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no.1 for canon DSLR users Issue 105 • Oct 2015

super test! best beginner EOS cameras

750D, 700D, 100D & 1200D

massive expert guide

make your photos pay today!

Build an online portfolio • Stock library secrets • Set up successful workshops Discover your speciality • Sell your prints • Shoot the perfect wedding

dslr techniques

shoot the rapids! Canon pro Guy Edwardes teaches you how to capture wild waterfall photos

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CANON CITY guide & essential guide to PORTRAITS ebook worth £6.95

canon pro interview

life in the fast lane

Drew Gibson on how to take unique motorsports shots new lens tests

super sigma

You won’t believe how sharp this 24mm f/1.4 wide lens is!


LIFE IN THE FAST LANE

Brilliant professional motorsports shooter Drew Gibson reveals his unique approach to capturing the world’s fastest cars on camera Page 62

Our Guarantee

Welcome... A

Peter Travers Editor

s editor of the biggest and best Canon DSLR photography magazine, I get to meet lots of readers, many of which aspire to ‘go pro’ one day. Whether you have desires to become semi- or fully professional, or are just interested in making a little pocket money from selling your images, our massive Make Cash With Your Canon guide this issue will help you take your hobby to next level. Over 12 pages, it’s packed with expert advice on all you need to know, including success stories from those pros who have made it. See page 28. This issue landscape pro photographer Guy Edwardes teaches our Apprentice how to capture wicked waterfall scenic shots (page 8) as they both get wet and go wild in the Brecon Beacons in Wales. Talented motorsports photographer Drew Gibson reveals the Canon kit and techniques he uses to capture truly inspiring shots of racing cars in this issue’s interview (page 62). While in Canon School you can learn how your Canon DSLR’s metering system works (page 82). In our Canon Skills section we have some lovely new projects for you to try, including how to capture beautiful black-and-white fine art nude photos, shooting and creating a time-lapse movie of a sunset, and great new Photoshop Elements, CC and Lightroom imaging tutorials. These are all backed up with easy-to-follow videos to help you really nail these new camera and image-editing techniques. As well our free videos, we’re giving you a free Essential Guide to Family Portraits with your Canon DSLR ebook worth £6.95, and a free Canon City Photo Guide on Madrid. More details over the page.

• We’re the only photo magazine in the newsagent that’s 100% dedicated to Canon EOS DSLR OWNERs so we’re 100% relevant to your needs.

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• We’re proud to use the World’s top Canon photographers and experts. Meet them on page 6.

New deals! Great print & digital edition subscriptions The Canon Magazine

PAGE 26 3


CONTENTS 40

70

28

Learn pro secrets

Make cash with

your Canon

Take your hobby to the next level with expert advice from the very best pro photographers

Essentials

Canon pros

This issue’s gallery section is given over to close-up shots of flowers from the Garden Photographer of the Year contest

Overcast sky and chucking it down? Ideal conditions for shooting waterfalls, then…

18 Inspirational Canon imagery 8 The Apprentice David Noton On Location 40 Subscribe today 26 The Canon Conversation 62 28 Make cash with your Canon 78 My Kit 70 Photo Stories Canon School 76 Focus Point 82 Canon DSLR Essentials 129 Next issue 88 Software Solutions 130 Canondrum 93 EOS S.O.S Pre-book a year’s worth of PhotoPlus in print, digital – or, best of all, both…

We examine how you can develop your hobby into a nice little earner, from selling stock shots to shooting weddings… A selection of your very best photographs – and the stories behind them

This is the place for you to air your views on the mag and all things photographic Coming soon in your not-to-bemissed next instalment of PhotoPlus… Quizmaster Chris is even more terrifying to pit your wits against than that lot from TV quiz show The Chase

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Our globetrotting travel photographer spends a few days in the Canadian Rockies

We put the pedal to the metal and grill motorsports pro photographer Drew Gibson David Clapp usually travels with everything but the kitchen sink – we force him to cut down to six must-have bits of kit

Boss your Canon’s metering system for spot-on exposures every time…

Selectively adjust colours in DPP and share your shots via Image Browser EX No Canon-related question is too big – or too small – for our expert Brian to tackle…

New tests

100 Gear Update 102 Mini Test: gimbal heads Test: Sigma 24mm 104 Full f/1.4 DG HSM A Kit out your Canon with an assortment of must-have accessories

Swing your super-telephoto around with ease with these specialized tripod heads

Sigma continues the roll-out of its high-end ‘Art’ lenses with a sublimely sharp wide prime

Test: 106 Super entry-level DSLRs

We pit Canon’s beginners’ lineup of EOS DSLRs against each other, from the 100D to 750D

118 Complete Buyers’

104

Guide for DSLRs and lenses

Every current Canon EOS DSLR – plus every available Canon-fit lens from Canon, Sigma, Tamron, Tokina and more! www.digitalcameraworld.com


Issue 105 October 2015

THIS MONTH’S

FREE

62

videos

106

9 ways to improve your photography today

44

Project 1: Light and pose a model for a variety of fine art nude images

Free! The essential guide to Family portraits Free 161-page ebook dedicated to Canon DSLRs users, worth £6.95! Download your free copy from www.ninabailey.co.uk/ pp/family.html

Free! Official canon photo guides No.4 Magical Madrid Download the fourth of six Canon photo guides for Europe’s most photogenic cities from our Video Disc or from this handy link: http://downloads. photoplusmag.com/ City_Guide_-_Madrid.pdf

The Canon Magazine

52

48

Project 3: Shoot simple, classic fine art stock shots at home

Photoshop elements

Photoshop CC

56

58

Project 4: Make the time fly Tutorial 1: Use Photoshop Elements’ graphics to create by shooting and editing a fantastic portraits time-lapse movie Lightroom

Canon DPP

60

88

Tutorial 3: Make your own prints at home using simple templates

50

Project 2: Construct a digital pinhole camera for your DSLR

Canon School: Selectively enhance and adjust colours and tones in Canon DPP

Tutorial 2: Core retouching skills for professionallooking portraits Canon Image Browser EX

91

Canon School: Share your favourite photos with Canon Image Browser EX

READ THE TUTORIALS… THEN WATCH OUR EXPERT VIDEOS

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To view our ‘pop-out’ videos, tap these badges that appear alongside the tutorials inside the magazine, or type the link that appears alongside into your web browser.

THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THESE VIDEO TUTORIALS ARE 100% INDEPENDENT AND NOT ENDORSED OR SPONSORED BY CANON OR ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED

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Meet the team... Print 20,240 Digital 4,289 The ABC combined print, digital and digital publication circulation for Jan-Dec 2014 is

24,529 A member of the Audited Bureau of Circulations

Who we are, what we do, and our favourite bits of issue 105…

PhotoPlus: The Canon Magazine, Future Publishing, Quay House, The Ambury, Bath BA1 1UA Editorial +44 (0)1225 442244 photoplus@futurenet.com

Peter Travers

Adam Waring

peter.travers@futurenet.com

adam.waring@futurenet.com

Editor • 5D Mark III

Operations editor • 7D

Peter often meets readers asking for advice on how to go pro – now he can point them to this issue’s Make Cash With Your Canon big expert guide. Page 28

Adam’s a big nude photography fan, although we prefer him to be fully clothed rather than in his birthday suit when he’s the one taking the photos. Page 44

Hollie Latham

Martin Parfitt

hollie.latham@futurenet.com

martin.parfitt@futurenet.com

Technique editor • 60D

Art editor • 600D

Hollie was soaked to the skin after going behind-the-scenes for our Apprentice feature in rainy Wales. At least it meant the waterfalls were flowing. Page 8

Martin adores pansies – dahlias and hydrangeas too – and almost swooned when he saw this issue’s Inspirations was devoted to our petalled pals in close-up. Page 18

Angela Nicholson

Tom Welsh

angela.nicholson@futurenet.com

chris.george@futurenet.com

Head of testing • 5D Mk III

Technique writer • 5D Mk II

Angela was delighted to discover that Sigma has produced a top-notch Art lens in the guise of a 24mm f/1.4 optic. It’s now top of her wish list. Page 104

Tom enjoyed playing with intervalometers while shooting his time-lapse project, as well as getting out in the elements to enjoy the sunset. Page 52

This issue’s contributors… Guy Edwardes

Guy does go chasing waterfalls with this issue’s Apprentice in the Brecon Beacons. Page 8

David Clapp

David doesn’t know the meaning of ‘travelling light’ but narrows his kit list down to six vital items. Page 78

Marcus Hawkins

Marcus shows how to make dosh with your DSLR, from selling stock to shooting weddings. Page 28

Andrew James

Andrew tells you everything you always wanted to know about metering but were afraid to ask. Page 82

Advertising & Marketing Matt Bailey Account director 01225 687511 matt.bailey@futurenet.com Claire Harris Account manager 01225 687221 claire.harris@futurenet.com Sasha McGregor Advertising Business Manager 01225 687675 sasha.mcgregor@futurenet.com Charlotte Lloyd-Williams Campaign Manager Production & distribution Vivienne Calvert Production controller Mark Constance Production manager Michelle Brock Trade Marketing Manager 0207 429 3683 Printed in the UK by: William Gibbons & Sons Ltd Distributed by: Seymour Distribution Ltd, 2 East Poultry Avenue, London EC1A 9PT, Tel: 0207 429 4000 Overseas distribution by: Seymour International Subscriptions & back issues UK reader order line & enquiries 0844 848 2852 Overseas order line & enquiries +44 1604 251045 Online enquiries www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk Email photoplus@myfavouritemagazines.co.uk Licensing Regina Erak International director regina.erak@futurenet.com Management Nial Ferguson Content & marketing director Matthew Pierce Head of content & marketing, photography Chris George Group editor-in-chief Rodney Dive Group art director

Chief executive Zillah Byng-Maddick Non-executive chairman Peter Allen Chief financial officer Penny Ladkin-Brand

David Noton

This month David explains why he dedicated four days to shooting a lake scene in British Columbia. Page 40

Brian Worley

Another batch of your Canon problems solved by in our EOS SOS Q+A section by brainbox Brian. Page 93

Drew Gibson

Motorsports supremo Drew talks about life in the fast lane in the latest PhotoPlus interview. Page 62

Matthew Richards

Canon’s beginners’ range of DSLRs are put through their paces in our Super Test. Page 106

Our contributors Ben Andrews, George Cairns, David Clapp, David Clark, Guy Edwardes, Pete Gray, Drew Gibson, Marcus Hawkins, Andrew James, Simon Lees, Andy McGregor, Andrew McLaughlin, Mike McNally, David Noton, Victoria Palframan, James Paterson, Matthew Richards, Joby Sessions, Jesse Wild, Brian Worley

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The PhotoPlus team Peter Travers Editor Adam Waring Operations editor Hollie Latham Technique editor Martin Parfitt Art editor Shona Cutt Deputy art editor Angela Nicholson Head of testing Ali Jennings Lab manager Cover photo iStock

Tel +44 (0)207 042 4000 (London) Tel +44 (0)1225 442 244 (Bath) Printed in the UK by William Gibbons and Sons Ltd, on behalf of Future. Distributed by Seymour Distribution Ltd, 2 East Poultry Avenue, London EC1A 9PT. Tel 020 7429 4000. Overseas distribution by Seymour International.​

PhotoPlus is an independent publication and is not in any way authorised, affiliated, nor sponsored by Canon. All the opinions expressed herein are those of the magazine and not that of Canon. ‘EOS’ and all associated trademarks are the property of Canon. © Future Publishing Limited 2015. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be used or reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Future Publishing Limited (company number 2008885) is registered in England and Wales. Registered office: Registered office: Quay House, The Ambury, Bath, BA1 1UA. All information contained in this publication is for information only and is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Future cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. You are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price and other details of products or services referred to in this publication. Apps and websites mentioned in this publication are not under our control. We are not responsible for their contents or any changes or updates to them. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Future a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine, including licensed editions worldwide and in any physical or digital format throughout the world. Any material you submit is sent at your risk and, although every care is taken, neither Future nor its employees, agents or subcontractors shall be liable for loss or damage.

We are committed to only using magazine paper which is derived from well managed, certified forestry and chlorine-free manufacture. Future Publishing and its paper suppliers have been independently certified in accordance with the rules of the FSC (Forest Stewardship Council).

www.digitalcameraworld.com


PHOTOPLUSApprentice

Apprentice Name:

Sue Green Camera:

Canon eos 70D Sue is a freelance TV producer from Berkshire with a passion for cameras, be it video or stills. She has worked alongside many film and TV directors and cameramen, and now wants the opportunity to work on her own landscape photography. Having used film cameras in the past and recently upgraded to an EOS 70D, she asked for Guy’s help to get the best out of her camera to take her photography to the next level.

8

canon PRO Name:

Guy Edwardes Camera:

Canon EOS 5D Mk III Landscape, nature and travel photographer Guy is based in Dorset. He has a passion for conservation and capturing the beauty of the British Isles and further afield. Guy runs an extensive series of over 30 landscape and wildlife photography workshops each year, both in the UK and overseas. To find out more and view his stunning work, see his website www.guyedwardes.com

www.digitalcameraworld.com


SHOOT WITH A PRO

Don’t go

chasing

waterfalls …not until you’ve read our expert advice on capturing fastflowing falls as our Apprentice heads to the Brecon Beacons in a very wet Wales with landscape pro Guy Edwardes

The Canon Magazine

9


PHOTOPLUSApprentice TECHNIQUE ASSESSMENT Is Sue ready to shoot? Guy throws Sue in the deep end with a crash course in all things manual

M for Manual

Shoot Raw

“Sue hadn’t shot in Manual mode since using her film SLR a number of years ago, so a quick refresher course was all that was required to get her controlling the aperture and shutter speed independently again for greater control,” says Guy. “As our cameras were going to be set up on a tripod, I got Sue to set her ISO to 100 to ensure top-quality shots and also got her to switch to manual focus for more accuracy to capture pin-sharp images.”

“For the best image quality, shoot in Raw. As its name suggests, it stores all the data recorded by the camera’s sensor in a raw, unprocessed state,” says Guy. “The more file information you have, the more control you have in post-production in order to lift dark shadows, rescue clipped highlights and correct any nasty colour casts. However, the downside is that your memory card will fill up quicker as Raw files are larger in size.”

EXPERT INSIGHT

Love landscapes with Live View

03

02

“There are many reasons why you should enable Live View mode, not just for accurate focusing but also for aiding composition and exposure,” explains Guy. 01 It’s much easier than looking through the viewfinder,

04

especially if your camera and tripod are in an awkward position. Some models, like Sue’s 70D, have a flip out LCD screen, which is even better! You see the whole scene too; as many viewfinders don’t show a 100% view.

05

02 It’s simple to meter for different areas of the scene by moving your focus point (a white square) around the frame, which will give you precise exposure readings. This is great for when you want to take more than one exposure to blend.

04 If Exposure Simulation is enabled you’ll see Exp.SIM in the bottom-right-hand corner of the screen. This is great for getting a good idea of how your shot will look using your current exposure settings.

03 The histogram is live, so you fine-tune your exposure to make the most of the highlights or shadows easily, plus you can quickly adjust your exposure if the light changes.

05 The 10x magnification view is brilliant for accurate focusing. Simply twist the focusing ring until the most important part of the image is pin-sharp.

10

www.digitalcameraworld.com


HOT SHOT #1 Sue’s comment For a strong composition Guy said to get down low and including some foreground interest to lead the eye into the waterfall in the background. Guy suggested if you don’t have anything of interest, find something and move it – so he simply found a big rock and placed it neatly in the foreground of my scene! Guy said a shutter speed of three seconds was long enough for this short waterfall, so we upped the ISO800 for a good exposure in this dark Welsh forest. Lens

Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM

Exposure

3.2 secs, f/16, ISO800

1/200 sec

1/2 sec

Top gear #1

Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Canon’s EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM is Guy’s go-to landscape lens on his full-frame EOS 5D Mark III, but on a crop-sensor camera, an ultra-wide-angle lens is needed for a similar angle of view, such as the Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM Sue was using. “It’s great for capturing sweeping scenes, and also allows us to shoot in confined spaces,” explains Guy. “It will capture great depth of field, so your images will be sharp from front to back.”

The Canon Magazine

shutter speeds “I SHOOT waterfalls between 1/2 sec to 3 secs, depending on the size and speed of the falls, and to avoid the very milky effect that you get from a longer exposure. If the light is low I will up the ISO so I can shoot at f/16 and 1/2 sec. In these example shots, the blurred water defines the shape of the rocks and flow of the water; whereas a faster shutter speed freezes the water and can make it look messy.”

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PHOTOPLUSApprentice

Sue’s comment Here we have three waterfalls in one, so it made sense to compose this shot vertically to get everything in. Guy pointed out the foam in the pool at the bottom of the frame and explained that a slightly longer exposure would capture some lovely swirls. This meant exposing separately for this area of the scene and combining shots later. In the end this image was comprised of three exposures; 8 secs for the foreground and 2 secs for the waterfall. The third exposure was for the leaves at the top of the frame to ensure they were nice and crisp. As we didn’t want to adjust the aperture but required a faster shutter speed to freeze the movement of the leaves, we simply upped the ISO to 1600 to get a shutter speed of 1/4 sec.

HOT SHOT #2

EXPERT INSIGHT

Wet weather gear “The weather can change at any time, despite what the forecast might say, so come prepared!” exclaims Guy. “A good pair of walking boots is essential, as is a pair of wellies in case you need to wade into water. To save on space, weight and time I use waterproof overboots called Feetz (£10; www.feetz.co.uk) that I slip over my hiking boots. I also carry a lightweight waterproof jacket, which folds up really small. When it’s really wet, I use my waterproof cover to protect my camera bag from the rain. A bin bag is handy to pop over your tripod-mounted camera in case of a sudden downpour, as well as after the shoot to chuck wet clothes and boots in!”

12

Lens

Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM

Exposure

1/4 sec, 2 secs & 8 secs, f/22, ISO100

Top gear #4 Tripod & head

“A tripod is vital when shooting long exposures, and the sturdier, the better!” says Guy. “My BH55-Pro ball head enables me to quickly change the orientation of a composition, and spikes on my tripod feet anchor it into the ground, which is great to secure it in place in mud, water and heavy foliage.”

www.digitalcameraworld.com


HOT SHOT #3

Sue’s comment To capture a close-up shot, Guy suggested switching to a longer focal length and zooming into the details and patterns in the waterfall. We were standing at the top of this one, so a focal length of 88mm was long enough on my 70D. Guy says he often uses his 600mm to capture similar close-up shots, to compress the perspective and capture lots of layers. A shutter speed of 0.4 sec was slow enough for this fast-flowing falls.



Lens

Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM

Exposure

0.4 sec, f/22, ISO100

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PHOTOPLUSApprentice EXPERT INSIGHT

Be grad-free Guy avoids ND grad filters and prefers to blend his shots in Photoshop instead…

Shoot waterfalls whatever the weather A selection of Guy’s favourite waterfall shots

Slap Pericnik, Slovenia

1. Take two exposures – one for the darker foreground and one for the lighter waterfall. Open both images into Photoshop and copy and paste the lighter exposure as a separate layer onto the darker exposure.

If the temperature remains well below freezing for several days waterfalls can freeze, resulting in spectacular icicles – but beware the dangers of falling ice!

Seljalandsfoss, Iceland For waterfalls with a really long drop, such as this famous Icelandic fall, set your exposure time approximately the same as the length of time it takes the water to fall from the very top of the waterfall to the bottom. This will result in a smooth and unbroken fall of water.

2. In the Layers panel you should see both exposures, with the lighter one at the top of the stack. Add a layer mask to this top layer, grab the Brush tool and pick a soft-edged brush.

3. Make sure your foreground and background colours are set to black and white. Paint in black at 100% opacity over the waterfall and bright foliage to reveal the darker exposure on the layer beneath.

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Sgwd-yr-Eira, Wales Although overcast light generally works best for many waterfalls, some nice effects, such as rainbows or illuminated spray, can be seen on sunny days.

Top gear #3 Polarizing filter

“I don’t tend to use filters but a polarizer is a must when shooting waterfalls,” says Guy. “It helps to cut through reflections in the water and on wet rocks and leaves, and saturates the colours of foliage. It also reduces the light entering your camera, making longer exposures of a second or two very achievable, without the need of an additional ND filter.”

www.digitalcameraworld.com


SHOOT WITH A PRO

HOT SHOT #4 Sue’s comment Guy got me to change my white balance setting to Cloudy as it was getting late in the day (which normally results in a bluish light). Due to the angle we were standing at I had to shoot down at the waterfall, so Guy suggested shooting it a little wider so we could correct the converging verticals of the falling water later. He explained that correcting perspective in Lightroom means that you lose part of the image through cropping, so I composed with this in mind.

Lens

Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM

Exposure

0.6 sec, f/8, ISO400

Weather conditions “There’s no need to wait for sunny conditions to capture magical waterfall shots; in fact, the duller the better. Bright light means faster shutter speeds, which is what you don’t want when shooting long exposures,” explains Guy. “It also casts dark shadows and blows out highlights. Heavy rainfall means fuller waterfalls; if it’s been particularly dry, you’ll find pathetic dribbles.”

Top gear #5 Self-timer mode

“You need to minimize any camera vibration during the exposure,” wisely advises Guy. “I recommend using the 2-sec Self-timer to fire the shutter, rather than a remote shutter release, so there are less things flapping around in the wind.”

The Canon Magazine

15


Win Landscape Calendars by pro guy edwardes! This calendar includes a dozen beautiful photos from Guy’s stunning collection of landscapes from around the world. With the images printed at almost A3 size (50x30cm), they can be removed and framed after use. For your chance to win one of ten limited-edition calendars, go to www.futurecomps.co.uk/calendar To see more of Guy’s work or to find out more about the calendar please visit www.guyedwardes.com

Sue’s comment

Guy’s verdict

I had a fantastic day with Guy and the PhotoPlus team, it was such a good experience and I learnt so much. This shot was taken fairly early on in the shoot when I was getting a recap from Guy on shooting manually, so I’m really pleased it’s been awarded Shot of the Day! For me, the large branch and mosscovered stones in the foreground make the shot, leading the eye in nicely. Here I took two exposures, one for the foreground and another for the waterfall to combine, which is a new concept to me, yet surprisingly simple.

Sue was very enthusiastic and picked things up quickly. For a first attempt at shooting waterfalls on her new 70D, the results are impressive. She has used the rule of thirds to compose the scene, making use of the foreground interest for two thirds of the frame and positioning the waterfall in the top third to avoid capturing lots of green foliage above it. The rocks and large branch in the foreground lead the eye in and the polarizer has cut through the reflections in the water to reveal the beautiful colours and details of the riverbed. By combining two exposures, Sue has achieved a balanced exposure, and she has captured some nice swirls in the foreground by setting a slightly longer one-second exposure.

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Lens

Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM

Exposure

1 sec, f/22, ISO100

www.digitalcameraworld.com


Next Month LIVE RUGBY MATCH

SHOT of the day!

Be our next apprentice Do you need some help to take your Canon photography to the next level? Let us know what you’d like help with and we could pair you up with a top pro for the day! Send an email to photoplus@ futurenet.com with ‘PhotoPlus Apprentice’ in the subject line, and include your telephone number and address. The Canon Magazine

17


Stunning imagery from the world of Canon photography

These Canon images were placed or highly commended in the International Garden Photographer of the Year Macro Art Photo Project competition 9. Visit www.igpoty.com for more information about International Garden Photographer of the Year.

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www.digitalcameraworld.com


fantastic CANON photography

01 Graceful Anemone by Janice Kum

I bought this Japanese anemone from the florist – I was attracted by its long, delicate petals, its pure colour and the central stamens. I placed it in a vase on my balcony and the sunlight shone right through, carrying the light from some pink roses behind onto the back of the anemone. It was fantastic having the contrasting background to reveal the form and the details of the petals.

The Canon Magazine

Lens

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM

Exposure

1/400 sec, f/2.8, ISO100

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INSPIRATIONS

02

03

02 Stitchwort by Mandy Disher

A small patch of these delicate spring flowers, stellaria holostea, grow in my garden; they are more commonly known as stitchwort or poor man’s buttonhole. I photographed a single bloom against a brightly sunlit natural background; I was attracted to the wonderful delicacy of these tiny woodland flowers, and the way in which their pure white starshaped petals contrasted beautifully with the small orange anthers.

Lens

Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro USM

Exposure

1/160 sec, f/4, ISO100

03 Bowl of Beauty by Roy Hunt

This peony is growing in a garden that I tend for a client. Looking closely into the bowl of petals I was struck by the apparent animation of the anthers.

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Lens

Tamron SP AF 180mm f/3.5 Di LD[IF] Macro 1:1

Exposure

1 sec, f/8, ISO200

www.digitalcameraworld.com


fantastic CANON photography 04 Meteoroids by Christine

Blanchin dos Santos Looking through my macro lens, these strange seeds trapped behind a glass pane magically transported me to their micro cosmos. I had never seen such seeds, and I was fascinated by their unusual shape. I wonder about their origin too; there’s an aura of mystery about them.

Lens

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM

Exposure

1/4 sec, f/11, ISO100

05 Enchanted Forest by

Anna Ulmestrand I photographed this fern, which reminds me of a boxer because of its shape, through and between plant parts, and the effect of this natural filter appears to have been painted around it. The photo was taken in the afternoon when the sun was low, highlighting the fern.

Lens

Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1

Exposure

1/160 sec, f/2.8, ISO250

04

05

04

The Canon Magazine

21


INSPIRATIONS

06 Last Embrace by Minghui Yuan

Dandelion seeds fly away in the wind. They leave the ‘mother’, and fly to another place to begin a new life cycle of their own. I find such inspiration in nature: even ordinary, everyday events like this convey emotion.

Lens

Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1

Exposure

1/100 sec, f/9, ISO400

07 Anemone by Barbara Gardner

This photograph of an anemone was achieved by focus-stacking 11 images to show the flower’s beauty and detail in perfect focus. A close-up study reveals more detail than can be seen with the naked eye, and I wanted to capture this detail in my photograph.

Lens

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM

Exposure

1/30 sec, f/2.8, ISO400

06

07

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www.digitalcameraworld.com


INSPIRATIONS

08 Androecium by James Woodend

I picked several flowers from the plant rhododendron lees, and pressed them between regular stationary paper and a sheet of blotting paper. I heated the arrangement in a Microfleur microwave flower press before photographing it.

Lens

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM

Exposure

1/8 sec, f/13, ISO400

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www.digitalcameraworld.com


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Print + Digital offer Save up to 54% on the shop price Print copy to read at leisure plus digital edition to archive Free PIXI Mini Tripod worth £24.95* From £63 TERMS AND CONDITIONS: *PIXI Mini Tripod comes with print and print + digital subscriptions to PhotoPlus for new UK customers only. Prices and savings quoted are compared to buying full-priced UK print and digital issues. You will receive 13 issues in a year. If you are dissatisfied in any way you call us to cancel your subscription at any time and we will refund you for all unmailed issues. Prices correct at point of print and subject to change. Gift is subject to availability. Please allow up to 60 days for the delivery of your gift. In the event of stocks becoming exhausted, we reserve the right to replace with items of a similar value. Full details of the Direct Debit guarantee are available upon request. Prices correct at point of print and subject to change. For full terms and conditions please visit: myfavm.ag/magterms. Offer ends 15 October 2015.

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learnprosecrets

Take your hobby to the next level with expert advice and success stories from the very best professional photographers

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www.digitalcameraworld.com


Make cash with your canon

MASSIVE EXPERT G • Build a UID • Set up brilliant online p E ortfo suc

• Essenti cessful skills wor lio ksho al sto • Discov ck library secre ps er your s ts pe • Shoot th e perfect ciality wedding • Sell you r prints

W

e’d find it hard to believe that any PhotoPlus reader first picked up a camera with the intention of turning it into a cash machine. In fact, we’d put money on it. We’re in it for the art, escapism and enjoyment, right? The thing is, photography can be an expensive business. All the travelling. All the shiny new lenses and accessories. Software, storage, prints… it can soon start to mount up. So, if you can use your camera to earn yourself some extra cash to splash on new gear, then why not? The Canon Magazine

Over the next 12 pages you’ll find a comprehensive guide to getting started. We’ll show you smart ways in which you can make money with your existing photographic portfolio, and how to shoot a fresh stock of images that sell. We’re going to be realistic too; don’t expect to be inundated with commissions when you take your first steps into the world of freelance and semi-professional photography. Only a lucky few social media-savvy photographers can boast of ‘overnight’ success. In reality it takes time to build a name for yourself, as well as a collection

of cracking, commercial images. But it can be done. For instance, combining your other interests with your photography can put you ahead. Do you have an in-depth knowledge of fishing? Mad for martial arts? Have the hots for dogs? You’re more likely to pick up sales if you’re a big fish in a specialist pond. Don’t overlook the opportunities close to home, either. Offering to shoot your company’s corporate headshots or a local hairdresser’s marketing photos may generate enough word-of-mouth to start the ball rolling. Turn over the page for more easy first steps…

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learnprosecrets Your web presence makes the biggest first impression with your potential customers

It will be easier to build a reputation if you specialize in the type of photography you love shooting, rather than being a ‘jack of all trades’

Get started today

You don’t have to invest a lot of time to begin making cash from your photography – there are some simple steps you can take right now…

W

hen you’re setting out to make money from your camera, you need to keep your business head screwed on. There’s no need to splurge on new kit and you should avoid offering your services for free, otherwise clients will grow to expect it. While business cards from the likes of Moo (www.moo.com) give a professional touch, these days it’s the state of your web presence that makes the biggest first impression with potential customers; it’s essentially your shop window. It could be a simple online portfolio presented

Useful to know 30

alongside your contact details through to a fully-functional website and blog with private client area and browsable stock library with e-commerce facilities. As a minimum, you should have a web presence on photo-sharing sites such as Flickr and 500px, with a link to a Facebook page dedicated to your commercial photography interests. The key is to make it easy to get in touch with you and to stay active. There’s no point in starting a blog if you don’t keep it updated; if the last entry was made in 2013, then the consensus will be that you can’t be bothered. You don’t need

to be too ambitious; topping up your blog once a month is perfectly acceptable for a dedicated photographer. But the more effort you put in, the faster your following will likely grow. If you can upload a picture a day, whether it’s fresh and hot or one pulled from your archives, then you’ll keep visitors coming back for more.

Build a presence online

Be active on social media, too. The likes of Facebook, Google Plus, Twitter and Pinterest are your biggest marketing opportunities, and the bigger the fan-base you can build for your work, the greater the opportunity you’ll have for making a sale. Remember internet etiquette: follow everyone who follows you, and ‘interact’ and strike up conversations rather than simply posting links to your own pictures. You’ll have to get your head around SEO (Search Engine Optimization) if you’re going to start attracting large numbers of visitors to your site. Your pictures will be invisible to users

Make sure that you have the necessary insurance cover. We’re not just talking for your equipment, but public liability insurance. It covers you should a member of the public seek compensation for an injury or damage caused by your business activities – such as tripping over a tripod leg. Firms with bespoke plans for photographers include Aaduki (www.aaduki.com) and Photoguard (www.photoguard.co.uk). www.digitalcameraworld.com


Make cash with your canon searching for images online, unless you give them keyword-rich filenames and captions. Starting a blog through a popular service like Wordpress (http://wordpress.com) is a great way of bringing visibility to your portfolio, as you’ll have scope for targeting keywords and phrases that you want to rank for on search engines like Google; such as ‘best British landscape photography’ or ‘cool London photo prints’. You can be up and running with a ‘responsive’ Wordpress theme (which adapts your website to the dimensions of the device it’s being viewed on automatically) in a weekend. There’s a huge assortment to choose from, and plenty of gallery styles and commercial plug-ins with which to customize your website. You’ll have to pay for the more advanced features, but the basic Wordpress package itself is free. Once you’re up and running with a website, you can start offering image licensing and print sales to the world. The majority of professionals also offer training in some form to supplement their commissioned work and print sales. This typically ranges from one-to-one tuition by the day, to group workshops and accompanied tours and holidays. Naturally, being an established name helps to attract bookings, but that

You may not be equipped to run a group workshop when you’re starting out, but one-on-one training is certainly an option

Do’s & Don’ts

Pro advice David Newton www.photopositive.co.uk Upload images to photo-sharing site 500px and you can make them available through its royalty-free sales licensing service

shouldn’t stop you from offering a training service on your local patch if you have a gift for teaching. “The most important lesson I’ve learned with running workshops is to try to cater for all levels of experience,” says pro wildlife photographer Ben Hall. “Organizing and planning is also vital. I take clients to areas that I know well, or I do a thorough recce beforehand. Having a good knowledge of a location is critical.” If you’re as confident in front of a camera as you are behind it, then starting a YouTube channel is another moneymaking and marketing option. Whether you’re delivering a verdict on a lens, explaining a photography technique or providing a Photoshop tutorial, as long as you upload original content you can start to earn revenue from advertising. And talking of videos, don’t overlook the video function of your camera. Photo libraries are morphing into multimedia outlets, and being able to supply moving pictures as well as stills means that you can double your chances of making a sale from the same shoot.

Photographer and expert Canon tutor David Newton has steadily built up a reputation in education. He reveals: “I began training people who contacted me through a publication I wrote for and a forum I set up. That gradually caused work to grow by word-of-mouth. I built a website where people could get more information and contact me to book sessions; since then it has been a very organic growth. The training seminars and workshops I give for Canon at various dealers helps as this gets me in front of more people regularly. The best advice I can give is to find your own niche. My training is different to others as I don’t teach creativity but concentrate on the camera kit – most people don’t make the best use of what they’ve got. People go away having learnt something concrete about their camera that they can use in any situation. Be willing to share everything you know – too many people are precious about knowledge. If they don’t learn it from you, they’ll learn it elsewhere, so you may as well teach whatever you can. That way they go away happy and are more likely to come back, not to mention tell their friends about you.”

Flickr’s a useful way of building a reputation and contacts – and to direct visitors to your website

Do… make it easy for potential clients to get in touch – add an email address to all your online channels, as not everyone wants to fill out an online form to enquire about your work. Don’t… forget to ask for endorsement from satisfied customers that you can use for marketing purposes.

The Canon Magazine

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learnprosecrets

Making gains in T the stock market Do you have a brilliant back catalogue of commercial images? Able to spot trends and think laterally? Crafty with keywords? Then stock photography might just be your calling…

When ‘keywording’ think in terms of emotive words as well: ‘peaceful’ and ‘calm’ would apply to this image just as much as ‘trees’ and ‘landscape’

If you specialize in a particular field, chances are there’s a dedicated photo library Useful to know 32

he stock photography market may appear to have crashed, but having images available to buy online is still one of the few ways you can earn cash from your camera while you’re asleep. Only a very few photographers can rely on it as a major source of income; you need to be committed and able to produce commercial work consistently to make a decent amount of cash. There are three main routes for reaching clients: through a regular photo library, a microstock collection or your own website. To sell your pictures through a commercial photo library, you’re likely to have to submit a batch of test shots before being accepted. For instance, Alamy – which claims to be the world’s largest stock photo collection – requires four shots ‘of varied subject matter’ to evaluate for technical quality. Once you’ve passed this stage only a sample of pictures are checked in each subsequent submission – although the whole batch will be rejected if one shot fails to make the grade. Microstock behemoth, iStock by Getty Images, requests just three samples of your work to check when you apply to be a contributor, while the submission process for Getty itself is much more stringent. It is the dominant force in worldwide premium stock, after all. Of course, you don’t have to approach the big libraries. If you specialize in a particular field, then chances are there’s a photo library dedicated to suppling that type of image. For example, if you have an eye for wildlife photography, then a collection such as Nature Picture Library (www.naturepl.com) will be more likely to attract the type of customer you’re trying to reach. Smaller agencies will only want to represent your work if you

Upmarket photo libraries, such as Alamy, have higher standards than ‘microstock’ libraries

One decision you’ll need to make is the type of licence you want to apply to your work: rights-managed or royalty-free. With rights-managed photos, the client is essentially renting your image for a specific purpose. This allows the stock library to control where the image is seen and for how long. Royalty-free means the customer can, within reason, use the image where they want to, as many times as they want to. www.digitalcameraworld.com


Make sure you upload seasonal shots well in advance of the season they’re depicting…

The British Association of Picture Libraries and Agencies has links to large/small stock libraries at http://bapla.org.uk

can offer a fresh approach or supply images they don’t already have. Many publish a specific ‘wants list’ of images they’re short of, and this can be a route in.

Stock library cheats

When it comes to submitting images to a stock library it pays to think in terms of concepts and metaphors rather than just uploading pretty pictures. What are the major national and international stories you could illustrate in a conceptual rather than literal way? Keep a running calendar of upcoming events for the next year or two that you could ‘shoot to brief’ for. You will need to be meticulous when it comes to metadata. You’ll need to add titles, keywords and captions to your images in order to make your image

Join the Fotolia library (https://en.fotolia.com) and you can sell your images through Adobe Stock, a service embedded in Adobe’s Creative Cloud apps, such as Photoshop CC

Do’s & Don’ts

visible within the thousands of other images in a commercial library. Think about the words and phrases that people are going to be searching for. Don’t think simply in terms of descriptive words for the subjects depicted in a photo. Consider listing any photographic techniques, the type of camera or lens and any relevant conceptual descriptions, such as ‘love’, ‘power’ and ‘growth’. And it is important to be relevant; any keywords should be clearly portrayed in the image rather than loose interpretations, otherwise you’ll simply frustrate potential customers. Think about the end use of your images if you want to maximize your potential for a sale, too. Magazine designers looking to incorporate image into a layout may be searching for pictures that have space for headlines and text. Make sure you always shoot a vertical shot too, as you increase your chances of an image being used on the cover of a magazine. When it comes to the financial side of things, you’ll need to factor in the commission that a library will take for each image sale. For instance, Alamy currently offers photographers 50% from every sale while iStock pays a basic rate of 15% for each file downloaded using its iStock Credits or Pay As You Go pricing, with that fee boosted to 45% if you become an Exclusive contributor. Microstock is cheap, though, so the amount of money you can make from each sale is considerably smaller than on a regular photo library – although you’re likely to make a sale more often.

Pro advice David Clapp www.davidclapp.com Photographer David Clapp has built up a successful stock photography business and explains: “My first contract in 2006 came from being spotted by a picture agent but a lot of this was done over the phone, which is the best way to progress all business. This helped me to refine my aims and head towards a commercial look that other companies and agencies could use. I began to research architectural agencies and travel agencies, building a portfolio to represent me. It’s harder now, because microstock sites changed the value of rights-managed and royalty free-imagery. If you want to succeed then it is important to shoot subject-specific content. Most agencies will highlight what it is they are looking for. You can’t just take the photos and think money will roll in. Diversity is the key, it takes time to refine your aim and build stock.”

Do… get signed model and property releases for your stock images. You can download an example model release from the Royal Photographic Society website at www.rps.org/learning/resources/downloads. Don’t… include recognizable trademarks or copyrighted works as it’s likely to be rejected by a library.

The Canon Magazine

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learnprosecrets

Selling prints Pictures on the internet come and go, but a good print can be enjoyed for a lifetime. Here’s how to sell yours to an international audience

S

cooping up Likes on social media is great, but it’s hard to beat the satisfaction you get from someone choosing to buy one of your prints to hang on their wall. When it comes to selling prints you can start small-scale and keep it local. You’ll often find that coffee shops, restaurants and bars will be willing to display your images in return for a cut of the selling price. You’ll have to offer them the prints on consignment. This means that you continue to own them until they’re sold, at which point the retailer will split the revenue with you. This can be anywhere from 70:30 in your favour to a 50:50 share. Draw up a contract before you hand over the images. It should detail the prints, their retail price and how this will be split and paid, and which party will cover any damage while the pictures are on display, as well as the length of time they’ll be on show. Typically, you’ll have to collect any unsold photos between three and six months later. Building up a relationship with a gallery is even better. You may have to work harder to convince them to display your work and the fee structure may be

Putting on an exhibition is an obvious way of getting your prints out there Useful to know 34

Getting your work printed commercially will save you time, even if it doesn’t save you money

more complex and potentially higher compared with using the walls of your local cafe. But you’re likely to be able to charge more for your pictures, as well as getting your work in front of people who will be in a buying mood. Putting on an exhibition is an obvious way of getting your prints out there, but you’ll have to weather a considerable upfront cost. Printing photos and getting them mounted and framed doesn’t come

cheap – stick with A4 size as this makes a big difference to the price – but it’s worth getting it done professionally when you’re putting on an exhibition or looking to sell through a gallery. An alternative hands-on approach is to take a stall at a craft fair, a market or a local art event. Again, this is going to take a substantial initial outlay on your part, particularly if you’re looking to offer prints, canvases, calendars and more.

There are several ways to market photo calendars. You can print your own, but it’s not easy to estimate how many you’ll sell. A print-ondemand service like Calvendo (www.calvendo.co.uk) might be a better option, although you’ll only get up to 30% of the revenue. Or register as a photographer with a calendar company such as Carousel Calendars (www.carouselcalendars.co.uk) or Judges (www.judges.co.uk). www.digitalcameraworld.com


Make cash with your canon

Canon’s PIXMA PRO-1 boasts gallery-quality A3+ prints in under three minutes, but at 2.3x1.5 feet and getting on for 30kg, it’s a beast

Consider asking another photographer to get involved, as this will shave the costs and spread the risk, as well as halving the amount of work you have to do! Of course, any freelance photographer worth their salt will offer picture sales through their own website. Doing this enables you to print on demand, reducing both your outgoings and your storage requirements. If you intend to print the images yourself, then you’ll need an inkjet printer that offers high-res printing in the region of 4800dpi and is capable of churning out A3 borderless prints. You’ll also need to factor in long-life ink and media to ensure your pictures will stand the test of time.

Geoff Scott-Simpson www.geoffscottsimpson.com

If you fancy selling a photo calendar without paying printing costs up front, Calvendo prints to order and takes care of transactions

Cut your costs

When you consider the running costs of such a printer – a complete set of inks for Canon’s flagship £799 PIXMA PRO-1 will set you back almost £280, for example – as well having to negotiate the minefield of calibration, printer profiles and test prints, then the higher price of getting prints made commercially can start to look acceptable. Using a reliable,

Smugmug enables you to create a website, upload your pictures and sell them to the public – and keep up to 85% of the markup

Do’s & Don’ts

Pro advice

high-quality commercial colour bureau locally will enable you to keep tabs on the quality and turnaround times, although that shouldn’t put you off using an online photo lab, such as Loxley Colour (www.loxleycolour.com) or Whitewall (http://uk.whitewall.com). Look for recommendations on forums or from professional photographers. If that sounds like hard work then you can always create a website with a hosting company such as SmugMug (http://smugmug.com) that enables you to integrate photo lab ordering on your pages, so that you can offer wall art and gifts such as mugs, ceramic tiles and keyrings. You set the profit you want to make while they take care of credit card processing and fulfilment. Websites like Fine Art America (http://fineartamerica.com) and Redbubble (http://redbubble.com) work in a similar way, offering a range of products that you can add your images to, while they take handle the ordering and customer care. Alternatively, if you’re looking for place to sell your existing prints, you can try an Ebay-style arty marketplace like Etsy (www.etsy.com).

Nature photographer Geoff Scott-Simpson has taken the bold step of setting up galleries to sell his prints through. “It was my intention to open a series of galleries initially in the UK but, having moved to Spain in 2011, I decided on my doorstep would be a more sensible idea,” he reveals. “Now we have two showroom galleries in Ronda and Gaucín, with a third gallery planned to open next March in Marbella. With so many people owning a digital camera and/or a smartphone these days and internet print services readily available, your pictures have to up there with the best and it’s important to produce idiosyncratic work – only that way can you ever hope to sell. Depending upon your intended clients I would strongly advise to shoot local scenes. Living in a tourist area, our Gaucín gallery is all about scenes of the castle and view to Africa, while Ronda is about the town’s world-class architecture and its culture. Above all, know your customers’ spending ability. It’s no good being overpriced and equally it’s no good being underpriced. Collect email addresses, send out a monthly newsletter and be proactive.”

Do… ensure that images that will be viewed closely will print at a resolution of 300dpi at the size required. Don’t… assume that your monitor is displaying colours correctly. Calibrate it using a device such as Datacolor Spyder and use the correct printer profile.

The Canon Magazine

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learnprosecrets

Your first wedding is likely to be a nerve-shredding experience

Shoot the perfect wedding Shooting a wedding can be a daunting experience – there are no second chances if you take any duff shots – but everyone’s got to start somewhere. Here’s how to approach your first one…

D

espite the proliferation of smartphones and on-the-spot social media sharing seen at the average wedding, the appetite for a professional photography doesn’t appear to have diminished. Shooting a wedding is a rite of passage for many pros, and while the competition may be stiff, you can squeeze in the odd weekend wedding or two during the year without taking food from another photographer’s plate. Don’t consider offering a wedding photography service unless you’re totally confident you can handle it. Not only will you need to be brilliant with people, with the ability to usher a large group of people into the necessary positions, you’ll also need to be on top of the technical side of things so you’re not checking every single shot you take on the spot. For a feel for what’s expected, offer to shadow a full-time wedding photographer as a second shooter. You may even be able to use the pictures you produce to

Useful to know 36

promote your work. If you enjoy the experience then lining up your first job can be as easy as letting people at your place of work know about your talent, advertising in local press (or shooting a story for them for free in return for a plug) or creating a dedicated website. As with any debut, your first wedding is likely to be a nerve-shredding experience. Digital cameras have made it mildly less stressful; instant playback, histograms and Raw files take some of the heat out of the white dress/black suit exposure conundrum. Don’t underestimate how much editing you’ll need to do, either. Pro wedding photographers typically offer anywhere up to 500 high-res pictures as part of the package, so you’ll need to brush up on your batch-processing skills. Lightroom makes easy work of this, and enables you to quickly apply commerciallooking presets to the entire shoot. You’ll also need a decent range of kit, either bought, borrowed or hired. While it may be okay to shoot a hipster wedding

using nothing more than an iPhone, most Big Days will require wide-angle, standard and telephoto shots covered off. Pro wedding shooters can often be seen with the ‘holy trinity’ of Canon L-series zooms (EF 70-200mm, 24-70mm and 16-35mm) along with fast prime lenses that offer wide maximum apertures for working inside the dimly-lit church, registry office and for the evening do.

Pro gear on a budget

You don’t have to splash out on lots of expensive glass; you can always hire lenses to fill any holes you have in your lineup. Companies such as Lenses for Hire (http://lensesforhire.co.uk) offer a diverse range of rental EF lenses that can be delivered straight to your door. The trick is not to take so much kit that you spend longer thinking about which lens to attach to your camera than you do getting the shots. And there’s also the small matter of turning a profit! Do make sure you hire a second camera body,

The Society of Wedding and Portrait Photographers (http://swpp.co.uk) represents photographers in the UK and Europe. Membership ranges from £60 to £120, depending on your level of service, and there’s a no-fee complimentary preview. As well as organizing seminars, competitions and a mentoring programme, it offers reduced insurance rates and the chance to advertise your services on its website. www.digitalcameraworld.com


Make cash with your canon

Pro advice Victoria Grech www.victoriagrech.com Discuss with the couple what type of images they’re looking for: Formal? Candid? Instagram-style filtered? This will determine your approach, both photographically and digitally

identical to your own Canon EOS, though. Not only will this allow you to carry two different lenses at once, but it’ll be a backup should the worst happen with your main one. As far as making preparations for the day, you’ll need to meet with the bride and groom to discuss their requirements well in advance. Get a running order for the day and prepare a checklist of shots as it’s easy to miss important little details, such as the bride’s shoes and table decorations. Keeping these printouts in a lanyard will ensure you’ve got them close by for reference. Ideally you’d visit the wedding venue ahead of time, too, so you can scout suitable locations and predetermine exposures. You can also find the best place to park; the last thing you want to do is get boxed in when you’re trying to zip between locations. The big question for many wedding photography newcomers is how much to charge. The answer really depends on the level of service you’re prepared to offer. Prices from full-time pros typically range from £600 to £3000, with the higher-end of the scale reflecting a complete package of pre-wedding or engagement shoot, full-day coverage from preparations to the first dance, a luxury photo album and more. No matter where you pitch the price, your clients will expect the high-res

Do’s & Don’ts

images. Some photographers also supply low-res images that can be shared on Facebook and other social media. Gone are the days when the photographer maintained total rights over the images, although you’ll need to retain the rights to use images to promote your work.

Wedding photographer and filmmaker Victoria Grech explains: “I never intended to be a wedding photographer but after taking some additional images at a friend’s wedding, who hated her professional photographer’s work, my business was born. I shot over 50 weddings with as many photographers as I could to fully understand their style and how they interacted with their clients; I took the things I wanted my brand to embody and implemented those in my own business. Always putting the client first became my secret to success. I shot 52 weddings in my first year in business and ended up £16,000 in the red because I never learnt to price and run a business. The clear difference in successful people in our industry is to become a business owner in the photography industry rather than ‘just’ a wedding photographer. Mindset will set you apart from the rest.”

You’ll need a range of top-quality optics and a second body – if you don’t own them, hire them

Do… consider getting some training with a reputable company such as Aspire Photography Training (www.aspirephotographytraining.co.uk) if you’re confident that wedding photography is an area you’ll be committed to. Don’t… forget to include the cost of hiring any lenses or lighting equipment required when costing out a wedding.

The Canon Magazine

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learnprosecrets

Get your pictures published Building a relationship with publishing houses can boost your income on a regular basis, especially if you can spin a few words to support your shots

T

he monthly and weekly cycle of magazines means that they’ve traditionally been a good source of regular work. But these days it’s not just a case of seeing your pictures in print. The ‘magazine experience’ includes digital versions, websites, social media channels and international editions, all of which may be used to showcase your photos. Don’t expect any fee you may receive to be increased exponentially, just bear in mind that your images are likely to reach a global audience, and a bigger market for potential future sales. In the first instance, approach the magazine’s editor or art editor with examples of your work. An email works best as your first point of contact. Keep it brief and attach five to ten low-res examples of your best images. Include a link to your website or your pages on photo-sharing websites such as Flickr or 500px, should they want to see more of your portfolio. Don’t panic if you don’t hear back the next day – the magazine team may be on deadline – but send a follow-up email if you haven’t received a response within a week or two. Seeing your work in print can be a reward in itself, and a great marketing opportunity should you get to plug your website or social media page. But the best way to earn some cash is to be able to provide words-and-images packages. Be honest with yourself when it comes to your writing skills: there’s no point in pitching an extensive article if you break into a sweat stringing a photo caption together. But some recent examples of blog posts you’ve written may help to convince a commissioning editor to take a punt on you. You should always retain copyright for ‘stock’ images that you have on file, and agree a fee for licensing these pictures. It can be slightly different if you’ve been commissioned to shoot images for a magazine and they’ve covered all the necessary costs, such as travel expenses,

Useful to know 38

Do you have interests outside of photography? Pets? Gardens? Cakes? Why not approach specialist magazines in that field?

The Freelance Photographer’s Market Handbook is a useful resource of contacts at British publishing houses. It also lists picture agencies, greetings cards companies and other photo-buying markets. It’s published by the Bureau of Freelance Photographers (www.thebfp.com), an organization that offers advice, a monthly newsletter highlighting potential opportunities and a copy of the book for an annual fee of £54. www.digitalcameraworld.com


Make cash with your canon

Seeing your work in print is a reward in itself, and a great marketing opportunity

If you’re looking to sell to print publishers, remember to take at least one picture that has space to drop text over the top

model fees and location hire, in which case you may be asked to hand over or share the rights to the images. You should agree all these terms up front and ask questions if you need anything clarified. Book publishing is another area where you can combine your pictures and words for financial benefit. Depending on your level of ambition, you can try everything from producing a short run of books through a local printers and selling them through your website, through to pitching for a commission from an established book publishing company.

Pro advice Sara Melotti www.saramelotti.com

Do it yourself

In between these two extremes is the self-publishing route. Online bookprinting services such as Blurb (www.blurb.co.uk) or Bob Books (www.bobbooks.co.uk) are geared up for the complete process. Not only do they provide design tools and templates to help you create your book, they also offer an online bookshop where you can sell your printed title. The advantage here is that you don’t have to stump up for any copies as they’re printed on demand. Blurb goes a step further: not only is its service integrated into Lightroom, but it enables you to sell your books through Amazon, the Apple iBook store and beyond.

Blurb offers a print-on-demand service for books as well as offset printing for large orders, and can handle fulfilment, too

Do’s & Don’ts

Self-publishing in this way allows you to set your mark-up for each book. You’ll need to factor in any charge that a retailer will make for selling your book, but don’t forget to include costs associated with the book’s production, such as the time it took you to take the shots, process them and put the book together. If you find that including all these costs will make the book you want to produce prohibitively expensive for customers, then try the crowd-funding route. Kickstarter (www.kickstarter.com) always has a diverse range of photography book projects looking for backing. By asking others to donate to your book project, you can cover costs such as professional design and proofreading, as well as the printing fees. You can ask for pledges as low as £1 and beyond £100, but bear in mind that it’s customary to offer the biggest sponsors a signed copy of the book and a credit inside. You’ll also need a thick skin if you choose crowd-funding, as you may not hit the figure you’ve set as a goal.

Based in New York, Sara Melotti is an advertising and fashion photographer who works with clients and magazines. She says: “The secret to getting clients is to do a lot of legwork. I send a lot of emails every month to either introduce my work to potential clients or to remind them of it – persistency is key! Don’t let rejections bring you down; in any creative job you’ll be constantly facing rejections, even when you’re established. Believe in yourself but be modest and keep learning. When I approach magazines I email the editor or fashion editor and introduce them to an idea I am planning on shooting – if my idea fits the upcoming theme of the publication they will issue me a commission letter that allows the stylist to get the clothes needed for the shoot. One important thing to keep in mind is that there isn’t much money to be made in editorial – which is unfortunate because editorial is where the fun is! The real money lies in advertising…”

Do… consider the schedules magazines work to. There’s no point submitting autumn/fall pictures in October, as magazine teams will be planning their winter issues, so this year’s shots will be more likely to appear in next year’s publications… Don’t… blanket-bomb magazines with the same pitch; editors are unlikely to use you if they see your images duplicated in a rival publication.

The Canon Magazine

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DAVIDNOTONonlocation

Emerald Lake

01

Yoho National Park, British Columbia, Canada. 07:10 local time. 18 September 2009

02

Landscape photographer David Noton finds that working one location for a few days is more rewarding than rushing from place to place

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sun break through? No, not e pass over the continental divide this morning, but the scene through the Kicking Horse Pass and 01 Emerald Lake with the peak  is wonderfully muted; into Yoho National Park; such great of Mt Burgess beyond subtle and moody. This is names – don’t they alone just make Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L USM II what I’d been waiting for – it’s Lens you want to come to British all come together. I zoom in, Columbia in Canada? Emerald Lake is Exposure 1/10 sec, f/13, ISO50, 0.6 ND grad incomparably situated, with its creamy jade focus on the twig at the 02 Emerald Lake at dawn,  hyperfocal distance, zoom glacial waters surrounded by the towering peaks of the shrouded in mist and with out, and do a test exposure. President Range. We’re here for four days, and I’m going to be the peaks of the President I decide here and now that shooting in this vicinity every dawn and dusk. Range in the distance. The this image is going up big – a Increasingly I like to work this way – maybe I’m getting on a fallen trees in the foreground print over one metre wide is bit, but while I should perhaps be whizzing all over western create effective lead-in lines Canada, trying to do it all now, experience has taught me that if on the cards. Crisp and sharp detail from fore to aft, rich, you travel less you see more – and that’s always going to be Lens Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L USM II deep shadow information, worthwhile photographically. Exposure 0.5 sec, f/11, ISO100, polarizing filter pure evenness of tone with The combination of the previous day’s rain and a big subtle gradations of colour. When you overnight drop in temperature has left a get it right with a full-frame DSLR the thick layer of mist lying over the lake in results look phenomenal in print, but the dawn light. I’m trotting around the to get the very best from my camera/ lake again, paranoid that some other lens combination everything has to photographer has nabbed my spot – if be right: tripod stability, focus point, so there will be the sound of tripod legs exposure and processing, not to clashing in the woods. But no, I have the mention the aesthetics. lake to myself; relief. There is a decisive moment when all I set up in the cool light before sunrise. the elements combine harmoniously, Two crossed pieces of driftwood give the but with landscapes it’s often difficult composition some bold lead-in lines. How to know when that moment is. Here, wide to go? I’m using my 16-35mm, and the dawn sky has picked up a hint of frame up with a 0.6 ND hard graduated twilight colour, and this is my moment. filter to balance the reflections. If I go It’s my fourth morning shooting at this super-wide the foreground looks wowee, same viewpoint. I could have been but the scale of the President peaks Pro travel & landscape photographer rushing all over British Columbia, beyond diminishes. This composition working a multitude of different spots, game is all about balancing shapes. David is an award-winning Canon but that approach just doesn’t work for What’s right and wrong? It’s impossible to photographer with more than 28 years’ me – I end up with memory cards full say, but with the strong lines of the logs, professional experience. During his career of mediocrity. Like a dog with a bone, the mountains, the tree-clad headland, David has travelled to just about every when I’ve found a magic spot I’ll work the mist and the reflections, a natural corner of the globe. In 2012, Canon invited it to death, and Emerald Lake, without arrangement jumps out at me. Move David into its Ambassador Program by a doubt, is a magic location. slightly, assess, improve, analyse. designating him an Official Canon Explorer. Once the shot is framed up, I wait. Will Info and photos at www.davidnoton.com strong directional light from the rising Next month The Alps

DAVID NOTON

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www.digitalcameraworld.com


DAVID NOTON COLUMN

Like a dog with a bone, when I’ve found a magic spot I’ll work it to death

03 Emerald Lake with the peak 

of Mt Burgess reflected. Here the rocks at the water's edge create foreground interest

Lens

Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L USM II

Exposure

0.6 sec, f/16, ISO100, 0.6 ND grad


canon skills

Sharpen up your photography skills with our all-new photo projects and expert guides

Hollie Latham Technique editor

hollie.latham@futurenet.com

Welcome... This issue we’ve got a great variety of projects for you to try. Starting off in the studio, James Paterson shows you how to approach a variety of fine art nude shots by taking control of lighting and posing. Staying indoors, put your DIY skills to the test to construct a digital pinhole – with your DSLR and a body cap – to create some pin-teresting results, then find out how to shoot the classic ring-heart shadow stock shot with some basic household items. Moving outdoors, Tom Welsh heads off in search of a glorious sunset to show you how to shoot and edit your own time-lapse movie. Moving into the digital darkroom, we have a fun technique in Photoshop Elements, using graphics to transform portraits, plus core retouching skills for professional results in CC. If you want to produce perfect prints in the comfort of your own home, check out our Lightroom tutorial, with everything you need to know about the Print Module.

The Canon Magazine

New projects with video guides Follow our Canon DSLR walkthrough guides and Photoshop editing videos

44 The body beautiful Light and pose a model for a variety of fantastic fine art nude images with James Paterson

48 Get pin-teresting

Construct a digital pinhole camera with your Canon DSLR with Hollie Latham

50 Say it with shadows 52 Make time fly Shoot simple, classic fine art stock shots in your own home with Hollie Latham

How to shoot and edit lots of images to create a time-lapse movie with Tom Welsh

56 Turn over a new leaf

Use Photoshop Elements’ graphics to create fantastic portraits in Photoshop Elements

View the videos

58 Retouching skills

Core retouching skills for professional-looking portraits in Photoshop CC

60 Print with Lightroom Make your own prints at home using simple templates in Lightroom

Whenever you see this icon you’ll find an accompanying video – tap the ideo link and the video View the v will ‘pop-out’ of the page (as long as you have an internet connection). You can also download project files to your computer.

43


The Mission Shoot understated fine art nudes by taking control of lighting and posing Time needed Two hours Skill level Intermediate Kit needed Studio lighting kit • Black velvet backdrop

44

The body beautiful James Paterson shows you how to take control of lighting and posing to create captivating fine art images of the female form

F

rom Brassai to Brandt, there’s a rich history of the fine art nude in photography. A nude shoot enables you to present the most celebrated form in the history of art – the female body – in any way you like, from a striking silhouette to an abstract array of simple lines and shapes. However, there are fine lines between fine art, erotica, and

porn. So how do we go about creating art from a naked body? Over the next three pages we’ll explore several ways to approach the subject, with the emphasis on form, shape and light rather than titillation; think understated rather than X-rated. Studio lights are a must, but you don’t necessarily need a full studio setup for a shoot like this. Most of our shots were taken with two

softboxes, of the kind you’ll find in any good home studio lighting kit. We’ll look at a few different setups over the page, but for our first setup the aim is to shoot an abstract nude. By excluding obvious features like the face, and concentrating instead on the shapes, shadows and highlights of the torso, we can transform the body into a form that looks almost like a landscape. www.digitalcameraworld.com


ideo view the v

Video also online http://bit.ly/pp_105_1

fine art nudes Project 1

The setup Essential gear for a fine art nude shoot A model, two flash heads fitted with softboxes, and a black backdrop is all you need to get started… 01 Softboxes

Softboxes are perfect for a nude shoot as they provide even, soft illumination that can be directed in channels across your subject. You’ll need to light both edges of the body; a third light, such as a beauty dish, can be added for top-down light.

02 Black velvet

Nothing sucks up light like black velvet, which makes it perfect for a backdrop. A plain dark backdrop makes it easy to tidy up areas in post-production, but try to stop your lights spilling onto the background to keep it as dark as possible.

03 Light power & distance

As well as adjusting the power, you can control the strength of lighting by changing its distance from the subject. Keep in mind the ‘inverse square’ law, which states that halving the distance of a light source will increase its illumination by four times.

02

01

05 03

04

06

04 exposure settings

A good starting point is to use Manual mode, set a shutter speed of 1/200 sec and aperture of f/11, and take some test shots. If images are too bright either close down the aperture or reduce the flash output; if they’re too dark do the opposite. The Canon Magazine

05 wireless flash Trigger

A wireless trigger that connects to your Canon’s hotshoe makes things easier, as you won’t need messy sync cables. These triggers have a receiver that connects to the studio flash, so that when you press the shutter release the flash fires.

06 Look after your model

If your model is going to be lying down for long periods, as here, think about her comfort. Bring along soft blankets, cushions or beanbags so she isn’t sprawled on a hard, cold studio floor. Turn the heating up too.

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Project 1

Setup 1 Low-key edge lighting

Keep your subject in the dark for atmospheric results For a moody low-key look, keep the frontal illumination to a minimum. Positioning the lights to the side and slightly behind the model will light the edges of the figure and plunge the front into darkness, enabling you to create bright highlights along the edges of the body. Posing the body in

an hourglass shape creates attractive gentle curves, from the feet slightly apart to the closed, overlapping knees up to the hips, waist and shoulders, and eventually to the face. Having the head tilted to one side like this will allow the side lighting to hit the profile of the face and accentuate the features.

Kit needed: Black background, two softboxes and an optional top light

Exposure: 1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO100

Setup 2 Wide angle

Elongate your subject’s limbs A wide-angle lens creates distortion, which is usually something to avoid on a portrait shoot. But for nudes, distortion can add to the drama of the shot by exaggerating and elongating parts of the body that are closer to the camera, like the legs here. You’ll need to get in quite close to the subject and focus precisely, as the closer you are the more limited the depth of field. You may find with a wide-angle lens that the backdrop isn’t big enough to reach the edges of the frame, but with a black backdrop it’s easy to fill these in later using Photoshop’s brush tool.

Kit needed: Wide-angle lens Exposure: 1/200 sec, f/5.6, ISO100

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www.digitalcameraworld.com


fine art nudes Booking a model

Setup 3 High-key backlit

Turn your model into a silhouette For a high-key setup that turns your subject into a silhouette, use a white background and direct your lights at this rather than the subject – here we used two softboxes either side of the background, and a top light. Angle the softboxes slightly inwards so that light spills onto the edges of the subject. The body shape is important, so ask your model to angle their hips out and hold their arms away from the sides of the body. A sheet of white Perspex on the floor will capture a reflection that helps to ground the subject.

Kit needed: White background board Exposure: 1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO100

When booking a model for a nude shoot, it helps enormously if they have some experience, as they’ll be confident in front of the camera and will have plenty of poses to call upon – there’s real skill in knowing how to strike poses that are both aesthetically interesting and natural-looking. We found our model through Model Mayhem, a website that enables you to connect with models and other creatives. Talk through your ideas with your model beforehand, and have them sign a model release.

Next month shoot a multiplicity portrait

Setup 4 capture a rippled reflection

Add water for a mirrored effect At the right angle, a tray of water placed in front of your subject can create a beautiful reflection that mirrors the edge of the body. A shallow tray with an inch or two of water is all that’s needed (a black cement-mixing tray like this can be picked up from a DIY store). Gently disturb the surface of the water for a lovely rippled effect. Of course, water and studio lighting can be a dangerous mix, so keep the power packs and studio heads well away. If water isn’t an option, a sheet of black Perspex is a good alternative.

Kit needed: Shallow tray, water Exposure: 1/200 sec, f/20, ISO100 The Canon Magazine

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Video also online http://bit.ly/pp_105_2

ideo view the v

Project 2

The Mission Make a pinhole lens Time needed One hour Skill level Intermediate Kit needed Tripod • Aluminium drinks can • Body cap • Needle • Tape • Sandpaper • Drill • Scissors

Get pin-teresting

Hollie Latham shows you how capture quirky images without a lens, by making a digital pinhole camera using your DSLR’s body cap

B

elieve it or not, you don’t need a lens to capture a photo with your Canon DSLR – you can make an image simply by allowing light to pass through a small hole onto your camera’s sensor. The technique is known as pinhole

photography, and it’s a great way to add a twist to your creative repertoire. Okay, so the images you get won’t be perfect; in fact they’re likely to be quite blurred, but that’s all part of the charm! What’s more, the technique is very simple, and very cheap. All you need is a spare body cap for

your camera, a small, thin piece of metal, a pin or needle to make the hole, scissors, some tape, fine sandpaper, a drill and some basic DIY skills. And if you’re not too handy with tools, you can purchase a pre-made laser-drilled pinhole – they’re readily available online.

Step by step shoot a hole in one Make your pinhole lens, set up your DSLR to capture a long exposure and add some flash lighting

01 Drill the body cap

02 Make the pinhole

03 align the holes

04 use a tripod

05 Set the shutter speed

06 Add some flash

Place a spare body cap on a block of wood or other secure protective surface, and drill a hole that’s roughly 5mm in diameter in the centre. Use some fine sandpaper to file away any loose bits of plastic so they don’t fall into your camera.

Place the camera on a tripod – because the light is passing through the pinhole exposure times are likely to be several seconds, so it’s essential that your camera remains still. Set your camera to Manual mode, and set a low ISO of 200.

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Carefully cut out a small square (to fit snuggly inside the plastic body cap) from a clean aluminium drinks can. Use a needle or pin to make a hole in the centre of the square, and file down the centre of the hole with sandpaper until it’s smooth.

You’ll need to experiment with the shutter speed, as the camera’s metering system won’t be able to calculate a good exposure through the pinhole. Start at between 5-10 seconds, take a test shot and adjust your settings until you get a balanced exposure.

Place the aluminium square inside the body cap and secure it with tape, positioning it so the pin-size hole is as close to the centre of the hole in the body cap as possible. Now attach the body cap to your camera body.

When you’re happy with the exposure, use off-camera flash to add vibrance and depth to your image. Set the flash to quarter power, point it at the subject and press the test button to fire flashes from different angles during the exposure. www.digitalcameraworld.com


pinhole photography

Quick Tip!

Use your camera’s histogram after taking a test shot to help you calculate a balanced exposure

Composition Composing your shot will require a bit of guesswork, so use the rear LCD screen to help you. The smallest of adjustments to the position of your camera will have a big impact on the composition; to make things easier, move the camera further back so there’s plenty of breathing room around the subject, then crop in as necessary in post-production.

Next month Fake an urban Reflection 

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Video also online http://bit.ly/pp_105_3

ideo view the v

Project 3

Say it with shadows

Hollie Latham shows you how to distort the shadow of a ring into an arty heart shape The Mission Create a ‘ring heart’ shadow image Time needed One hour Skill level Easy Kit needed Tripod • Lamp • Ring •Book

Next month create a multi-colour collage

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ne way of creating stylish fine art images is by using clever lighting techniques to make interesting shapes with shadows. ‘Ring heart’ shadow pictures are some of the most commonly bought stock photos and a staple of greeting cards, and in this project we’ll show you how to recreate the classic ring heart shadow effect by placing a ring between the pages of an open book. The effect is achieved by positioning a single light source behind the ring so it casts a shadow on the pages, with the curves of the open book distorting the shadow so that it becomes heart-shaped rather than oval. The exact shape of the shadow will vary depending on several factors, including the power and positioning of the light and the position of the ring and your camera, so you’ll need to play around with the setup to get the effect you want.

Get the best composition Although lying the ring down flat across the pages of the book is the easiest way to create the heart shadow effect, positioning the ring upright will give you a more pronounced heart shape. Make sure you leave plenty of space around the ring and its shadow, so that you can crop the image to create the desired composition.

Step by step Shooting shadows Experiment with the position of the light and subjects for the best effect

01 Shine a light

For the best results position a powerful light source behind the book. We used a small Manfrotto LED light, but an angle-poise desk lamp works well too.

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02 shape the shadow

Elevate the light source so the shadow forms a tight heart shape, and shoot the setup from slightly above at a shallow angle, so the shadow is well defined.

03 Depth of field

To ensure that both the ring and shadow are in focus, set a mid-range aperture such as f/5.6. Use Live View mode to help you compose and focus your shot. www.digitalcameraworld.com


Teach yourself

Black & White Photography Master mono photography – from visualising the shot through to how to get the best results when editing

Teach yourself

Teach yourself

Lightroom

Photography

Get to grips with Adobe’s powerful Lightroom image editing program with our complete instructional course

Beginner’s guide to understanding the key settings on your digital SLR so that you can take better shots

versions! Available in book, interactive DVD and app

Teach yourself

Photoshop

Complete instructional course on mastering Adobe’s powerful Photoshop CC image editing program

Teach yourself

Photoshop Elements

Elements is a more powerful editing program than its low price suggests. We help you unlock its full potential

Get the book and DVD versions today from our secure online store:

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Teach yourself

Raw in Photoshop Serious photographers shoot in Raw… We give a complete guide to unleashing the power of this professional file format

Buy the eBooks and interactive video course via the free Digital Camera app


The Mission Shoot a sequence of images and turn them into a time-lapse movie Time needed Shooting time plus two hours editing Skill level Intermediate Kit needed Intervalometer (or built-in interval shooting) • Tripod • Time-lapse software

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01

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04

05

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08

Make the time fly

Tom Welsh shows you how to shoot and edit a sunset time-lapse movie

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ime-lapse movies are a great way of recording the passing of time, by compressing an event that takes place over hours or even days – such as the movement of clouds across the sky, or day turning into night – into minutes. Time-lapse photography essentially enables you to create a flip-book style video, by shooting images over a set period and then playing them back at movie frame rates. As videos are shot at a frame

rate of at least 24 frames per second, we need to shoot a lot of images to create a movie of useful length – for just a one-minute video at 24fps, for example, you’ll need 1,440 images! To capture the images we need to set our camera up to shoot at set intervals – so if we wanted to capture those 1,440 images over a period of two hours we’d need a photo every five seconds. Some cameras, like the EOS 7D Mk II, include an interval timer that will do this automatically; if your

camera doesn’t have this feature you’ll need a remote with an interval shooting setting, or a dedicated intervalometer. We’ve used spot metering to keep the exposure consistent for our shots of the setting sun; it’s advisable to keep an eye on your exposures, and use exposure compensation if necessary. We’re using Lightroom 5 to create our time-lapse movie; you can also use Photoshop CS6/CC, or one of the many free time-lapse programs that are available. www.digitalcameraworld.com


Video also online http://bit.ly/pp_105_4 view the video Project 4

Preparation plan your shoot 03

06

09

Things to check before heading out to capture your time-lapse images

01 Come rain or shine

02 follow the sun

03 charge your battery

04 prepare for the worst

Checking the weather forecast is always advisable before shooting outdoors – and even more so if you’re going to be sitting in one spot for a few hours.

Make sure your battery is fully charged; a time-lapse shoot will take a long time, and will often require you to capture in excess of 1,000 images.

Checking where the sun will rise and set at your location will help you plan your shoot. The Photographer’s Ephemeris website and app can help you here.

Whatever the forecast, make sure you’re prepared for rain or falling temperatures. Take a cover for your camera, even if it’s just a rain-proof jacket to drape over it.

ESSENTIAL kit What Essential Everything do youyou need need forfor long-exposure a perfect time-lapse seascapes?

01 Tripod

It’s essential that your camera doesn’t move throughout the lengthy shooting process, so use a sturdy tripod. Make sure it’s on a solid footing, and that all the adjustments are fully tightened.

The Canon Magazine

02 Interval remote

Unless your Canon DSLR has a built-in interval timer you’ll need a remote control which includes an interval timer, or a dedicated timer called an intervalometer, which connects to your camera.

03 Grad filter

If you’re shooting over 1,000 images, bracketing your exposures will be time-consuming and will fill up your memory cards quickly – an ND grad filter will help prevent bright skies from blowing out.

04 memory card

Make sure you have a large-capacity memory card or two, as this will enable you to capture Raw images or high-quality JPEGs. Remember to empty and format the cards first.

05 Calculator

Use a calculator to work out your shooting intervals and ensure that you have enough images for your video. Divide the length of time you’re shooting over by the number of shots you need.

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Project 4

shooting technique how to capture your images How to shoot a sequence of images that can be easily combined to create a smooth-running movie

Interval remote We’ve used a Hama Timer Remote Shutter Release, which connects to your DSLR via a cable. The Hama remote features all of the shooting modes found in your camera along the bottom of its screen, plus, at the top of the screen, additional Delay and Interval Shooting options. Use the arrow keys to move between the functions, and the centre button to select them. Use the same controls to set the interval time, and press the play/stop button to begin shooting.

01 Accurate positioning

02 rock solid

03 check your capacity

04 exposure settings

05 cover the viewfinder

06 timing is everything

Set up your shoot where it won’t be disturbed, out of the way of passers by and sheltered from the wind. Use a compass with the Photographers Ephemeris app to work out where the sun will be.

As a time-lapse video will be viewed on-screen, we don’t need ultra-high resolution images. Shoot JPEGs or low-resolution Raw files depending on your camera and card capacity – ensure you have enough space.

Next month Shoot a bokeh panorama 54

During long exposures the viewfinder can leak light and affect metering or cause blemished images. You won’t need to use the viewfinder once set up, so cover it using the cap on your lens strap or with some tape.

Set up your tripod, making sure that it can’t move for the duration of the shoot; if necessary, open the legs wider for maximum stability, and hook your bag onto the central post to weigh it down.

Set your camera to Aperture Priority mode (Av) to keep the depth of field constant; your camera will adjust the shutter speed as the light changes. If you prefer to use Manual mode, use Auto ISO.

Calculate how many images you’ll need and how long you’re shooting for, and set the interval timer accordingly. We set our remote to shoot every five seconds for just over an hour, giving us 800 images. www.digitalcameraworld.com


shoot a time-lapse

time-lapse treatment timely subjects You can make time-lapse movies of all kinds of subjects and scenes…

01 opening flowers

This popular time-lapse can take up to a week to shoot, depending on the flower. You’ll need to set up your shoot in a quiet space with no air currents to prevent the flowers moving around; placing the stems in florist’s foam will help to keep them still. The lighting needs to be constant too.

02 Decaying food

The timescale for this will vary depending on the food – you can save time by buying fresh food, such as fruit or bread, that’s close to its sell-by date. As with flowers, set up the shoot with constant lighting in a location where the camera can be left in place for several days.

03 day-to-night city scene

Another popular choice for time-lapse photography is a bustling city – as with our sunset this requires images shot at shorter intervals over a shorter period. Shoot from a high vantage point, use Manual shooting mode, and use Auto ISO to balance the exposures.

editing Create your time-lapse movie How to edit your time-lapse sequence and turn it into a video using Lightroom 5

time-lapse templates

Create a collection

edit your images

Batch editing

Import your images, select all (Ctrl+A), and click the ‘+’ icon on the Collections panel to create a new collection.

Select one image, go to Develop, and make any necessary edits, such as using the Spot Removal tool to erase lens marks.

With one image edited, select all the images you want to change and click ‘Sync Settings’ to apply the edits to those images.

Filter your images

Import your template Export your movie

Scroll through the images and delete any that don’t work in the sequence. Go back to Develop to alter individual images.

Go to Slideshow view, right-click on the Templates panel, select ‘Import...’ and locate and import your template (see sidebar).

The Canon Magazine

To create a time-lapse using Lightroom 5 you first need to download Adobe’s free time-lapse templates from the ‘LRBplugins’ website: http://lrbplugins.com/ shop/presets/ lrb-timelapsepresetstemplates/. In the LRB Timelapse folder there will be two further folders – you need ‘Slideshow Templates> User Templates’. This folder includes options for a variety of frame rates per second, enabling you to choose how quickly your images are played back.

Select the frame rate template you want; we used 25fps. Select ‘Export video’ and set the resolution for your screen; we used 1080p.

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photoshop cc

After

The Mission Create a surreal portrait by blending graphic effects Time needed 30 minutes Skill level Intermediate Kit needed Photoshop Elements

Before

Turn over a new leaf James Paterson blends graphics with a portrait for fantastic effects

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his surreal effect may look complex, but you can copy it quite easily with any portrait, using the graphics or backgrounds that come with Photoshop

Elements. We’re using a simple Brass Leaves graphic, but there are lots of other options. We’ve built up the intricate foliage effect by duplicating the leaves graphic and reshaping it in

different ways. We then duplicated the cut-out face and ‘clipped’ it to each layer to apply the pattern, before applying a Drop Shadow layer style and changing the colours. Here’s how it works…

layering effects in photoshop elements Use clipping masks and layer styles to apply textures, colours and realistic shadows

01 Cut out the portrait Download project files to your computer from: http://downloads. photoplusmag.com/pp105.zip

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Open the start image. Select the face with the Quick Selection tool, then go to Select>Refine Edge to tidy up the selection. Set Radius 2.1, Contrast 25%, Shift Edge +17. Set Output to: New Layer and click OK.

02 Add the brass leaves

Go to Window>Graphics. Set to filter ‘By Word’ and type ‘Brass Leaves’ in the search box. Drag the leaves graphic into the image. The graphic is a Smart Object, so it can be resized without any loss in quality. www.digitalcameraworld.com


ideo Video also online view the v http://bit.ly/pp_105_5

Graphic effects photoshop elements

Quick Tip!

Drag a corner handle on the Transform box to resize a layer, and click and drag outside the box to rotate a layer 03 Build up the leaves

Take the Move tool, check Show Bounding Box and drag the box handles to resize and reshape the leaves, and position the pattern over the face. Press Ctrl+J to copy the layer and transform it again, in a different way to the first copy. Create and transform more copies until the face is mostly covered.

04 Copy & clip to the face

Rename the portrait layer ‘face’, and drag it above the bottom leaves layer. Hold down Alt and click the line between the two layers to clip the face to the leaves. Hold down Alt, drag the face layer above the next leaves layer to make a copy, and clip these two layers. Repeat to clip a copy of the face to every leaf layer.

Add a vignette effect

05 Mask the leaves

06 Add drop shadows

07 Colour the effect

08 Drop in the background

Hold down Ctrl and click the image thumbnail of the uppermost face layer to load its outline as a selection. Highlight the leaves layer below, then click the Add Layer Mask icon to convert the selection to a mask. Hold down Alt and drag the mask thumbnail onto each of the other leaves layers to copy it over.

Select the top face layer and add a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer. Set Hue to +60, then hold down Alt and click the line between the Hue/Sat layer and the face layer below to clip the layer to the face. Repeat to clip a Hue/Sat layer to the other face layers, changing the Hue value slightly each time to vary the colours. The Canon Magazine

Highlight any leaves layer and go to Layer>Layer Style>Style Settings. Check Drop Shadow and set Angle 40, Size 18, Distance 6, Opacity 90. Click OK. When you add a layer style an ‘fx’ icon will appear on the layer thumbnail – hold down Alt and drag this icon to the other leaves layers to copy the drop shadow.

Go to the Graphics panel, find ‘leaves 02’ and place it at the foot of the layer stack. Press Ctrl+T, right-click and choose Flip Horizontal. Add a Brightness/ Contrast layer set Brightness to +10 and Contrast to +100. Finally, darken the corners of the background to draw the eye into the frame – see the sidebar.

To darken the corners of the background layer, add a Solid Colour adjustment layer above it, with the colour set to black. Select the Brush tool and set the foreground colour to black. Click the Solid Colour layer’s mask to select it, and paint over the central part of the layer to hide the black and reveal the green background.

Next month create a movie poster 57


Video also online http://bit.ly/pp_105_6

ideo view the v

photoshop cc

Before

The Mission Learn how to retouch faces, lift eyes, smooth skin and give your portrait shots a professional edge Time needed 20 minutes Skill level Intermediate Kit needed Photoshop CC

Download project files to your computer from: http://downloads. photoplusmag.com/pp105.zip

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Retouch portraits to get realistic results James Paterson reveals a host of high-end Photoshop retouching techniques that will help you take your portraits to the next level

A

full 25 years after Photoshop came on the scene, the retouching debate rages on. When it’s possible to remove every flaw, enhance facial features and even reshape a subject’s body, the question is – where do we stop? The best portrait retouching should go almost unnoticed – a spot masked out here, a lift to the face there – while still retaining the character of the subject. The flipside, however, is that we all have insecurities about the way

we look, so most subjects will want you to go to town on them. And there are times, as with this shot, when the image straight out of camera is almost there, but not quite. When a person is moving like this the hair and the pose can create a lovely sense of motion, but it can be hard for them to keep a relaxed, composed expression. The jaw tightens, or the mouth clenches, or hairs fly out of place. These little flaws are all easy to fix, and if the aim is to create a flawless, stylised portrait, then we

can use an array of Photoshop tricks to finish off the job. In this tutorial we’ll show you a complete retouching workflow. It’s easy to lose hours when you start retouching, so we’ll employ a few shortcuts to keep things quick. It helps to break the face down into different areas, so we’ll start by removing spots and marks from the skin, then go on to subtly boost the colour and tone in the eyes, before employing a skin smoothing technique to leave skin tones looking silky smooth. www.digitalcameraworld.com


Portrait retouching

Step by step retouching faces masterclass Reshape a dodgy smile, get silky textured skin and give your portraits a professional sheen

Quick Tip!

01 Remove spots

Open the start image, create a new layer and rename it ‘Spot’. Take the Spot Healing Brush from the Tools panel, check ‘Sample All Layers’ in the Tool Options panel, then simply paint over small spots and marks on the face to remove them.

02 Clone out the bags

Retouching can get monotonous, so use the Actions Panel to record common tasks, so you can run them next time with a single click

Next select the Clone Stamp tool, choose All Layers from the Sample menu, and press 2 to set the tool opacity to 20%. Alt-click to sample a clean area of skin on the cheek below the eye, then carefully paint over the eye bags to tone them down.

enlarge the eyes 03 Warp the smile

04 Start the smoothing trick

05 Create silky skin

06 Boost the eyes

The mouth looks a little strained, so press Ctrl+Shift+ Alt+E to create a merged layer, then go to Filter> Liquify. Select the Forward Warp tool, and nudge the corners of the mouth to form more of a smile. Push the right arm in slightly to make a body tighter shape.

Go to Filter>Other>High Pass, and enter 9px to blur the detail. Next go to Filter>Blur>Gaussian Blur and set Radius to 3. Alt-click the Add Layer Mask button to add a black mask that hides this layer, then paint with a white brush over the skin to reveal the blur effect. The Canon Magazine

Create another merged layer, then open the blending mode menu at the top of the Layers panel and choose Linear Light. Press Ctrl+I to invert the image, then reduce the layer opacity to 50%. At this point the image will be completely grey.

Add a Curves adjustment layer, plot a shallow S-curve to boost contrast, then select Red from the menu and drag down to add cyan. Add another Curves layer with a more pronounced S-curve. Invert the mask, and paint white over the eyes to reveal the contrast boost.

Pro retouchers will sometimes make eyes slightly larger to make a portrait more engaging. To do this, simply grab the Lasso tool and make a rough selection around the eye, then right-click the selection, choose Feather and set amount to around 15px. Press Ctrl+J to copy the area to a new layer, then press Ctrl+T to transform. Hold down Shift+Alt, and drag the corners of the box to enlarge the eyes – but not too much! You can use the same technique to de-emphasize noses, or make fuller lips.

Next month add 3d text to images 59


After The Mission Set up a print template in Lightroom for printing for specific sizes and papers Time needed 15 minutes Skill level Easy Kit needed Lightroom

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Print with Lightroom

Before

James Paterson explains how Lightroom’s Print module takes all the hassle out of making prints, with simple controls and handy templates

P

art of the reason many of us don’t print out nearly enough of the images we so lovingly create may be down to the fact that printing can be a bit of a chore. There’s setting up the page, resizing and cropping images, working out resolution, handling your printer’s colours and profiles and so on. However, Lightroom’s Print module makes the whole process much less daunting. If you haven’t used the Print module before, you’ll find that it’s designed to make printing your images as easy as possible. At first it may take

you a few minutes to work through all of the settings. But the beauty of Lightroom is that – as with other aspects of its workflow – settings can be easily transferred from one image to another, or even to an entire batch of photos. So once you’ve gone through the print setup process once, you won’t have to do it again. Selecting and preparing your photos for print is a whole other topic in its own right, so before you head for the Print module it’s worth spending some time learning how to soft-proof and sharpen your images. Colour management and printer profiles

also have a huge bearing on print quality, so make sure that your monitor and printer are properly calibrated before you start. Once you’re ready to make a print, the first step is to set up your page. You can choose to print a single image, display several on the same page, or create contact sheets for an entire set of images, which is particularly useful if you’re taking photos for clients. As well as all the layout options you could possibly need it’s very easy to add other elements to the page, such as a logo or signature, or copyright watermarks. Here’s how it all works... www.digitalcameraworld.com


ideo view the v

Video also online http://bit.ly/pp_105_7

Lightroom print module lightroom

Step by step Printing perfection Choose a paper, print size and layout for your image in the Print module

01 Set up the page

Choose the images you want to print, and create a collection for them in the Library module by clicking the ‘+’ icon in the Collections panel. Next head to the Print module and click the bottom-left Page Setup button. Select your printer and choose a print size.

Quick Tip!

Once your layout is ready, be sure to save it in the Template Browser at the left of the screen, for use with other images

02 Choose printer settings

Click the Print Settings button (Mac only; in Windows, all the Print Settings are within the Page Setup options). Choose a paper type and colour settings. Make sure Colour Settings are set to Off. Choose the highest quality settings and turn off High Speed.

Watermark your images

03 Single image or multiple?

04 Set the image size

05 Add text or graphics

06 Print the job

Head to the Layout Style panel at the top right. The Print Package feature enables you to print several copies of the same image in different sizes on a single page, while Custom Package enables you to drag image cells into whatever setup you like.

In the Page panel you can add text and graphics. Choose Identity Plate to add a graphic element such as a logo. You can also go to the Photo Info settings to add file info (if you want to add captions to images, do this first in the Library module’s metadata panel). The Canon Magazine

Go to the Image settings. Check ‘Zoom to fill’ and add a border if you like. Next go to the Layout panel. Start by setting Cell Size to your chosen print size (10 x 12 inches here) then use the margin sliders to tweak the positioning on the page.

Go to the Print Job settings. Set Print to: Printer, turn off the Draft and Resolution settings and select a sharpening amount for your paper type. Go to Colour Management Settings. In Profile, click Other and select the paper profile for your printer. Click Print.

Watermarks can be very useful if you’re worried about sending images via email or posting them online, as once an image is out there in digital form there’s no telling where it’ll go. Watermarks help you keep ownership of your work. It’s very easy to create a watermark template in the Print module. Simply check Watermarking in the Page panel, then choose Edit Watermark. You can choose the text, size, positioning and opacity in the Watermark Editor, then save it for use on any image you like.

Next month lightroom’s web module 61


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www.digitalcameraworld.com


drew gibson

Drew Gibson

Drew Gibson specialises in photographing the glamorous world of motorsports, but, as he tells David Clark, it takes hard graft to get great pictures t 31, Drew Gibson is a rising star in the highly competitive world of motorsports photography. He shoots a wide range of events, including Formula 1, endurance and sports car racing, and he’s not content to take the easy route. Drew prides himself on making images that appeal to people beyond the world of motorsports, and he’s always looking for fresh angles and innovative ways to photograph his subjects creatively. Freelance for the past three years, Drew has built up a formidable list of top editorial and corporate clients, including major Formula 1 teams. To achieve this kind of success you have to be dedicated, determined and hard-working. Drew undoubtedly ticks all those boxes and, as he explains, fast cars and the thrills of the racing circuit have been his overriding passion from an early age… So which came first – the photography or the motorsports? As a teenager I was really into rallying and motorsports, and I travelled around to events with my brother, who’s a couple of years older than me. When I went to college in 2001 to do a City and Guilds media studies course I was given an SLR, and I found that I enjoyed using it. I started taking the camera along to events to record what was happening, and take pictures of cars I really liked.

01 no need for speed

Drew shot this image using a long exposure while the car was pushed along the track at walking pace. The speed is an illusion, but the approaching dark rain cloud was real.

The Canon Magazine

Lens

Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM

Exposure

3.2 secs at f/11, ISO50, ND filter

How did you start on the road to becoming a pro photographer? I made black and white prints of drivers we knew, and they started asking to buy my pictures. At the time I was 16 or 17, and earning £15 a night working in a bar. Suddenly I had someone who wanted to

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TheCanonconversation

02

02

a good grade. I continued to go out to motorsports events with photographers for LAT, and I started shooting rally pictures at weekends for an agency in Birmingham; I missed some days at uni because I was driving up to attend rallies. I was aware that very few people made a living out of motorsports photography, but I really didn’t want to do anything else.

03

pay me £20 for a black and white picture. I thought ‘this is brilliant’, and it got me motivated to do more. What was the next step? I wrote to Motoring News, and they put me in touch with their picture agency, LAT Photographic. LAT offered me work experience in their archive in London,

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and it was amazing to have access to a vast archive that goes back to the 1800s; I loved looking at those images. After that I decided to study photography at Cumbria Institute of the Arts in Carlisle. Did a degree help in your career? I was as busy trying to make a career out of photography as I was trying to get

What was your big break in motorsports photography? When I left university I had a call from F1 Racing magazine. Their picture editor was going on maternity leave and they needed someone for six months, so I moved down to London and was plunged right into the industry. I had the world’s best agencies and freelance Formula 1 photographers trying to get work from me. After six months I was given the job permanently. At weekends I worked for LAT photographing junior British racing, Formula 3 and other young driver series. After that I got a full-time job at LAT, which I did for three years before going freelance at the start of 2012. How do you arrange your work? I’ve got big regular clients like Aston www.digitalcameraworld.com


drew gibson 02 NICO ROSBERG, BELGIan GRAND PRIX

Drew shot just one frame of Rosberg as he approached down the long straight. This kind of shot takes years of practice, but, says Drew, “When it all comes together it’s worth the hard work, and it can feel like the best job in the world.”

Lens

Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM

Exposure

1/1000 sec at f/8, ISO200

03 PIT STOP

This overhead shot of Mark Webber was taken during 2013 Formula 1 Testing in Barcelona. Drew made the most of the vantage point above the pit garages.

Lens

Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II

Exposure

1/250 sec at f/5.6, ISO200

04

04 JULES BIANCHI, belgian grand prix

Drew was able to get close to Bianchi while working for the Marussia F1 team during the 2014 Belgium Grand Prix. The French driver died in July from injuries suffered in a crash in October 2014. “It was one of the last pictures I took of Jules, who I’d worked with for a number of years,” he says.

Lens

Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM

Exposure

1/160 sec at f/1.2, ISO50

05 LEWIS HAMILTON, indian grand prix

This shot, taken during the 2012 Indian Grand Prix, shows Hamilton in his McLaren. Drew waited for one of the evening practice sessions so he could shoot in soft light.

Lens

Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM + 1/4x convertor

Exposure

1/500 sec at f/6.3, ISO100

Martin, plus semi-regular clients such as sports car teams. I prefer to work for a smaller number of clients at each race as I shoot in quite a creative way, which makes it difficult to get pictures of a lot of different cars or drivers. For example, if I do a pit lane session it’s nice to sit in one garage and wait to get portraits when the background’s clean and the drivers are in the right position; if you’re working with ten or 15 cars in the pit lane you’ve got to get a shot of one driver then quickly move on to the next team. So I choose a smaller number of clients, which allows me to take these creative images. How do you cover a race from so many different angles? A race takes a lot of concentration and planning, and I’m constantly thinking ‘what’s the next step?’. So in session one, I’ll go into the garage and get some nice driver shots, for example. Then in session two I might get some evening sunlight to work with, so I’ll go to a particular place The Canon Magazine

05

where I can do a nice head-on or panning shot. It’s all about thinking ahead, and planning each session differently to make the most of the conditions. There’s a lot of physical work involved in getting around a track to get a good, varied set of pictures that I’m personally satisfied with at the end of a weekend. That’s the way I work, and luckily that’s what my clients want from me. Tell us about your first camera… It was a film camera, a Canon EOS 5, which I bought around 2004. I remember that it had eye-controlled focusing – it would register where you were looking in the frame and change the focus spot accordingly, although it didn’t work very well. After that I bought two second-hand Canon EOS 1V cameras, which looked awesome. My first few commissions were shot on film, because at the time a digital camera which could take a magazinequality double-page spread image was very expensive.

There’s a lot of physical work involved in getting around a track to get a good, varied set of pictures What was the first digital camera that you used? An EOS 20D, which I bought in 2006. However, I didn’t have it for very long and soon moved on to an EOS-1Ds. It was a slow camera and it took a long time to write images, but I liked it. When I went to LAT they provided my equipment, so I had all sorts, including a 5D Mk II and a 1V Mk III. Eventually I got two EOS-1Ds Mk IIs, which I inherited from two F1 photographers. They were battered and

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06

STORy BEHIND THE SHOT

06 FELIPE MASSA, belgian grand prix

Drew panned his EOS-1Ds Mk III with Massa as he passed through the trees during the 2014 Belgian Grand Prix. He set his exposure manually, pre-focused on a chosen spot and kept his panning movement smooth and steady.

Lens

Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L USM

Exposure

1/8 sec at f/22, ISO50

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there was barely any paint on them, but I used them for most of my career at LAT. What bodies do you use now? When I went freelance I bought two EOS 1Ds Mk IIIs, and I still use them. I love the Mk III – it’s a great camera and it produces a beautiful file, although it’s a little bit behind the times now. I think it’s been overtaken by the speed at which the new cameras can work, and some of their focus point features. What’s the next camera you’re planning to buy? I should have bought a 1D X when it came out, but I hung on and I think I’ve missed the boat a little bit. I think Canon must have something new in the 1D line around the corner, so I’m wary of buying now and losing out. I always use two cameras as it’s very important to be able to react quickly, especially when working in the garage. You’ll see something and

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07

Beautiful backlighting Drew tells the story behind this sunlit evening shot of the Aerial Atom “It had been a beautiful sunny day at Blyton Park, where I was shooting Evo magazine’s track car of the year feature,” says Drew. “With the circuit closed for the evening all the journalists disappeared off to the hotel, but I decided to sit it out and waited for the sun to sit low enough in the sky to create this image. Then it was just a case of wheeling the car into position, and choosing the correct exposure. It’s not often that all the elements come together for a picture like this, so it was well worth a late arrival at the hotel bar.”

www.digitalcameraworld.com


07

07 2015 WORLD ENDURANCE CHAMPIONSHIP

Drew had pre-focused further forward on the circuit for this picture, but changed his focus point as he saw the cars approaching; as a result he got a much better formation of cars than he would have if he’d waited.

Lens

Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM

Exposure

1/800 sec at f/6.3, ISO400

08 2015 LE MANS 24-HOUR RACE

Drew pre-focused on a chosen spot when photographing this Nissan GTR LMP1 car. “As it hit the spot, the rear of the car hit the ground hard, showering the circuit behind with sparks and creating this dramatic image,” he says.

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know it’s only going to be happening for a few seconds, so it’s important to be able to switch to different lenses instantly. Using two cameras makes it expensive to change kit, but I’ll probably jump on the next top Canon that comes out. Which camera features are the most useful for you? I work in quite a traditional way. I don’t use a lot of autofocus, or Tv or Av; I use a lot of manual focus and pre-focusing. And I don’t burst ten images as a car’s The Canon Magazine

coming around a corner – I’ll take one or two shots as the car goes past a spot at which I know I want to take a picture. So for me, features like fast autofocus aren’t really important. However, for some shots, like when winners are on the podium, catching the right moment is a bit hit-and-miss, so it would be helpful to be able to shoot ten frames a second. What lenses and other gear are in your kitbag on a typical shoot? I only use fixed lenses for motorsports

Lens

Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM

Exposure

1/500 sec at f/6.3, ISO400

events. I’ve got one zoom, which is a 17-40mm, but I tend to use that for automotive photography or when I’m doing clamp-on photography. So at an event I’ll take a Canon EF 14mm f/2.8, 24mm f/1.4, 50mm f/1.2, 85mm f/1.2, an old 200mm f/1.8 and a 600mm f/4. Apart from that I take a 1.4x convertor, an EF 12 close-up ring and a 580EX Speedlite, but I use very little flash. I also have a monopod for the 600mm lens. I don’t use a camera bag when I’m working track-side as I’m moving around a lot, so I carry everything in pouches. So what I take comes down to what I can physically

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TheCanonconversation

09

09 ASTON MARTIN AT LE MANS

For this image, taken during the 2013 Le Mans 24-Hour race, Drew waited for the Aston Martin to appear in the shaft of sun light; a cloud passing overhead cast the dark foreground shadow.

Lens

Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM

Exposure

1/1000 sec at f/7.1, ISO50

10 Neel Jani, Porsche 919, 2014 World

endurance championship, brazil To get this shot Drew had to kneel down and shoot through the fence to make an interesting shape out of the kerbing.

Lens

Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM

Exposure

1/500 sec, f/8, ISO200

11 Gulf GR8

“I took this picture as part of a magazine feature,” says Drew. “This type of automotive photography offers far more control than my race photography, and it’s nice to have the chance to choose how and where the car is positioned. Having brought the car to the front of the garage, I used a tripod to steady the camera and a remote flashgun to illuminate the car in the dark garage.”

Lens

Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM

Exposure

1/200 sec at f/4, ISO50

carry; when you’re walking miles at a time you don’t want to be dragging too much around in a big, heavy bag. Which lens do you most often use? I use my 600mm a lot, but mainly to do more stock pan shots and stock head-ons. A lot of the more creative images are shot on shorter lenses like the 200mm. I enjoy doing an action shot on something like a 50mm, as it encourages you to work in a different way and take a creative image. Often the interesting things are going on around the car, like big skies, or the crowd, or trees in the background; if you just crop in on the car you miss a lot of that. A lot of my favourite action shots are taken on the shorter lenses. What kind of images do you most enjoy taking? I really enjoy taking photographs which someone who isn’t particularly into cars or motorsports can look at and think they’re cool or interesting. It’s the same when I look at other photographers’ work in, say, tennis, surfing or fashion – I’m inspired by people who can look at subjects in a new or different way and give their shots the ‘X’ factor. What’s the most challenging aspect of your work? Almost every race weekend is a

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challenge. It takes a lot of mental concentration to do something different to what you have been doing, when you’re working with very similar cars on very similar circuits. It would be easy to drop into a rut, and use the same shooting positions every time; doing something different and trying to evolve and push yourself needs a lot of focus. When you do nail something you’ve never seen before, that you know other people are going to like, it’s just brilliant – it’s the best feeling. When all the bits of the puzzle fall into place like that you feel like punching the air and saying “Yesss!” What’s your favourite motorsports image that you’ve taken? One of my favourites is a shot of an Aston Martin at Le Mans in 2013 [see page 70]. I visualised it two weeks before I took it. I asked to have the car for an hour, plus the mechanics to help set it up. I clamped the camera onto the car, then one mechanic sat in the driver’s seat and we literally pushed the car at walking pace while I set off a 3.2-second exposure, shooting through an ND filter. We only had two tries, then the heavens opened and we had to stop. I was gutted at the time, but the picture turned out really well. For me, the thing that makes it is the foreboding sky – it looks like it was Photoshopped, but it was actually like that. www.digitalcameraworld.com


drew gibson

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Profile

Drew Gibson Motorsports Photographer Drew did a degree in photography at Cumbria Institute of the Arts, and subsequently worked as a motorsports photographer for the picture agency LAT Photographic. He won the prestigious Renault MSA Young Motorsport Photographer of the Year Award in both 2007 and 2008. Freelance since 2012, Drew specialises in endurance and sports car racing, but also shoots automotive images and other sports, including cycling and horse racing. 11

Is shooting F1 a glamorous job? I would say generally that it’s one of the least glamorous lifestyles. There are a lot of low-cost airlines, protracted flights and cheap hotels. People don’t see the long hours you do. Sessions start at 9am, but you’re there at 7am to be in position so you leave the hotel at 6am. Cars finish on track at 5 or 6pm, and then often there are other shoots you have to do for products or sponsors that take you through to 9 or 10pm. After that you grab some food in hospitality, then start image processing until 11pm or midnight. Then you drive back to your hotel, get some sleep and get up at 6am the next morning to do it all again. Are there any glamorous aspects? Yes – don’t get me wrong. I did a job the other day with Serena Williams, who is a The Canon Magazine

brand ambassador for Aston Martin. We flew to a racetrack in a private helicopter so she could drive one of the cars, then flew back and did a factory tour. While I was doing that I was thinking this is quite cool, quite glamorous. Occasionally it’s nice to have a little insight into that world, but to be honest I’d rather be with the fans than at the exclusive parties. What’s the best advice you can offer an aspiring motorsports photographer? I know it’s basic advice, but I’d say people should learn about photography first. Don’t assume that the best thing to do is get yourself into the Formula 1 paddock. Anyone can make Lewis Hamilton look good on the grid of the British Grand Prix with a massive crowd behind him; the challenge is to make a good picture out

His editorial clients include the Telegraph, Times, Guardian and New York Times. Corporate clients include Hackett, Porsche, Aston Martin, Jaguar, Mercedes, Mazda, Nissan, McLaren and Red Bull.

Next issue: Acclaimed American fine art and portrait photographer Howard Schatz of something that’s not particularly interesting or beautiful, and to do that you need to know how your camera works. Also, don’t be afraid to start at the bottom, at the less glamorous races where it’s easier to get access; this is where you can learn from your mistakes. That’s how I came up, and I wouldn’t have done it any other way. To see more of Drew Gibson’s work visit www.drew-gibson.co.uk.

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PHOTOSTORIES Photo essays from PhotoPlus readers and up-and-coming pro photographers

Get £50 for every photo story we publish!

Join in the fun! Reflections in water make for captivating images, but photographing them is harder work than the serene-looking resulting images might suggest, as George Johnson explains opposite. Also this issue, Goran Jovic tells us how he descended into a volcanic crater to document the harsh lives of Javanese sulphur miners, and we get an insight into an aspiring portrait photographer’s first location shoot. We want your photos and stories! We’ll pay you £50 for every project we publish. Please send them to… Email photoplus@futurenet.com Online www.facebook.com/photoplusmag www.twitter.com/photoplusmag Post PhotoPlus: The Canon Mag Future The Ambury Bath BA1 1UA UK

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PROJECT INFO 01

Mirror images Name: George Johnson AGE: 43 Location: South-east England Mission: To capture genuine, perfect reflections in bodies of water and flooded landscapes Kit: Canon EOS 5D Mk II, Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM, Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM, Lee soft and hard 2-stop and 3-stop graduated filters, Manfrotto CX055 tripod with 410 Junior geared head www.fuzzypig.com

Capturing perfect reflections requires careful planning and lots of patience – not to mention a little luck with the weather

I

have been shooting landscapes for five or six years now, and I’ve always had a fascination with reflections. They’re a very challenging subject to shoot, as the wind is almost always against you, disturbing the surface of the water. You need to locate a good scene, and plan to shoot when there will be no algae or detritus on the water. You also need to ensure that the water is deep enough

so the bottom of the river or pond will not show through. I like to travel as light as possible, keeping my kit bag to the bare minimum when I’m on location – I might need to stand in 18 inches of water with nowhere to rest my bag. I usually only carry my camera, tripod, two lenses and my ND graduated filters. I generally find the best reflections when the sun is low, and lighting the sky rather than the ground. www.digitalcameraworld.com


YOUR PHOTO STORIES

02 03 01 Horsey Windpump

Just as the colour started to fade, the clouds broke apart in the sky

Lens

Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM

Exposure

2.5 secs, f/8, ISO100

02 Dawn on the Stour

I stood in a flooded field for two hours until I got the shot I was after

Lens

Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM

Exposure

1/8 sec, f/16, ISO100

03 Keyhaven Harbour

I set a long exposure to capture the moving clouds as the sun rose

Lens

I had to trek for a mile through flooded fields, and then stand in the water for close on two hours while I got the shot! I prefer sunrise to sunset, as you’re more likely to get a location to yourself first thing in the morning when sensible people are still in bed! Keyhaven Harbour was shot first thing in the morning, at around 4.30am. There was very heavy cloud but the water was perfectly still, so I waited around for an hour or so and eventually the cloud began to recede; I’ve found that for a landscape photographer The Canon Magazine

patience is not just a virtue, it’s a mandatory requirement! On the day I shot Horsey Windpump I arrived to find less that perfect conditions, but I decided to stick around and about an hour later, just as the colour started to fade from the sky, the clouds broke up but fortunately the water remained still. Dawn on the Stour was shot by the River Stour at Dedham in Suffolk. There had been lots

Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM

Exposure

132 secs, f/11, ISO100

feedback

morning when the F or the best results shoot reflections early in the from the sky into the waters are still, and to reflect the warm tones still in shadow cooler-coloured pools or bodies of water that are ’s Ephemeris (TPE) Use a smartphone app such as The Photographer given location a at rise to work out where and when the sun will your composition; try You don’t necessarily have to include the sky in different results framing just your subject and its reflection for of rain in the previous week and the river had burst its banks, creating a fantastic opportunity to capture reflections. I had to trek for a mile through flooded fields, in about a foot of water, and then

stand in the water for close on two hours while I got the shot! Lots of Photoshop tutorials will show you how to fake a reflection in your shot, but it’s more rewarding to find and capture the real thing.

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Your PHOTO YOUR Photo STORIES stories

PROJECT INFO

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Hell’s kitchen Name: Goran Jovic AGE: 37 Location: Kawah Ijen, Indonesia Mission: To document the harsh lives of Javanese sulphur miners Kit: Canon EOS 5D Mk III, Canon EF 15mm f/2.8 Fisheye, Canon EF 50mm f/1.4, Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM, Benro carbon fibre tripod www.goran-jovic.com

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The sulphur miners of Kawah Ijen eke out a living in the harshest conditions imaginable – on the slopes of an active volcano

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ocumenting the lives of sulphur miners on the slopes of Eastern Java’s Kawah Ijen volcano was a challenge. Hiking 2,800m up to the rim of the volcano is demanding, especially when you’re carrying 10kg of photo gear. It doesn’t get much easier as you descend into the crater

lake, avoiding slippery rocks hidden in the sulphuric mist. But when you finally come face to face with the spectacular blue flames the journey seems worth it. The flames are created by sulphur combusting as it comes into contact with the air, and this magnificent sight attracts tourist from all over the world. Although the blue flames are worth wandering through the dark night for, they can be very dangerous – especially if you want to be in the centre of the combustion to photograph 01 Sulphur Spring

Liquid sulphur solidifies, and miners hew it with sharp tools

Lens

Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM

Exposure

1/30 sec, f/1.4, ISO3200

02 The Return

Miners are paid by the weight of sulphur they collect

The Canon Magazine

Lens

Canon EF 15mm f/2.8 Fisheye

Exposure

1/15 sec, f/2.8, ISO6400

the miners who work right beside the acid lake. Kawah Ijen is one of the toughest and most toxic working environments in the world, where one light breeze can literally kill you – if the wind suddenly changes direction the sulphur gases can suffocate you instantly. If this doesn't scare you, there’s always the risk of slipping and falling into a lake filled with hydrochloric acid. But I’ve learnt that danger often goes with adventure, especially if you want to be able to photograph such miracles of nature.

k feedbac a high ISO  on’t be afraid to use D to increase your shutter speed – you can reduce image noise but you can’t fix a blurred shot

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PhotoStories

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PROJECT INFO

Name: P1ay AGE: 35 Location: London, UK Mission: I don’t want to stumble across a photo that shows a revealing moment – I want to get out there and create it. Kit: Canon EOS 60D, Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM, Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS, Westcott 40-inch reflector www.p1ay.co.uk, Instagram: @p1ay_

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In at the deep end How a carefully planned first location shoot turned into an ultimately rewarding photographic adventure

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have been taking pictures for a little while, but it was not until 2014 that I had my first experience of shooting people, albeit in a studio. Afterwards my synapses were firing all at once; the experience had left me feeling focused, and my mind had been charged. I spent the next few months learning all about the effects

of light on people, directing models, choosing clothes, makeup and backdrops. With each shot I was growing and my imagination was evolving. When summer arrived I was itching to get outside for a shoot, and one afternoon I got an email from Jessica de Virgilis, a model I had worked with before. She said she was coming to London and wanted to know if I was interested

in doing another shoot. The universe had heard me, and had sent me my new muse. This was my first location shoot, and I wanted to make sure I had a location that would complement my ideas and my model. I began searching, walking down side streets looking for something that would stand out. I finally found two locations that were perfect. I emailed pictures to www.digitalcameraworld.com


Your Photo stories

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01 Looking For A Warm

Embrace This is a very romantic location, and I wanted to show another side to it

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Jessica, along with ideas about the clothing and makeup I was visualizing, and she responded with exactly what I wanted. When the day of the shoot arrived I was nervous and excited. We met at the first location and began shooting, and everything was going great – better than I had expected. The main focus for the next location was a big purple door, but when we got there we discovered that the door had been painted a

different colour – a horrible cream! – so we moved on. We had to take the Underground to the next spot, and as we sat down we heard a message saying the train was delayed, so we got off and found another route. When we finally arrived it had started raining lightly – typical. By this point I was beyond caring – all I wanted to do was get my shots – but then I noticed that the gate to my chosen spot was closed and that there was an eerie silence; normally this gate is open and you can hear people. We got closer and my heart was beating fast. I grabbed the gate with both hands and pushed it – and it

This was my first location shoot, and I wanted to make sure I had a location that complemented my ideas and my model The Canon Magazine

opened! Thank the photography gods! Suffice to say the second part of the shoot went to plan, and I got my shots. Looking back I could probably have used Photoshop to change the colour of that door back to purple. But would I go back and change anything? No. I love an adventure, and I think that goes hand in hand with photography.

Lens

Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM

Exposure

1/1250 sec, f/2.2, ISO100

02 Pose From Within

I used the hanging lights as a backlight for this shot

Lens

Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM

Exposure

1/80 sec, f/2.5, IS0160

03 Look Into My Eyes

I wanted to use the wall lines to lead you into Jessica’s eyes

Lens

Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM

Exposure

1/500 sec, f/2.2, ISO100

feedback

t will help things to Scouting your chosen location in advance of a shoo model about your your run smoothly on the day. Communicating with length and wave ideas will also ensure that you’re both on the same working towards the same goals. nts of a shoot are No matter how much planning you do, some eleme and working with simply out of your control. Thinking on your feet pher. what you’ve got will help you grow as a photogra

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FocusPoint

We’d love to hear your thoughts on the new-look mag and all things photographic! Email us at photoplus@futurenet.com Shot of The Month

Derwentwater After deciding to collect a portfolio of landscape shots from around the UK, my first stop was Keswick to enjoy the sublime nature of the Lake District. I stumbled across the Derwentwater area by accident and the sun had just set, so I literally had seconds to capture the last remaining light. I used an ND8 filter in conjunction with an ND8 graduated filter to make sure I got an even exposure for the entire image; I also wanted the water to have the much-adored ‘silky effect’. I used my Canon 7D and Tamron 10-24mm, with an exposure of 30 secs at f/16 and ISO100. A great end to a successful weekend!

Rory Wilson, Derby

Every month we invite you to send in your best images, along with around 100 words on the ‘story’ behind each shot (include Canon DSLR and lens used, plus exposure settings). Email photoplus@futurenet.com with Shot of the Month in the subject header. Good luck!

WIN A £50 CEWE VOUCHER!

Each issue, the photographer behind our Shot of the Month is awarded a £50 voucher to have their image professionally mounted. Rory’s shot would look great as an Aluminium Print – mounted on a 3mm thick aluminium composite panel, they add a modern touch to any home and ensure a sleek, glossy finish. CEWE Wall Art is available at www.photoworld.com

Digital edition options I came back to SLR photography after buying myself an EOS 650D for my 60th birthday. Recently I upgraded to a 7D Mk II, with EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 and EF 70-200mm f/4L IS lenses. I have to say that there is so much content in PhotoPlus now, it takes a whole month to get through it all! There are so many different aspects of photography in the magazine that I would like to try, but I never have enough time! I have a long-standing digital subscription to PhotoPlus, and read the magazine in Newsstand on my iPad, which I find both enjoyable and extremely informative. I have recently upgraded my home desktop PC to Windows 10 and my question is: is there a way of reading the magazine on both my iPad and PC with a single digital edition subscription? Jon Weiner, Harrietsham, Kent Glad to hear you’re a long-standing subscriber, Jon! Unfortunately, the Apple Newsstand edition of PhotoPlus can only be read on an iOS device (iPad or iPhone). However, it is available from other

digital providers, notably Zinio, which can be viewed on computers (PC and Mac) and tablets (Android and iOS). Though it doesn’t quite have all the functionality of the Apple Newsstand edition, and the way videos are viewed works a little differently. If you’re interested go to https://gb.zinio.com/photoplus

Where have all the camera shops gone? I have been looking to upgrade my Canon DSLR, but to my dismay I find the Scottish capital is lacking a proper camera shop. I’ve resorted to looking online via adverts in PhotoPlus, but this is not the same as trying equipment locally and supporting local traders. Has this happened in other parts of the UK? Kenneth Smith, Edinburgh There is a Calumet Photographic in Leith, Kenneth, but we appreciate this isn’t central Edinburgh. Who else feels there aren’t any proper camera shops in their local city? We have three in PhotoPlus’s home town (and popular tourist destination) of Bath, but we realize that this isn’t typical these days.

write to us by emailing photoplus@futurenet.com using the subject Focus Point, or write to us at Photo Plus: The Canon Magazine, Contact us at... YouFuturecanPublishing, The Ambury, Bath, BA1 1UA UK. We reserve the right to edit your letters and queries for clarity or brevity.

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Your views Photography permits

Button benefits

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cross-type AF points on the Canon EOS 750D (page 108)

170

lenses featured in our Buyers’ Guide (page 120)

4

million max ISO on Canon’s new ME20F-SH multipurpose video cam

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years – Canon and Magnum photographer Martin Parr’s career

PhotoPlus Facebook fans – www.facebook. com/PhotoPlusMag

Follow us on... The Canon Magazine

Naughty @PhotoPlusMag. In your live music event article (PhotoPlus 103) you forgot to mention flash generally isn’t allowed... @jonathanmorgan on Twitter

There’s lots to shoot at Canary Wharf, but you’ll need a permit…

Your lion eyes

You’re right that flash is a no-no at some events, yet at the Bathfest dance music event (many flashing lights on stage) we could use flash. Always best to check beforehand. We’d add that our best gig shots were taken without using flash.

The only way to shoot a lion – or trophy hunt any animal – is with a camera. www.facebook.com/pages/ Art-Wolfe-Photography-Fan-Club

Satisfaction guaranteed Some would say, if you want to learn DSLR photography, buy a half-inch book on the subject, and read it from cover to cover. Some would say buy a modern DSLR camera. I say buy PhotoPlus, and read that once a month. Do that for 12 months and you’ll become an expert. Guaranteed. Michael Cowley, Luton

Kick the bucket

Subscribe and save! See page 26

The month in numbers

2693 253,561

amount of images we shot for our time-lapse project (page 52)

Flash happy

The most-popular stories found on the web this month

Hang Meang Khou

When people talk about backbutton focus, they often leave out a couple of great benefits (EOS SOS, PhotoPlus 103). Instead of half-pressing the shutter button to pre-focus then switching the lens to MF to hold the focus, just hit back-button focus and go on with your business. You can also take advantage of the full-time manual focus feature of a lens to make a quick adjustment, should autofocus choose a focus point slightly ahead or behind what you want. Jay Showalter, New York, USA

The Social Network

Art Wolfe

I read with interest your article on street photography in the August issue, however there are many parts of London and other cities that are privately owned, Canary Wharf being one of them. Canary Wharf is an amazing place to take striking images but you will need a permit if using a DSLR and a tripod. These can be applied for from the Canary Wharf Press Office (http://bit.ly/cwpermit). I have visited three times with a photography permit and have been asked to show it numerous times during the day. If you are travelling a long way, as I sometimes do from Somerset, it is always best to check if you need permission, rather than be disappointed when you’re there. Glynis Dunkley, Taunton

Perhaps a cynical view – with amazing ‘what you imagine’ and depressing ‘what it’s really like’ photos – but have you ever been really disappointed or happily surprised when you’d finally visited a Bucket List location? http://bit.ly/17bucket

Which new prime lens do you want the most?

4% tilt shift 10% super

29%

wide-angle prime

telephoto prime

15% telephoto prime

18% nifty fifty Facebook www.facebook.com/PhotoPlusMag

24%

macro prime

Vote in our next poll on shooting modes at http://bit.ly/poll106

Twitter www.facebook.com/PhotoPlusMag

Grin and Bear it

“We’re delighted to welcome rugby super-fan Bear Grylls to Canon’s Rugby World Cup 2015 team…” We’re big Bear fans but were intrigued when Canon announced he’s part of their RWC2015 team! You can see Canon sports pro shooter Dave Rogers get Grylled by Bear in a camera skills videos at: www.facebook.com/CanonUK

Digital camera world www.digitalcameraworld.com

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Professional photographers reveal their top six tools of the trade they couldn’t shoot without

The technology makes life easier, but it’s important it doesn’t hinder; synergy with mind and camera is the key What do I do?

David Clapp

Travelling light isn’t an option for landscape and travel photographer David Clapp. In addition to all the camera kit, these days he even takes the office with him…

W

orking as a landscape and travel photographer means I shoot a wide range of subjects in all kinds of conditions, and this requires a lot of kit and a heavy bag. I’m a ‘long haul lugger’ and I find it hard to refine things down! My ‘bare minimum’ kit comprises three camera bodies and nine lenses. I take two Think Tank bags with me everywhere: one ‘airport’ bag (Airport Acceleration V2) which stays in the hotel, and a

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smaller day bag (Streetwalker Pro) into which I decant the kit I need for the day. I use heavyweight Gitzo tripods – a 6x 5540 and a smaller 4543, with a levelling base, as large-reproduction panoramic images are a very important part of my work. Canon ISO technology has always been world-class, so I leave the tripod behind in the day and shoot hand-held at higher ISOs, especially on travel assignments. Then there are all the leads, chargers and cleaning kit, plus the computer. I’ve abandoned

the idea of having an office now, and I do all my ‘office’ work and image processing on a top-spec MacBook Pro, anywhere there’s a plug socket and a flat surface – from my kitchen table to airports, car seats in the Arctic and, recently, a super yacht in the Med. Internet access is crucial, so I run a 4G iPhone/iPad Mini system which I use for personal Wi-Fi hotspots. The technology makes life easier, and it opens doors to creativity, but it’s important it doesn’t hinder; synergy with mind and camera is the key.

David Clapp www.davidclapp.co.uk I am a landscape, travel and architectural photographer based in South Devon. I regularly work abroad, although I’m still obsessed with Dartmoor, where my photographic journey began in 2003. I work regularly for Canon UK, and run photo tours for workshop company Light and Land as well as my own tours. I sell my pictures worldwide through Getty Images, and I’m known for my moonlight and infrared photography. I don’t specialize in one area, so I tend to do a bit of everything!

www.digitalcameraworld.com


Canon Pros & their kit IN david’s BAG

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05 06

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Canon EOS-1D X

Canon EOS 6D

This is my night vision and extreme weather camera. My 6D is a great camera, but it was struggling out in Finland this year, where temperatures reached -25C, and the 1D X performed flawlessly in extremes as low as -40C. I use it to shoot the aurora borealis, stars and moonlit scenes because of its incredible high-ISO performance, but it also produces beautiful landscape images thanks to its fabulous dynamic range.

With GPS and Wi-Fi, this camera suits me above all other bodies. The creative potential it can release is utterly remarkable. From light-painting standing stones using my iPhone as a remote monitor, to fast, unobtrusive travel photography, it’s an understated wolf in sheep’s clothing. The quality of the full-frame sensor makes well-exposed shots look remarkable, and I can’t imagine my professional life without it – although I may well upgrade to a 5DS soon.

Canon EOS 6D Canon TS-E Canon EF Canon EF (IR conversion) 24mm f/3.5L II 16-35mm f/4L 70-300mm Web: www.advanced Web: www.canon.co.uk IS USM f/4-5.6L IS cameraservices.co.uk Price: £1450/$1899 Web: www.canon.co.uk Price: Camera £1139/$1399 USM Price: £729/$1099

Web: www.canon.co.uk Price: £4499/$4599

The Canon Magazine

Web: www.canon.co.uk Price: £1139/$1399

Conversion £350/$350 approx

This camera was bought to replace a 5D Mk I that I had converted for infrared photography for a magazine article in 2010. I’ve been an infrared addict ever since, and I upgraded to this 6D converted for IR, enhancing my love of the medium with Live View and great high-ISO capability. Infrared photography is an interpretive medium that can produce incredible results.

04

I’ve used this lens so much that I had to have the entire tilt-shift mechanism replaced this year. It’s the most versatile lens that Canon produces in my opinion – from landscapes and seascapes to architecture, I can use it to stitch 2.5:1 panoramas from a simple shift left and right. The tilt adjustment takes some working out, but once conquered it opens doorways to limitless creativity. It’s an absolute gem.

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this is the lens we’ve all been waiting for. It’s the sharpest, most versatile wide-angle lens made by any manufacturer. It can be used wide-open at 16mm and produce images that are staggeringly sharp from corner to corner. The inclusion of Image Stabilization is a real bonus for travel photographers – taking a deep breath, I can shoot hand-held as slow as 1/4 sec and still get sharp results.

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Web: www.canon.co.uk Price: £729/$1099

this smaller, compact L-series zoom is one of the most important lenses in my kit bag. I was an avid 70-200 f/4L IS user until this lens was released, but I found myself constantly reaching for my 1.4x extender. This lens is so compact that it can fit inside my camera bag. It’s very sharp, and resolves the detail in images on the new 50Mp 5DS R. A superb optic for all genres.

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Your ultimate photographic reference guide to the complete Canon EOS DSLR system DIGITAL SLR ESSENTIALS 

PAGE 82

Master metering to get your exposures bang-on

Andrew James Photo expert

It’s your Canon’s built-in metering system that determines what it sees as a ‘good’ exposure, so understanding the various metering modes on your DSLR and in what shooting scenarios they are best used is vital – as is knowing what conditions your camera is likely to be fooled by and the best methods to counteract such situations.

SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS 

Andrew James has combined photography with writing for over 25 years. He uses a Canon 5D Mk III and 1D X, he teaches on photography holidays and workshops, and runs PhotoBuzz.

PAGE 88

Learn to master Canon’s free suite of software

Need a question answered or a problem solved?

Flummoxed by f-stops? Bamboozled by Bulb mode? Exasperated by exposure compensation? You’ve come to the right place. Our technical guru Brian has been an inside man at Canon, and no one knows the inner workings of the EOS system better than him. So drop him a line and you’ll be confounded by your Canon no longer… The Canon Magazine

WITH

George Cairns Editing expert

This issue George explains how Digital Photo Professional can selectively adjust colours – to boost drab areas of a shot without over-saturating the shades that the camera has got spot-on. Plus he reveals how you can share shots with Image Browser EX, in print, slideshows, via email, or uploaded to an online album.

EOS S.O.S 

WITH

George Cairns has been writing image-editing tutorials for PhotoPlus since our first very issue, back in 2007. He uses a Canon EOS 650D and 70D, and writes for the Canon Professional Network newsletter.

PAGE 93

WITH

BRIAN WORLEY Camera expert Brian has unrivalled EOS DSLR knowledge after working for Canon for over 15 years. He now works as a freelance photographer and photo tutor in Oxfordshire.

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CANONSCHOOL

DIGITAL SLR ESSENTIALS Welcome to Canon School. In the third part of Digital SLR Essentials we take a look at your camera’s metering system

In-camera metering How your DSLR interprets reflected light

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etering is the way in which you and your Canon DSLR decide on what the exposure should be for the image you want to capture. Taking a reading of the light reflecting from a subject enables you and/or the camera to calculate a combination of shutter speed, aperture and ISO that will, hopefully, produce a correctly exposed image. All Canon DSLRs have a sophisticated metering system, and different metering modes enable the camera to read the light in a way that suits both the subject and the result you want to achieve. But metering can never be 100% accurate, as the quality of the light, and the way it’s reflected, differs from scene to scene. It’s the word ‘reflective’, that’s important. Light is said

to be ‘incident’ light if it’s falling directly onto a subject. So your light source – typically the sun, although it could also be flash or studio lighting, is incident light, and this light can be read by an off-camera light meter. When incident light hits a subject and bounces off it, it becomes reflected light – and it’s this light that’s used by the camera to calculate exposure. The metering system does this by assuming the world is a midtone grey, or at least that it has the same reflectance of 12-18% grey. Of course this isn’t the case, which is why metering doesn’t always work perfectly; different objects reflect light in different ways, and this is when your camera can give you an incorrect exposure, underexposing or overexposing an image or parts of an image.

Andrew James Photo expert Andrew James has combined photography with writing for over 25 years. He uses a Canon EOS 5D Mk III and 1D X, he teaches on photography holidays and workshops, runs online photo community FotoBuzz – and now is your tutor at Canon School.

‘Incident’ light falls on your subject

‘Reflective’ light bounces off your subject and is read by your Canon DSLR’s metering system

Why different scenes can confuse the meter these TWO images have been converted to greyscale to give you an idea of what the camera’s meter is reading. There are no large areas of brightness or darkness in the tree image, so a midtone grey metering won’t trouble any of the metering modes and will give a fairly accurate exposure. The gondolas image is different. There are large areas of

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shade in the foreground, plus a large, bright sky. Not only is this likely to fool the meter; the scene may also fall outside the camera’s exposure latitude. For example, a 6D has one of the best exposure latitudes of any DSLR, but it can still only cope with approximately 11 stops of light before either underexposing or overexposing parts of a scene. www.digitalcameraworld.com


master metering

Av F

F8.0

200

AWB

ONE SHOT

Metering modes

ISO

L 537

Q

WB SET

AF

Learn the four different metering modes in most Canon DSLRs our Canon camera typically has four metering modes: Evaluative, Spot, Centreweighted average and Partial (the 1200D doesn’t have Spot mode). The default metering mode is Evaluative, and this ‘catch-all’

mode is used when you take a picture in any of your camera’s auto shooting modes. It takes a series of light readings from different points within the frame and averages them out. To show you how the four modes work here are a series of portraits, all taken with the

model standing in the shade. Each image was taken at the same focal length, at f/2.8. Each metering situation is different and therefore it’s impossible to say which mode is best, but as you can see from these examples there’s little to choose between Partial and

Centre-weighted average for this scene, although none of the modes has completely let the side down. Evaluative has done a pretty good job too, which supports the notion that when you want to hedge your metering bets it’s a sensible option to choose.

Evaluative

Partial

Spot

Centre-weighted average

Evaluative does a good job, although it’s biased towards the zone where the AF point is, as the meter assumes this is the most important part of the scene. It has come up with a ‘best of all worlds’ exposure: the model’s face is only slightly underexposed, and the bright foliage is toned down.

As the meter reading is taken entirely from the face area in this shot, the exposure is very much biased towards the skin – exactly what we’d want in a portrait. However, this also means that the background remains bright, although it’s certainly not overexposed in this area.

As Spot metering only takes a reading from a tiny area of the face in the middle of the frame it produces an image that’s slightly underexposed, with detail lost in the shadows of the hair. But it’s not far off, and Spot is a good option if you want to be precise about the area you meter from.

Centre-weighted average has given us a halfway house between the exposures achieved with Spot and Partial, which isn’t surprising when you look at the area it’s metered from. The resulting exposure is very good in this case, with a lighter face and some hair detail preserved.

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Evaluative

Meter from an AF point ou can link Spot metering to a single or group of moveable AF points if you have Canon’s current top of the range pro camera, the 1D X, or any of the earlier 1-series cameras. But while this sounds like a great idea in principle, unless you’re careful your exposures can be way off the mark. Whether you’re selecting just one AF point or a group, the metering is still only taken

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The Canon Magazine

from a 3% area of F8.0 200 Av the frame, so where F AWB you’re metering WB ONE SHOT L SET AF from is critical. If 537 the point you need to focus on is very dark, for example, these two images you could end up with a show. The darker slower shutter speed than you image was taken want, and an overexposed with Evaluative metering, image. Conversely, if the area and although the camera your AF point hits is very has attempted to balance the bright, the rest of the image will be too dark. However, this scene, the tricky backlighting isn’t helping. However, with option can prove useful, as

Linked to AF

ISO

Q

Spot metering linked to AF, and the AF point positioned on the boy’s darker top, the resulting exposure is better balanced, with more detail visible in the subject.

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CANONSCHOOL manual override

Exposure compensation

Av F

Dial in more or less light to get the perfect exposure

F8.0

A

-2

Canons don’t have a +/- Av button; you simply turn the rear command wheel to dial in exposure compensation. For experienced users this becomes second nature, but if you’re a beginner it can take a little getting used to; simply remember that it’s ‘right for light’ and left for dark. You can only dial in exposure compensation in the semi-auto modes: Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority and Program. You can’t use it in any of the fully automatic

0

-1

shooting modes, or full Manual mode. Your camera enables you to compensate by up to plus or minus five stops, and the increments in which this can be done varies from model to model. As a rule of thumb, third of a stop increments will give you more precise control over the exposure. You can use exposure compensation with any of the metering modes, although you may find it’s more often required with

+1

200

AWB

ONE SHOT Q

s sophisticated as Canon’s metering systems are you’ll sometimes need to help the camera get things right, and you can do this by using exposure compensation. On most entry-level and mid-priced Canon DSLRs, to dial in exposure compensation you press the +/- Av button and then turn the command wheel to the right (plus) or left (minus). However, the high-end enthusiast and pro

ISO

L 537

WB SET

AF

the more area-specific modes, such as Partial and Spot. In the examples below, -1 stop of exposure compensation brings out detail in the sky, but underexposes the foreground, while +1 gets the foreground right but blows the sky; the default exposure strikes a reasonable balance, and if you shot Raw you could recover both highlight and shadow detail in post-processing.

+2

Assessing the histogram How to tell when exposure compensation is required WE TALKED about histograms, and how useful they are for exposure assessment, back in the very first Canon School (issue 100), so this is just a reminder that they can be used in conjunction with exposure

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compensation. In brief, a histogram is simply a tonal representation of your image, and the graph you see when you press the Info button on your DSLR when reviewing images can give you a precise indication of whether you’re underexposing or overexposing your photo. There’s no such thing as a ‘perfect’ histogram, as each image has a different tonal range (see our high key image and histogram), but it’s important to look out for areas that are totally underexposed

The histogram for our high key portrait (left) looks similar to that of an overexposed image, but in this case we’re deliberately clipping highlights or overexposed. These will show as pixels stacked flat against the left (shadows) or right (highlights) edge of the histogram. By using exposure compensation you can move the

tonal range towards the left or right as desired. You don’t need to look at the histogram of every shot you take but, it can be very handy, especially in tricky lighting. www.digitalcameraworld.com


all about metering

HDR

Bracketing & HDR

Auto bracketing s well as dialing in exposure compensation manually, you can also set your Canon DSLR to automatically bracket exposures. When using exposure bracketing you set up the camera so that it will capture (typically) three images: one exposed darker

than metered, one lighter and one at what the camera thinks is the correct exposure. The bracketing ‘spread’ can be adjusted, and in most high-end DSLRs you can also choose the sequence in which the exposures are captured; one correct exposure and two ‘over’ for example. Some pro cameras, such as the

5D Mk III, enable you to adjust the number of images shot. Why would you want to use bracketing? Well, for a start it’s a simple way of hedging your bets, working on the principle that one of the three exposures will be perfect, or close enough that you’ll be able to recover sufficient shadow or highlight detail in post-processing. Alternatively, you may want to shoot three images to expose for a greater

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dynamic range than can be captured in a single frame, with the intention of merging them to create a high dynamic range image. Either way, it’s not really a technique to use for subjects that move, and if you want to merge exposures then your camera must be in the same position on a tripod for all three shots, or the images won’t align perfectly. Bracketing exposures enables you to create HDR images that capture detail from deep shadows to bright highlights in high-contrast scenes

In-camera HDR options Create a high dynamic range image the easy way WHILE YOU can use exposure bracketing to capture a series of differently exposed images to blend together in post-production, newer EOS DSLRs – such as the 7D Mk II, 5D Mk III, 5DS and 5DS R – enable you to capture and process the files as an HDR image in-camera. Although it’s an automatic mode, you can choose the amount of exposure bracketing applied, and the style of blending that’s used. Most of the blending comes strictly from the ‘over the top’ drawer, so if you want to use in-camera HDR then stick with

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Natural as your setting, unless you have a particular liking for the over-processed images created by using Art standard, Art vivid, Art bold or Art embossed. There’s no doubt that in-camera HDR works, and it’s a no-fuss way to get that popular HDR look. However, you don’t get as much control as you would by shooting a series of frames with different exposures and then blending them with software on your PC. When blending images, the in-camera software relies on each frame being taken from precisely the same point, so it’s essential to use a tripod. But you can shoot handheld with fast shutter speeds, and the camera will attempt to align the three frames. Note that the in-camera HDR images end up cropped so allow for this in your compositions. Plus the HDR image will WB only be saved as a SET AF JPEG, although you can save the three originals Raw files.

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CANONSCHOOL taking control

Lock the exposure

The AE lock button is within easy reach of your thumb

Use the AE lock button to ‘save’ an exposure he AE lock function on your Canon camera is a useful way of ‘saving’ an exposure setting while you recompose a shot, and it’s well worth familiarising yourself with this feature. The AE lock button is on the back of the camera, usually on the upper right-hand side, and it’s marked by a * symbol. It’s easily operated with your thumb, and when you press

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it the camera will store the metered exposure until you take the next shot; if you want to lock the exposure in for several frames it pays to keep the button pressed, or the exposure may drop out. Using AE lock you can, for example, point the camera at and meter from a midtone area of a scene (pavement, grass, etc) to give you an average exposure, then lock that exposure in while you reframe and take the shot.

Without AE lock, when you’re in Aperture Priority or Shutter Priority modes, once you’ve recomposed a scene the camera will alter the exposure

according to the change in reflected light; if it happens to meter from a very bright or dark area then the resulting exposure may be way off.

landscapes, shooting in a studio environment or for any general shots where the exposure is particularly tricky, such as the above shot of the hare sitting in his snow hole. Remember, in Manual mode whatever exposure you dial in is fixed, even if you recompose a scene. This isn’t the case in either of the

semi-automatic modes, where you need to use the AE lock button (above) if you want to hold an exposure in place when you move the camera. Of course, just because the indicator is in the centre of the exposure dial it doesn’t mean the exposure is correct, so be sure to check exposures, using the histogram as a guide.

Go Manual How to take full control of your exposures

hen you want to take full control over exposure settings, Manual mode is the way to go. In full Manual mode – M on your DSLR’s command dial – you set the shutter speed and aperture independently of one another, using the command wheels on the back and top of the camera. The only ‘help’ the camera gives you is to indicate when it thinks the exposure is correct, by placing the point on the exposure indicator bar in the centre of the scale. Using full Manual mode is easy as long as you’ve grasped the relationship between shutter speed, aperture and ISO, and know which is the most important element within the ‘triangle’ for you to get right. In other words, if front-toback sharpness is required for a landscape image, then aperture will be your starting point. Set a narrow aperture, such as f/11 or f/16, and then see what shutter speed you

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Manual mode can give you better results in tricky lighting conditions, such as snowy scenes

need to set. Conversely, for an action shot of some sort, shutter speed will be your prime consideration. Manual isn’t necessary for every shooting situation. A lot of the time I’ll shoot in Aperture Priority mode, but there are occasions when I’ll want the complete control of Manual, such as when taking

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all about metering Exposure warnings

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correctly. Also bear in mind that if you’re shooting Raw and you overexpose an image slightly then you can usually pull the detail back into the image in post-production, as long as it isn’t drastically bright in those areas; if you shoot JPEGs there’s much less chance of retrieving lost highlight detail.

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visual indication of overexposure. If I see the screen blinking like this I’ll double check the degree of overexposure by referring to the histogram, then dial in the required amount of negative exposure compensation. I’ve found that sometimes, although the Highlight alert is

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he Highlight alert is a very useful function for those who are getting to grips with understanding exposure but are making a few mistakes along the way. It was briefly mentioned in the first Canon School, but deserves a longer explanation. In most of the current EOS DSLRs you can have Highlight alert disabled or enabled, and if you find that you’re consistently overexposing images I’d recommend that you enable it immediately. The LCD screen provides a preview of the image you’ve just taken, but it’s not always easy to see that image, especially in bright conditions. I often resort to finding shade, or even sticking the camera under my shirt to review the image on the screen! Even then the JPEG preview isn’t a 100% accurate reflection of the image you’ve just taken. This is why, especially in tricky, bright conditions I’ll enable the Highlight alert, so that any areas of an image where the highlights have pushed too far to the right will blink black in the LCD screen as another

blinking, the histogram shows that the highlighs are within the acceptable range, so don’t assume that detail is always totally blowing out – just check to ensure that you’re in control of the exposure; remember, sometimes you may be quite happy to blow some highlights as long as the main subject is exposed

Preserving the highlights is important in bright and finely detailed subjects such as flowers

School tip Auto Lighting Optimizer Use ALO to balance exposures by enhancing shadow detail When you’re shooting JPEGs in harsh lighting it can be useful to enable the Auto Lighting Optimizer. This has been available in all Canon EOS DSLRs since 2008, and is designed to even out exposures so that the overall image is better balanced. There are three ALO settings, as well as the option to disable the function. These are Standard, Low The Canon Magazine

and Strong, with Standard being the default mode and certainly the most useful. It works by bringing out the shadow detail, although if you’re not careful it can do this at the expense of pushing the highlights too far. Other than in extreme contrast conditions, stick with the Standard setting, and keep a check on highlight detail by looking at the histogram.

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SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS Get to grips with Canon’s free Raw image organising, editing and sharing software – Digital Photo Professional 4

george cairns Imaging expert George Cairns has been writing image-editing tutorials for PhotoPlus since our first very issue, back in 2007. He uses a Canon EOS 650D and 70D, and writes for the Canon Professional Network – a newsletter for Canon pro kit users.

Adjust colour selectively Use Canon’s DDP to tweak the saturation and lightness of colours independently

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n the previous issue we demonstrated how DPP4 can fix colourrelated problems caused by incorrect white balance (WB) settings. We’ll now move on to demonstrate how to make selective colour adjustments to create more colourful and attractive images. In previous versions of Digital Photo Professional you could only boost the

saturation of all of a photo’s colours equally. While this global adjustment might give a drab blue sky more impact, it could simultaneously make over-saturated skin tones look too orange. Photoshop users can selectively boost weaker colours in their Raw files without over-saturating stronger ones, courtesy of the Vibrance slider. Although DPP 4 lacks a Vibrance slider it does boast a new Color

Adjustment palette that can be persuaded to produce similar selective adjustment results. As with the Adobe Camera Raw editor’s HSL panel, DPP 4’s Color Adjustment palette enables you to target and tweak an individual colour’s Hue, Saturation and Luminance values, making it a much more useful program when it comes to increasing the saturation of a photo’s weaker colours without

over-saturating the stronger ones. The sky in our example image is rather desaturated, while the flowers’ colours are stronger. We’ll show you how to adjust the saturation of specific colours to make the sky more blue, while also creating more textural variety in areas such as the ivy on the pub wall. We’ll also show you how to tweak tones to reveal missing colours that you can then enhance.

Step by step Prepare your picture Before adjusting colours, get your photo’s tones looking their best

01 LIGHTEN THE SHADOWS

Browse to Color_start.CR2 in the Folder pane. Click the Edit Image button, then the Basic palette tab. In the Advanced section, drag the Shadow slider to 3 to lighten the slightly underexposed shadows and reveal more colour detail.

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02 GAMMA ADJUSTMENT

To reveal more midtone colour and detail, toggle the Gamma adjustment pane open. In the histogram window, drag the vertical midtone control bar left to remap the shot’s original midtones to a lighter value; -45 will do the trick here.

03 FINE-TUNE

In the Fine-Tune pane, tick the Auto Lighting Optimizer box. Leave it set to Standard. Go to the Advanced pane and drop the Highlights slider to -1 and boost Color Saturation to 1. You’re now ready to make selective colour adjustments. www.digitalcameraworld.com


eo view the vid VIDEO also online

Selective Colour Adjustments

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Canon DPP 4

HOW IT WORKS Change your COLOURs Discover how to boost an individual colour’s saturation, hue and lightness in your Raw images

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COLOR ADJUSTMENT PALETTE Click here to access the Hue, Saturation and Luminance (lightness) adjustment sliders for eight separate colours.

all the image’s colours. Even if you close DPP 4, you can later choose Adjustment>Revert To Shot Settings to see the shot’s colours as they were captured in camera. You can also reset individual colours by clicking the Reset icon below their thumbnail.

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HUE The H slider adjacent to each colour thumbnail creates a shift in that colour’s hue. By changing the Hue of the Aqua and Blue colours we’ve added a hint of cyan to them.

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LIGHTNESS

These top two sliders adjust all the photo’s colours simultaneously. The Hue slider causes colours to shift to new values in a dramatic way.

These thumbnails give you an idea of the range of colours that will be altered if you drag the adjacent HSL sliders; although this colour is labelled Yellow, it also alters lighter greens. It’s worth boosting the Saturation slider of the Yellow section if you have vegetation in your photo.

By reducing the value of the Blues Lightness slider we’ve darkened the skies and made them look more dramatic. This slider can help increase the contrast between objects with different colours.

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RESET Feel free to experiment with different H, S and L settings. As you’re editing a Raw file you can click here to reset

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EXTRA TEXTURE By boosting the Saturation of the Yellows we’ve made some of the ivy leaves stand out against their greener colleagues, creating more variety in this area. Distant yellow plants also have more impact, which helps give the photo more depth.

The Canon Magazine

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SELECTIVE ADJUSTMENT By dropping the Orange colour’s Saturation slider to -3.0 we’ve kept the warm tiles from becoming over-saturated. This slider provides an effective way of keeping skin tones from looking too orange when boosting the saturation of other colours in a shot.

JARGON BUSTER OVER-SATURATED Saturated colours may not look good printed, due to the different way colour is reproduced by screens and printers. AUTO LIGHTING OPTIMIZER This tool helps auto correct an image that is underexposed or lacks contrast with a click. You can fine-tune the result using a three-setting slider.

Can I use DPP 4? DPP 4 is now available to all current Canon EOS DSLR owners – 1200D, 100D, 700D, 750D, 760D, 70D, 6D, 7D Mk II, 5D Mk III, 5DS/R and 1D X, plus 1D Mk IV, 5D Mk II, 7D and 60D. Download it from http://bit.ly/ get_dpp but you’ll need your serial number. Check the website to see if your DSLR is compatible with DPP 4.

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Share shots

http://bit.ly/pp_105_9 Image Browser EX

Share photos using ImageBrowser EX Use Canon’s free software to share your processed JPEGS at home, in print, online or via email n our previous issue’s look at Canon’s free ImageBrowser EX program we demonstrated how to use the software to tweak your photographs’ colours, tones and composition to perfection. And once you’ve got your favourite images looking their best you can use ImageBrowser

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EX’s sharing tools to enable your photographs to be seen by family, friends and colleagues. Sadly, ImageBrowser EX no longer enables you to export JPEGs directly to Facebook or video clips to YouTube (despite those buttons still being present in the Share menu). You need to use a web browser to perform those social media

uploading tasks. However, you can still upload your best shots (and favourite video clips) directly from ImageBrowser EX to a free web gallery, courtesy of Canon’s Image Gateway service. After registering with Image Gateway you can enjoy 10GB of storage space for free, which is enough to display thousands of JPEGs online.

You can then send friends a link to the Canon-hosted web gallery so that they can enjoy perusing your pictures from their PC or mobile device. ImageBrowser EX also makes it easy for you to share shots via email. A full-size JPEG weighs in at around 10MB, so you can resize the images to smaller email-friendly formats.

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Display your selected thumbnails as a series of full-screen images. 02

PRINT Click here to print a full page shot, or turn a section of thumbnails into a contact sheet for clients to peruse. 03

EMAIL The Email Images option summons the Custom Settings window, where you can resize files. 04

iMAGE GATEWAY Enables you to upload selected images to free online albums.

STEP BY STEP SHARE TO A WEB GALLERY Export your stills and clips online from within Canon ImageBrowser EX

01 SELECT ASSETS

Click the Thumbnail Mode icon then Shift-click to pick a range of thumbnails to share. Click the Canon Image Gateway icon. Choose Upload images. The Canon Magazine

02 ACTIVATE UPLOADER

Log into Canon Image Gateway – or click Register to get a free account. The Uploader window displays the thumbnails for your selected photos.

03 ADVANCED SETTINGS

To create web-friendly versions of shots, tick the Still Image Resize button. Set Movie Size to HD 720p, or leave it at SD size 360p. Click Upload.

04 SHARE ALBUMS

You can make albums in Canon Image Gateway then share a link and password for access. You can also decide whether images can be downloaded.

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CANONSCHOOL

EOSS.O.S Our technical guru is here to help. No Canon conundrum is too big or small. Get in touch today at photoplus@futurenet.com

I’ve purchased an inexpensive set of three extension tubes – how can I get the best results using these?

BRIAN WORLEY Canon Pro Brian is a freelance photographer and photo tutor based in Oxfordshire. He has unrivalled EOS DSLR knowledge, after working for Canon for over 15 years, and is on hand to answer all your EOS and photographic queries

Digital Photo professional

Lightroom

Ian Lane, Hampshire

Brian says… Extension tubes move the lens further from the sensor, enabling the lens to focus on a subject closer than would otherwise be possible and therefore increasing the magnification. Using the EF 50mm f/1.8 lens, for example, the maximum magnification is 0.21x life size, and adding a 12mm extension tube increases the magnification to 0.45x. When using an extension tube you need to be very close

to a subject to get maximum magnification. Wide-angle lenses are less suitable for use with extension tubes, as the point of focus may actually be inside the lens; I’ve used an extension tube with an EF-S 18-55mm lens, and the flower I was shooting was so close it was touching the front of the lens. Generally, you’ll use extension tubes with longer lenses. Use manual focus, Live View and a tripod for the best results.

The DPP-processed Raw image on the left has more sharpening and contrast than the file processed with Lightroom’s defaults

Why does a Raw image processed with Canon Digital Photo Professional look different from the same image processed using Lightroom?

Claire Dayton, Lancashire

Extension tubes, such as the EF 25 fitted to an EF 135mm f/2L USM lens here, enable a lens to focus on closer subjects

The Canon Magazine

Brian says… The Raw images from your Canon D-SLR are analogous to the unprocessed film of old, and the results you create from a Raw image will depend on which tools you use to process it, much like film results depend on the developing chemistry used. Canon’s DPP software will read information from the Raw file to set its defaults for processing the pictures. The Canon Standard Picture Style has more contrast, saturation and sharpening than the

Lightroom standard profile, and DPP will recognise the Picture Style that’s been set in-camera, whereas Lightroom ignores it. Similarly, Adobe Raw software will produce different results to Capture One for the same Raw file. You can, of course, tweak contrast, sharpening and other settings yourself, but if you rely on default settings then you’ll need to decide which software gives the best results for the kinds of images you typically shoot.

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The 600EX-RT, left, and 430EX III-RT

Long exposure noise reduction takes a second ‘dark frame’ after the main image is captured, with the same exposure time

Why is my camera unresponsive for a long time after I shoot long exposures?

Gary Lawson, Keswick

Brian says… This sounds like you’ve set Long exposure noise reduction to Auto or On in the camera settings. Exposures of more than one second can result in a pattern of noise that is largely repeatable, but it depends on several factors, including the exposure time and temperature of the sensor. What the camera does is capture a second, ‘dark frame’ exposure with the shutter curtains closed for the same duration, and with the sensor at a similar temperature. The camera then ‘subtracts’ the dark frame from the captured image to reduce noise. So if you shoot a ten-minute exposure, it will take a further ten minutes for the camera to capture the dark frame before the next picture can be taken.

I have the EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM lens, but I need more reach for sports photos. Which zoom would you suggest that’s not too heavy?

Mark Thomson, Canada

Brian says… There are two Canon options: the EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6L IS USM and the EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM, both of which are compact and lightweight. Sigma and Tamron both offer 150-600mm zooms that give a huge increase in range for not too much weight. Another option is to add the Canon EF Extender 2x Mk III to your 70-200mm, turning it into a 140-400mm f/5.6 lens. My view is that your 70-200mm lens is hard to beat, and enables your camera’s AF to perform at its maximum thanks to the f/2.8 aperture. I’d choose the 2x Extender if you’re not working in dusty environments when you need to attach the converter. Otherwise I’d choose the Canon 100-400mm, unless you really need the 600mm reach.

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I see that Canon Rebel cameras are cheaper to buy online than the non-Rebel equivalents. Why is this? John Pegler, West Bromwich

Brian says… Canon uses a regional naming scheme for its entry-level EOS cameras. In the USA the Rebel name is applied to the EOS 100-series and 1000-series models seen in Europe – Rebel T6s in the USA is the EOS 760D in Europe, for example. Canon warranties are regional on EOS cameras, meaning that Canon in the UK is not obliged to support Rebel cameras in the same way as it does cameras bought in the UK. This means you’re likely to have to pay for repairs that would otherwise be covered by the warranty.

I’m having trouble installing Lightroom 6. I have Windows 7, and I’m getting a message saying: OS requirements not met. Vista not supported. Jim McGregor, UK

Brian says… If you’re installing the standalone version of Lightroom 6, as opposed to the Creative Cloud version, open your computer’s DVD drive and locate the setup file for Lightroom. Right-click the file, select Properties, click on the compatibility tab and set the OS to Windows 7. You should now be able to install Lightroom.

I’ve got an EOS 70D and I want a Speedlite. Should I get the new 430EX III-RT or the 600EX-RT?

Dawn Parker, Truro

Brian says… The 600EX-RT does offer one stop more power at a given zoom setting, it can be set as an optical master and it’s weather sealed; but, purely from a size and weight point of view, if this is a first flash I’d go for the smaller and more compact 430EX III-RT. Both Speedlites can be set as an optical slave triggered by the built-in flash on your 70D, and as a radio flash master they have similar capabilities.

Folders can be used to segment different parts of the same shoot or event

When should I use the option on my 5D Mk III to select the folder where images are stored?

Lynn Smith, Essex

Brian says… EOS cameras typically store up to 1000 pictures in a folder before creating a new one, to improve read/write performance, and you can create custom folders to organise your images – if I’m shooting a sports meeting I may use folders to separate different events. Folders are also useful if you need to copy part of a shoot between two cards in the camera. www.digitalcameraworld.com


All About light painting multiple exposure light painting Ask Brian!

Confused with your Canon DSLR? Email photoplus@ futurenet.com with the subject ‘EOS SOS’

Four separate frames went in to the making of this image. They were lit with a Speedlite and then blended in Photoshop CC

Painting with Speedlites Try a different approach to light painting by shooting several images and combining them in Photoshop he word photography has its linguistic roots in the Greek for drawing with light, and you can use some clever capabilities of Canon’s camera and flash systems to paint with light in your pictures. Light painting typically involves long exposures, using flash or a powerful torch to illuminate a subject. Recently I’ve tried a different approach that involves taking a series of images and blending them in Photoshop. Set the camera on a tripod in Manual mode, with the shutter speed at or close to the flash sync speed. Set an aperture and ISO so the frame will be mostly dark apart from where you paint the light. I work with my Speedlite 600EX-RT in my hand to light parts of my picture. The Speedlite is set as a slave, and I use an ST-E3-RT on the camera as the master. Using Group mode, I set the

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The Canon Magazine

group with my Speedlite to External Auto metering, so that the light sensor on the front of the Speedlite measures the light reflected off the subject and cuts the light output when the correct exposure is achieved. For a subject like a car, where the brightness needs to be even, the results are remarkably consistent, even with changes in distance between the light and the subject – just be careful not to block the sensor on the flash with your finger. The radio flash system includes a function to release the shutter by pressing a button on the slave flash, so I don’t need to go back to the camera while shooting, eliminating any risk of camera shake. Pressing the REL button sends a message to the camera to release the shutter, and also fires the flash in the External Auto mode. If your lens has stabilization turn this off, as it

can cause small shifts in the picture from frame to frame, making it harder to layer the images in Photoshop. Combine the images in Photoshop as layers in a single document. In CC I use the Stack mode to define how the frames are blended – set the Stack mode to Maximum so that the brightest areas from each image are displayed.

The Speedlite 600EX-RT set to External Auto mode and ready to release the camera shutter

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CANONSCHOOL I’ve bought the new EOS 760D and I can’t get the focus points to illuminate the spot in the centre of the AF frames, even when using Spot metering. I used to see the spots on my EOS 700D.

Rate my photo

Keith Shenkin, Israel

Brian says… The 700D and 760D both have a spot meter that measures the brightness from a small area of the frame at the centre of the viewfinder. Activating the Spot metering mode doesn’t change the viewfinder display of the AF points. In terms of AF points, selecting a single point is possible on both the 700D and 760D when using one of the creative modes – P, Tv, Av or M. Although the default for a new camera fresh from the box is that the whole array of points is active, rather than a single AF point, the camera chooses the best AF point automatically. There’s a difference in the behaviour of the viewfinder AF points on the 700D and the 760D. On the 700D the AF point that is active, or the one that achieves focus, shows a red spot in the centre of the grey focus frame when focus is achieved. On the 760D the AF points don’t turn red unless the camera is

By default, on the 760D AF points are not illuminated in red except in low light conditions

being used in low light. This is a change between the 700D/ 650D and 750D/760D. If you prefer the older way of operating there’s a custom function on the 760D that will make the camera operate like the 700D. Custom function C.Fn 8 changes the behaviour when the camera is set to one of the creative zone modes, and has three options. The default is that the AF points light up only in low light when focus is achieved; option two is that the AF points are lit when focus is achieved regardless of the light level (as on the 700D/650D); and the third option is that the points never light up in red.

Custom function 8 on the newer Canon EOS 760D enables you to choose how the AF points illuminate when focus lock is achieved

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Exposure

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Get critiqued!

Splash by Tony Messner Tony says… I set up this water splash picture and lit it with off-camera flash. The flash was on the floor below the table which the glasses were on, illuminating the blue backdrop. I used a smaller tumbler filled with clear water, and a wine glass filled with coloured water. I dropped a perfume bottle cap shaped like an ice cube into the water to create the splash. Brian says… Tony’s picture has something extra; the clear and coloured water raised my interest over most splash photos. Given the camera settings I’m sure this picture is only

Email photos to photoplus@ futurenet.com with the subject ‘Rate My Photo’

lit by the flash; certainly very little of the light will be ambient light in the room. The warm-coloured orange liquid in the glass and the cool blue of the backdrop create lovely contrast. I wish the bottom of the glass stem was included in the shot though. I’d also be tempted to try removing the outline of the tumbler from inside the wine glass, and clone or heal the water spots on the backdrop. I would also experiment with a circular spot of light on the background; this could be done with a snoot made from black card wrapped in a tube around the flash.

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Everything the Canon photographer needs!

A comprehensive reference guide to your Canon EOS digital SLR


100 Gear Update All the latest Canon-fit kit

118 Buyers’ Guide Every EOS and Canon-fit lens

The latest Canon DSLR and photo gear tested. Independent advice to help you buy smarter PAGE 106

Entry-Level EOS DSLRs

Angela Nicholson Head of testing

angela.nicholson@futurenet.com

Welcome... For those taking their very first steps into DSLR photography (or exisiting users simply wishing to upgrade to a newer beginner-friendly model), the choice of Canon EOS DSLRs on offer can be confusing. Do you go for the very cheapest available option, or splash out on a more refined piece of kit that will grow with you? We’ve pitted four entry-level models against one another in our Super Test. So what will come out on top – the budget-friendly 1200D, the diminutive 100D, the higher-specced 700D, or the brand-spanking new 750D? In our Mini Test, we turn our attention to gimbal heads – these specialized tripod heads are perfectly weighted for when you need to move your heavy supertelephoto lens around with fluid ease, such as when shooting birds in flight. We also check out Sigma’s latest upmarket lens in its Art line of optics. The 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM A is among the sharpest wide-angle primes we’ve ever had the joy to use – and with a price tag a fair bit less than Canon’s equivalent.

The Canon Magazine

PAGE 104 sigma 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM A

PAGE 102 gimbal heads

Tests & awards

When IT comes to testing Canon DSLRs, lenses, photo gear and services in PhotoPlus, we tell it like it is. We’re 100% independent and we use our in-depth lab tests to find out how kit really performs and compares. Here are our main awards…

Buy for the best combination of quality and value

Only the best of best win our coveted award

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The latest DSLR photography must-haves to make your life easier

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New CANON-FIT KIT 01

Manfrotto 290 Dual and Xtra

New additions to the popular 290 range Xtra Aluminium £100 /$140, Xtra Carbon Fibre £195/$250, Dual £130/$170 www.manfrotto.co.uk

Manfrotto has added two new models to its 290 range of entry-level tripods. The Xtra comes in aluminium and carbon fibre variants; the aluminium version has a 160.5cm maximum height, while the carbon fibre model extends to 165.5cm. The aluminium-only Dual has a 90-degree rotating centre column and a maximum height of 165cm. All three tripods have a maximum payload of 5kg.

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LowePro Photo Sport BP 300 AW II 02

Tough-but-lightweight backpack £147/$199 www.lowepro.co.uk

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Designed for the active photographer, the BP 300 AW II combines protection with comfort. The base section provides side access to your Canon kit, with enough space for a 70D with 24-70mm lens, plus another lens or accessory. The upper section has space for general supplies.

Venus Optics Laowa 15mm f/4 Macro 03

Ultra-wide macro at an ultra-low price £419/$479 www.ukdigital.co.uk 07

finding 1:1 macro and optical shift perspective correction in the same lens is uncommon, especially at the price of the Laowa 15mm. The all-metal lens has no electronic contacts, so focus and exposure are handled manually. The shift-release lever is a little crude, but the aperture ring and focus rings are smooth in operation. The minimum focus distance of 12cm for 1:1 macro enables seriously close-up shooting, although accurate focusing is essential as such a short focus distance.

Canon PIXMA MG5750, MG6850 & MG7750 04

Well-connected all-in-one inkjet printers £100/$100, £130/$150, £170/$200 www.canon.co.uk

canon has overhauled its home inkjet printer range with three new all-in-one models that combine high-quality printing technology with improved cloud and Wi-Fi The Canon Magazine

functions. The MG5750 and MG6850 are controlled via 6.2cm and 7.5cm colour displays respectively and use five inks, while the MG7750 has an 8.8cm colour touchscreen, and uses six inks to produce high-resolution images up to 9600dpi, giving smooth tonal gradations even in mono prints. All three printers can be controlled from a smartphone or tablet using Canon apps, and support optional XL cartridges for cost-effective printing. 05

Vanguard VEO CM 264

Compact-but-sturdy monopod £99/$120 www.vanguardworld.co.uk

The VEO CM 264 is a carbon fibre monopod with a maximum payload of 6kg; that’s easily enough to handle a combined 5.2kg weight of a pro 1D X and EF 400mm f/2.8L lens attached. The four leg sections are extended using flip locks that feature an adjustment screw to enable them to be kept tight. Folded down the VEO CM 264 measures just 54cm and extends to a maximum of height of 160cm, ensuring plenty of flexibility. The rubberized grip provides a good firm purchase, and the adjustable rubber foot at the base with integrated spike ensures slip-free footing. 06

Takeaway T1 Clampod

Versatile and portable camera clamp £49/$75 www.kenro.co.uk

Camera clamps enable you to attach your camera to just about anything, but finding one that’s small and light enough to carry with you has been difficult – until now. The Takeaway T1 Clampod is small and lightweight, yet can hold up to 3kg in weight. The worm screw clamp design enables the Clampod to attach to almost any object it can get its jaws around. 07

Crumpler Light Delight 4000

Stylish shoulder bag for street shooters £49/$89 www.crumpler.eu

The funky colours of this shoulder bag hide a serious interior. The outer shell is made from light-but-strong material that offers resilience against rips and scrapes, and the interior features movable padded dividers. It’s not the toughest out there, but it offers enough protection for street photographers. It’s large enough to house a mid-sized DSLR like the EOS 70D with kit lens, plus another small zoom lens.

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MINiTEST

Gimbal heads

Benro GH3 £339/$425 www.benroeu.com

When you need to support a seriously bulky body and lens combo, no other head will do

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raditional ball heads are versatile, and a geared head is great for precision work. When it comes to supporting big full-frame telephoto lenses for wildlife or sports photography, however, you need a big head – or rather your tripod does. Simply using a larger ball head isn’t ideal, though, as having the weight of a hefty 400mm-plus telephoto lens, and perhaps a full-frame Canon DSLR, perched on top of a ball head will be a precarious balancing act. What makes a gimbal so special is that it enables you to lower your camera’s centre of gravity, so it effectively

Gimbal heads tend to conform to a fairly standard design recipe, but the GH3 stands out by being fully collapsible, with the main gimbal arm split into two pieces for compact storage; it’s a neat trick, though it doesn’t make much difference in practice. At least rigidity isn’t compromised, as the GH3 stays strong under a mighty 25kg of kit. Compactness doesn’t equal lightness though, and at 1.8kg this is one of the heavier options on test. As with most gimbal heads, the GH3 incorporates an ArcaSwiss quick-release mounting plate, in which there’s plenty of vertical adjustment. Large, grippy locking knobs are easy to use if you’re wearing gloves and they lock solidly, while also undoing without introducing any play into the pan or tilt joints.

hangs alongside the head, rather than sitting on top of it. You’ll need to spend a few moments aligning your lens so it balances on the head’s mounting plate, and, if you go for a gimbal with vertical adjustment, be sure to set this so the centre line of the lens is parallel with the gimbal’s tilt axis. Once you’ve nailed the perfect point, your Canon will effectively become weightless and able to hold any position, even if you loosen the head’s clamps and let go. We’ve selected five gimbal heads which all use the same basic design principle, but, as you’ll discover, it’s the small details that separate the best from the rest…

VERDICT Pros: Collapsible, fully-featured design that’s easy to use Cons: Relatively heavy, with a stiff and slightly jerky tilting motion We say: A clever, highly adjustable gimbal at a reasonable price

six THINGS TO LOOK OUT FOr Most gimbal heads may look similar, but there are a few features you should take note of before splashing out on one 01

Vertical adjustment

A gimbal head without a vertical adjustment will do the job, but you’ll need this feature in order to achieve complete weightlessness – and the more vertical travel, the better. 02

Precision engineering

Loosening the clamps that lock the pan base and tilt arm on cheaper gimbals can introduce slack and wobble in the joints; better designs will have tighter tolerances. 03

06

Telephoto lens support

Large telephoto prime lenses, like Canon’s EF 500mm L-series monster, come with a lens collar bracket so you can attach the lens safely to your gimbal head’s mounting plate. This is because the heavier lenses is what needs supporting centrally, not your comparatively lighter weight Canon DSLR!

Ergonomics

You’ll be using your gimbal in all weathers, so be sure it has controls that are easy to grip in the wet or cold, and if you’re wearing gloves. 04

Mounting methods

All the heads on test here use the widely-compatible Arca-Swiss mounting plate standard. Go for a gimbal with a long plate and you’ll also get better adjustment. 05

Leg it

There’s no point in buying a top-notch gimbal head and then mounting it on a travel tripod. Stout, rigid legs are a must, even if the combined weight will be a pain when you’re on the move.

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Gimbal heads

LensMaster Gimbal RH2 £148/$230 www.lensmaster.co.uk At less than half the price of any of the other gimbals on test, LensMaster looks to be on to a winner with the RH2. You still get solid, aircraft-grade aluminium construction with a choice of two powder-coated finishes. Payload capacity is also very respectable at 45kg, yet the gimbal’s 1.21kg weight is only beaten by the Nest gimbal head. However, there are some cost-cutting compromises. Most obvious is the lack of vertical adjustment, which although not a major drawback does mean you can’t quite get the perfect weightless balance that other heads provide. The pan and tilt locking clamps are slightly flawed, too: the latter doesn’t lock very tightly, and their design means undoing them also separates the joints between components.

£300/$467 www.nest-style.com

VERDICT Pros: Well priced and well made, yet also lightweight Cons: No vertical adjustment; substandard clamp design We say: Not perfect, but a decent budget option for occasional use

ProMediaGear Katana

The Canon Magazine

High-end tripods are often made from carbon fibre, so why not gimbal heads? This is the material of choice for the NT-530H, with a ten-layer construction giving a loadbearing capacity of 25kg. At 1.16kg it’s not a lot lighter than comparable aluminium options, but this is still one of the lightest gimbals around. Lightweight doesn’t mean no-frills though, as there’s good vertical adjustment and a long Arca-Swiss lens plate gives plenty of balancing adjustment. But while the tilt rotation is smooth and precise, some bearing slack is apparent when loosening the panning clamp. And the clamps themselves aren’t ideal, being wrapped in smooth leather-like material that isn’t grippy enough for easy adjustment in the wet.

VERDICT Pros: Strong yet lightweight build; versatile mounting plate Cons: Some slack in pan base; locking knobs not very ergonomic We say: A capable mid-price head, but the small flaws are frustrating

Wimberley Head WH-200 II

£563/$750 www.promediagear.com The Katana looks more like a piece of high-tech weaponry than a camera support, thanks to its macho design and huge 33cm height. A load capacity of ‘just’ 23kg isn’t especially impressive, but superb build and material quality give the impression that it could hold much more. However, at 2.2kg, this is the heaviest gimbal head on test. The top-notch build extends to the tilt and panning motion, which is perfectly smooth and has no bearing slack when the locking knobs are undone. When tightened, these will hold your DSLR completely steady; they’re large enough for easy use in all weathers, and they can be repositioned for easier access. Being such a tall gimbal also means there’s plenty of vertical adjustment to perfectly balance even the largest telephoto lens.

Nest NT-530H MKII

£520/$595 www.tripodhead.com 

VERDICT Pros: Superb build quality; large enough for most long lenses Cons: Pricey; few setups require such a large and heavy head We say: Worth the money if you use especially bulky setups

Wimberley has a strong reputation in the gimbal head world, and WH-200 certainly lives up to it. It uses the same basic design as most rivals, and though there are few frills it nails the basics. There’s plenty of vertical adjustment, yet the head is fairly compact at 23.5cm tall and tips the scales at a reasonable 1.4kg. Panning and tilt rotation are smooth, and can be locked nice and tight by grippy, ergonomic knobs when required; these also control the friction resistance in each joint, which is progressively adjustable. The head uses the standard Arca-Swiss lens mount, and Wimberley also offers replacement low-profile feet to help balance lenses with taller than average feet. Ultimately the ProMediaGear gimbal does give you more for your money, but this Wimberley’s the best all-rounder.

VERDICT Pros: Top quality; easy to use; wide lens compatibility Cons: Higher cost compared to all but one of the competition We say: It’s quite pricey, but that aside this is an excellent gimbal

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LENSTEST 03

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Sigma 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM A

Sigma’s Art lenses are becoming synonymous with highquality fast glass. We test their new wide-angle prime…

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e’ve been dazzled by the quality of Sigma’s recent Art-line prime lenses; indeed, the 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM A and 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM A took the ‘Best on Test’ awards in our issue 100 and 103 Super Tests respectively. The newest addition to the lineup is this 24mm lens, which maintains the same wide f/1.4 maximum aperture while extending wideangle viewing potential. Compared with the 63.4-degree viewing angle of the 35mm lens, this one stretches the envelope to a much more generous 84.1 degrees (measured on the diagonal, using a full-frame body). Like the 35mm and 50mm Art lenses, the new 24mm costs around £700/$850, so it’s by no means a budget option. However, it’s much less expensive than the

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directly competing Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM, which retails at around £1,225/$1,550. Starting at the back and moving forwards, the 24mm lens follows the same design ethic as the 35mm and 50mm Art lenses. As such, it features a high-quality brass mounting plate that enables compatibility with Sigma’s optional USB dock for firmware updates and customization, along with metal and TSC (Thermally Stable Composite) barrel parts. There’s a focus distance scale under a viewing window with depth of field markings for f/8 and f/16 apertures towards the rear, and a comfortably wide and super-smooth focus ring towards the front. Focusing is completely internal, so the front element neither extends nor rotates. Autofocus is extremely rapid,

The 24mm f/1.4 features the same styling and high build quality as Sigma’s other recent Art lenses

precise and whisper-quiet, based on a ring-type ultrasonic system that features the usual full-time manual override. Typical of upmarket Sigma lenses, a petal-shaped lens hood and soft case are included. The build quality and specs are similarly impressive under the skin,

Specifications Full-frame compatible Yes Effective focal length With APS-C sensor: 38.4mm With full-frame sensor: 24mm Image Stabilizer No Minimum focus distance 0.25m Max magnification factor 0.19x Manual focus override Full-time Focus limit switches No Internal zoom N/A Internal focus Yes Filter size 77mm Iris blades 9 (rounded) Weather seals No Supplied accessories Front/rear lens caps, petal-shaped hood, soft case Dimensions (dia x length) 85x90mm Weight 665g web www.sigma-imaging-uk.com Price £700/$850

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sigma 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM A

Sharpness

FEATURES 2500

01

2000

Centre

The brass mount is compatible with Sigma’s optional USB Dock for firmware upgrades and customization.

1500 1000 500

02

The rear section of the lens barrel has a metal construction.

Simple controls boil down to a single switch for AF/MF focusing modes. 04

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with three FLD (F Low Dispersion) elements that are claimed to be of equal optical performance to top-grade fluorite glass, four SLD (Special Low Dispersion) elements and two aspherical elements. Super Multi-Layer Coatings are also applied to reduce ghosting and flare, and a nine-blade diaphragm enables well-rounded apertures for smooth bokeh. Overall, the build quality and handling of the lens are absolutely superb, although it’s not a weathersealed design, so it loses out to the competing Canon 24mm L-series lens in this respect. And while the Sigma 50mm Art lens is something of a Goliath, this 24mm optic is a

similar size and weight to the equivalent Canon lens. Wide-angle lenses often lack sharpness towards the edges of the frame, but the Sigma does well to retain corner-to-corner sharpness even at its widest f/1.4 aperture, where vignetting is also fairly well controlled; stop down to f/2.8 and both corner sharpness and peripheral illumination become excellent. Resistance to ghosting and flare is similarly impressive, while chromatic aberrations and distortion are both minimal. In short, the Sigma 24mm f/1.4’s high-quality build is complemented by optical performance of the highest order.

24mm at f/5.6

Architectural shots benefit from the lens’s minimal barrel distortion, with little correction required The Canon Magazine

TSC (Thermally Stable Composite) is claimed to enable greater precision and less heat expansion than polycarbonate for barrel and inner components. 05

A focus scale under the viewing window has DoF markings for apertures of f/8 and f/16.

f/2.8

f/5.6

f/8

f16

f/1.4

f/2.8

f/5.6

f/8

f/16

2000

Edge

03

f/1.4

1500 1000 500

Sharpness across the frame is superb, especially given the wide viewing angle

Fringing (at Edge)

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0.25

0.5

0.75

f/1.4

1

1.25

f/2.8

1.5

1.75

f/5.6

2

2.25

2.5

2.75

f/8

f/16

There’s remarkably little fringing at any aperture, even towards the corners

Distortion

06

Smooth and precise in operation, the focus ring enables full-time override of the impressively fast autofocus system.

-1.5

–1.25

–1

-0.75

-0.5

-0.25

0

0.25

0.5

0.75

Barrel distortion from the 24mm f/1.4 is impressively minimal for a wide-angle lens

VERDICT

24mm at f/16

Continuing the trend set by recent Art-line lenses, the new Sigma 24mm is beautifully built and delivers exceptional image quality. It’s a fully professional-grade lens that’s available at a much more affordable price than the equivalent Canon lens.

The narrowest aperture of f/16 ensures the greatest depth of field, with just a slight drop in sharpness

Features Build & handling Image quality Value Overall

NEXT ISSUE: Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM S

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SUPERTest The contenders

Canon EOS 1200D/Rebel T5 £230/$320

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Canon EOS 100D/Rebel SL1 £280/$400

Canon EOS 700D/Rebel T5i £400/$650

Canon EOS 750D/Rebel T6i £520/$750

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beginner EOS DSLRs

beginner eos DSLRs

Getting into the world of DSLR photography doesn’t have to cost a fortune. We put Canon’s most cost-effective EOS beginner bodies through their paces in our in-depth lab tests…

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ver the last couple of years Canon has launched some seriously sophisticated DSLR cameras at very competitive prices. All boast advanced features, such as Full HD movie capture and the ‘Live View’ mode to help you compose shots on the rear LCD. All the cameras in our test group have a lightweight and compact yet sturdy build, and all have high megapixel-count sensors – from 18Mp on the EOS 100D, 1200D and 700D, to 24Mp on the newest and most advanced EOS 750D. Stabled in Canon’s lineup as ‘EOS for Beginners’, these cameras are wonderfully intuitive, even for complete novices. All have built-in feature guides to demystify complex menu options, while the newer 1200D and 750D have companion apps which you can download to a smart device. Even in fully automatic mode, they all feature Canon’s Scene Intelligent Auto system, which analyses compositions in real time and adjusts shooting parameters as necessary for the best results. Plentiful scene modes help to tailor settings to specific requirements, while the ‘Creative Auto’ mode helps bridge the gap between basic and ‘creative’ zone settings like Shutter Priority and Aperture Priority. Ultimately, these cameras can grow with you as you learn, while giving you access to the vast range of Canon lenses, flashguns and accessories. Let’s pick out the best buys…

The Canon Magazine

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SUPERTest

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05

Canon EOS 1200D

The most basic of Canon’s entry-level cameras, the 1200D combines new and established technologies

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year newer than the 100D and 700D, this camera was originally launched back in early 2014. It’s a major revamp of the older 1100D, which had a relatively low megapixel count of 12.2Mp and could only stretch to 720p video capture. The 1200D is a much more modern affair that adds a Scene Intelligent Auto shooting mode, creative filters like Grainy Black & White, and matches the 100D and 700D with a 18Mp image sensor and Full HD video recording. Despite its relative youth compared with the 100D and 700D, the 1200D nevertheless has a budget-friendly selling price. Scratch the surface and you’ll soon find that some of the features and specifications are more dated, or absent altogether. For example, it has an older-generation Digic 4 image processor that harks back to the 500D, launched in 2009.

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Further shortcomings compared with all the other cameras in the group include a lack of a touchsensitive screen – and the screen that is present has a relatively low resolution of 460,000 dots. The 1200D is also the only camera that lacks ‘Hybrid CMOS AF’, so

continuous autofocus isn’t available when you’re shooting movies. Some of the finer points of custom functions are also absent, including the Mirror Lockup option which helps to minimize blurring from mirror-bounce, especially in tripod-mounted shots. The range of scene modes is also comparatively limited, and we particularly missed the in-camera HDR (high dynamic

The 18-55mm kit lens is the old IS II version; the 100D and 700D come with the newer, faster-focusing STM (stepping motor) model

The EOS 1200D’s rear LCD is a non-touchscreen, low-res unit

Specifications

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04

Sensor 18Mp APS-C CMOS (1.6x crop) image processor DIGIC 4 AF points 9 (1 cross-type) ISO range ISO100-6400 (12800 exp) metering zones 63 HD Video Full HD at 30, 25, 24fps Viewfinder 95% coverage, 0.80x magnification Memory card SD/SDHC/SDXC LCD 3-inch 460K-dot fixed Max burst 69 JPEGs or 6 Raws at 3fps WI-FI/NFC No/No Shutter speeds 30-1/4000 sec, bulb size 130x100x78mm Weight (body) 480g Web www.canon.co.uk Price £230/$320 (body only)

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beginner EOS DSLRs

1200D lab tests Raw* signal-to-noise ratio

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02

Typical of entry-level cameras, there’s a pop-up flash module as well as a hotshoe. 03

It’s the only camera in the group that lacks a touchsensitive screen; the screen is relatively low-res as well. 04 01

range) mode that’s featured in all of the other cameras in our group.

Build and handling

A little larger than the dinky 100D, the 1200D feels less cramped in the hand, and it has a more mainstream layout of controls. For example, the cross-keys at the lower right of the back panel double up in function, so they can give direct access to ISO, autofocus mode, white balance and drive mode, as well as being used for menu navigation. The camera’s weight is a modest 480g, making it a full 100g lighter than the 700D, although not as light the 407g 100D. It has the best

INDOOR: ISO 6400

stamina of any camera in the group, with a fully-charged battery good for around 500 shots.

Performance

The 9-point autofocus module is basic but reasonably effective, with one cross-type point at the centre. The sensitivity range is a little limited at ISO100-6400 (12800 expanded) on account of the older processor, and image noise is more noticeable at high ISOs. The max burst rate in Continuous drive mode is pedestrian at 3fps (frames per second), again losing out to the other budget options. Image quality is good rather than great, with colours noticeably lacking vibrancy.

Rear panel controls have a conventional layout, with cross keys doubling up to provide access to shooting settings. 05

The LP-E10 battery enables 500 shots on a full charge.

50 40 30 20 10 Canon eos 1200d ISO100

200

OUTDOOR: ISO 200

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

Raw* dynamic range 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 ISO100

Canon eos 1200D 200

400

800

1600

6400 12800

3200

There’s not quite as much dynamic range as from other cameras at low ISOs, and it drops off more at the mid-to-high ISOs

Raw* resolution (at iso200) Canon EOS 1200D

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Line widths per 0 picture height x100

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10

15

20

25

30

35

With the same megapixel count as the 100D and 700D, the 1200D’s resolution score is only really beaten by the 750D

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It’s the only camera in which the SD/ SDHX/SDXC slot isn’t UHS-1 compatible, but it’s not really a problem with the slow 3fps max burst rate.

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The 1200D lags behind Canon’s other budget options, with image noise being more noticeable at ISO1600 and above

Dynamic range (EV)

The shooting mode dial lacks the ‘SCN’ setting for additional scene modes that’s present on the other three cameras.

Signal-to-noise ratio (dB)

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Colour error Canon EOS 1200D

% (closer to 0 is better)

3.6

-2

-1

0

1

2

3

4

5

In lab conditions colour accuracy is good, and similar to the 700D, but in general shooting colours can look desaturated

VERDICT The 1200D is the outright cheapest DSLR in Canon’s current line-up. It’s not bad value, but it’s the least impressive in the group for features, performance and outright image quality.

ISO6400 is at the top of the 1200D’s standard range, Blues, greens and other colours look rather insipid and noise is clearly visible in this low-light interior compared with all the other cameras on test The Canon Magazine

Features Build & handling Image quality Value Overall 109

*Raw files are converted to TIFF using Canon’s Digital Photo Professional software

FEATURES


SUPERTest

06

Canon EOS 100D

They say the best things come in small packages, but is the 100D capable of punching above its modest weight?

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vailable in black or white, complete with colourcoordinated 18-55mm kit lens, the 100D’s main claim to fame is that it’s the smallest DSLR Canon has ever made. Compared with the still fairly streamlined 133x100x79mm dimensions of 700D, the 100D measures just 117x91x69mm, and sheds many grams in the process. At 407g (body only), it’s a real lightweight, but in a good way; in fact, it’s only about two-thirds the weight of the 700D, but it feels equally solid and robust. Under the skin there are marked similarities between the 100D and 700D. Both were launched in early 2013 and feature 18Mp image sensors coupled to late-generation Digic 5 processors, along with a generous sensitivity range of ISO 100-12800 (25600 expanded). In some specifications, the 100D falls between the 1200D and 700D. For

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example there’s a 9-point autofocus module with just one (more sensitive) cross-type point at the centre, which also has a highersensitivity capability for lenses with an f/2.8 aperture (or wider). The 1200D lacks the extra sensitivity in its single cross-type point, whereas

the 700D also has a 9-point AF module, but all of the points are cross-type with an f/2.8 point at the centre. Similarly, the 1200D and 700D have maximum burst rates of 3fps and 5fps respectively; the 100D falls in between at 4fps.

If you want to stand out from the DSLR crowd, the 100D is available in white as well as black

Build and handling

Pick up the 100D and the reduction in size and weight is immediately The smaller 100D has different, more simplified layout to squeeze in all the buttons

Specifications

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05

Sensor 18Mp APS-C CMOS (1.6x crop) image processor DIGIC 5 AF points 9 (1 cross-type) ISO range ISO100-12800 (25600 exp) metering zones 63 HD Video Full HD at 30, 25, 24fps Viewfinder 95% coverage, 0.87x magnification Memory card SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-1) LCD 3-inch 460K-dot fixed Max burst 28 JPEGs or 7 Raws at 4fps WI-FI/NFC No/No Shutter speeds 30-1/4000 sec, bulb size 117x91x69mm Weight (body) 407g Web www.canon.co.uk Price £280/$400 (body only)

www.digitalcameraworld.com


beginner EOS DSLRs

100D lab tests

FEATURES

Raw* signal-to-noise ratio

02

The SCN option on the mode dial adds extras like Kids, Food, Candlelight and HDR. 03

02

obvious. Indeed, the layout of buttons at the rear bucks tradition for this class of Canon DSLR, enabling sufficient space to be maintained for the thumb grip area. As such, the AF point selection and exposure/flash lock buttons are shifted towards the edge of the body. The normal provision of four individual cross keys is replaced by a four-way pad that doesn’t give direct access to shooting settings such as white balance and drive mode. Making up for the lack of direct controls is Canon’s excellent Quick control menu, which gives easy access to key shooting settings. The ‘Q’ menu is even easier to use than in the 1200D, thanks to a screen

that’s both touch-sensitive and has a much higher resolution.

Performance

For optimum autofocus accuracy in regular shooting when using the viewfinder it’s best to stick to the 100D’s central AF point, as it’s the only cross-type point. However, Live View and movie autofocus benefit from a second-generation hybrid AF system that’s faster than the 700D’s. Image quality is a step up from the 1200D, and a comes close to that of the 700D. The auto picture style option gives vibrant yet natural images in wide-ranging conditions, and image noise is well contained even at high ISOs.

INDOOR: ISO 6400

With its relatively narrow build there’s no room for a vari-angle LCD, but you do get a high-res, touchsensitive screen. 04

A simple directional pad replaces the usual four cross keys, and doesn’t give direct access to shooting settings. 05

The Set button doubles up to give access to the Quick menu, saving space.

50 40 30 20 10 Canon eos 100D ISO100

200

400

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

The 100D edges ahead for Raw noise performance but, in practice, images are similarly noise-free as from the 700D

Raw* dynamic range 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 ISO100

Canon eos 100D 200

400

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

Again, dynamic range is almost identical to the 700D, with good results that only really start to drop off at ISO3200

Raw* resolution (at iso200) Canon EOS 100D

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Line widths per 0 picture height x100

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

The 100D is outclassed for resolution by the 750D, but holds its own against the 700D right through the sensitivity range

Colour error Canon EOS 100D

6.1

06

The 100D’s LP-E12 battery only delivers around 380 images on a full charge.

OUTDOOR: ISO 200

% (closer to 0 is better)

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-4

0

4

8

12

16

20

Here again performance is similar to the 700D. Colour rendition is accurate and very lifelike, with just a hint of warmth

VERDICT Not just one for the road, the 100D packs plenty of punch into a small, light and travel-friendly build. It’s very competitively priced, although, in some respects, the 700D has more to offer.

Noise is well suppressed for clean-looking images, even at ISO6400 in low light indoor scenes The Canon Magazine

The Canon EOS 100D produces noticeably punchier and more saturated images than the 1200D

Features Build & handling Image quality Value Overall 111

*Raw files are converted to TIFF using Canon’s Digital Photo Professional software

01

Dynamic range (EV)

The sculpting of the finger grip is relatively shallow, and the main dial is more in line with the ISO button than on the 700D.

Signal-to-noise ratio (dB)

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SUPERTest

Canon EOS 700D

The 700D’s stainless steel chassis helps to make it the heaviest of Canon’s beginner cameras

A feature-packed and powerful beginner’s EOS camera, with a screen that ensures it looks good from any angle

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ith a full-sized body that’s almost identical in its dimensions to the 1200D and 750D, the 700D is nevertheless heavier than both other cameras, mainly due to having a stainless steel rather than aluminium alloy chassis. The high-quality glassfibre reinforced polycarbonate shell is more typical, as used in the design of all cameras in the group, as well as some upmarket bodies like the 70D and 6D. An impressive feature list includes an 18Mp image sensor (typical for APS-C format Canon cameras launched a couple of years ago), Digic 5 image processor, Full HD movie capture, and extensive ranges of scene modes and creative filters. Advanced scene modes include the now ubiquitous HDR (high dynamic range) option, which merges multiple bracketed exposures, while creative filters

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include the likes of Grainy Black & White and Toy Camera effects.

Build and handling

The 700D has a more natural grip thanks to its bigger size compared with the 100D, for large-handed photographers in particular. Another bonus is the excellent rear

The rear LCD is a touchscreen, vari-angle unit that’s helpful for shooting at awkward angles

06

05 03

04

screen, which matches the size, resolution and touch-sensitive operation the 100D’s, while also adding vari-angle movement – this enables Live View or movie shooting from any angle, or even for shooting around corners. It’s also great for taking the compulsory selfies, as well as enabling you to fold away the active surface of the screen for

Specifications Sensor 18Mp APS-C CMOS (1.6x crop) image processor DIGIC 5 AF points 9 (1 cross-type) ISO range ISO100-12800 (25600 exp) metering zones 63 HD Video Full HD at 30, 25, 24fps Viewfinder 95% coverage, 0.85x magnification Memory card SD/SDHC/SDXC LCD 3-in 1,040K-dot vari-angle touchscreen Max burst 22 JPEGs or 6 Raws at 5fps WI-FI/NFC No/No Shutter speeds 30-1/4000 sec, bulb size 133x100x79mm Weight (body) 580g Web www.canon.co.uk Price £400/$650 (body only)

www.digitalcameraworld.com


beginner EOS DSLRs

700D lab tests

FEATURES

02

As on the 100D and 750D, the main on/ off power lever also gives access to the movie mode.

02

03

The rear layout is practically identical to the EOS 750D. 04

01

greater protection when the 700D is packed inside your bag. The control layout is more traditional than in the 100D, and enables quicker access to shooting settings. For example, the cross keys are on hand for navigating the menus but also give access to white balance, AF mode, picture styles and drive mode. It’s intuitive enough for absolute beginners, while also catering for proficient photographers who want to take control of advanced settings.

Performance

Well suited to sports and action photography, the 700D turns in a maximum continuous shooting

speed of 5fps, outstripping both the 1200D and 100D, and equalling the 750D. However, there’s only enough buffer capacity for six shots in Raw quality mode, compared with the 750D’s eight shots, which also have a higher megapixel count and therefore a bigger data size. Autofocus performance is better than in the 1200D and 100D, with greater accuracy when using off-centre AF points. This is because all of the 700D’s nine AF points are cross-type and so able to focus on detail in both the vertical and horizontal planes. The 700D keeps going for longer than the 100D as well, with a battery life of 440 shots on a full charge.

INDOOR: ISO 6400

The 700D’s variangle touchscreen enables you to compose shots from almost any angle. 05

As is the case on all the cameras in this group, the Live View button also acts as a start/stop record button when you’re shooting movies.

50 40 30 20 10 Canon EOS 700D ISO100

200

OUTDOOR: ISO 200

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

Typical of its generation of Canon DSLRs, noise is well controlled even at high ISO settings of ISO6400 and above

Raw* dynamic range 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 ISO100

Canon eos 700d 200

400

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

Dynamic range is an almost exact match to that of the 100D, both cameras edging ahead of the 750D at mid-to-high ISOs

Raw* resolution (at iso200) Canon EOS 700D

24

Line widths per 0 picture height x100

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

There’s nothing to choose in resolution scores when comparing the 1200D, 100D and 700D; they perform equally well

Colour error

06

The viewfinder’s proximity sensor for turning off the screen when the camera is raised to the eye is absent on the newer 750D.

400

Canon EOS 700D % (closer to 0 is better)

3.7

-8

-4

0

4

8

12

16

20

Scores for colour accuracy are slightly better than from the 100D, but it’s hard to see any difference in actual images

VERDICT The 700D is nearly twice the price of the 1200D but it’s well worth the extra, with more sophisticated features. It handles better than the 100D, but there’s no real difference in terms of image quality.

The 700D produces similar results to the 100D at ISO6400, with clean, largely noise-free images The Canon Magazine

Image quality is similar to that from the 100D, with very good colour rendition, contrast and sharpness

Features Build & handling Image quality Value Overall 113

*Raw files are converted to TIFF using Canon’s Digital Photo Professional software

As is typical, the shooting mode dial is divided into basic zone and creative zone settings.

Dynamic range (EV)

01

Signal-to-noise ratio (dB)

Raw* signal-to-noise ratio


SUPERTest

Canon EOS 750D

Good, better or best? Let’s see how the new and improved 750D fits into Canon’s ‘beginner’ lineup

A

ccording to Canon, the new 750D comes off second-best in the current line-up of ‘beginner’ cameras, losing out to the more feature-rich 760D. However, apart from a few additions like the 760D’s top-plate info LCD and secondary command dial, both cameras are essentially identical. To our way of thinking, the 760D’s extra features and higher price put it more in the ‘enthusiast’ sector, alongside models like the 70D – all of which makes the 750D potentially the latest and greatest beginner’s DSLR. Headline attractions include a new, high-res 24.2Mp image sensor that’s a significant step up from the 18Mp sensors in the 1200D, 100D and 700D. Next up there’s the very latest generation of Digic 6 image processor, again beating the other three contenders. Autofocus is yet another upgrade, with a 19-point

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phase-detection module in which all points are cross-type. The Hybrid CMOS autofocus system for Live View and movie capture also gets a revamp, with the new third-generation system being significantly faster than those used in the 100D and 700D. The metering system is new and the 750D is also better connected,

With the 750D you get a choice of two EF-S kit lenses: the 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM, or the 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM pictured here

The vari-angle touchscreen on the Canon 750D is the same as the 700D’s 06

03

adding built-in Wi-Fi and NFC (Near Field Communication).

Build and handling

The 750D inherits the 700D’s rear layout, complete with an excellent touch-sensitive vari-angle screen. The intuitive rear button layout is practically identical, but there are changes on top. Whereas the 700D has a single button in front of the

Specifications Sensor 24.2Mp APS-C CMOS (1.6x crop) image processor DIGIC 6 AF points 19 cross-type ISO range ISO100-12800 (25600 exp) metering zones 63 HD Video Full HD at 30, 25, 24fps Viewfinder 95% coverage, 0.82x magnification Memory card SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-1) LCD 3-in 1,040K-dot vari-angle touchscreen Max burst 940 JPEGs or 8 Raws at 5fps WI-FI/NFC Yes/Yes Shutter speeds 30-1/4000 sec, bulb size 132x101x78mm Weight (body) 555g Web www.canon.co.uk Price £520/$750 (body only)

04

www.digitalcameraworld.com


beginner EOS DSLRs

750D lab tests

FEATURES

Raw* signal-to-noise ratio

01

02

05

The DISP. button turns the LCD on and off, in the absence of the 700D viewfinder’s proximity sensor. 03

The layout of the controls on the rear panel is practically identical to the 700D, which is no bad thing. 04

shooting mode dial, for ISO, the 750D has three. As well as the ISO button you get a DISP. button for turning the LCD screen on or off, although we prefer the 700D’s proximity sensor, which does this automatically. The third button is for AF Area Selection, as seen on Canon’s recent upmarket DSLRs. This enables switching between single-point, selective zone, and full 39-point automatic selection, and it’s good to have, especially considering the much greater number of AF points available than on the other beginner cameras. Thanks to the newer generation of processor and larger memory buffer, the 750D is able to match

the 700D’s maximum burst rate of 5fps despite its higher megapixel count, as well as enabling bursts of up to eight Raw-quality images.

Performance

Lab tests and real-world shooting both confirm that the 750D easily beats the other cameras in the group for retention of fine detail and texture – the new camera really does make the most of its greater megapixel count. It also manages to retain detail well at high ISOs while effectively suppressing noise. Last, but not least, the new metering system gives more consistent and predictable image results.

INDOOR: ISO 6400

The 750D’s fully articulated variangle touchscreen LCD is a joy to use. 05

The 750D is the only ‘beginner’ camera with built-in Wi-Fi, and there’s NFC connectivity too.

50 40 30 20 10 Canon EOS 750D ISO100

200

400

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

Low light images taken at very high ISOs are as clean as from the 700D and 100D, despite the higher megapixel count

Raw* dynamic range 11 10 9 8 7 6 4 ISO100

Canon eos 750D 200

400

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

Dynamic range is similarly impressive to the lower-resolution 100D and 700D, even at high sensitivity settings

Raw* resolution (at iso200) Canon EOS 750D

30

Line widths per 0 picture height x100

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

The 750D leads the field by some distance, retaining much more fine detail in shots than the other cameras on test

Colour error

06

Live View shooting and movie capture benefit from the faster, thirdgeneration hybrid autofocus system.

Canon EOS 750D % (closer to 0 is better)

6.2

-8

-4

0

4

8

12

16

20

Colour accuracy is very good, with the 750D producing slightly more saturated, punchier shots than the 100D and 700D

VERDICT

OUTDOOR: ISO 200

With more megapixels, better AF and metering and built-in Wi-Fi, the 750D overtakes the 700D as Canon’s top beginner camera. Image quality is superb, and it’s very good value.

Wonderfully crisp and vibrant, this indoor image is typical of the 750D, with excellent retention of detail The Canon Magazine

The 750D produces colour-rich images, as well as retaining more fine detail than the 100D and 700D

Features Build & handling Image quality Value Overall

NEXT ISSUE: Flashgun upgrades

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*Raw files are converted to TIFF using Canon’s Digital Photo Professional software

02

Dynamic range (EV)

The autofocus point selection button is a welcome addition, making the most of the 750D’s 39-point AF system.

Signal-to-noise ratio (dB)

01


SUPERTest The winner is... Canon EOS 750D

It has youth on its side, and excels in terms of features and image quality hen it comes to digital cameras, the march of progress often seems like a marathon that’s run at sprinting pace. Two years newer than the 100D and 700D, the 750D is a much more sophisticated camera. Pretty much every key area has been upgraded and revamped, from the image sensor and image processor to the dual autofocus systems and the metering system. All of these elements combine to deliver the best image quality and the most

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impressive overall performance we’ve ever seen from a ‘beginner’ DSLR. Let’s not forget that the 1200D is a year newer than the 100D and 700D, but it has an older-generation image processor than both of those cameras, and a relative lack of clever features or advanced functions. Getting back to the clear winner of the group, the 750D is also the only camera of the four that sports built-in Wi-Fi and NFC for better-connected photography.

What’s your best option? All the cameras in this group have something to offer the novice photographer. On tight budgets the 1200D is simply the most affordable option, and capable of good image quality despite its ageing processor. However, the 100D isn’t much more expensive, and it delivers much better image quality, and has a newer and faster AF system; its small size and light

weight also make it a good travelling companion. The 700D is good deal more expensive than the 100D, but it’s worth it if you want the feel of a bigger camera. There are more direct-access buttons for changing key settings, and a vari-angle screen, and the 700D has a more advanced AF system and a faster burst rate, making it a good choice for action photography.

Get the complete kit Pair your new DSLR with one of Canon’s kit lenses – here are the options Unless you’re upgrading from an older Canon DSLR it’s likely that you’ll need a lens to complement your new camera body, and you’ll usually save a considerable amount of money if you buy your camera complete with a ‘kit’ lens. Indeed, the quality of Canon’s more recent kit lenses is so good that it’s often worth buying a complete kit even if you have an older lens already. The 1200D is often offered with the EF-S 18-55mm IS II lens. It’s a decent optic, but we much prefer the newer EF-S 18-55 IS STM. The STM ‘stepping motor’ autofocus is virtually silent in operation, and enables smooth autofocus

116

transitions in video shooting (not relevant for the 1200D). The STM lens is a particularly good option for the 100D because, unlike the older IS II, the focus ring doesn’t rotate during autofocus. This improves handling in the small 100D, as well as the other cameras in the group, as it doesn’t matter if the focus ring rests on the fingers of your left hand while you’re shooting. There are two popular kit lens options for the 700D and 750D. As well as the EF-S 18-55 IS STM you can go for the EF-S 18-135mm IS STM. It’s bigger and heavier, but offers much greater telephoto reach and very good image quality.

www.digitalcameraworld.com


BUYERS’ GUIDE

quid to With prices ranging from a couple of hundred ryone, several thousand, Canon has a DSLR to suit eve pro… from the complete beginner to most demanding

What to look for Canon EOS DSLRs Canon splits its EOS lineup into entry-level, enthusiast and professional ranges, and the fewer digits the more upmarket the camera; so the 1200D is the most basic, the 750D/760D for intermediates, while the 1D X is strictly for pros or those with deep pockets. Expect greater ease of use (with thumboperated scrollwheels replacing cumbersome cursor keys), more robust build quality (with weather-sealing and tough magnesiumalloy shells), more advanced functionality, and full-frame (rather than smaller APS-C) image sensors with more expensive EOS models. DSLR prices quoted are body-only

Canon EOS 1200D (Rebel T5) An ideal starter camera, it keeps things simple yet covers all the basics, including an 18Mp sensor. A handy companion app is available for free download, serving as an interactive shooting guide. However, the low-res LCD screen lacks touch or vari-angle facilities.

Canon EOS 100D (Rebel SL1) It’s smaller than any other Canon DSLR but is big on features and is something of a step up in sophistication from the 1200D, with a newergeneration image processor, high-res touchscreen and ‘hybrid CMOS AF’ for effective continuous autofocus during movie capture.

Entry level

Canon EOS 700D (Rebel T5i) With a faster continuous drive rate than the 100D, better AF and the bonus of a vari-angle touchscreen, the 700D is more versatile for shooting from extreme angles or around corners. It’s a lovely lightweight camera but is now outclassed by the newer 750D.

Canon EOS 750D (Rebel T6i) Headline attractions include a new 24.2Mp high-resolution image sensor and DIGIC 6 processor, plus a 19-point autofocus system. It beats the older 700D in all these respects, and adds Wi-Fi and NFC connectivity for easy image sharing and printing.

Canon EOS 760D (Rebel T6s) Building on the impressive features of the 750D, the 760D adds a secondary info LCD on the top and Quick Control Dial on the rear. This improves handling and makes it feel more like an ‘enthusiast’ model, rather than an entry-level DSLR, and is worth the extra outlay.

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Tested In ISSUE 105 Price: £230/$320 Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

18Mp, APS-C (5184x3456 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.8x, 95% 100-6400 (12,800 expanded) 9-point (1 cross-type) 3in, 460K dots 3fps (6 Raw/69 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 105 Price: £280/$400 Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

18Mp, APS-C (5184x3456 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.87x, 95% 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) 9-point (1 cross-type) 3in touchscreen, 1040K dots 4fps (7 Raw/28 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 105 Price: £400/$650 Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

18Mp, APS-C (5184x3456 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.85x, 95% 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) 9-point (all cross-type) 3in touchscreen vari-angle, 1040K dots 5fps (6 Raw/22 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 105 Price: £520/$750 Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

24.2Mp, APS-C (6000x4000 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.82x, 95% 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) 19-point (all cross-type) 3in touchscreen vari-angle, 1040K dots 5fps (8 Raw/940 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 75 Price Tested In ISSUE 101 Price: £649/$849 Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

24.2Mp, APS-C (6000x4000 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.82x, 95% 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) 19-point (all cross-type) 3in touchscreen vari-angle, 1040K dots 5fps (8 Raw/940 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

www.digitalcameraworld.com


Buyers’ Guide CAMERAS Canon EOS 70D

Tested In ISSUE 79 Price: £735/$999 A breakthrough DSLR, the 70D delivers fast and smooth autofocus in Live View and movie modes, thanks to its revolutionary ‘Dual Pixel CMOS AF’ image sensor, backed up by DIGIC 5+ processing. The 7fps continuous drive rate is quick and it has built-in Wi-Fi.

Canon EOS 7D

20.2Mp, APS-C (5472x3648 pixels) Pentaprism, 0.95x, 98% 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) 19-point (all cross-type) 3in touchscreen vari-angle, 1040K dots 7fps (16 Raw/65 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 29 Price: £710/$749

Canon EOS 7D Mk II

Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

18Mp, APS-C (5184x3456 pixels) Pentaprism, 1.0x, 100% 100-6400 (12,800 expanded) 19-point (all cross-type) 3in, 920K dots 8fps (25 Raw/126 JPEG) CompactFlash

Tested In ISSUE 95 Price: £1299/$1499 Here’s the king of action-packed APS-C format cameras. A long-overdue revamp of the original 7D, it has 65-point AF with advanced tracking, 10fps continuous drive, dual DIGIC 6 processors and GPS, all wrapped up in a tough, weathersealed magnesium alloy shell.

Canon EOS 6D

Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

20.2Mp, APS-C (5472x3648 pixels) Pentaprism, 1.0x, 100% 100-16,000 (51,200 expanded) 65-point (all cross-type) 3in, 1040K dots 10fps (31 Raw/unlimited JPEG) CompactFlash + SD/SDHC/SDXC

Enthusiast

It’s a quick-shooter 8fps camera with dual processors and a tough magnesium alloy build. However, while it had standout specifications when launched back in 2009, it has now been eclipsed by the new 7D Mk II. It is great value though – whilst stocks last!

Tested In ISSUE 67 Price: £1139/$1399 Amazingly good value for a full-frame EOS DSLR in a medium-sized body, the 6D combines a respectable 20.2Mp sensor with super-high sensitivities of up to ISO102,400. Image quality is excellent and there’s built-in Wi-Fi and GPS, but the 6D has a fairly basic AF system.

Canon EOS 5D Mk III

Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

20.2Mp, full-frame (5472x3648 pixels) Pentaprism, 0.71x, 97% 100-25,600 (50-102,400 expanded) 11-point (1 cross-type) 3in, 1040K dots 4.5fps (17 Raw/1250 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 61 Price: £2249/$2499 Remarkably compact and lightweight for a fully pro and weather-sealed full-frame body, the 22Mp 5D Mk III boasts the same top-notch AF system as the 1D X and delivers stunning image quality, even under very low lighting. The big, bright viewfinder is brilliant.

Sensor

22.3Mp, full-frame (5760x3840 pixels)

Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

Pentaprism, 0.71x, 100% 100-25,600 (50-102,400 expanded) 61-point (41 cross-type, 5 dual-cross) 3.2in, 1040K dots 6fps (18 Raw/16,270 JPEG) CompactFlash + SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 103 Prices: £2999/$3699 (£3199/$3899)

The world’s first 50Mp full-frame DSLR delivers huge and amazingly detailed hi-res images. The higher-cost 5DS R adds a ‘low-pass cancellation filter’ for marginally sharper shots. As expected with such a high-res sensor, max ISO and drive rate are lower than with the 5D Mk III.

Canon EOS 1D X

Sensor

50.6Mp, full-frame (8688x5792 pixels)

Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

Pentaprism, 0.71x, 100% 100-6400 (50-12,800 expanded) 61-point (41 cross-type, 5 dual-cross) 3.2in, 1040K dots 5fps (14 Raw/510 JPEG) CompactFlash + SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 66 Price: £4499/$4599 Canon’s flagship full-frame professional camera boasts ultra-fast 14fps shooting and super-high ISO, along with sublime handling in its large EOS body. Build quality is rock-solid, yet image resolution is relatively modest, especially compared with the 5DS and 5DS R.

Sensor

18.1Mp, full-frame (5184x3456 pixels)

Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

Pentaprism, 0.76x, 100% 100-51,200 (50-204,800 expanded) 61-point (41 cross-type, 5 dual-cross) 3.2in, 1040K dots 12–14fps (38 Raw/180 JPEG) 2x CompactFlash

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Professional

() Canon EOS 5DS (5DS R)

The Canon Magazine

Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card


BUYERS’ GUIDE

Choosing lenses Key factors to watch out for The main factors to consider in a lens are its focal length, maximum aperture, and whether or not it’s full-frame compatible. We’ve categorized lenses by focal length range – from wide-angle to telephoto. The larger a lens’s maximum aperture, the ‘faster’ it’s considered to be – allowing you to control depth of field more, and offering better options in low light. Zooms are more flexible than primes, but tend not to have such fast maximum apertures. Full-frame lenses will also work with ‘crop-sensor’ EOS D-SLRs, but crop-sensor lenses aren’t compatible with full-frame cameras.

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7 7 6 9 7 9 7 7 7

90 104 104 101 104 104 74 104 104

Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX DC HSM Sigma 12-24mm f/4.5-5.6 II DG HSM Tamron SP AF 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 Di II LD Tamron SP 15-30mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Tokina 10-17mm f/3.5-4.5 AT-X DX Fisheye Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X PRO DX II Tokina 12-28mm f/4 AT-X Pro DX Tokina 16-28mm f/2.8 AT-X PRO FX Tokina 17-35mm f/4 AT-X PRO FX

£300/$350 £600/$950 £360/$500 £900/$1200 £450/$485 £360/$400 £495/$450 £550/$590 £420/$450

No Yes No Yes No No No Yes Yes

2.0x 2.0x 2.4x 2.0x 1.7x 1.5x 2.3x 1.8x 2.1x

No No No Yes No No No No No

f/4-5.6 f/4.5-5.6 f/3.5-4.5 f/2.8 f/3.5-4.5 f/2.8 f/4 f/2.8 f/4

465g 670g 406g 1100g 350g 550g 530g 950g 600g

0.24m 0.28m 0.24m 0.28m 0.14m 0.3m 0.25m 0.28m 0.28m

0.15x 0.16x 0.2x 0.2x 0.39x 0.09x 0.2x 0.19x 0.21x

77mm None 77mm None None 77mm 77mm None 82mm

6 6 7 9 6 9 9 9 9

74 104 87 104 87 87 87

ti n Ra

£975/$1350 £805/$1200 £440/$650 £370/$650 £900/$1350 £1120/$1400 £190/$200 £220/$180 £1150/$1400 £2000/$2200 £8600/$11,000 £320/$240 £800/$1510

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

2.9x 2.9x 2.9x 4.3x 4.3x 4.3x 4.0x 4.0x 4.0x 4.0x 2.8x 2.0x 10.0x

No Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes No Yes

f/2.8 f/4 f/4 f/4-5.6 f/4-5.6 f/4.5-5.6 f/4-5.6 f/4-5.6 f/4.5-5.6 f/4.5-5.6 f/4 f/8-16 f/4.5-6.3

1310g 760g 705g 630g 1050g 720g 480g 480g 1380g 1640g 3620g 2000g 1970g

1.5m 1.2m 1.2m 1.5m 1.2m 1.4m 1.5m 1.5m 1.8m 0.98m 2.0m 5.0m 0.5-1.8m

0.16x 0.21x 0.21x 0.26x 0.21x 0.19x 0.25x 0.25x 0.2x 0.31x 0.15x 0.2x 0.32x

77mm 67mm 67mm 58mm 67mm 58mm 58mm 58mm 77mm 77mm 52mm 95mm 95mm

8 8 8 8 8 6 7 7 5 9 9 0 9

64 98 96 96 83 90 15 70 94 100 77 94

Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM

£800/$1200

Yes

2.9x

Yes

f/2.8

1430g

1.4m

0.13x

77mm

9

98

Sigma 70-300mm f/4-5.6 DG Macro

£100/$170

Yes

4.3x

No

f/4-5.6

545g

0.95m

0.5x

58mm

9

96

Sigma APO 70-300mm f/4-5.6 DG Macro

£150/$150

Yes

4.3x

No

f/4-5.6

550g

0.95m

0.5x

58mm

9

96

Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM S Sigma APO 150-500mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM S Sigma 200-500mm f/2.8 EX DG Sigma 300-800mm f/5.6 EX DG HSM Tamron SP AF 70-200mm f/2.8 Di LD (IF) Macro Tamron SP AF 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Tamron AF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di LD Macro

£2600/$3600 £570/$680 £1455/$2000 £12,700/$26,000 £5500/$8000 £475/$770 £1000/$1500 £100/$150

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

2.5x 3.3x 4.0x 2.5x 2.7x 2.9x 2.9x 4.3x

Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes No

f/2.8 f/5-6.3 f/5-6.3 f/2.8 f/5.6 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/4-5.6

3390g 1780g 2860g 15,700g 5880g 1320g 1470g 458g

1.5-2.5m 2.2m 2.6m 2.0-5.0m 6.0m 0.95m 1.3m 0.95m

0.12x 0.19x 0.2x 0.13x 0.14x 0.32x 0.13x 0.5x

105mm 86mm 105mm 72mm 46mm 77mm 77mm 62mm

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

98 94

64 98 96

Tamron SP AF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD

£250/$450

Yes

4.3x

Yes

f/4-5.6

765g

1.5m

0.25x

62mm

9

96

Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD

£850/$1090

Yes

4.0x

Yes

f/5-6.3

1951g

2.7m

0.2x

95mm

9

94

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Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L IS USM Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L USM Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6L IS USM Canon EF 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 DO IS USM Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III USM Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Extender 1.4x Samyang 650-1300mm MC IF f/8-16 Sigma 50-500mm f4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM

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£1500/$2100

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£200/$300

Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM

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Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM

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TELEPHOTO ZOOMs

TELEPHOTO zooms

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KEY: ● BEST VALUE AWARD ● BEST ON TEST AWARD

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None 67mm 77mm None 82mm 77mm 77mm None 82mm

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0.34x 0.15x 0.17x 0.16x 0.22x 0.23x 0.24x 0.13x 0.15x

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0.15m 0.22m 0.24m 0.28m 0.28m 0.28m 0.28m 0.24m 0.24m

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540g 240g 385g 1180g 640g 615g 500g 555g 520g

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f/4 f/4.5-5.6 f/3.5-4.5 f/4 f/2.8 f/4 f/4 f/4.5-5.6 f/3.5

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No Yes No No No Yes No No No

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1.9x 1.8x 2.2x 2.2x 2.2x 2.2x 2.4x 2.0x 2.0x

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Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Yes No No

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£915/$1250 £190/$300 £410/$600 £2800/$3000 £1090/$1600 £725/$1100 £500/$800 £520/$700 £385/$450

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Canon EF 8-15mm f/4L Fisheye USM Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L USM Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM Sigma 8-16mm f/4.5-5.6 DC HSM Sigma 10-20mm f/3.5 EX DC HSM

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WIDE-ANGLE ZOOMs

WIDE-angle zooms

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KEY: ● BEST VALUE AWARD ● BEST ON TEST AWARD

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Rs, With over 150 lenses available for Canon DSL Here’s picking the best for the job can be a minefield. glass the lowdown on all currently available EOS-fit

● ●

● ●

www.digitalcameraworld.com


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None 77mm 72mm 77mm 58mm 52mm 82mm 58mm 58mm 72mm 67mm None None None None None None 77mm 77mm 82mm 77mm 122mm None None None None 77mm 77mm 62mm 67mm 52mm 52mm 52mm 95mm 82mm 82mm 67mm 58mm 72mm 58mm

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0.15x 0.14x 0.14x 0.17x 0.23x 0.27x 0.34x 0.18x 0.2x 0.18x 0.24x 0.13x

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0.2m 0.25m 0.25m 0.25m 0.2m 0.16m 0.21m 0.25m 0.23m 0.3m 0.24m 0.22m 0.3m 0.3m 0.25m 0.2m 0.28m 0.2m 0.25m 0.2m 0.3m 0.15m 0.14m 0.14m 0.14m 0.15m 0.25m 0.2m 0.3m 0.3m 0.2m 0.22m 0.38m 0.25m 0.3m 0.22m 0.25m 0.24m 0.3m 0.3m

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645g 820g 405g 650g 280g 125g 780g 310g 260g 580g 335g 400g 630g 435g 600g 530g 560g 590g 680g 680g 660g 1560g 470g 400g 475g 370g 665g 500g 435g 665g 240g 230g 250g 820g 510g 720g 600g 580g 850g 570g

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N/S N/S N/S N/S N/S N/S N/S N/S 0.16x 0.17x 0.22x 0.11x 0.26x 0.19x 0.34x 0.15x 0.19x N/S N/S N/S 0.11x 0.08x 0.2x 0.17x 0.21x 0.2x 0.19x

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Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM Canon TS-E 17mm f/4L (tilt & shift) Canon EF 20mm f/2.8 USM Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM Canon EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II (tilt & shift) Canon EF 28mm f/1.8 USM Canon EF 28mm f/2.8 IS USM Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM Peleng 8mm f/3.5 Fisheye Peleng 17mm f/2.8 Fisheye Samyang 8mm f/3.5 IF MC CSII DH Circular Samyang 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS Samyang 12mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Diagonal Samyang 14mm f/2.8 IF ED UMC Samyang 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS Samyang 24mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC Samyang T-S 24mm f/3.5 ED AS UMC (tilt & shift) Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS UMC AE Schneider 28mm f/4.5 PC-TS (tilt & shift) Sigma 4.5mm f/2.8 EX DC HSM Circular Fisheye Sigma 8mm f/3.5 EX DG Circular Fisheye Sigma 10mm f/2.8 EX DC HSM Diagonal Fisheye Sigma 15mm f/2.8 EX DG Diagonal Fisheye Sigma 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM A Sigma 28mm f/1.8 EX DG Asp Macro Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC HSM A Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM A Voigtlander 20mm f/3.5 Color-Skopar SL II Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 Color-Skopar Voigtlander 40mm f/2 Ultron Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Zeiss Distagon T* 18mm f/3.5 ZE Zeiss Distagon T* 21mm f/2.8 ZE Zeiss Distagon T* 25mm f/2 ZE Zeiss Distagon T* 28mm f/2 ZE Zeiss Distagon T* 35mm f/1.4 ZE Zeiss Distagon T* 35mm f/2 ZE

The Canon Magazine

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67mm 72mm 77mm 62mm 62mm 72mm 67mm 62mm 62mm 67mm 62mm

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0.28x 0.24x 0.30x 0.33x 0.34x 0.33x 0.34x 0.27x 0.26x 0.29x 0.34x

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7.5x 11.1x 10.7x 11.1x 13.9x 16.7x 18.8x 11.1x 15.0x 10.7x 10.7x

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No No Yes No No No No No No Yes Yes

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£305/$550 £390/$700 £1795/$2450 £270/$400 £300/$350 £400/$580 £450/$630 £135/$200 £270/$450 £540/$850 £330/$400

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Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Canon EF 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6L IS USM Sigma 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM C Sigma 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM Sigma 18-300mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM C Tamron 16-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD Macro Tamron AF 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 XR Di II LD Macro Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD Tamron 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di VC PZD Tamron AF 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 XR Di LD Macro

KEY: ● BEST VALUE AWARD ● BEST ON TEST AWARD

7 7 6 6 7 9 9 7 8 7 7 9 9 9 7 9 7

SUPERZOOMS

SUPERzooms

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KEY: ● BEST VALUE AWARD ● BEST ON TEST AWARD

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72mm 77mm 67mm 58mm 58mm 82mm 77mm 77mm 77mm 77mm 72mm 72mm 82mm 82mm 72mm 82mm 67mm

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0.21x 0.17x 0.2x 0.34x 0.36x 0.21x 0.7x 0.3x 0.23x 0.2x 0.36x 0.23x 0.19x 0.22x 0.21x 0.2x 0.26x

sb

0.35m 0.35m 0.35m 0.25m 0.25m 0.38m 0.38m 0.4m 0.45m 0.28m 0.22m 0.28m 0.38m 0.45m 0.29m 0.38m 0.33m

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575g 645g 475g 200g 205g 805g 600g 525g 670g 565g 465g 810g 790g 885g 570g 825g 510g

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f/3.5-5.6 f/2.8 f/4-5.6 f/3.5-5.6 f/3.5-5.6 f/2.8 f/4 f/3.5-5.6 f/4 f/2.8 f/2.8-4 f/1.8 f/2.8 f/4 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/2.8

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Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes No

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5.7x 3.2x 5.0x 3.1x 3.1x 2.9x 2.9x 4.4x 4.4x 2.9x 4.1x 1.9x 2.9x 4.4x 2.9x 2.9x 2.7x

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No No No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes Yes No Yes Yes

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£510/$700 £535/$830 £335/$300 £130/$200 £170/$250 £1400/$1900 £700/$1000 £375/$600 £640/$1000 £310/$470 £330/$400 £650/$800 £600/$800 £680/$900 £330/$650 £740/$1300 £320/$500

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Canon EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM Canon EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM Sigma 17-50mm f/2.8 EX DC OS HSM Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM C Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM A Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 IF EX DG HSM Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM A Tamron SP AF 17-50mm f/2.8 XR Di II VC Tamron SP AF 24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Tamron SP AF 28-75mm f/2.8 XR Di

STANDARD ZOOMS

Standard zooms

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Buyers’ Guide LENSES KEY: ● BEST VALUE AWARD ● BEST ON TEST AWARD


Contacts

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52mm 52mm 58mm 58mm 67mm 72mm 62mm 62mm 72mm 86mm 55mm 55mm 58mm 72mm 55mm 67mm 67mm

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0.5x 1.0x 5.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 1.0x 0.5x 0.5x

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0.23m 0.20m 0.24m 0.31m 0.3m 0.48m 0.26m 0.31m 0.38m 0.47m 0.23m 0.29m 0.3m 0.47m 0.3m 0.24m 0.44m

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280g 335g 710g 600g 625g 1090g 525g 725g 1150g 1640g 350g 400g 550g 985g 540g 570g 680g

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f/2.5 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/3.5 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/2 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/3.5 f/2.8 f/2 f/2

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£205/$300 £320/$470 £850/$1050 £375/$530 £635/$900 £1050/$1400 £360/$450 £380/$770 £670/$1100 £1190/$1700 £320/$525 £290/$500 £380/$750 £700/$740 £370/$380 £920/$1085 £1300/$1545

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Canon EF 50mm f/2.5 Compact Macro Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro USM Canon MP-E65mm f/2.8 1-5x Macro Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM Canon EF 180mm f/3.5L Macro USM Sigma Macro 70mm f/2.8 EX DG Sigma Macro 105mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Sigma APO Macro 150mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Sigma APO Macro 180mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Tamron SP AF 60mm f/2 Di II LD (IF) Macro Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro VC USD Tamron SP AF 180mm f/3.5 Di Macro Tokina 100mm f/2.8 AT-X PRO Macro Zeiss Makro Planar T* 50mm f/2 ZE Zeiss Makro Planar 100mm f/2 T* ZE

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MACRO

MACRO

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72mm 58mm 58mm 58mm 72mm 52mm 72mm 52mm 77mm 52mm 52mm 77mm 52mm 52mm 52mm 72mm 77mm 95mm 72mm 30mm 104mm 77mm 46mm 46mm 46mm 72mm 77mm

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0.11x 0.13x 0.29x 0.14x 0.19x 0.12x 0.16x 0.18x 0.24x 0.17x 0.13x 0.12x 0.15x 0.15x 0.14x N/S N/S N/S N/S N/S 0.25x 0.12x 0.13x 0.13x 0.11x 0.1x 0.25x

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0.95m 0.85m 0.5m 0.9m 0.9m 1.9m 1.5m 2.0m 1.5m 2.7m 3.3m 3.5m 3.7m 4.5m 6.0m 1.0m 0.8m 2.0m 1.7m 3.5m 0.57m 0.85m 2.5m 4.0m 7.0m 1.0m 0.8m

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1025g 425g 565g 460g 750g 2520g 765g 2400g 1190g 3850g 2100g 1250g 3190g 3920g 4500g 513g 830g 705g 320g 870g 1110g 725g 2400g 3150g 4.9kg 670g 930g

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f/1.2 f/1.8 f/2.8 f/2 f/2 f/2 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/4 f/2.8 f/4 f/5.6 f/4 f/4 f/5.6 f/1.4 f/2 f/6.3 f/6.3 f/8 f/2.8 f/1.4 f/2.8 f/4.5 f/5.6 f/1.4 f/2

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£1500/$2000 £240/$370 £1125/$1400 £360/$500 £700/$1000 £4400/$5700 £570/$750 £4800/$6100 £960/$1350 £7700/$10,000 £7000/$6900 £920/$1250 £6900/$9000 £8900/$11,500 £9900/$13,000 £230/$270 £380/$550 £125/$150 £105/$110 £170/$190 £2805/$3180 £650/$970 £2280/$3400 £3760/$5000 £4300/$6700 £980/$985 £1650/$1825

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TELEPHOTO PRIMES

Telephoto primes Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Canon TS-E 90mm f/2.8 (tilt & shift) Canon EF 100mm f/2 USM Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L II USM Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II USM Canon EF 300mm f/4L IS USM Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM Canon EF 400mm f/4 DO IS II USM Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM Canon EF 800mm f/5.6L IS USM Samyang 85mm f/1.4 IF MC Samyang 135mm f/2 ED UMC Samyang 500mm MC IF f/6.3 Mirror Samyang 500mm MC IF f/8 Mirror Samyang 800mm MC IF f/8 Mirror Schneider 90mm f/2.8 PC-TS (tilt & shift) Sigma 85mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM Sigma APO 300mm f/2.8 EX DG HSM Sigma APO 500mm f/4.5 EX DG HSM Sigma APO 800mm f/5.6 EX DG HSM Zeiss Planar T* 85mm f/1.4 ZE Zeiss Apo Sonnar T* 135mm f/2 ZE

KEY: ● BEST VALUE AWARD ● BEST ON TEST AWARD

7 8 8 8 5 7 8 8 9 9 9 9

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52mm 72mm 72mm 58mm 52mm 49mm 77mm 90mm 77mm 77mm 58mm 77mm

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0.18x 0.16x 0.15x 0.15x 0.15x 0.21x N/S 0.11x 0.14x 0.18x 0.15x 0.15x

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0.3m 0.4m 0.45m 0.45m 0.45m 0.35m 0.45m 0.65m 0.5m 0.4m 0.45m 0.5m

sb

130g 645g 580g 290g 130g 160g 575g 1400g 520g 815g 380g 1030g

KEY: ● BEST VALUE AWARD ● BEST ON TEST AWARD

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f/2.8 f/2.8 f/1.2 f/1.4 f/1.8 f/1.8 f/1.4 f/2.8 f/1.4 f/1.4 f/1.4 f/1.4

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No No No No No No No No No No No No

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Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

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£130/$150 £1100/$1400 £995/$1450 £240/$350 £90/$110 £100/$125 £360/$390 £2820/$3365 £300/$500 £700/$950 £520/$525 £2700/$3990

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Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Canon TS-E 45mm f/2.8 (tilt & shift) Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC Schneider 50mm f/2.8 PC-TS (tilt & shift) Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM A Zeiss Planar T* 50mm f/1.4 ZE Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4

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Standard primes

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STANDARD PRIMES

KEY: ● BEST VALUE AWARD ● BEST ON TEST AWARD -fr a

Sigma www.sigma-imaging-uk.com Tamron www.tamron.co.uk Tokina www.tokinalens.com Voigtlander www.robertwhite.co.uk Zeiss www.zeiss.co.uk

Canon www.canon.co.uk Peleng www.digitaltoyshop.co.uk Samyang www.samyang-lens.co.uk Schneider www.linhofstudio.com

Iri

BUYERS’ GUIDE

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don’t miss next issue Peter Travers

Jörg Kyas

top pro techniques

learn from

the best World-class Canon professional photographers tell you how to capture winning shots – from landscapes and wildlife to portraits and sports

Thorsten Milse

FREE VIDEOS! In the next Canon Skills chapter…

■ Multiplicity portraits ■ Reflections in buildings ■ Fill-flash portraits ■ Make the most of colours in a collage ■ Photoshop Elements, CC, Lightroom & DPP tutorials

plus all this... ■ Canon interview: iconic American pro photographer Howard Schatz ■ The Apprentice: The Times chief sports photographer Marc Aspland teaches our reader how to shoot a live rugby match ■ Super Test: the best flashguns tested ■ Canon School: what’s white balance?

ISSUE 106 ON SALE 13 October 

Howard Schatz

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triviaquiz

Next month don’t miss our next issue on sale 13 October

Chris George’s

CANONDRUM How much do you really know about Canon photography? Test yourself to the max every issue with our tricky trivia quiz!

01 What is a fixed-aperture zoom? A A zoom where the maximum aperture remains the same size whatever the focal length B A zoom that has only one aperture value C A zoom where the maximum aperture varies so that the same amount of light is let in as you zoom D A n obscure term for what we now call a prime 02 If I focus at the hyperfocal distance of 2m, where does depth of field extend from and to? A  From 2m to infinity B  From 1m to infinity C  To infinity and beyond D  You would need to know the aperture and focal length to work this out 03 Who is this pop star who featured in Canon’s advertising a few years back? A A my Winehouse B  Madonna C  Avril Lavigne D Miley Cyrus

08 Image noise increases as ISO increases, but what other factor plays a part? A Aperture B  Altitude C A mbient temperature D A ir pollution 09 Colour temperature is measured in Kelvin. If a light source is 2000K, what colour is that most likely to appear to us and to a camera? A Purple B Green C Orange D Blue

04 What is the key difference between a 50mm macro lens and a 100mm macro lens? A  The 100mm can make the subject twice as big B T he 100mm can get you life-size images from further away C T he 50mm lens can also be used a prime D T he 100mm is usually much lighter

10 DPP is Canon’s own editing software that comes free with every D-SLR. What does DPP stand for? A  Digital Photo Professional B  Digital Professional Processing C  Don’t Please Photoshop D  Dual Photo Processing

05 None of these scenarios is great, but which is the worst? A Scratching your lens cap B Scratching the front element C Scratching the rear element D  Scratching your lens’s back cap 06 Which of these famous photographers is not known for their street photography? A Martin Parr B Elliott Erwitt C  Sebastião Salgado D Henri Cartier-Bresson

Answers

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How did you do? 1.C, 2.B, 3.C, 4.B, 5.C 6.C, 7.D, 8.C, 9.C, 10.A

07 Which of these filters do landscape photographers use to ensure that the foreground in the shot does not appear too dark? A  Neutral density (or ND) B  Ultraviolet (or UV) C Linear polarizer D  Graduated neutral density (or ND grad)

10 points 8–9 points 6-7 points 4-5 points 2-3 points 0-1 points

You’re a photography mastermind! Fantastic, you’re a brainiac Really good score Respectable, but no cigar We’ll keep your score secret Epic fail

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Photoplus the canon magazine october 2015