra Jordan Ivory Alpaca throw, embroidered): Lillian August, lillianaugust.com. Coffee table (“Karl Cocktail Table” #8201-40G, by Celerie Kemble): Henredon, henredon .com. Available as #1340864 from Lillian August, lillianaugust.com. Selenite on coffee table (#1335727); box on coffee table; gold pot with greenery on coffee table (#1361892); selenite logs in fireplace (#1367955): Lillian August, lillianaugust.com. Blue vases (mid-century case glass, Murano): designer’s collection. Andirons (antique Sunflower Andirons): Hiden Galleries, 1stdibs .com/dealers/hiden-galleries/. Bar behind sofa (“Westmacott Bar” #6105-475CC): Theodore Alexander, theodorealexander.com. Available as #1326662 from Lillian August, lillianaugust.com. Leather on bar (“Arden”/Wintertide #LE5065): Holland & Sherry, hollandandsherry.com. Lamp on bar (“Baccarat Eye Lamp”); decanter and glasses on bar (“Château Baccarat”): Baccarat, us.baccarat.com. Brass bowls on bar; floor lamp: Lillian August, lillianaugust.com. Crystal sculpture at right on bar: Hiden Galleries, 1stdibs.com/dealers/hiden-galleries/. Art above bar (by Willem de Kooning): Ryan Ross, Arcature Fine Art, arcaturefineart.com. Accessories in bookshelf: Lillian August, lillianaugust.com. Interior designer: GaryMcBournie, Gary McBournie Inc., 71 Newbury St., Suite 300, Boston,MA 02116; 617/542-5700, gmcbinc.com. Page 74. Caribbean Island Holiday—Fabric on walls and ceiling (“Tides Stripe”/Lagoon #TDS-05): Gary McBournie for Antilles Designs, antillesdesigns.com. Blue trim (“Grosgrain Ribbon”/Cobalt #977-44931-133): Samuel & Sons, samuelandsons.com. Rope tiebacks: Jonas, jonasworkroom.com. Bamboo blinds: Back Bay Shutter, backbayshutter.com. Jute area rug (“Bora Bora”/Sunrise): Merida, meridameridian.com. Ceiling light (“The Shell Chandelier” #8209, by WP Sullivan); console table under sun sculpture (“The Ovation Table” #8028, by Marie Suri): Liz O’Brien New York, lizobrien .com. Sun wall sculpture (Sunburst Wall Sculpture, by Sergio Bustamante): Palm Beach Antique & Design ➤

MARVIN WINDOWS & DOORS

MITCHELL GOLD & BOB WILLIAMS

NAPOLEON FIREPLACES

Marvin Windows and Doors brings its Built Around You® philosophy to life with every customer and every solution. A premier manufacturer of made-to-order windows and doors, Marvin offers the industry’s most extensive selection of shapes, styles, sizes and options to fit the diverse needs and match the personalities of homeowners.

We’re on a mission to make the world a more comfortable place: for everyone. Shop our Signature Stores or retailers across the country to peruse our collection for the home that spans the style spectrum from traditional to modern. Many items are in stock and available for quick delivery. www.mgbwhome.com

Bring out your home’s natural beauty and warmth with a Napoleon fireplace. Whether you prefer a gas, electric or wood-burning hearth, Napoleon offers the widest selection of indoor and outdoor fireplaces available. Discover a Napoleon design to fit your home décor. Visit napoleonfireplaces.com

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SAFAVIEH

SHERRILL FURNITURE

THE CONTAINER STORE

THERMADOR

Safavieh offers a full home furnishing experience, so you can create amazing rooms exclusively with Safavieh products. Now that experience is complete with the launch of the Safavieh Dream mattress, a new line of plush spring-coiled mattresses that ship directly to your door in a box.  For information about the line, visit www.safavieh.com

Quality and Style: A sound investment since 1946. www.sherrillfurniture.com

It’s not just a closet.   It’s an escape to the way things should be.  It’s the promise of an organized life.SM TCS Closets™ is the ultimate closet experience! Each custom closet is built from the floor up to fit your space and showcase your wardrobe. containerstore.com/tcsclosets

Thermador empowers those who love to cook with innovations that make kitchens hotter, cooler, faster, and better than ever. Sign up for our exclusive newsletter at thermador.com/account/register

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Center, palmbeachantique.com. Orchids: Manhattan Plant + Design Concepts, manhattanplant.com. Benches by windows (“Thebes Stool,” by John Hutton): Neo Studio, 561/366-7693. Bench cushion and welt (“Solid Strie”/Green #SST-03); pillow on bench (custom, patchwork pillow made from Gary McBournie for Antilles Designs fabrics): Gary McBournie for Antilles Designs, antillesdesigns.com. Étagère (“Pair of Bamboo Clad Étagère”): S. Julian, sjulian.1stdibs.com. Box on top of étagère (antique): bk Antiques, bkantiques.com. Plant beside étagère: Manhattan Plant + Design Concepts, manhattanplant.com. Sofas (“WJR” custom sofa): Gary McBournie Inc., gmcbinc.com. Sofa fabric (“Chaine”/ White #3050-40): Glant, glant.com. Blue floral pillow (“Frangipani”/Cobalt #FGP-04); green pillow (“Solid Strie”/Green #SST-03): Gary McBournie for Antilles Designs, antillesdesigns.com. Mohair throw (Ezcaray mohair in Cobalt): Bergdorf Goodman, bergdorfgoodman .com. Mirrored end table beside sofa by window (“Asian Inspired Side Table by James Mont, c. 1940”); end table by sofa in foreground (“Bombe Chest by Bert England For Widdicomb, c. 1960”): Duane Antiques, 1stdibs.com/ dealers/duane. Candle on end table (“Diptyque Figuier (Fig) Candle”): Barney’s New York, barneys.com. Vase on sofa end table by window (“Gema” #2965): Moser, moser-glass.com. Available through Mary Mahoney, marymahoney.com. Coffee table (“Illuminata” custom table): Gary McBournie Inc., gmcbinc.com. Floor lamp (“Neoclassic Design Standing Lamp” #4039): David Duncan Antiques, davidduncanantiques.com. Brass fish on wood base: Mecox Gardens, mecox.com. Mirror above mantel (antiqued glass): Mirror Fair, mirrorfair .com. Fire screen (“The Laurel Fire Screen” #8025, by Marie Suri): Liz O’Brien New York, lizobrien.com. Conch shells in fireplace: designer’s collection. Chairs facing mantel (“Thebes Chair,” by John Hutton): Neo Studio, 561/366-7693. Chair cushions (“Solid Strie”/Green #SST-03); pillows on chairs, front (“Town House”/White on Cobalt #TOH-11); pillow fabric, back (“Pinchecks”/ Cobalt and Turquoise #PCH-03): Gary McBournie for Antilles Designs, antillesdesigns.com. Cabinet behind chairs (vintage French teak sideboard): Horseman Antiques, horsemanantiques.net. Lamps on cabinet (glazed lamps with footed wood bases, blue-and-white over soft green): John Boone Inc., johnbooneinc.com. Lamp on desk beind sofa (“Wire Pineapple Lamp,” product line varies): Epoca, epocasf.com. Lidded candle on desk (“Fornasetti Soli E Lune Avorio Lidded Candle”): Barney’s New York, barneys.com. Interior designer: Michael Tavano, Michael Tavano Design, 2201 3rd Ave., New York, NY 10035; 212/5640034, michaeltavano.com. Page 74. Bedroom—Ceiling wallpaper (“Weathered Metals”): Maya Romanoff, mayaromanoff.com. Paint: Farrow & Ball, farrow-ball.com. Hanging pendant lights (“Saturno”): Baroncelli, baroncelli.com. Sofa (“Tangram”); bed; red table; coffee table (“Cuba Libre”); leather chairs (“Echo Chairs”); table between leather chairs; high-back armchair by window; side table by chair; area rug (“Touch Me Rug”); red bookcase (“Mic Mac”): Roche Bobois, roche-bobois.com. Wall fabric; bed-cover fabric; sofa fabric; pillows on sofa; fabric on high-back armchair; JAB Anstoetz, jab.de. Drapery sheers (made from white rope trim, custom design by Michael Tavano): Samuel & Sons, samuelandsons.com. Candlestick (“Butterfly Parade,” by Christian Lacroix): Vista Alegre, myvistaalegre.com. Image of girl’s face (Maya7616, by Seungmo Park, wire mesh); drawing with red border (me’re et fille, by Sarah Saito): KateShin Gallery at Waterfall Mansion, waterfallmansion.com. Interior designer: Louis Navarrete, Louis Navarrete Decoration, 834 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032; 917/656-4345, louisnavarretedecoration.com. Page 74. Sitting room—Wall paint (“Drawing Room Blue” #253); ceiling paint (Estate Emulsion with a custom silver wash): Farrow & Ball, farrow-ball.com. Area rug (by Lavar Kerman, antique): Marc Phillips, marcphillipsrugs.com. Chandelier (custom, by Warren Muller): Bahdeebahdu, bahdeebahdu.com. Pedestal table (antique): designer’s collection. Figure on table (by Ferdinand Barbedienne, 19th-century); sofa fabric (vintage): Louis Navarrete for Flourish Art, Antiques and Decoration, louisnavarretedecoration.com. Sofa (custom, by Louis Navarrete): Fairchild Fine Furniture, 718/441-1818. Center pillow on sofa; pillows flanking

center pillow (“Villanova” #9-7509-050); pillows at either end of sofa (“Mandas” #9-7507-050): JAB Anstoetz, jab.de. Mirror behind sofa: Van Gregory & Norton, vangregoryandnorton.com. Drapery around sofa: vintage wool. Pair of upholstered chairs (custom by Louis Navarrete): Fairchild Fine Furniture, 718/441-1818. Cube end tables (“Cube”): John Lyle Design, johnlyledesign.com. Vase on end table (“Bosphorus Bowl”): Pottery Barn, potterybarn.com. Framed art on end table (Jim Bloom in Antique Dream): Ric Best Art, ricbestart.com. Three-panel screen (discontinued): Ralph Lauren Home, ralphlaurenhome.com. Pedestal by screen (“Single Skyscraper Pedestal” #2343): Global Views, globalviews.com. Lamp on pedestal (antique, Agrand Lamp, c. 1830): Flourish Antiques & Decoration, louisnavarretedecoration.com. Art behind pedestal (by KAZ): Ric Best Art, ricbestart.com.

Pages 94–101 SUGAR AND SPRITZ Architect: Cliff Deetjen, Peregrine Design/Build, 49 Commerce Ave., Suite A-1, South Burlington, VT 05403; 802/383-1808, peregrinedesignbuild.com. Interior designer: Kim Deetjen, Truex Cullins Architecture + Interior Design, 209 Battery St., Burlington, VT 05401; 800/227-1076 and 802/658-2775, truexcullins.com. Page 20. Table of Contents—Hand-blown glass lights (custom): Conant Metal & Light, conantmetalandlight .com. Pages 96–97. Family room—Tree (“8-foot Noble Fir”): Green Valley Christmas Trees, greenvalleychristmastrees.com. Chandelier (custom): Larz Allen, larzallen .com. Sconces (custom): Conant Metal & Light, conantmetalandlight.com. Cabinetry: Amoskeag Woodworking, amoskeagwoodworking.com. Sofa (“Hamilton Custom Sofa”); lounge chair to left of sofa (English Arm Club Chair, custom): Lester Furniture Mfg. Inc., johnlesterlimited.com. Sofa fabric (“Cozy Cord”/Moss #25395.3, colorway discontinued): Kravet, kravet.com. Coffee table; ladder-back chair: owner’s collection. Carpet (“Kindly”/Coffee): Williston Weaves, willistonweaves.com. Chair-seat fabric (“Nevada”/Ficelle #4622-10, by Manuel Canovas): Cowtan & Tout, cowtan.com. Loft ladder: Alaco Ladder Co., alacoladder.com. Pages 98–99. Back entry—Flooring (“Lake Champlain Stone”): custom installation by Ben Jacobs, Points North Tile, 802/343-6233. Console (antique with soapstone top, repurposed from iron porch balcony): Anthony Catalfano Home, anthonycatalfanohome.com. Ceiling light (“Solaris 3-Light English Bronze Mini Chandelier” #9225-EB): Crystorama, crystorama.com. Mirror (“Expedition Mirror” #3002): Arteriors, arteriorshome .com. Kitchen sitting area—Gas fireplace: Mendota, mendotahearth.com. Sconces (“Boston Functional Library Wall Light” #SL2922): Circa Lighting, circalighting.com. Clock on mantel: antique. Cowhide chairs (imported from Switzerland); leather milking stool; red spool table: Alpine Home, 802/253-7005. Cowhide rug: Stowe Kitchen Bath & Linens, stowekitchen.net. Wool check throw: Pompanoosuc Mills, pompy .com. Swiss heart-shaped ornaments (made by owner); Swiss candleholders for tree: owner’s collection. Kitchen staircase—Carpet runner (“Stellar Stripe”): owner’s collection. Balusters (custom, Swedish fish): Bill Vanat Carpentry, LLC, 802/644-8810. Rocker (hand-painted); baskets for ribbon: antique. Kitchen— Wall paint (“Creamy” #SW 7012): Sherwin-Williams, sherwin-williams.com. Cabinetry : Tom Lyman, Run of the Mill Handcrafted Wood Products, runofthemillvt .com. Perimeter countertop (Vermont soapstone); island countertop (Honed Vermont Danby Marble): Burlington Marble & Granite, burlingtonmarbleandgranite.com. Island: John Lomas Custom Furniture, johnlomascustomfurniture.com. Light fixture (hand-blown glass pendant, custom designed and fabricated): Conant Metal and Light, conantmetalandlight.com. Area rug (“Stellar Stripe”); art (by Helen Johnson): owner’s collection. Main faucet (“Talis S 2-Spray High Arc Kitchen Faucet”): Hansgrohe, hansgrohe-usa.com. Island faucet (“Concetto”): Grohe, grohe.com. Refrigerator: KitchenAid, kitchenaid.com. Pages 100–101. Dining room—Wall treatment (custom Venetian plaster with a waxed finish): Chris Ward, Ladeside Design Studios. Drapery; dining table; server (antique, mahogany); area rug (antique, Persian); art between windows (Vermont Summer Meadow, by Carolyn

Walton); tablecloth; dinnerware (by Coalport): owner’s collection. Chairs: custom. Chandelier: antique. Sconces (gilded antique mirror sconces): Scofield Lighting, scofieldlighting.com. Flatware (“Suffolk,” by Alvin): Antique Cupboard, antiquecupboard.com. Stemware (“Jojo”): Crate & Barrel, crateandbarrel.com. Bedroom toward windows—Wall paint (“Accessible Beige” #SW 7036); ceiling and trim paint (“Creamy” #SW 7012): Sherwin-Williams, sherwin-williams.com. Carpet (wool loop): Karastan, karastan.com. Pillow with red flower (by Manuel Canovas, discontinued); pillow with white snowflakes (by Manuel Canovas, discontinued): Cowtan & Tout, cowtan.com. Striped pillow (“Surya” #2074-03, by No. 9 Thompson): Jim Thompson Fabrics, jimthompsonfabrics.com. Pillow fabrication: Caryn Long, Window Works, 802/7343003. Cabinet at end of bed: owner’s collection. Art on cabinet: by Austin Abbott, austin_abbott@msn.com. Wall light above cabinet (“Globen Lighting Tulip One Light Wall Bracket”/Black #799-1236, discontinued): Tesco Direct, tesco.com. Bedroom toward bed—Pencil post bed (custom): Cloude Quenneville, Quenneville Custom Wood Products, LLC, 802/247-8301. Bed linens: Target, target.com. Pillow with red flower (discontinued): Cowtan & Tout, cowtan.com. Striped pillow (“Surya” #2074-03, by No. 9 Thompson): Jim Thompson Fabrics, jimthompsonfabrics.com. Pillow and window-cushion fabrication: Caryn Long, Window Works, 802/7343003. Duvet (product line varies): Pottery Barn, potterybarn.com. Chest: antique. Sconces (“Boston Swing Arm Wall Lamp” #SL2920-L): Circa Lighting, circalighting.com. Botanical prints: owner’s collection.

Pages 102–109 CHART-TOPPING CHRISTMAS Interior designer: Kelley Proxmire, Kelley Interior Design, 4519 Wetherill Rd., Bethesda, MD 20816; 301/320-2109, kelleyinteriordesign.com. Holiday designer: Rachel Gang, Helen Olivia Flowers, 123 N. Pitt St., Alexandria, VA 22314; 703/548-2848, helenolivia.com. Pages 102–103. Dining room—Wall paint (“Pale Vista” #2029-60); trim paint (“White Dove” #OC-17): Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Wall treatment: Sheppard Bear, Fine Art Finishes, fine-art-finishes.com. Area rug (“Jalousey”/Brown): Stark, starkcarpet.com. Dining table (custom): Keith Fritz, keithfritz.com. Chairs (“Louis XVI Square Back Side Chair” #9751-02): Hickory Chair, hickorychair.com. Chair fabric, front (“Spring Shower”/Lizard #9909/06): Pollack, pollackassociates.com. Chair fabric, back (“Valera”/Cocoa #VALERA.6): Kravet, kravet.com. Chandelier (“Sorbonne” #CL0028.NI): Vaughan, vaughndesign.com. Mirror over mantel (custom): Artisans Art & Frame, 202/333-4093. Sconces flanking mantel: owner’s collection. Drapery (“Chrysanthemum”/Lemongrass #800224H-717, by Highland Court, discontinued): Duralee, duralee.com. Drapery rods: Lundy’s lundysiron.com. Tabletop—White, green and gold plate (vintage Orington Bros., France); white-and-gold plate (Royal Worcester): owner’s collection. Pages 104–105. Living room toward dining room—Wing chair (#6200 ): Baker, bakerfurniture.com. Wing-chair fabric , front (“Bella Diamond” #2801-315, colorway discontinued): Lee Jofa, leejofa.com. Wing-chair fabric, back (by Anna French): Thibaut, thibautdesign.com. Side table to right of wing chair : The Kellogg Collection, kelloggcollection.com. Floor lamp behind wing chair (“Candlestick Swing Arm Floor Lamp” #S1012): Circa Lighting, circalighting.com. Wallpaper in niche bahind wing chair (“Labyrinth”/Celery #8209/4, Britannia Collection): Tyler Hall, tyler-hall.com Blue-and-white porcelain: owner’s collection. Foyer behind living room—Wallpaper (“Cordoba”/Tilleul #3054-02, by Manuel Canovas): Cowtan & Tout, cowtan.com. Ceiling paint (“Breath of Fresh Air” #806); trim paint (“White Dove” #OC-17): Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Console table (“Taylor Reed Classic Console”): owner’s collection. Lamp on console; mirror behind console; blue-and-white pot holding flowers: antique. Area rug (“Eulora”/Isle de France): Stark, starkcarpet .com. Hanging lantern (“Crowther”): Dennis & Leen, dennisandleen.com. Veranda—Wall paint: custom. Hanging lanterns (“Zenke”): McLean Lighting Works, mcleanlighting.com. Bench (Lutyen’s teak bench); mailbox to left of door (vintage, from London): owner’s collection. Pages 106–107. Foyer—Wallpaper (“Cordoba”/Tilleul ➤

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#03054-02, by Manuel Canovas); settee fabric (“Maroquin”/Verveine #4300-14, by Manuel Canovas): Cowtan & Tout, cowtan.com. Settee (custom): fabricated by J K Drapery Inc., 703/941-3788. Settee trim (“Vine Cord”/Seaport #TA5323.515): Kravet, kravet.com. Pillow on settee (“Sant’ Elmo” #2007102-5, colorway discontinued): Lee Jofa, leejofa.com. Art behind settee: owner’s collection. Living room toward fireplace—Wall and trim paint (“White Dove” #OC-17); ceiling paint (“Breath of Fresh Air” #806): Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Area rug: Stark, starkcarpet.com. Sofa (“Libby” #2339-1): Pearson, pearsonco.com. Sofa fabric (#15059-81 in Snow, discontinued): Duralee, duralee.com. Architectural renderings behind sofa (from Marché aux Puces, France): vintage. Mirror behind sofa: John Richard, johnrichard.com. Ottoman (“Ellsworth”): The Charles Stewart Co., charlesstewartcompany.com. Ottoman and pillow fabric (“Chirk Embroidery” #2008141-5, colorway discontinued): Lee Jofa, leejofa.com. Coffee table (“Athena Cocktail Table” #K25201K): Allan Knight, allan-knight.com. Round end table by sofa (antique): owner’s collection. Lamp on end table (“Moselle Ceramic Vase Lamp” #TV0028.XX): Vaughan, vaughandesigns.com. Pair of chairs opposite sofa (“Sterling Club” #CH616): Edward Ferrell + Lewis Mittman, ef-lm.com. Chair fabric (“Margate Damask Print”/Apple #173851): Schumacher, fschumacher.com. Drapery (“Athens” #124): Taffard, taffard.com. Drapery trim (custom Greek key trim): Rogers Custom Trims, rogerstrims.com. Drapery fabrication: J K Drapery Inc., 703/941-3788. Drapery hardware: Lundy’s, lundysiron.com. Art above mantel (by Lisa Tureson): Broadway Gallery, broadwaygalleries.net. Accessories on shelves by mantel: owner’s collection. Wing chair (#6200): Baker, bakerfurniture.,com. Wing-chair fabric, front (“Bella Diamond” #2801-315, by Groundworks, colorway discontinued): Lee Jofa, leejofa .com. Wing-chair fabric, back (by Anna French): Thibaut, thibautdesign.com. Side table to right of wing chair: The Kellogg Collection, kelloggcollection.com. Demilune table to right of wing chair (antique); mirror above demilune (antique): owner’s collection. Lamps on demilune: antique. Sunroom—Wall paint (“Wood Grain Brown” #2109-30); trim paint (“White Dove” #OC-17): Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Parsons table (custom): J K Drapery Inc., 703/941-3788. Wing chair; high-backed chair (antique): owner’s collection. Fabric on high-backed chair (“Temple Garden”/Appletini #173580): Schumacher, fschumacher.com. Lamps on parsons table (“Bamboo Mini-Porcelain Lamp” #L-M/1001BMA, discontinued): Festoni, festoni.com. Twig sculpture above table (antique store find); basket under table: owner’s collection. Pages 108–109. Family room—Wallcovering (“African Raffia”/White Wash #3404): Phillip Jeffries, phillipjeffries .com. Ceiling paint (“Breath of Fresh Air” #806, 25 percent): Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Drapery (“Kendra Texture”/Cocoa Brown #2298-5): Dogwood Fabrics, dogwoodfabrics.com. Area rug (“Pelagia”/ Chocolate #304): Stark, starkcarpet.com. Paint behind shelves in cabinet (“Citron” #74): Farrow & Ball, farrow-ball.com. Built-in bookshelves and window bench: existing. Window-seat cushion (“Colorado”/ Yellow #1-1205-040, colorway discontinued): JAB Anstoetz, jab.de. Trim (“Capri Lipcord”/Java #63353): Schumacher, fschumacher.com. Black-and-white pillow on window seat (“Ales”/Chocolat #4715-05, by Manuel Canovas): Cowtan & Tout, cowtan.com. Yellow trim (“Double Ruche Fringe”/Gold): Smith & Brighty, smithandbrighty.com. Yellow-and-white pillow on window seat (“Kabba Kabba”/Yellow #1914): by Martyn Lawrence Bullard, martynlawrencebullard.com. Pair of chairs (“Rowley Lounge Chair” #UC3111, Guy Chaddock Collection): Chaddock, chaddockhome.com. Chair fabric (“Zen”/Buttercup, by Sunbrella Outdoor, discontinued): Calico Corners, calicocorners.com. Pillow on yellow chair, ground fabric (#32072-10 in Brown, discontinued): Duralee, duralee.com. Center detail on pillow (“Bodrum Stripe”/Saffron #1309): Martyn Lawrence Bullard, martynlawrencebullard.com. Ottoman (custom): Charles Stewart, charlesstewartcompany.com. Ottoman fabric (“Zebra”/Brown #16366-002): Scalamandré, scalamandre .com. Tray on ottoman (large oval tray with handles #ATCBS208B): The Kellogg Collection, kelloggcollection .com. Sofa (“Bromley” #C230-808): Charles Stewart, charlesstewartcompany.com. Sofa fabric (“Sadler Chenille”/ Espresso #3444001): Schumacher, fschumacher.com.

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Square end tables: Salvations, salvatonsaf.com. Pillows on sofa (“Lyford Pagoda Petit,” by China Seas): Quadrille, quadrillefabrics.com. Trim (“Dolce Marabout”/Chocolate Chip #983-45496-07): Samuel & Sons, samuelandsons. com. White sofa table (“Peony Console” #7777-10, by Mariette Himes Gomez): Hickory Chair, hickorychair.com. Table lamp (“Round Balustrade Table Lamp in Crystal” #SL3339 with Silk Box Pleated Shade): Circa Lighting, circalighting.com. Kitchen eating area—Table: Antique Designs through American Eye, americaneyewdc.net. Slipcovered chair; lantern: owner’s collection. Art: by David Oleski, davidoleski.com. Lantern color (“Yorktowne Green” #HC-133 with antique silver trim): Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com.

Pages 110–117 HOLIDAY PLUMAGE Architect for remodel: David May, May Architects, 4616 25th Ave. N.E., Suite 377, Seattle, WA 98105; 206/245-0661, mayarch.com. Interior designer: Kristi Spouse, Kristi Spouse Interiors, 425/269-9672, kristispouseinteriors.com. Pages 110–113. Living room—Wall paint (“Winter Snow” #OC-63): Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Sofa (“Lampert Sectional”/Brussels Charcoal, antiqued velvet); cocktail table (“Radcliffe” #17527); blue upholstered chairs (“Haines”/Venice Peacock, velvet #8096): Jonathan Adler, jonathanadler.com. Benches in front of fireplace (“Tibetan Lamb Chrome Stool”/ Natural): Clayton Gray Home, claytongrayhome.com. Mirror over fireplace (“Silver Beaded Mirror”); silver wreath on mirror (product line varies): Pottery Barn, potterybarn.com. Stockings on mantel; end table between blue chairs: owner’s collection. Area rug (“Shagariffic”/Ivory #3001, by Royal Dutch): Stanton, stantoncarpet.com. Chairs by fireplace (“Casper Dining Armchair” #EEI-121-CLR): LexMod, lexmod.com. Sconces above fireplace (#102-12): Corbett Lighting, corbettlighting.com. Console table/bar (“Frank” FRANK-CONSL #VK-27): Pangea Home, pangeahomeus .com. Tall candesticks on console table/bar (“Orissa Pillar Holders”): Z Gallerie, zgallerie.com. Blue vases on bottom shelf of console/bar (product line varies): Home Essentials, homeessentials.com. Barcelona-style chairs; hide rug: HauteLook, hautelook.com. Grandfather clock (pine): antique. Foyer—Wall paint (“Winter Snow” #OC-63): Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Gray paint on upper wall (“Silver Cuff Links” #VM155): Ralph Lauren Home, ralphlaurenhome .com. Flooring: 3-inch oak floors dyed black with espresso stain. Carpet on stairs (Berber): Shaw, shawfloors.com. Victorian hall mirror: antique. Sconces (“Rockland” #8421-PN): Hudson Valley Lighting, hudsonvalleylighting.com. Hanging pendant (“Aberdeen Chandelier”): Hudson Valley Lighting, hudsonvalleylighting.com. Pages 114–115. Sitting room off kitchen—Pair of chairs (“Porter”); chair fabric (“Faye”/Navy): Kim Salmela, kimsalmela.com. Console table: One King’s Lane, onekingslane.com. Table lamp (“Bourgie Table Lamp,” by Kartell): Lightology, lightology.com. “S” wall hanging: Joss & Main, jossandmain.com. Area rug (custom, Berber): Shaw, shawfloors.com. Bench in front of chairs (“Iron CowhideX-Base Bench,” discontinued): Arteriors, arteriorshome.com. Kitchen—Wall and cabinet paint (“Winter Snow” #OC-63): Benjamin Moore, benjamimoore.com. Cabinetry: custom. Cabinetry hardware (“Bronte Round Pull”/Brushed Nickel #314): Atlas, atlashomewares.com. Backsplash (beveled white subway tile): Oregon Tile & Marble, oregontileandmarble.com. Countertop: Venatino marble. Range: Viking, vikingrange.com. Sink: Houzer, houzersink.com. Sink faucet (“ProMaster” #K-6330): Kohler, kohler.com. Pot filler (“Chesterfield”/Polished Chrome #9481, in finish 26): Newport Brass, newportbrass.com. Dining table (custom): ModShop, modshop1 .com. Bar stools (“#1006 Navy Bar Stool,” by Emeco): Design Within Reach, dwr.com. Dining room—Table (custom); side chairs (“Louis Dining Chair”/Charcoal Velvet); host chairs (“Ultra Tall Mod Wing Dining Chair”/Charcoal Velvet): ModShop, modshop1.com. Chandeliers (“Empire 12-light Crystal Chandelier,” by Worldwide Lighting): Wayfair, wayfair.com. Pair of armoires: antique. Stemware (“Sandra”): Crate & Barrel, crateandbarrel.com. Charger (by Celebrate It); candle centerpiece; peacock feathers: Michaels, michaels.com. Dinnerware: Sur La Table, surlatable

.com. Flatware (“Celtic Braid” by Waterford): Replacements Ltd., replacements.com. Flooring: 3-inch oak floors, dyed black with espresso stain. Pages 116–117. Powder room—Wall paint (“Winter Snow” #OC-63): Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Wallpaper (#SBK13532, Como Collection, by Printers Guild Productions, colorway discontinued): Seabrook, seabrookwallpaper.com. Sink (“Retrospect” #0282.008); sink stand (“Retrospect” #8711.000): American Standard, americanstandard.com. Faucets (#N38002, discontinued): Belle Foret, belleforet.com. Mirror (“Parisian Mirror”/Glossy White #5152146): Rosenberry Rooms, rosenberryrooms.com. Cabinet (“Curly Half Round Cabinet”/White, discontinued): Worlds Away, worldsaway.com. Bedroom—Paint on upper walls (“Silver Cuff Links” #VM155): Ralph Lauren Home, ralphlaurenhome.com. Paint on lower walls (“Winter Snow” #OC-63): Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Bed: antique. Bedding: owner’s collection. Table lamp (“Mariposa,” discontinued): Z Gallerie, zgallerie.com. Nightstand (“Annecy Metal-Wrapped Closed Nightstand”/Zinc): Restoration Hardware, rh.com.

Pages 118–125 IN THE PINK Architect: Charles A. Aquino, Charles Aquino Architect, 417 North Blvd., Richmond, VA 23220; 804/354-0614, charlesaquinoarchitect.com. Interior designer: Janie Molster, Janie Molster Designs, 3600 Douglasdale Rd., Richmond, VA 23221; 804/282-0938, janiemolsterdesigns.com. Landscape architect: Preston C. Dalrymple & Assoc., 12201 Gayton Rd., Henrico, VA 23238; 804/740-9308. Landscape design: Terry Tosh, Abbie Wharton, and Sue Thompson, Garden Graces, LLC, 9800 Mayland Drive, Richmond, VA 23233; 804/387-1849 and 804/389-3631. Builder: Mako Builders Inc., 7677 Hill Drive, Richmond, VA 23225; 804/272-8549, makobuildersinc.com. Pages 118–119. Sunroom—Wall paint: custom, mixed on site. Upholstered sofa: Lee Industries, leeindustries .com. Block-print pillows (vintage): Janie Molster Designs, janiemolsterdesigns.com. Rattan chair (for similar, “Campaign Arm Chair” #7418): Palecek, palecek .com. Chair fabric (“Waterlily”/Espresso, Pink #GWF-#2631.68, by Groundworks): Lee Jofa, leejofa .com. . Cocktail table (discontinued); chandelier (discontinued): Oly, olystudio.com. Carpet (“Tresor”): Masland Carpets & Rugs, maslandcarpets.com. Area rug (antique); Gothic windows (antique): Janie Molster Designs, janiemolsterdesigns.com. Tree: owner’s collection. Large ball ornaments: Christmas Central, christmascentral.com. Drapery (“Cordelia Sheer”/Bone #55971): Schumacher, fschumacher.com. Bench next to tree (“Athena”): Worlds Away, worldsaway.com. Pages 120–121. Entry hall—Wall paint (custom): created on site. Sofa: family heirloom. Sofa fabric: discontinued. Cocktail table (“Benton Accent Table”): Port 68, port68 .com. Available from Candelabra, shopcandelabra.com. Side table (“Gloria” #SCH-240310): Gabby Home, gabbyhome.com. Lamp on table (“Cannes Table Lamp #ARN3100, by Aerin for Visual Comfort): Circa Lighting, circalighting.com. Art (by Alison Cooley): Page Bond Gallery, pagebondgallery.com. Gold embroidery pillows: Ankasa, ankasa.com. Green ombre pillows: Kevin O’Brien Studio, kevinobrienstudio.com. Chairs (antique): Kim Faison Antiques, kimfaisonantiques.com. Rug (antique Kaisery): Janie Molster Designs, janiemolsterdesigns.com. Family room toward fireplace—Paint: custom, mixed on site. Lounge chair; round stool (“Drum Ottoman” #9203-10): Lee Industries. Chair fabric; stool fabric (“Timon”/Citron #1804): Pindler & Pindler, pindler.com. Pillow (by Etamine): Zimmer + Rohde, zimmer-rohde.com. Art above mantel (by Henry Greenewalt): Dwelling & Design, dwellinganddesign.com. Area rug (“Willoughby”/Bay Pearl): Stark, starkcarpet.com. Side table in sunroom— Paint: custom, mixed on site. Console table (“Reclaimed Lumber Spanish Console” #OW051): CFC, customfurniturela.com. Available through Homespun Design, homespundesign.com. Art (by Frankie Slaughter): Glave Kocen Gallery, glavekocengallery.com. Silver trees: owner’s collection. Pages 122–123. Family room toward kitchen—Mirrors (antique): Janie Molster Designs, janiemolsterdesigns .com. Sofa (#C3106-11); sofa fabric (“Riva”/Dune): Lee Industries, leeindustries.com. Ottoman (“Louis Upholstered Ottoman,” discontinued”): Ballard ➤


P R O MOTION

DESIGN FILE OUR FAVORITE EVENTS, PRODUCTS + PROMOTIONS

Holiday House NYC 2015 Celebrate the best in interior design and holiday entertaining while supporting the fight against breast cancer. The eighthannual Holiday House NYC features rooms by top designers, plus special events and programs throughout its run from November 11-December 2. Open daily 11–5 & Thurdays until 8 2 East 63rd Street, NYC Admission: $35 Tickets and details at holidayhousenyc.com.

Traditional Home’s Bedroom Design Guide What does it take to make your bedroom a beautiful and restful haven? From lighting to linens, furniture to mattresses, discover helpful advice in Traditional Home’s Beautiful Bedrooms online guide, sponsored by Stearns & Foster. Live October 19 at traditionalhome.com/beautifulbedrooms

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Check out the designers’ boards and learn more at TraditionalHome.com/BenMoore

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Traditional Home and Benjamin Moore have teamed up with New Trad designers, Cecily Mendell, Ginger Brewton, and Heather Garrett to create Pinterest boards that embody “traditional-with-a-twist,” using Benjamin Moore’s newest color collections.

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Designs, ballarddesigns.com. Ottoman fabric: Pindler & Pindler, pindler.com. Lamps (“Bienville Table Lamp” #TA1126): Flambeau Lighting, flambeaulighting.com. Side tables: Accents Beyond Inc., accentsbeyond.com. Rounded-back chair (#1213-01): Lee Industries, leeindustries.com. Chair fabric (“Soma”/Citrine, discontinued): Pindler & Pindler, pindler.com. Club chair (#3794-01): Lee Industries, leeindustries.com. Striped pillow fabric (by Etamine): Zimmer + Rohde, zimmer-rohde.com. Breakfast room—Paint: custom, mixed on site. Table: Calligaris, caligaris.us. Dining side and arm chairs (“Chloe”): Bungalow 5, bungalow5.com. Chair-seat fabric; stool and bar-stool fabric (“Micah” #1008, colorway discontinued): Pindler & Pindler, pindler.com. Stools (“Bongo Ottoman” #9045-00): Lee Industries, leeindustries.com. Chandelier (“Serena Drum Chandelier”): Oly, olystudio.com. Bar stool at right (“Biedermeier Counter Stool”): O’Brien Ironworks, obrienironworks.com. Dining room—Wallpaper (grasscloth): discontinued. Ceiling paint: custom, mixed on site. Dining table: Artifacts International, artifactsinternational.com. Chairs (“Provence” #2864): Artistic Frame, artisticframe.com. Chair fabric: Schumacher, fschumacher.com. Chandelier (antique); sideboard (antique); mirror (antique); armoire (antique); area rug (antique): Janie Molster Designs, janiemolsterdesigns.com. Dinnerware (“Queen Victoria”): Herend, herendusa.com. Stemware; flatware; vase holding roses: owner’s collection. Pages 124–125. Master bedroom—Paint: custom, mixed on site. Bed (custom); bench in window (antique): Janie Molster Designs, janiemolsterdesigns.com. Bed linens; pillows: owner’s collection. Bench fabric (discontinued): Lee Jofa, leejofa.com. Bench at foot of bed (“Nori Lizard Bench” #175087): Interlude Home, interludehome.com. Bedside table: Bungalow 5, bungalow5.com. Lamp (“Ananas”): Ro Sham Beaux, ro-sham-beaux.com. Art above bed (by Karen Blair): Page Bond Gallery, pagebondgallery.com. Chandelier (“Versailles Small Chandelier” #89252): Arteriors, arteriorshome.com. Window shades (“Rainforest”/Birch): Horizons Natural Woven Shades, horizonshaes.com. Carpet (“Ellipse”/ Oatmeal, White): Stark, starkcarpet.com. Mirror; throw: owner’s collection. Back porch—Chairs (Catalina Collection): Restoration Hardware, rh.com. Pillows (“NTB Estate Pillow in Black” #V750010, by Villa Home): Burke Decor, burkedecor.com. Rug (antique, Beni Ourain): Janie Molster Designs, janiemolsterdesigns.com. Garden stools (“Cloud Scroll Stool” #1927CR): Emissary, emissaryusa.com. Front exterior— Fountain: Elegant Earth, elegantearth.com. through Janie Molster Designs, janiemolsterdesigns.com.

Pages 126–133 ALL IS BRIGHT Interior designer: Shelley Johnstone Paschke, Shelley Johnstone Design, 140 E. Ridge Lane, Lake Forest, IL 60045; 847/235-2076, shelleydesign.com. Pages 126–127. Exterior—Lanterns at front door: original to home. Planters: Munder-Skiles, munderskiles.com. Greek key edging (custom design); garage lanterns (custom): Shelley Johnstone Design, shelleydesign.com. Pages 128–129. Living room toward tree—Secretary (mahogany): antique. Chair next to secretary: owner’s collection. Chair-seat cushion (“Bellini Stripe” #103225, discontinued): Cowtan & Tout, cowtan.com. Pillow on chair (ikat): Bermingham & Co., berminghamfabrics.com. Through Brunschwig & fils, brunschwig.com. Living room toward bay window—Drapery and trim: Scalamandré, scalamandre.com. Drapery hardware: Van Gregory & Norton, vangregoryandnorton.com. Through Dessin Fournir, dessinfournir.com. Roman shade (“Bellini Stripe” #103225, discontinued): Cowtan & Tout, cowtan.com. Banquette (custom): Shelley Johnstone Design, shelleydesign.com. Banquette fabric (silk velvet, by Old World Weavers): Stark, starkcarpet.com. Banquette trim (“Aristotle Greek Key”): Samuel & Sons, samuelandsons.com. Pillow on banquette, center; pillows on chairs (silk ikat); pillow on banquette, right: Bermingham & Co, berminghamfabrics.com. Available through Brunschwig & Fils, brunschwig.com. Bergères: antique. Bergère fabric (silk velvet): Brunschwig & Fils, brunschwig.com. Trim on bergères: Scalamandré, scalamandre.com. Cocktail tables (glass-and-brass, midcentury): Négrel Antiques, negrelantiques.com. Architectural drawings:

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owner’s collection. Flower photograph behind bergère: Shelley Johnstone Design, shelleydesign.com. Living room toward fireplace—Wall paint (“Feather Down” #OC-6); ceiling and trim paint (“Linen White” #912): Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Area rug (Aubusson): Stark, starkcarpet.com. Sofa: George Smith London, georgesmith.co.uk. Sofa fabric (damask in color, Elephant, discontinued): Peter Jones London, johnlewis.com. Striped pillows on sofa (“Bellini Stripe” #103225, discontinued): Cowtan & Tout, cowtan.com. Lounge chair: Edward Ferrell + Lewis Mittman, ef-lm .com. Chair fabric; tape trim on skirt: Scalamandré, scalamandre.com. Fauteuil: antique. Fauteuil fabric: Edelman Leather, edelmanleather.com. Brass side table: Viya Home, viyahome.com. Available through Stephanie Odegard, stephanie odegard.com. Coffee table (custom, lacquered brown); sofa side table (custom, tortoise finish): Shelley Johnstone Design, shelleydesign.com. Mirror (Italian): antique. Portrait—Silk top: Shellkare Designs, shellkare.com. Pages 130–131. Dining room—Wall fabric (“Fortuny style Venezia Portofino” #SSF200c, damask, discontinued): Brunschwig & Fils, brunschwig.com. Dining table (mahogany); side chairs: antique. Chair leather (chocolate brown): Edelman Leather, edelmanleather .com. Chandelier (“Iron & Crystal Chandelier”): Niermann Weeks, niermannweeks.com. Area rug (sisal): Stark Carpet, starkcarpet.com. Sideboard: owner’s collection. Lamps (opaline, vintage): Donald Stuart Antiques, 847/501-4454. Placemats (linen): Shellkare Designs, shellkare.com. Water goblets (“Kelsey”): Waterford, waterford.com. Champagne flutes (“Pearl”): William Yeoward, williamyeowardcrystal.com. China: antique Staffordshire. Soup bowls: Lenox, lenox.com. Tea glasses: owner’s collection. Flatware: antique. Flowers on table: Lord & Mar Ltd., 847/295-5456. Dining room toward sideboard—Sideboard; mirror over commode: antique. Lamps on commode (opaline, vintage): Donald Stuart Antiques, 847/501-4454. Reindeer: Pasquesi Home and Gardens, pasquesi.com. Foo dogs: Shelley Johnstone Design, shelleydesign.com. Angel: Neiman Marcus, neimanmarcus.com. Chairs flanking sideboard: antique. Foyer—Console table by stairs (Regency shelf motif with custom black granite top): vintage. Bench: owner’s collection. Trellis room—Wall and trim paint: Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Ceiling paint: custom lacquered to match Hermès box orange. Trellis on wall and hanging lantern (custom design by Shelley Johnstone Design): Northworks Architects + Planners, nwks.com. Banquette (custom): Shelley Johnstone Design, shelleydesign.com. Banquette fabric (“Taos Velvet,” by Old World Weavers): Stark Carpet, starkcarpet.com. Greek Key tape trim (“Aristotle Greek Key”): Samuel & Sons, samuelandsons.com. Iron chairs (Italian style): vintage. Chair leather: Edelman Leather, edelmanleather.com. Mirror (“Starburst Mirror”): Mecox, mecox.com. Iron coffee table (“Chinese Fret Coffee Table”): Niermann Weeks, niermannweeks.com. Pages 132–133. Library—Area rug (“Antelope Ax”): Stark Carpet, starkcarpet.com. Decorative painting on ceiling (custom design by Shelley Johnstone Design): Simes Studios, simesstudios.com. Rattan chairs: vintage. Seat cushions: Rogers & Goffigon, 203/5328068. Lithograph (by Salvador Dali): owner’s collection. Backgammon table (made from Brunschwig & Fils tea table): custom. Light over bookshelf (“Boston Functional Library Wall Light” #SL2922): Circa Lighting, circalighting.com. Drapery (“Gramercy Park”/ Cream #D07721): Coraggio, coraggio.com. Tree skirt (from Rome): owner’s collection. Solarium—Paint (“Spring in Aspen” #954): Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Sofa (“Kames”): Crate & Barrel, crateandbarrel.com. Pillow fabric (“Chevron,” by Michelle Nussbaumer Textiles): Ceylon et Cie, ceylonetcie.com. Pillow fabric (“Leopard,” by Old World Weavers): Stark Carpet, starkcarpet.com. Sofa end table: vintage. Chairs: owner’s collection. Chair and drapery fabric (discontinued): Brunschwig & Fils, brunschwig.com. Coffee table (custom): Shelley Johnstone Design, shelleydesign.com. Area rug: jute.

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February/March issue on sale January 19, 2016

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, AND CIRCULATION (Requester Publications Only) 1. Publication Title: Traditional Home. 2. Publication Number: 004-465. 3. Filing Date: 10/01/2015. 4. Issue Frequency: February/March, April, May, June, July/August, September, October, November/December. 5. Number of Issues Published Annually: 8. 6. Annual Subscription Price: $24.00. 7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication: 1716 Locust Street, Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa 50309-3023. 8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher: 1716 Locust Street, Des Moines, Iowa 50309-3023. 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor: Publisher: Beth McDonough, 805 Third Avenue, New York, New York, 10022; Editor: Ann Maine, 1716 Locust Street, Des Moines, Iowa, 50309-3023; Managing Editor: Michael Diver, 1716 Locust Street, Des Moines, Iowa, 50309-3023. 10. Owner: Meredith Corporation, 1716 Locust Street, Des Moines, IA 50309-3023. The names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock: Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. (0010), Attn: Jerry Travers, 525 Washington Blvd., Jersey City, NJ 07310; Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, LLC (0015), Attn: John Barry, 1300 Thames Street, 6th Floor, Baltimore, MD 21231; Brown Brothers Harriman & Co./ETF (0109), Attn: Jerry Travers, 525 Washington Blvd., Jersey City, NJ 07310; First Clearing, LLC (0141), Attn: Matt Buettner, 2801 Market Street, H0006-09B, St. Louis, MO 63103; Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. (0164), Attn: Christina Young, 2423 E. Lincoln Drive, Phoenix, AZ 85016-1215; National Financial Services, LLC (0226), Attn: Sean Cole, 499 Washington Blvd., Jersey City, NJ 07310; The Bank of New York Mellon (0901), Attn: Jennifer May, 525 William Penn Place, Suite 153-0400, Pittsburgh, PA 15259; JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association (0902), Attn: Marcin Bieganski, Associate, 14201 Dallas Pkwy., 12th Floor, Corp Actions Dept, Dallas, TX 75254; The Bank of New York Mellon/Mellon Trust (0954), Attn: Jennifer May, 525 William Penn Place, Suite 153-0400, Pittsburgh, PA 15259; State Street Bank and Trust Company (0997), Attn: Christine Sullivan, 1776 Heritage Drive, North Quincy, MA 02171; Comerica Bank (2108) Attn: Gloria Imhoff, 411 West Lafayette, Detroit, MI 48226; The Bank of New York Mellon/Mid Cap (2209), Attn: Jennifer May, Vice President, 525 William Penn Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15259; JPMorgan Chase Bank/IA (2357), Attn: Marcin Bieganski, Associate, 14201 Dallas Pkwy., 12th Floor, Corp Actions Dept, Dallas, TX 75254; The Northern Trust Company (2669), Attn: Andrew Lussen, Team Leader, 801 S. Canal Street, Attn: Capital Structures-C1N, Chicago, IL 60607; SSB–Blackrock Institutional Trust (2767), Attn: Trina Estremera, 1776 Heritage Drive, North Quincy, MA 02171; U.S. Bank N.A. (2803), Attn: Stephanie Storch, 1555 N Rivercenter Drive, Suite 302, Milwaukee, WI 53212. Through some of the nominees listed above, the E. T. Meredith and Bohen families and family foundations own, directly or beneficially, approximately 16% of the issued and outstanding stock of the corporation. Each nominee listed above holds stock for one or more stockholders. 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities: None. 12. Tax Status (For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) (Check one): The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: __ Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months __ Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement) Not applicable. 13. Publication Title: Traditional Home 14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below: October 2015 15. Extent and Nature of Circulation Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run): 1,080,531 b. Legitimate Paid and/or Requested Distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail): (1) Outside County Paid/Requested Mail Subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541 (Include direct written request from recipient, telemarketing, and Internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies.): 709,876 (2) In-County Paid/Requested Mail Subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541. (Include direct written request from recipient, telemarketing, and Internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies.): 0 (3) Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid or Requested Distribution Outside USPS®: 76,257 (4) Requested Copies Distributed by Other Mail Classes Through the USPS (e.g., First-Class Mail®): 0 c. Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation (Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4)): 786,133 d. Nonrequested Distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail): (1) Outside County Nonrequested Copies Stated on PS Form 3541 (include Sample copies, Requests Over 3 years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association Requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists, and other sources): 49,023 (2) In-County Nonrequested Copies Stated on PS Form 3541 (include Sample copies, Requests Over 3 years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association Requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists, and other sources): 0 (3) Nonrequested Copies Distributed Through the USPS by Other Classes of Mail (e.g., First-Class Mail, Nonrequestor Copies mailed in excess of 10% Limit mailed at Standard Mail® or Package Services Rates): 0 (4) Nonrequested Copies Distributed Outside the Mail (Include Pickup Stands, Trade Shows, Showrooms, and Other Sources): 5,876 e. Total Nonrequested Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)): 54,898 f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and e): 841,031 g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4, (page #3)): 239,500 h. Total (Sum of 15f and g): 1,080,531 i. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation (15c divided by 15f times 100): 93.47% No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run): 1,064,025 b. Legitimate Paid and/or Requested Distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail): (1) Outside County Paid/Requested Mail Subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541. (Include direct written request from recipient, telemarketing, and Internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies.): 720,831 (2) In-County Paid/Requested Mail Subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541. (Include direct written request from recipient, telemarketing, and Internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies.): 0 (3) Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid or Requested Distribution Outside USPS®: 76,308 (4) Requested Copies Distributed by Other Mail Classes Through the USPS (e.g., First-Class Mail®): 0 c. Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation (Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4)): 797,139 d. Nonrequested Distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail): (1) Outside County Nonrequested Copies Stated on PS Form 3541 (include Sample copies, Requests Over 3 years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association Requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists, and other sources): 49,457 (2) In-County Nonrequested Copies Stated on PS Form 3541 (include Sample copies, Requests Over 3 years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association Requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists, and other sources): 0 (3) Nonrequested Copies Distributed Through the USPS by Other Classes of Mail (e.g., First-Class Mail, Nonrequestor Copies mailed in excess of 10% Limit mailed at Standard Mail® or Package Services Rates): 0 (4) Nonrequested Copies Distributed Outside the Mail (Include Pickup Stands, Trade Shows, Showrooms, and Other Sources): 4,429 e. Total Nonrequested Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)): 53,885 f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and e): 851,025 g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4, (page #3)): 213,000 h. Total (Sum of 15f and g): 1,064,025 i. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation (15c divided by 15f times 100): 93.67% 16. Electronic Copy Circulation Average No. Copies Each Issue During Previous 12 Months a. Requested and Paid Electronic Copies: 0 b. Total Requested and Paid Print Copies (Line 15c) + Requested/Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a): 0 c. Total Requested Copy Distribution (Line 15f) + Requested/Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a): 0 d. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation (Both Print & Electronic Copies) (16b divided by 16c × 100): 0 I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are legitimate requests or paid copies. No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date a. Requested and Paid Electronic Copies: 0 b. Total Requested and Paid Print Copies (Line 15c) + Requested/Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a): 0 c. Total Requested Copy Distribution (Line 15f) + Requested/Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a): 0 d. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation (Both Print & Electronic Copies) (16b divided by 16c × 100): 0 I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are legitimate requests or paid copies. 17. Publication of Statement of Ownership for a Requester Publication is required and will be printed in the November/December 2015 issue of this publication. 18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner: Trish Schroder. Date: 8/11/15. I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).


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Name Rebecca Proctor Hometown Ithaca, New York Occupation Creative Director for MacKenzie-Childs Mother knows best “My mother was from the Deep South, a real Georgia peach, and she had a great sense of humor. I’m told that from the time I was about 9, I was constantly rearranging the furniture. I was very small but quite mighty! Once I moved our piano (by myself ) down two steps into another room. When my mother saw it, instead of scolding me, she said, ‘Is that really where you want it?’” She lives with eyes wide open “My list of fashion and design icons is so long that it couldn’t possibly fit on a page. From Charles Rennie Mackintosh to Jean Paul Gaultier, history books to antique shops, and Iris Apfel’s point of view to the way Chaplin cinched his trousers: Inspiration comes from everywhere.” She’s a storyteller “Our home is an environment we’ve created ourselves. It feels very personal, sort of like a diary. Someone said, ‘Collect the things that are authentic to you, and your house becomes your story.’ That really speaks to me.” She’s our style icon “I would say my style is quite eclectic, a bit romantic, and a little unpredictable. I love vintage clothing and have collected funky clothes through the years—embroidered coats from India, stacks of striped sailor shirts. In a way, my style reflects the way we design—a lot of layers, inspiration from the past, with patterns and textures mixed together in playful ways.” Artisans make the world go ’round “The ability to invent and make things is what defines a culture. Wouldn’t you rather have something made by hand, something that’s truly individual and says something about the person who made it?” I am traditional She collects teapots and demitasse spoons, dreams about opening a pastry shop straight out of a Wes Anderson film, and loves storytelling.

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November+December 2015

TRADITIONAL HOME® (ISSN 883-4660); November/December 2015, Volume XXVI, Issue VIII, is published eight times a year in February/March, April, May, June, July/August, September, October, and November/December by Meredith Corporation, 1716 Locust Street, Des Moines, IA 50309-3023. Periodicals postage paid at Des Moines, IA, and at additional mailing offices. Subscription prices, $24 per year in the U.S.; $32 (U.S. dollars) in Canada; $32 (U.S. dollars) overseas. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 707.4.12.5); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: send address corrections to Traditional Home Magazine, P.O. Box 37508, Boone, IA 50037-0508. In Canada: mailed under Publications Mail Sales Product Agreement No. 40069223; Canadian BN 12348 2887 RT. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to Traditional Home Magazine, 2835 Kew D, Windsor, ON, N8T 3B7. ©Meredith Corporation 2015. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

PRODUCED BY JENNY BRADLEY PFEFFER P H O T O G R A P H BY KAT H E R I N E O S B O R N


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